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Posts tagged with Journalism

New Pew data: newspaper pay walls will likely fail

A number of prominent newspapers, including the New York Times, have publicly committed to setting up pay walls as they struggle to find new sources of revenue.

But according to the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism "State of the News Media 2010" report, newspapers planning to erect pay walls could be in for a rude awakening.

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The BBC's misguided approach to social media

News organizations are getting hip to social media. For many of them, figuring out how to use social media hasn't been easy, but a growing number of them have seen the light and realize that social media platforms can serve as valuable tools for journalism.

But should news organizations require that their journalists use, say, Twitter and Facebook? The director of BBC Global News, Peter Horrocks, apparently thinks so.

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iPad hoax lessons: people are gullible, trust is overrated

The actions of internet entrepreneur Jason Calacanis, no stranger to controversy, have sparked a debate about media credibility after his off-the-wall tweets about the Apple tablet were picked up by prominent online and offline media outlets.

Prior to the launch of the iPad, Calacanis tweeted that he had been "beta testing" the "Apple tablet" for two weeks and spilled the beans on his experience and the specs. From old media stalwarts like CNN and the Wall Street Journal to new media mavens like TechCrunch and Silicon Alley Insider, 'reporters' were quick to relay Calacanis' claims to their audiences.

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Sky News wants its staff to embrace social media

Most news organizations get that social media is important. And while many are embracing it, in a lot of cases social media is still kept in a silo.

But Sky News is looking to change that. It plans to install the popular Twitter client Tweetdeck on all of its journalists' computers in an effort to encourage them to incorporate social media into their news gathering efforts.

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Rupert Murdoch clears the air on the future of journalism

Rupert Murdoch's media empire produces news, but he also has a habit of making it himself. Most recently, he was a headline-creator when he stated he'd be pulling his websites out of Google's index.

Journalism in the 21st century is clearly something that matters a lot to Murdoch, both financially and personally. And in an op-ed piece in his own Wall Street Journal, Murdoch laid out his views on where he sees journalism going, and who needs to stay out of it.

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Why Facebook could be the next big news publisher

Facebook's growth, it seems, is limited only by the scope of Mark Zuckerberg's ambition. It began as a social networking site trying to keep up with MySpace, but Facebook is now circling its own orbit.

All that's stopping Facebook from becoming the pre-eminent news publisher for its 300m users is Zuckerberg's desire to do it.

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Do news organizations sell objectivity? Should they?

The Washington Post's Twitter crackdown has created a lot of debate. At the heart of it: whether it's okay for journalists to express their opinions publicly through social media outlets.

It's an interesting debate and there are a lot of ways to approach it. A central issue -- whether or not expressing an opinion jeopardizes a news organization's journalistic credibility -- is a fascinating subject. After all, most news organizations like to present themselves as objective sources who deliver truth and fact. But the debate over online postings that show their journalists and employees to (gasp) have opinions raises interesting questions: do news organizations even sell 'objectivity'? Should they?

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With a pay wall coming, The Times promotes the brand

With the death of the News Corporation title thelondonpaper last week, chatter about pay walls has increased. News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has already said that most, if not all, News Corp. titles will have a pay wall in place soon enough.

In anticipation of that,  The Times has launched an ad campaign on the Tube that promotes what they see as their unique brand of news.

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What the Internet Manifesto gets right and wrong

The 15 German journalists and bloggers behind the Internet Manifesto have a message for mainstream media organizations: the internet is here and you had better adapt.

The Manifesto, which has now been widely-circulated and discussed by some of the very organizations it speaks to, contains 17 declarations about "how journalism works today".

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Anatomy of a re-branding: The Economist

Back in July I wrote about the planned re-branding of The Economist. It was a risky move because The Economist is a magazine with a sterling reputation and an affluent readership. Two months on, the full strategy behind the re-branding has appeared online. 

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Q&A: BusinessWeek.com Editor-in-Chief John A. Byrne

Journalism on the web requires a new way of thinking. As editor-in-chief of BusinessWeek.com, John A. Byrne is responsible for guiding the BusinessWeek brand on the web.

In this exclusive interview Byrne, who was previously editor-in-chief of Fast Company and is the author of eight books, talks at length about BusinessWeek's strategy for engaging readers and managing BusinessWeek's web brand.

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Even a bad news aggregator is better than none at all

In the face of defeat, America's news outlets continue to find ways to innovate. Mind you, they aren't ground-breaking innovations. But they're innovations none-the-less.

This week online news magazine Slate launched a new aggregator called Slatest. It's not great, but at least it's something. I just wish I could say the same for British media.

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