{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Instagram became a worldwide cultural phenomenon, mainly by being first to market with a cool idea: a photo sharing app with built in filters and a social platform for sharing.

Now its days may be numbered as the Facebook acquisition and new terms of service make it extremely uncool to the digitally hip.

We used a Twtpoll to ask how many of you will bail on the service after the changes go into effect Saturday. It was a very limited sample size, but the results are still interesting.

Instagram users received an email from the service yesterday reminding them of the changes. Here is how those changes break down now, according to the Instagram blog:

Our updated privacy policy helps Instagram function more easily as part of Facebook by being able to share info between the two groups. This means we can do things like fight spam more effectively, detect system and reliability problems more quickly, and build better features for everyone by understanding how Instagram is used.

The backstoryIn dealing with a backlash that reached Reddit army sized proportions thanks to many prominent tech bloggers getting vocal on social media, Instagram's co-founder Kevin Systrom backpedalled on how some of the language around advertising in the photo stream will work.

What was first basically a blanket "we own everything you upload and can use it however we want" changed to:

Going forward, rather than obtain permission from you to introduce possible advertising products we have not yet developed, we are going to take the time to complete our plans, and then come back to our users and explain how we would like for our advertising business to work.

Our Twtpoll reveals that the majority of respondents are fine with sticking around after the TOS update and to work with the platform for their eventual advertising needs. 38% of you said you will be leaving soon, and 63% said you will stay.

Q: Will you be leaving instagram when the new terms of service come into effect on Saturday? 

Interestingly, Facebook has seen a recent drop off (1.86% fall in UK user base) in UK memberships, which led many to speculate it has reached its peak.

What do our blog readers have to say about Facebook usage, and what alternatives are there for Instagram out now in the app marketplace, should you not be a believer in the grand advertising scheme from Facebook/Instagram/Microsoft? Vote in our Twtpoll

Ryan Sommer

Published 17 January, 2013 by Ryan Sommer

Ryan Sommer is web veteran and recovering expat who contributes to Econsultancy on startups, content marketing and new media. You can connect with him on LinkedIn, follow him on Twitter, or add him to your circles on Google+

91 more posts from this author

Comments (2)



I think in the end it will work out. Change the privacy settings and it's done... Still a good app.

almost 4 years ago


saint luci

So many people complain about this and that (i.e. privacy and data ownership) for a system they use for free. Very bad entitlement issue. No wonder their governments go bankrupt.

almost 4 years ago

Save or Cancel

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.