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Posts tagged with Ajax

Webwag enters customisable start page tussle

Webwag, the latest creation of ex-Google France chief Franck Poisson, is set to go live at the end of this month, adding more competition to the 'customisable start page' arena.


Kiko dives into the Web 2.0 deadpool, business model AWOL

This week Web 2.0 startup Kiko put itself up for sale on eBay, after its founders seemingly became bored or disillusioned.

Kiko, which is priced at $49,999 (it has yet to attract a bid), is an online calendar built using Ruby on the Rails and claims about 40,000 users per month. Which, in case you are wondering, is a cost to the ‘business’. Kiko doesn’t appear to have any notable revenue streams.

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How much traffic can Digg or Google News drive to your site?

Whilst looking through our site visitors stats recently I noticed two big spikes in traffic.

What may have caused them...?


Netvibes gets new cash injection

In another indication of growing interest among VCs in Web 2.0 outfits, Netvibes has raised US$15 million in a round of financing led by existing backer Index Ventures.

The Paris and London-based start-up, which claims to have recruited five million users of its customisable Ajax home page, plans to use the funding to help it take on rivals such as Microsoft's Live.com and Pageflakes.

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Web 2.0 to have high impact, says Gartner

Analyst group Gartner has included mashups, Ajax and other elements of Web 2.0 in a report that predicts which key technologies are likely to impact on businesses over the next decade.


French government censors Greenpeace's mashup

The French government has instructed Greenpeace to remove a webpage featuring a customised Google Map with details of the locations of Monsanto’s genetically-modified cornfields.

The ban, issued via a French court, flies in the face of EU law, which states that this sort of information should be made available to the public by governments.


Jeff Bezos invests in 37Signals

I nearly fell of my chair this morning when I read that 37Signals have taken on outside funding, but after reading a bit further I’ve come to the conclusion that they’re actually in a very, very sweet spot…


Tim O’Reilly and four big ideas about Open Source

If you’re interested in what’s happening on the Web at the moment (driven by open source technologies), then taking a moment to listen to Tim talk about the challenges to the Open Source model will probably be useful.


Why are you using Web 2.0 technologies?

I've been working on a project lately where there are elements of Web 2.0 (specifically Ajax stuff)  that keep being raised, almost without thought for form or function.

The end result is that I've forced the client in question to seriously consider why they want to do something, and what the benefit to the end user is. Of course, this adds caution to future thinking!


Diggnation – Digg relaunches and widens potential appeal

If you’re a user of Digg, you should know that it recently redesigned and relaunched its website. This in itself is not that interesting since we always knew that was coming soon – however, what is interesting is that new categories have been added which make the site more useful to a wider audience.


Free Web 2.0 software doesn’t mean better…

TechCrunch posts a heads up on ActiveCollab, a new open source alternative to popular online project management tool Basecamp, by Web 2.0 poster children 37Signals, and talks about the possible threat to current monopoly and current business model if the software is of high quality.


Five hot new visual metrics make analytics for humans

E-consultancy analyst Linus Gregoriadis last week solicited suggestions on a sexier name for "web analytics". But five new Web 2.0 services currently brewing in beta are threatening to take the whole online marketing measuring practice into a more sexy paradigm entirely.

All these new products ask is that you place some Javascript in your header - but they promise to serve up juicy thermal imaging, in-page indicators or movable feasts that produce easy-to-use visual metrics for left-brain webmasters.

So what are these new tools? Let's take a look...

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