Posts tagged with Design

Instagram

Three Instagram accounts every marketer and designer should follow

I have found it virtually impossible to find credible Instagram accounts around marketing and digital topics, why is this?

For someone who works in social media, I was restrained to get involved with the Instagram hype.

Having been a Twitter user since near launch, I regarded them as fairly similar products and didn’t really want to condemn myself to even more social network hours a day.

However, my love of food got the better of me and now, as an avid Instagrammer, I do not look back.

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the digitals logo

Six inspirational B2B case studies from The Digitals

It’s awards season here at Econsultancy as the entries detailing inspirational case studies from a huge range of companies continue to roll in.

The Digitals 2014 are designed to showcase the finest work from the global digital and ecommerce community, but not just from individuals, we want to put the whole team centre stage in order to celebrate and truly reflect the collaborative culture of our industry.

You have till 24 September 2014 to enter, and in order to give you inspiration for your own entry we’ve rounded up some of the best B2B case studies we received in 2013.

For more advice on how to write your entry, read David Moth’s 10 tips for writing a stand out awards entry for The Digitals.

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festival of marketing

Seven enlightening content and strategy slideshows

The Festival of Marketing (London's answer to Cannes Lions) will be upon us in November.

I've been rounding up some content to whet your appetite, including this collection of content and strategy slideshows relating to some of our speakers.

Check out the Festival website for more information, including a full lineup of speakers.

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airbnb logo

How to rebrand Airbnb

Airbnb rebranded earlier this summer and it was pretty hard to miss, at one point generating enough hundreds of thousands of tweets to top the global trends (partly due to its similarity to an existing company logo).

Recently I listened to some of the guys from DesignStudio, the agency behind the rebrand, talking about the joys and stresses of such a monumental project.

I thought I'd share some tidbits from their presentation and discuss what a brand and a logo means, as well as how one should go about changing it. I'll be concentrating on the creative side of the brief, as opposed to equally important considerations for those in the same boat, such as SEO (if you're picking a new name or slogan) etc.

So, what did a creative rebrand of Airbnb entail?

For more creative and branding stories, check out the Festival of Marketing, November 12-13th in London.

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her, movie poster

What the future holds (through the lens of Google I/O)

Google I/O revealed a host of interesting developments.

Here I attempt to stick my finger in the air and determine what they could mean for us as people in the long term.

Feel free to agree or disagree.

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LA

30 little things I love about the new Virgin America website

Virgin America's new website manages to turn booking a flight into a joyous process.

That tells you all you need to know about how good this website is.

Here I've picked out 30 good bits. I urge you, of course, to read this post, but go and check out the website yourself for some great design inspiration.

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spotlight logo

The rise and rise of search

The recent preview of OS X Yosemite from Apple caused predictable amounts of chatter online (including this article) and rightly so.

Sales of Macs hit 4.8m in Q1 2014, up from 4.1m for the same holiday period in 2013. OS X has a big impact on the conventions of UI and UX.

The feature I saw the most buzz about on social is the improved Spotlight. The feature has a new search window and a rich, scrollable preview of results that finds stuff on your Mac but now also Wikipedia, Bing, Maps, and other sources.

This is the latest reminder of how powerful search is and how consumers increasingly rely on it across technology and the web.

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The five golden rules of responsive web design

In May 2010, Ethan Marcotte started the craze that is Responsive Web Design, when we wrote his article of the same name for A List Apart. This article was so popular, he even wrote a book on the topic.

This introduction of fluid grids, flexible images and media queries has changed the way we've designed our websites quite dramatically. We've been re-sizing our browser windows ever since.

Starting off as a trend, Responsive Web Design has fast become the hot-topic of our industry and has now become the norm.

Over the past few years I have worked on several RWD projects. In almost all of these projects I have used a different design process, produced different deliverables and encountered many different problems.

Based on these experiences, and given that RWD is now becoming the norm, my workflow has had to adapt. Here are five areas in which I believe designers are required to step up in order to adapt to the responsive web.

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12 upwardly responsive websites designed for big screens

Responsive design has been a hot trend in the past couple of years, with plenty of brands adapting their websites for smartphone and tablet users. But here's the thing: responsive design should work for bigger screens too.  

I have a 27 inch iMac with a 2560 x 1440 screen resolution, and not many sites make full use of my screen. It seems like a waste. The best responsive websites will be optimised for wider displays, as well as narrower ones.

It goes without saying that a growing proportion of your website's visitors will be using handheld devices with little screens, but you may be surprised by how many people use bigger screens. Certainly I was. 

I thought I'd unearth a few examples of brands that are thinking big, as well as small. I shall kick things off by looking at our own stats, to prove the business case.

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15 delicious examples of card-based web design

The rise of the smartphone has ushered in a new way of thinking among web designers and developers, who need to create websites that work on smaller screens.

The constraints of smaller screens have actually helped the web to become that little bit more modular, with responsive design now one of the foremost web design trends: pages can be broken up into their constituent parts, and reordered on the fly, depending on browser or screen sizes. Content spread over three or four columns can be repositioned into just one. 

This has refocused attention on 'cards', as a design pattern for displaying information in bite-sized chunks. Cards are ideal for the TL;DR generation, perfect for mobile devices and responsive design, and I think we'll be seeing a lot more of them in the months and years ahead. The format may not be new, but it's on the rise.

What is a card, exactly? Well, they come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, but commonly cards will include information such as a title, a user name, a picture, and various icons. Sometimes there might be a brief amount of text, for example a product description. In a sense, they are miniature, condensed web pages.  

Cards were one of my 18 web design trends for 2014, and I wanted to highlight some beautiful examples of card-based user interfaces. Tuck in!

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14 beautiful designs based around shades of colour

Earlier this year I highlighted monochromatic design and hypercolour as two of my 18 web design trends for 2014. There is a third way that lives inbetween these two approaches: choosing a limited palette and using different shades of colour.

Designers who go down this route typically choose one vibrant colour (and various shades thereof) and offset it against a neutral background. Sometimes two (or more) complementary colours come into play. 

I thought I'd share a few examples, to hopefully provide you with a little visual inspiration. Many of these examples are, to my eye, rather elegant. 

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space jam website

25 old school websites for 25 years of the web

The web is 25 years old. Did you use it today? And yesterday? Wow, it’s really catching on.

Here are some old websites from 1994 to 1998, when the web was in full swing (or so we thought).

If you’ve got your own to share, do leave them in the comments section below.

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