Posts tagged with Copywriting

Seven reasons why you shouldn’t hire a ghost-tweeter

I believe that if you resort to using a ghost-tweeter to update your Twitter feed then you’re doing it wrong.

Why? Well mainly because I think social media is about customer (or audience) centricity. It is about placing the customer at the very heart of your business, and caring about what they have to say. And as such it has an impact on – and it reflects – organisational culture. 

The brands that are doing social media right are very much focused on listening, sharing, communicating and responding. Outsourcing these tasks is myopic, and it can also be rather dangerous (especially if you fire the ghost-tweeter and fail to change the passwords to your social media accounts).


Why you need a freelance copywriter

Using a freelance copywriter isn't just about flexibility and convenience. It's often the best way to get a quality result. 

A few weeks ago, Sharon Flaherty wrote a guest post here entitled Want quality content? Produce it in-house. As her title suggests, Sharon argues that the best way to get high-quality content is to employ an in-house copywriter. 

Although I commented on the post, I feel it deserves a more considered response, so here it is. 


Psychographic targeting in B2B marketing

There are so many ways to segment an audience and target your messages – by job title, industry, seniority, behaviour... But there's an important dimension that's often ignored by B2B marketers: psychographics.

How different prospects feel about things can guide your segmentation, offers and creative. The trick is to find ways to get your psychographic targets to identify themselves so you can market to their specific biases.


How to use content curation to add value to your own website

If you are responsible for adding high-value content to your website, you are constantly being challenged to find page or post topics which are new, shareable, helpful and original.


Why you should start to think like a media publisher

Every business is now a media business. Smart and successful ones think and behave like media publishers even though their origins are miles away from content creation.


Aiming content at competitors

Some brands, by their nature, find it hard to build a social profile and reap the SEO benefits. One way round this is to build a community of peers and competitors rather than customers. 


How gobbledygook clichés make your web copy invisible

Every copywriter and marketer faces the challenge of writing web copy that connects with their readers. Engaging copy encourages visitors to find out more, spread the news to colleagues and make return visits.


How to extract meaning from retweets

Everybody loves to be retweeted, unless they’ve completely messed up, but it’s worth noting that retweets aren’t created equally.

Speaking from the perspective of a publisher, we love it when our links are shared. But what I really look for is the buzz surrounding an article, rather than the sheer volume of retweets a post generates.

The background chatter is more important to me than counting up the retweets. The problem is, some retweets contain little or no additional information from the retweeter.


Copywriting for digital mindsets

Your web visitors come to your site to find out more about what you do. They’re looking for someone to help them.  If you’re like most companies, you are willing to invest large sums in the design and build of your website but much less in web copy to make it whistle and whirr.

Writing compelling web copy is a hugely undervalued skill. Too many companies think that being able to write is all that’s required. But even people who write well for the paper page can come unstuck with website copy.  

Only a very small minority of writers have a good understanding of the digital mindset.


How to write for the web: 23 useful rules

How to write for the webAbout a decade ago I lucked into a job as a technology journalist. I had no journalism experience / qualifications, but I could string a sentence together and was madly passionate about ‘the internet’. Still am, for that matter.

I had to learn on the job: it was very much a case of in-at-the-deep end. I remember doing a lot of reading to understand how users read online, and how best to write. A lot of the standards set by the likes of Jakob Nielsen still apply today. 

Nowadays writing is a part of what I do, but it isn’t my whole job. But I still manage writers on a daily basis and wanted to share some of the rules for web writing that I’ve embraced, adapted or created. 

Before we begin I should point out that Yossarian remains my foremost literary hero and rules are always there to be broken. These 23 ‘rules’ are just guidelines that you can adopt if you see fit. They work for me.


Start Me Up! A profile of Copify

copifyThis week on Start Me Up we speak to Martin Harrison, CEO of Copify.

Whatever kind of marketing you are involved in, there's almost always a need for quality, relevant copy. Copify is attempting to take the hard work out of sourcing freelance copy at short notice.


How do you write good copy for your website?

Copy, copy, copy. Not a Labour Party election slogan but an ode to the all important words that help elevate your website above the masses and improve on-page engagement and conversion.

Website copy plays a crucial role in informing your visitors, presenting your values and directing people to take actions, not to mention giving a boost to your SEO efforts.

But what is good copy? Is it copy that raises your search engine visibility? Or words that extol your virtues as the next laureate? 

In my latest attempt to open myself to professional and personal slaughter, this blog explores the qualities of good web copy, linking to useful articles written by respected copywriters. I don't claim it to be definitive but the intention is to open a discussion about what good copy really is.