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Posts tagged with Aol

AOL turns to Yahoo's ad exchange to move inventory

How to compete with Google in the display advertising space? Late last year, three unlikely allies, Yahoo, AOL and Microsoft, forged a pact that would allow each company to sell certain display ad inventory for the others.

At the time, Yahoo and Microsoft decided to use different ad exchanges, while AOL remained undecided.

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ITN unifies online ad sales with Rightster

As part of a major shift in digital strategy, British news producer ITN Productions is unifying its online ad sales as it hands control of its publisher network to video specialists Rightser.

The partnership means that for the first time, brands will be able to buy ads within ITN’s news and entertainment content - which features on AOL, Dailymotion, Metro.co.uk, Express.co.uk and more - from one place. 

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SAY Media acquires ReadWriteWeb

Yesterday ReadWriteWeb, a popular technology blog founded by Richard MacManus in 2003, announced that it is being acquired by digital publishing upstart SAY Media. 

Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but according to TechCrunch's sources, the deal was under $5m.

SAY Media has been active on the acquisition scene, having snapped up web properties including Dogster, Remodelista, a digital agency called Sideshow and publishing platform company Six Apart.

The apparent strategy; instead of simply building an ad network for new media, SAY Media wants to consolidate the market and own the properties it sells against.

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AOL asks editors to do marketing and ad sales

In 2007, Tim Armstrong was the head of Google's North American ad sales, making him one of the company's most important and powerful executives.

He was also very interested in local content, and disappointed by the lack of information about his hometown, helped start Patch Media, a company dedicated to building a network of local news and information.

After Armstrong became CEO of AOL in 2009, AOL purchased Patch and started funneling money into the network with plans to establish a footprint in hundreds of cities.

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AOL succeeds, struggles with its new ad formats

A year ago, AOL was prepping plans to launch new ad formats. Its initiative, codenamed Project Devil, was designed to provide ads that are more eye-catching and engaging than 'normal' ads.

As we detailed at the time, the ads would be up to four times larger and "be enabled with new functionality, with room for a photo gallery, a video, coupons, Facebook or Twitter updates or maps".

Project Devil was seen as crucial to AOL, which had been seeing significant double-digit declines in ad revenue. If AOL CEO Tim Armstrong was going to turn the company around, it seemed that the new initiative's success would be crucial.

Last week, however, we learned that AOL's new ad formats aren't finding as much tracking as hoped.

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Dispelling the TechCrunch myth

The debates over what constitutes journalism, and what the future of journalism will look like, rages on.

Last week, a firestorm erupted when TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington announced that he was launching a fund to invest in technology startups.

TechCrunch, of course, which is now owned by AOL, is a blog focused on technology startups, and while Arrington will apparently be off the editorial payroll, he'll still be able to contribute as an unpaid blogger.

Adding fuel to the firestorm: the fact that AOL itself is investing in Arrington's fund.

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The HuffPo's lesson: know why you're doing what you're doing

After being bought by AOL for $315m, it's safe to call The Huffington Post one of the most successful new media ventures to date.

The HuffPo's rapid rise and nine-figure acquisition is all the more incredible because of the fact that much of the HuffPo's content is created by unpaid contributors.

Lured by the promise of being able to write for a massive audience, experienced and often-recognizable individuals helped Arianna Huffington build the HuffPo into what it is today.

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Are social networks tapped out?

Social networking may be the most notable phenomenon in internet history. Few trends have grown as fast and gone as a far, and it has in many ways fundamentally altered the way hundreds of millions of people use the internet.

But have popular social networks like Facebook tapped out most of their growth potential? According to a new eMarketer report, the answer may be yes.

Currently, just under 64% of the internet users in the United States use social networks. By 2013, that number will increase to 67%. That's growth, but it's not the double-digit growth we've become accustomed to seeing.

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AOL and The Huffington Post: you've got fail?

Yesterday's surprise announcement that AOL is buying The Huffington Post for $315m sent shockwaves through the blogosphere.

The deal is not only one of the biggest in the consumer internet space in the past several years, it's one of the biggest online publishing acquisitions ever involving a 'blog'.

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Berners-Lee: the most popular services are bad for the web

Candy and soda might, under certain circumstances, have a negative impact on an individual's health. But most of us would probably find it ridiculous to state that candy and soda threaten the existence of the human race.

The man who invented the web, however, might be accused of making an equivalent argument when it comes to the web's version of candy and soda -- all of those 'closed' services so many of us love, like Facebook and iTunes.

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Group buying has jumped the shark

Could Groupon be an $8bn a year business? How about a $25bn a year business? Sound crazy? It's not -- at least to a number of observers, including TechCrunch's Michael Arrington and TrialPay CEO Alex Rampell.

Group buying is already one of the hottest markets on the internet right now, and if people like Arrington and Rampell are correct, it could be one of the largest markets on the internet in short order. No wonder there are rumors about a billion-dollar acquisition of Groupon.

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The demise of the new media empire?

Newspapers? Dying? Television? Might as well die too. New media? That's where future empires will be built.

At least that's what some have been claiming since blogging and 'new media' became a mainstream phenomenon. And to be sure, new media's future does look bright. But is it as bright as many had predicted? Perhaps not.

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