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Author: Richard Bundock

Richard Bundock

I am a founder and Partner at Cohaesus, a firm providing creatively engineered solutions for some of the world's top digital agencies. 

My background in software started at a young age when dial-up bulletin boards were popular.

My specialist practice areas are Line of Business Applications, Software Engineering Practice Advancement, Software Quality and Distressed Project Rescue.

Hera and Athena clasping hands.

Outsourcing tech: three steps to finding your technical partner for 2013

In the past few years, companies and brands’ digital ambitions have grown. 

More and more sites and apps are being built for longevity, and customers increasingly want fast and functional websites that are both reliable and easy to use.

All of this has meant that in-house technical teams have seen their remits broadening and their capacities stretched. Now, as well as working on complex creative concepts, they’re expected to deliver the support and maintenance to sustain these technical builds.

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Black and white photograph of original IBM processing machine

The other S&M: why ‘support and maintenance’ matters

The trick to a successful creative concept is keeping it going once the honeymoon period is over. 

Anyone who’s worked at an agency – or with an agency – will know the visceral thrill of being close to a fresh idea. The spark of inspiration; the impassioned atmosphere of the pitch; the reciprocated glory of a well-received campaign.

But there’s a boring, unsexy, and nevertheless universal truth behind every fruitful project: in-between the fertile seed of intent and the lush paradise of achievement, there’s a hell of a lot of gardening that needs doing.

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