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Posts tagged with Ecommerce

21 examples of user experience innovation in ecommerce

I’ve been keeping a close eye on innovation in the ecommerce sector for more than a decade now, and it seems to me that we're living in exciting times. We have hit some kind of purple patch. 

Why is this? Well, ecommerce has massively matured. It's big business. Digital teams are smarter, and more agile. Sexy new tech such as HTML5, CSS3 and jQuery allows for sublime user experiences. 

As such I wanted to raise a toast to innovation by highlighting a bunch of - hopefully inspiring - examples to you.

But first, a massive caveat: I would severely and mercilessly beat a few of these sites with a big best practice stick. There are product pages with missing information. There are search boxes with tiny fonts. There are usability issues galore.

Secondly, for ecommerce sites, it is all about the data. If you’re not constantly testing, measuring and refining, then you aren’t doing it right. What works for one brand might not work so well for another. 

All of that aside, the ecommerce teams that take chances and push the boundaries of are to be applauded. Guidelines are precisely that: guidelines. Rules are there to be broken. And innovation is always to be encouraged, even when it doesn’t work out.

So let's take a look at some ecommerce websites (and one mobile app) that are trying new things, and that are noteworthy for their approach to the user experience. Click on the screenshots to check them out for yourself, and do let me know what you think.

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rfm matrix

Finding your best customers with the RFM matrix

Ecommerce is simple. That’s the premise of this post, which follows on from ‘finding your best products’. The heart of ecommerce is finding your best products and your best customers, in the pursuit of most profit.

The old mail-order mantra of ‘recency, frequency and monetary value’ (RFM) is still useful here. Categorising your customers based on an RFM matrix is the start of identifying your hero customers, and those that need a little more attention.

These posts have been taken from a talk given by Mike Baxter, Econsultancy long-time friend and consultant (author of the Checkout Optimisation guide, amongst other things), at a recent breakfast briefing with Ometria.

Let’s see what Mike had to say…

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data triangulation

Simplifying ecommerce: finding your best products

Ecommerce is simple. Don’t let anyone trouble you with thoughts on mobile, social or personalisation. The beating heart of ecommerce is the triangulation of data and uniting your best products with your best customers to make the most profit. 

I had the pleasure of listening to Mike Baxter, an Econsultancy long-time friend and consultant (author of the Checkout Optimisation guide, amongst other things), talking about data triangulation at a recent breakfast briefing with Ometria.

Mike detailed his deceptively simple philosophy of selling online and I thought it worthwhile to put his thoughts down in full, over a couple of posts. Everything you read in these posts comes out of Mike’s presentation.

I think it’s worthwhile dwelling on this idea of knowing your products and customers ahead of anything else. Ultimately it’s the nub of your site design but also your marketing efforts including media spend. 

As marketers start to join up data sources, they need to be wary of jumping the gun, trying to stitch up remarketing, social CRM, personalization, before they’ve truly looked at optimising product mix and display. 

Here’s what Mike had to say…

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yandex logo

Six challenges and opportunities of Russian search marketing and conversion

Many retailers and pure-plays have expanded into Russia despite some difficulties stemming from changes to import laws.

I’ve previously shared some detail on Russian ecommerce, and the Econsultancy Russia Digital Market Landscape report is well worth a look.

In this post I thought I’d offer some thoughts on search in Russia, shared with me by Hannes Ben, EVP International at Forward3D and founder of Locaria.

Fashion is growing quickly in Russia, with a 42% year on year increase in revenue across clothing, shoes and accessories. In turn, the SEM strategies of these retailers have to be adapted.

So what are the challenges and opportunities of search in Russia?

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Voice of Customer

Voice of customer surveys: a killer tactic for quick CRO wins

Funnel analysis, A/B testing & landing page optimisation are all fantastic ways of improving your websites conversion rate.

However, nothing will come close to the effectiveness of VoC analysis to deliver quick conversion rate and website usability increases.

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primark logo

How Primark achieved 1.7m Facebook Likes in just six months

The low-cost clothing brand has entered the top five of the 100 UK retailers on social media for the first time.

According to eDigitalResearch’s Retail Social Media Benchmark, Primark now has almost 2.4m followers on Facebook alone, a steep rise from its reported 700,000 followers just six months ago.

It can be very easy for a high street brand to accrue a high number of followers on any social media platform just through brand identity alone.

However, in order to be an effective driver of traffic to online and offline commerce, brands need to use social media to directly engage with customers through conversation, quality entertaining content and through personalised, always-on customer service.

Therefore a high follower count isn’t necessarily the best metric to gauge whether a brand is ‘doing social media right’. Although the sharp rise in Primark’s social profile is indicative of Primark upping its game considerably.

Let’s take a look at Primark’s Facebook page to see if there’s anything to be learnt from its strategy. 

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What user tests tell us about Morrisons' grocery site

David Moth recently reviewed the new Morrisons grocery shopping site, and found a few UX flaws. 

The checkout process contained a number of issues, while the lack of mobile optimisation seems a massive oversight these days. 

Since the review, Whatusersdo has conducted remote user tests of the site and found a number of issues, of varying priorities. 

So let's see what they are, and how they could be fixed...

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'in the moment' m&s site feature

M&S launches new website, focuses on curation, clustering and content

The new Marks & Spencer website, two years in the making, is a feast for the eyes. As a replatform, it cost a lot of money and accompanies other changes such as an upgraded contact centre and new in-store tech and merchandising.

In this first look at the site, I'll be pointing out the most obvious changes and discussing why it's a step change and effectively gives the impression of 'luxe high street' online.

What stands out is the focus on visuals, a curated experience with magazine-style editorial, and a user experience that’s particularly impressive on tablet. This isn’t a surprising approach given that 44% of Christmas traffic to the website was from tablets and the brand is moving to a ‘lean back’ experience online for those that want it.

I’ll be following this post with more discussion of the new site and its various features that could be set to revitalise the brand across devices (the M&S mobile site and its apps have been updated, too).

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wordcloud of ecommerce tech problems

Ecommerce technology is failing to meet merchant needs: report

Companies are reporting the underperformance of ecommerce solutions in critical areas of functionality such as site search, product management, SEO and mobile-supported commerce.

These deficiencies, coupled with difficulties with integration, have led many merchants to replatform, according to Econsultancy’s first survey-based Technology for Ecommerce Report.

The reports, carried out in association with Neoworks, shows that only a minority of respondents say their technology performs well across each of the key functionality requirements.

In this post I’ll look in more detail at some findings of this new report based on a survey of more than 500 client-side and agency respondents

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Why brands need to move to a direct to consumer model

Are you a brand struggling to build or evolve to a direct to consumer model? Are you trying, but failing? Are sales from the digital channel below expectation?  

Or, are you a brand that has not yet made the move to a direct to consumer model, and still unsure if that is a move you should be making?  

If you answered yes to any of these questions, this article is written for you.

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asos russia

What you should know about ecommerce in Russia

Russia is currently in the spotlight, preparing to host the Winter Olympics, with all the associated negative press for its government.

But whatever the irregularities of Vladimir Putin, Russia has the third highest economic growth rate in the world.

Although online sales in Russia account for just 2% retail sales, this is estimated to rise to 5%, or $46bn, by 2015 according to Morgan Stanley.

And Russian internet users are in thrall to overseas brands. In 2013 the top 25 brands searched for on Yandex, the top Russian search engine with 61% share, were all overseas fashion brands.

So what are international ecommerce outlets waiting for? Shouldn’t everyone be importing into Russia?

One new hurdle to expansion into Russia is increased complexity in shipping since new import laws were implemented in December 2013.

What do you need to know about Russia, who’s already taking advantage and how can you follow suit? This post and our Russia Digital Market Landscape report can help.

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the middle east

MENA ecommerce by the numbers

In 2013, 30m people were shopping online in MENA according to PayPal. This was an increase of 65% from 2011.

Saudi Arabia was the top buying country in a region of high average income per capita (e.g. more than $100k in Qatar).

But what of the rest of the region? How does it compare with the rest of the world and what sort of numbers are we talking about?

In this post I’ve rounded up some stats shared by the COO of Aramex, Iyad Kamal, at MetaPack’s Delivery Conference this week.

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