tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/video-rich-media Latest Video Advertising content from Econsultancy 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68937 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 Stories from SXSW 2017: ad blocking, content distribution, and Joe Biden Nick Hammond <p>These looked at the areas of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">ad blocking</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">influencer marketing</a>, social video, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66752-10-steps-to-better-content-distribution/">content distribution</a>, and the thoughts of Joe Biden, former Vice-President of the USA.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP67501">Ending The Ad Blocking Wars</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included representatives from Brave Software, The New York Times, Digital Context Next and The Christian Science Monitor. They considered whether publishers can improve the ad experience to persuade readers to turn off blockers? Or will add blockers bring about the end of the free web?</p> <p>As you may imagine there was no simple solution to this conundrum. The two biggest players in the digital space (you know who they are) are not affected by ad blocking and therefore are not bothered by its effects. </p> <p>Although ad blocking is plateauing (<a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/uk-ad-blocking-levels-stabilise-22/1425085?bulletin=campaign_breakfast_briefing&amp;utm_medium=EMAIL&amp;utm_campaign=eNews%20Bulletin&amp;utm_source=20170223&amp;utm_content=www_campaignlive_co_uk_ar_6">at least in the UK</a>), the real squeeze is on smaller publishers, the little guys getting caught in the middle. These organisations are caught in an imperfect storm, made up of greater reliance on ad revenues and lacking the engineering investment levels and knowledge to respond to the threat.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/5034/adblock-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="163"></p> <p>As a result of this, there is a real possibility of local, smaller publishers, starting to disappear. This could create a regional ‘news desert’ as even more people seek their news from social media. Currently 44% of Americans use Facebook as a news source and the number is rising. </p> <p>There was also a discussion around different types of ad blockers. Much of the debate tends to be around the big players, such as AdBlock which has 200m downloads; but there are other providers with different business models. <a href="https://brave.com">Brave Software</a> (represented on the panel) doesn’t just remove ads – it replaces them with new ads and splits the revenue between publishers, users, network partners and the company itself.</p> <p>Brendan Eich from Brave suggested that this software is the first ‘post-bad’ ad blocking solution. Still early days for this, 'softer' ad blocking model and it will be interesting to see how it plays out.</p> <p>Predictably, content was identified as a way to get around this challenge. The NYT emphasized the importance of engaging content – ‘pull instead of push’ – and advised strongly against using technology to push advertising onto consumers.</p> <p>Sponsored ‘native’ content is not necessarily the panacea to solve this problem, as publishers often tag creative to acquire more data; these are then identified as ads and therefore blocked. </p> <p>Ad fraud was a serious related issue discussed, with an estimated 23% of global video traffic being served to robots. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65228">The Hundred Thousand Dollar Snap(chat)</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this one was ShopStyle and Neiman Marcus, who considered the opportunities and challenges arising from social commerce, as well as the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">growing importance of influencers</a>, particularly within retail.</p> <p>The background to this is the change in consumers’ consumption of media and the importance of the mobile channel. 30% of all time online is spent on social and 60% of that is on mobile.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5033/snapchat_logo.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="243"></p> <p>As is often not the case, influencer activity should be approached in the same manner as any other communications campaign. It is not safe to assume that a single endorsement – ‘one and done’ – will do the trick. An effective frequency of ‘seven’, was mentioned as appropriate to the fashion retail sector. As with other channels, planning should be considered over an extended activity period, not as a series of one-offs. </p> <p>In addition, activity should not undermine influencers connections with their followers, and these retail influencers can be initially incentivised through special deals to offer to their followers. </p> <p>An interesting analogy compared the purchasing process for expensive items, such as for a Chanel bag, to the dating process; where buyers return to the store to view and interact with the product over time. In instances like these, iterative influencer messages can be effective in moving an individual closer to purchase.</p> <p>Strategies need to be different across separate social channels. Facebook is all about advertising, whilst Instagram benefits from a more organic approach. Snapchat is the new kid on the block and the hardest to measure. </p> <p>Above all, brands need to work out when to act as themselves, or through influencers in the social space. What are the key KPIs, how to measure these and how to ensure valuable content lives effectively beyond social channels? </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP97038">Social Video and The Future of Consumption</a></strong></p> <p>Representatives from Vox Media, Vice Media and the New York Times joined this panel to discuss how social media is impacting video journalism. This session made very clear that Facebook is now the platform for video consumption. </p> <p>The NYT identified Facebook as ‘the stage’, and the essential channel for engagement and getting time with its audience. A major focus for NYT is around <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">Facebook Live</a>, which is being used to provide real-time coverage of news events. They are even looking at using this channel to create crowd-sourced investigations, a kind of mass citizen journalism.</p> <p>The upside of the live video phenomenon is that brands have an opportunity to powerfully engage with a massive audience, using current, exciting and rapidly changing content. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnytimes%2Fvideos%2F10151119750979999%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="476"></iframe></p> <p>The downside of live unedited content, is a concern around quality and the loss of editorial perspective. As a result, insightful user comments can be important to create context; but recognising this may not always be the case, Vice has indicated that all user comments are monitored in real-time.</p> <p>More controversially, the <a href="https://tytnetwork.com">The Young Turks</a> news channel is allowing users to pay to have their comments listed. Although the rise in importance of user comments can be seen as a democratic trend, allowing a financial bias on inputs would seem rather less altruistic. </p> <p>Another concern is that a publisher brand cannot easily prevent incorrect stories or unsuitable content being viewed. They can provide a retraction or an alternative perspective later on; but this may be seen by many fewer people. A good example of this would be the <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/10/technology/hillary-clinton-google-search-results/">SourceFed Hilary Clinton conspiracy theory</a>. </p> <p>For me, this progression towards an ‘always-on’ society is worryingly redolent of Dave Eggers' book, and now film, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCOXARv6J9k">The Circle.</a></p> <p>In any event, the benchmark for how quality video is defined is changing rapidly as we transition from a ‘TV-centric’ to ‘mobile video-centric’ world. In the digital space, where everyone with a phone is a director, quality is now less about production values and more about the story, speed and authenticity. </p> <p>Separate approaches to video content are needed across different channels. For example on Facebook a ‘raw’ approach is more appropriate and authentic. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy/">Episodic content</a> on Snapchat is popular, with bitesize ‘episodes’ being used to tell a story in a manner entirely fitting to the medium. </p> <p>With live video, there is also a greater ethical onus on brands to decide what they will show and what they will not. A good example of content that could be considered to be on this demarcation line is <a href="http://mashable.com/2016/10/21/snapchat-breaking-news/#i0SLEFuJPsql">Snapchat’s coverage of the conflict in Mosul</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65066">Content Distribution Platforms – Friends or Foes?</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included The Economist, Conde Nast International, The Young Turks and ABC News. They looked at how<em> </em>publishers are becoming more reliant than ever on content distribution platforms such as Facebook and Snapchat to reach new audiences. </p> <p>A good starting point for this session was mention of Emily Bell’s 2016 article <a href="http://www.cjr.org/analysis/facebook_and_media.php">Facebook Is Eating The World</a>.</p> <p>Facebook is the key platform under consideration here, as it increasingly becomes the place where online content is consumed. It’s importance and control over brand content has increased with the rise of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67544-facebook-to-open-up-instant-articles-what-publishers-need-to-know/">Instant Articles</a>, as opposed to publisher feeds, keeping traffic within the Facebook ecosystem. As an aside, Snapchat was seen to be on the rise but not currently a viable global option. </p> <p>With this is in mind, the panel considered that Facebook was both a friend and a foe. It was seen to be a friend in terms of providing a broad distribution platform and a foe with regards to its control over advertising revenues. </p> <p>According to Steve Oh of The Young Turks, the key to content success with Facebook is threefold:</p> <ul> <li>Creating regular, relevant content</li> <li>Swift use of new product features released</li> <li>Focus on building an audience </li> </ul> <p>The Economist’s approach is to focus on bite size content that lures customers towards subscription, with news topics including ‘on this day’ and ‘famous quotes’. A specific approach is with ‘Vimages’, using Facebook <a href="http://www.niemanlab.org/2016/09/with-vimages-the-economist-is-using-facebook-to-make-low-budget-video-versions-of-its-stories/">to re-package magazine stories into video form</a>.</p> <p>One of the questions in the session, was how to keep up with the rapid changes at Facebook and the best ways to share content. There was no clear answer, but suggestions included looking for Newsroom tips, and Google Alerts pertaining to Facebook algorithms. </p> <p><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP61899"><strong>Art + Science: Videos That Inform, Inspire &amp; Scale</strong></a></p> <p>Finally, PopSugar's David Grant discussed what brand marketers need to know about creating video that engages their target audience at scale while delivering on brand KPIs. The session sought to explain the success of PopSugar in targeting millennial women.</p> <p>The starting point for the brand's success is to understand, as does Snapchat, the increasing cultural relevance of the camera (<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html?_r=0">as identified in this NYT article</a>) and that humans naturally gravitate towards content that is made up of <a href="http://www.kvibe.com/2015/03/17/why-we-as-humans-gravitate-towards-video/">sight, sound and motion.</a></p> <p>PopSugar creates videos that inform, and are created from a combined perspective drawn from its brand, brand partners and their data. PopSugar has created its own tool, <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/how-popsugars-new-tool-will-help-you-stay-ahead-social-media-trends-174640/">Trend Rank</a>, to help it identify areas of content focus, supply ‘velocity data predicting’ and find trends ahead of time.</p> <p>Grant observed that, with video, companies typically have only one second to make an impact, so selected content has only that time to have an effect. </p> <p>Some examples of PopSugar's recent successful native content campaigns are: </p> <ul> <li>Doubletree by Hilton: ‘Find Your Happy’ campaign. Building on the fact that Hilton always leaves a cookie for its guests, PopSugar a campaign focusing on wider acts <a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Random-Acts-Kindness-You-Can-Do-Every-Day-40742607">of kindness and generosity</a>.</li> <li>Garner Shampoo: ‘Photo Ready Mums’. Based on the insight that mums often take pictures of the family, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzaKYqPYKyo">but regret that they are not in the pictures themselves;</a> this campaign shows how mums can be in the photos, and look great, with the help of Garner. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Joe Biden</strong></p> <p>And finally, some lessons from the keynote speech of SXSW 2017 (and a totally inspiring moment) from Joe Biden, former Vice-President of The United States. </p> <p>Perhaps more recently famous for his (unwitting) appearance in <a href="http://www.boredpanda.com/funny-barack-obama-joe-biden-tweets/">a sequence of memes with Barack Obama</a>, Joe Biden appeared on stage in Austin to raise awareness and seek support for his <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/09/biden-outlines-steps-to-pursue-post-obama-cancer-moonshot.html">cancer Moon-shot agenda</a>.</p> <p>He discussed the progress made during Obama's presidency by the call for innovative solutions to tackle the barriers that prevent faster gains in ending cancer; and described how he plans to remain in the fight. </p> <p>This talk has a wider relevance for business because, as Joe Biden put it, organisations involved in the cancer treatment process had become ‘siloed by design’ and their ability to face the growing threat of this disease was limited by this lack of co-operation.</p> <p>One of these silo-related issues was the low number of patients involved in clinical trials (only 4/100) as there was no system for companies to match the correct trial drugs to the correct patients and vice versa. In addition a database of patient learnings was not being effectively shared between hospitals.</p> <p>Biden’s efforts to break down the barriers in the cancer treatment process are a lesson to organisations who may have similar silo problems. </p> <p>Organisations in this process have started to collaborate and other bodies have become involved in the fight. NASA is adding information regarding the impact of radiation on astronauts, and Amazon has provided free cloud data storage for the project.  </p> <p>There is also focus on clear KPIs and where the biggest return on investment can be derived. As Biden said, of any process "where everything is treated as equally important, then nothing is considered important."</p> <p>The key to the project’s increasing success (apart from the obvious profile of the promoter) is the open sharing of information, offering clear encouragement and, of course, giving hope.</p> <p>Inspiring stuff and a lesson to all businesses interested in breaking down silos and identifying priorities.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68930 2017-03-24T10:00:16+00:00 2017-03-24T10:00:16+00:00 10 amazing digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to tickle your fancy, you can check out the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for more.</p> <h3>Online retail sales are up 15% while smartphone growth slows</h3> <p>According to the <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-march-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from the IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index, UK online retail sales were up 15% year-on-year in February. </p> <p>However, the rate of growth for sales through smartphone devices has roughly halved year-on-year, going from 96% in February 2016 to just 57% in February 2017.</p> <p>With tablet growth also remaining low at 3.5%, a sustained slowdown through this channel could potentially impact growth rates for online retail overall.</p> <h3>Instagram has more than 1m monthly active advertisers</h3> <p>Instagram has <a href="https://business.instagram.com/blog/welcoming-1-million-advertisers">just announced</a> that it has more than doubled its amount of monthly active advertisers in the past six months. Growing from 500,000 last September, it now with an advertiser base of 1m.</p> <p>Furthermore, there are now more than 8m businesses using a business profile on Instagram, with the greatest adoption coming from the US, Brazil, Indonesia, Russia and the UK.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4980/Instagram.jpg" alt="" width="275" height="548"></p> <h3>74% of shoppers will abandon purchases after adding items to their cart</h3> <p>Survey data from <a href="https://blog.salecycle.com/featured/infographic-people-abandon-shopping-carts/" target="_blank">SaleCycle</a> has revealed that 74% of online retail visitors who add something to their cart will leave without following through on the purchase.</p> <p>In terms of retail categories, health and beauty currently has the lowest abandonment rates of 68.2%. In contrast, consumer electronics has the highest with a rate of 78.8%.</p> <p>Overall, 34% of people are said to abandon their baskets because they are ‘just browsing’, while 23% might have an issue with shipping.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4975/SaleCycle.JPG" alt="" width="670" height="464"></p> <h3>8 out of 10 online shoppers avoid retailers after a bad returns experience </h3> <p>New data from Klarna has revealed that retailers who fail to provide consumers with a quick and easy returns service risk losing a large proportion of their customer base. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,000 UK consumers, <a href="https://www.theretailbulletin.com/news/past_the_point_of_no_return_22-03-17/" target="_blank">83% of online shoppers</a> said that they would never shop with a retailer they have had a bad returns experience with in the past. Similarly, 77% believe UK retailers need to improve their returns capabilities, while 28% said they have been put off returning items due to foreseen hassle. </p> <p>With online shoppers reportedly returning 10% of goods they buy online, and 40% deliberately ordering multiple items to send back what they don’t want, it is vital for retailers to improve returns processes in order to capture long-term loyalty.</p> <h3>Total video content views rose by 26% in 2016</h3> <p>The <a href="http://freewheel.tv/insights/#video-monetization-report" target="_blank">Video Monetisation Report</a> by FreeWheel has revealed that 2016 was a pivotal year for premium video consumption.</p> <p>The report states that content views rose by 26% from the previous year, with ad views up by 24%. Similarly, huge global events like the Rio Olympics and the Presidential election boosted video views, contributing to the general growth of popularity in live video content in the US.</p> <p>Meanwhile, as news and sport content enjoyed major growth across the pond, entertainment reigned supreme in Europe, with 93% of ad views being based on this content, as opposed to 46% in the US.</p> <h3>90% of UK agencies expect to increase turnover in 2017 </h3> <p>New findings from BenchPress suggest that, despite uncertainties over Brexit, a massive 90% of creative and digital agencies in the UK expect to increase their turnover in 2017.</p> <p>While 84% of agency owners were against Brexit, 52% have yet to notice any knock-on effect on their businesses following the referendum in June 2016.</p> <p>29% have experienced clients cancelling projects because of uncertainty around Brexit, while 11% have instead recorded increases in overseas work as a result of the devaluing of the Pound.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4976/Brexit.JPG" alt="" width="637" height="302"></p> <h3>78% of older shoppers fear a robot-run high street</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://possible.mindtree.com/SixthSenseofRetail.html" target="_blank">report by Mindtree</a> suggests that 78% of shoppers over the age of 55 are apprehensive about new retail technologies like automation, artificial intelligence and robotics infiltrating the high street.</p> <p>In contrast, 51% of shoppers between the ages of 16 and 24 are comfortable with the idea of automated technologies in stores.</p> <p>Additionally, the study – which involved a survey of 2,000 consumers in the UK – found there are differing opinions between genders, with 44% of men happy with a robotic shopping experience compared with just 30% of women. </p> <h3>Only a half of charities have a digital strategy in place</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.skillsplatform.org/content/charity-digital-skills-report" target="_blank">Charity Digital Skills Report</a> has revealed that many UK charities are still struggling to get to grips with digital transformation. </p> <p>From a survey of 500 charity professionals, 50% said they do not have a digital strategy currently in place, and only 9% said they have been through digital transformation. When it comes to the biggest barriers, 57% of charities cite a lack of the right skills and 52% say a lack of funding. </p> <p>It’s not a case of disinterest, however, as 75% of charities think growing their digital skills would help them increase fundraising.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4977/Charities_digital.JPG" alt="" width="690" height="264"></p> <h3>26% of UK shoppers plan to spend more this Mother’s Day than 2016</h3> <p>From a survey of 1,000 shoppers, Savvy found that 66% of respondents will be getting involved with Mother’s Day this year, with 26% planning to spend more than they did in 2016.</p> <p>Despite spending more, there seems to be some negativity surrounding the type of gifts on offer. 54% of shoppers agree that Mother’s Day products presented in retail stores are ‘boring and lack inspiration’. Consequently, 45% of shoppers plan to purchase presents online – an increase of 7% on last year.</p> <p>Finally, 36% desire a wider range of gifts to suit different budgets, while 38% of shoppers want more gift ideas and inspiration from retailers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4978/Mother_s_Day.jpg" alt="" width="665" height="583"></p> <h3>44% of advertisers are considering in-house solutions</h3> <p>ISBA and Oliver have conducted the first-ever UK survey on advertisers’ use of in-house and on-site agencies.</p> <p>The findings show that advertisers are now seeking closer relationships with fewer suppliers, as just under half of brands are now considering establishing an on-site or in-house capability.</p> <p>Lack of speed appears to be one of the main reasons for this, with 68% of marketers expressing frustration over the time it takes external agencies to make decisions or turn around briefs. In contrast, this figure drops to 8% for on-site and 20% for in-house agencies.</p> <p>Other advantages cited for in-house include improved brand expertise, collaboration, operational control and creative expertise.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68917 2017-03-20T14:58:48+00:00 2017-03-20T14:58:48+00:00 Can brands tell a story in six seconds? YouTube hopes so Patricio Robles <p>Introduced last April, YouTube <a href="https://adwords.googleblog.com/2016/04/bumper-ads-drive-incremental-reach-and-frequency.html">calls</a> Bumper ads "little haikus of video ads" and says that they "are ideal for driving incremental reach and frequency, especially on mobile, where 'snackable videos' perform well."</p> <p>But can brands really do a whole lot in just six seconds? In an effort to prove that they can, the Google-owned company <a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/youtube-challenges-agencies-retell-classics-6-seconds/308256/">recently asked</a> some agencies to turn a number of famous books, including <em>Romeo and Juliet</em> and <em>Bram Stoker's Dracula</em>, into six-second videos. Sadie Thoma, YouTube's head of creative agency development, said the goal was "to tell the essence of a longer story in a short form."</p> <p>Agencies that participated in the YouTube challenge included WPP's J. Walter Thompson, Wieden &amp; Kennedy and Interpublic's Deutsch.</p> <h4>The results?</h4> <p>One of the books adapted by J. Walter Thompson, Charles Darwin's <em>Origin of Species</em>, features an "animated fish eating another fish and then transition[ing] to a scene of baby growing into a man wearing virtual reality goggles as he reaches for his fish sandwich."</p> <p>In the opinion of this author, the six-second video makes sense only if you know that you're watching a six-second rendition of <em>Origin of Species</em>. Otherwise, it doesn't tell much of a "story" at all.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/4873/originspecieis-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="263"></p> <p>Of course, with YouTube calling the shots, brands and their agencies have little choice but to work with the ad formats they're offered. So if YouTube says that they have to try to tell their stories in six-second ads, that's what many of them will do.</p> <p>But can brands really tell compelling stories in six seconds? That seems like a tall order.</p> <p>When it launched Bumper ads, YouTube even noted that "we've seen Bumper ads work best when combined with a TrueView or Google Preferred campaign." TrueView ads are opt-in ads that don't have time limits. So not surprisingly, it would appear that Bumper ads are more effective when paired with ads that aren't so limited in terms of time.</p> <h4>The attention deficit economy</h4> <p>Much has been made about the "attention economy," but YouTube's Bumper ad push suggests that the label "attention deficit economy" might be more apt.</p> <p>And while there are no easy answers for brands seeking to meaningfully reach consumers in today's challenging digital environment, it's worth asking: instead of racking their brains to sweep consumers off their feet in six seconds, why shouldn't brands simply embrace the other extreme? </p> <p> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/4874/6secondad-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="263"></p> <p><em>A hypothetical video ad that gets straight to the point</em> </p> <p>While the power of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65397-five-brands-excelling-at-storytelling/">brand storytelling</a> is evident, savvy brands will figure out that there's a time and a place for it, and the time isn't six seconds.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68909 2017-03-17T13:00:16+00:00 2017-03-17T13:00:16+00:00 10 spellbinding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Advertisers predicted to be defrauded by $16.4bn in 2017</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www.campaignbrief.com/2017/03/16/Ad%20Fraud_Report_The%26Partnership_mSIX_Adloox.pdf" target="_blank">report by The&amp;Partnership</a> suggests that the global cost of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68067-is-ad-fraud-the-21st-century-drug-trade/">advertising fraud</a> could have been significantly under-reported up until this point.</p> <p>While fraud is believed to cost advertisers $7.2bn globally each year, the real cost of ad fraud may have been as high as $12.48bn in 2016 (accounting for almost 20% of the $66bn spent on digital advertising).</p> <p>If advertising fraud continues to evolve at its current rate, this figure could potentially rise to $16.4bn in 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4775/Ad_Fraud.jpeg" alt="" width="760" height="427"></p> <h3>A third of Brits would rather read a blog than a book</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">New research from Affilinet has found that one in three people in the UK say they read more online than they do in print.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In a survey of over 2,600 Brits, 32% confessed tospending more time reading online, with cookery, diet and nutrition recipes being the most likely category to search for.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">When asked about the reasons why, 61% said they prefer blogs because they are ‘cheaper’ than buying books, 58% stated that they are ‘more convenient’ and 49% said they ‘prefer short-form content rather than full books’.</p> <h3>42% of marketers agree that email relevance is hit and miss</h3> <p>A <a href="https://dma.org.uk/infographic/customers-want-relevance-marketers-need-content" target="_blank">DMA infographic</a> has highlighted how marketers are failing to create relevant emails, with 42% saying ‘some’ are relevant to the recipient at best. This is despite the fact that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67734-three-key-charts-from-our-2016-email-marketing-census/">the medium remains an effective channel</a>, with email ROI increasing from £29.64 to £30.01 in the past year.</p> <p>DMA also suggests that one of the biggest stumbling blocks is a lack of content, with one in four marketers citing this as a major problem.</p> <p>As shown below, other issues preventing effective email is said to be a lack of strategy, a lack of data and data siloes.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4776/DMA_email.JPG" alt="" width="630" height="539"></p> <h3>Poor communication results in nearly a quarter of missed deliveries</h3> <p>Research from Engage Hub has revealed that a lack of communication from delivery companies is the main reason UK consumers miss scheduled deliveries, with 23% of consumers saying poor communication has caused them to miss a delivery in the past 12 months.</p> <p>Other reasons include a parcel not arriving at the specified time and having no ability to reschedule the delivery time.</p> <p>When asked about the most important elements of the delivery process, 49% of UK consumers cited clear confirmation regarding delivery time, while 30% said updates from the delivery company in the event of any changes.</p> <h3>Top three searched-for luxury brands see 63.5% of online visits</h3> <p>In terms of the online market share, Hitwise has revealed that Michael Kors, Ralph Lauren and Coach are the most searched-for luxury brands.</p> <p>In fact, these three brands take 63.5% of the share of online visits to the luxury apparel industry as a whole. </p> <p>Meanwhile, data shows that Versace, Tom Ford and Yves Saint Laurent are a hit with millennials, as a large portion of their traffic is currently driven by consumers aged 18 to 34.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4777/Hitwise.jpg" alt="" width="703" height="390"></p> <h3>UK shoppers rate retail experiences as average</h3> <p>According to a <a href="http://www.zetaglobal-uk.com/linking-brand-digital-sophistication-with-customer-demands-whitepaper/?utm_source=media&amp;utm_campaign=cct_whitepaper_lpr&amp;utm_medium=pr" target="_blank">new report by Zeta Global</a>, only 40% of UK shoppers think their favourite retailers provide a good or great customer experience.</p> <p>This comes from a study of 3,000 UK adults, which also found that 48% of respondents considered their <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68839-the-10-principles-for-creating-amazing-online-retail-experiences/">retail experience</a> to be merely ‘average’. Meanwhile, a further 11% believe that their favourite shops provide poor service.</p> <p>From this, it is clear that personalisation presents a huge opportunity for retailers to capture consumer loyalty, with almost two-fifths of shoppers saying they would be inclined to shop around if they received a personalised service.</p> <h3>Emotional context could make digital ads 40% more effective</h3> <p><a href="https://yahoo.tumblr.com/post/158393152734/emotional-context-could-make-digital-ads-40-more" target="_blank">According to Yahoo</a>, the emotional state of consumers can dramatically impact how receptive they are to advertising.</p> <p>With US and UK consumers reportedly feeling ‘upbeat’ 46% of the time, this is a key window for advertisers, with people said to be 40% more receptive to digital ads when they are in this mood.</p> <p>The study also found that when consumers are upbeat, they are 30% more likely to engage with native video content than when they are in any other emotional state. </p> <p>Lastly, consumers are 28% more likely to engage with content marketing and 21% more likely to engage with direct marketing when feeling happy.</p> <h3>Majority of marketers haven’t got to grips with mobile</h3> <p><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6yVMKaNCUz6Qm9xMWxIcGpsZW8/view" target="_blank">A new report</a> by Mobile Marketing Association and RadiumOne has revealed that the majority of marketers are failing to tap into the way consumers use their mobiles.</p> <p>From interviews with over 300 senior marketers, two-thirds admitted that they’re not confident they've identified the most critical signals in their customers’ journey.</p> <p>What’s more, 61% aren’t fully confident in their ability to find new profitable customers, and 58% are not fully confident in their re-engagement efforts to prevent customer churn. </p> <p>In terms of the most valuable data, 29% of marketers cite content sharing from apps, 28% cite mobile site visits and 27% cite app installs as the best signals for improving mobile branding. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4779/MMA_report.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="236"></p> <h3>25 to 34 year olds 65% more likely to search for bank accounts</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise has revealed that people aged between 25 to 32 are 65% more likely to search for a savings account than any other demographic. What’s more, men in this age group are 60% more likely to be saving compared to women.</p> <p>From an audience of 8.3m 25 to 34 years old consumers in the UK searching to switch banks, Hitwise suggests that the most popular banks to visit are Santander and Halifax, followed by Lloyds and Natwest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4780/Hitwise_2.jpg" alt="" width="599" height="376"></p> <h3>BMW drivers are the biggest retail spenders of any car owner</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www2.viantinc.com/anatomy-of-an-auto-shopper-uk" target="_blank">study by Viant</a> has delved into the purchase habits and behaviour of major car brand owners in the UK. </p> <p>The report states that Fiat is the most popular car brand for millennials, with this age group 18% more likely to drive hatchbacks than non-millennials. BMW drivers are said to be the biggest retail spenders, being 54% more likely to shop at John Lewis and 2.3 times more likely to shop in Selfridges than Ford drivers.</p> <p>Lastly, Ford drivers reportedly spent £2,157 on flights over a period of six months, with their preferred airline being Emirates.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68886 2017-03-10T14:45:00+00:00 2017-03-10T14:45:00+00:00 10 mega digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Correlation between spam rates and subscriber engagement</h3> <p>The latest report from Return Path highlights how industries that outperform the average on key email marketing metrics (like read rate, reply rate etc.) also see less email delivered to spam folders.</p> <p>While the <a href="https://returnpath.com/downloads/hidden-metrics-email-deliverability/?sfdc=70137000000MhwH" target="_blank">Hidden Metrics of Email Deliverability</a> shows that overall spam placement has increased slightly year on year  - from 13% in 2016 vs 12% in 2015 - levels of positive engagement have significantly improved.</p> <p>In terms of industries, the banking and finance and distribution and manufacturing categories saw just 6% of email delivered to spam folders, while this figure rose to 28% in the automotive category. </p> <p><em>Chart shows percentage of email delivered to spam folders</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4558/Spam_rate.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="353"></p> <h3>Generation X perform four in 10 family travel searches</h3> <p>New research from Bing Ads has revealed how families are searching for holiday inspiration and services online.</p> <p>The <a href="https://advertise.bingads.microsoft.com/en-us/insights/set-sail-for-family-travel-searches-and-clicks" target="_blank">report</a> shows that 59% of searches for family holidays are undertaken by women compared to 41% by men. Similarly, Generation X (those aged 35 to 59) perform four of every 10 searches.</p> <p>Other highlights from the report include how consumers are more likely to use mobile devices to search for inspiration and PCs or tablet devices to make a final reservation. Meanwhile, it appears consumers dream of visiting the beach all year long, meaning companies need to invest in year-round campaigns to capture this evergreen interest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4559/Bing_Ads.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="221"></p> <h3>Nine in 10 consumers concerned about how companies use personal data</h3> <p><a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170307005123/en/Global-Study-Ten-Consumers-Concerned-Data-Security" target="_blank">New research</a> from Verint has found that while more consumers crave highly personalised customer service, they are also increasingly sceptical about how businesses collect and store personal data. </p> <p>From a study of more than 24,000 consumers, 80% said they like service that is personalised to their needs (which in turn relies on the use of customer data to deliver). </p> <p>However, 89% of consumers also want to know how companies keep their personal information secure, and 86% insist that they should know when their data is passed on to third parties.</p> <h3>Kinetic emails increase unique click rates by 18%</h3> <p>Experian’s Q4 2016 <a href="http://www.experian.com/marketing-services/email-benchmark-q4-2015.html" target="_blank">Email Benchmark Report</a> has revealed that kinetic emails – i.e. those that include interactive content like carousel navigation - see greater levels of engagement than any other kind.</p> <p>From analysis of seven brands in 2016, kinetic emails were found to increase unique click rates by as much as 18.3% and click-to-open rates by more than 10% compared to standard emails.</p> <p>The report also highlights that email volume increased 17.4% year-over-year, while metrics like click and transaction rates, revenue per email and average order volumes all remained relatively stable during the same period.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4557/Kinetic_emails.JPG" alt="" width="609" height="446"></p> <h3>British SMEs grow online exports by more than a third</h3> <p>New data from <a href="https://www.paypal.com/stories/uk/open-for-business-paypal-reveals-online-exports-boom" target="_blank">PayPal</a> has revealed how small and medium-sized businesses benefitted from the record lows of the pound last year. </p> <p>SMEs in the UK saw their rate of growth treble to 34% year-on-year from July to December 2016. Similarly, while there was an uplift in PayPal sales for British businesses overall, the biggest impact was seen on small and medium-sized organisations, with the amount international shoppers spent with UK SMEs rising 13% per transaction in the last six months of 2016. </p> <p>Fashion and sports experienced the highest growth, with a 49% year-on-year increase in goods from these categories sold to international shoppers.</p> <h3>Native video ads boost ROI</h3> <p>Yahoo’s <a href="http://b2bmarketing.yahoo.net/yfp-state-of-native/infographic?utm_source=AYC&amp;utm_campaign=Q12017YFPStateofNative&amp;utm_medium=organic" target="_blank">State of Native</a> report suggests that native advertising continues to reign supreme, with the brand seeing exponential growth of native ad consumption in all regions and across all devices.</p> <p>Data from more than 74.5bn native ad impressions show that publishers have seen a 446.7% lift in eCPMs (effective cost per thousand ad impressions) on native video ad placements compared to display.</p> <p>The report also highlights how consumer engagement for specific apps and devices vary by time of day and location. For example, in the US, users spend the late afternoons and evenings on their smartphones, while their nights are spent on desktop. This is compared to other parts of the world, where nights are typically spent on smartphones. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4561/Yahoo.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="286"></p> <h3>Household gifts drive the biggest basket value for Mother’s Day</h3> <p>According to Criteo, Brits are still lacking in imagination when it comes to buying Mother’s Day gifts online.</p> <p>Data reveals that household gifts such as kitchen, laundry appliances and vacuums drive the biggest basket value for online sales. Similarly, gardening tools typically see a boost in sales with spring just around the corner. Last year, there was a 193% increase in units sold in the two week’s leading up to Mother’s Day.</p> <p>In 2016, it was suggested that we spent a total of <a href="http://www.cityam.com/235965/mothers-day-2016-brits-will-spend-928m-this-year-on-mothers-day-gifts" target="_blank">£928m on the day</a>, with this figure expected to rise even higher this year.</p> <h3>TV accounts for 94% of viewed video ads in the UK</h3> <p>New data from <a href="https://www.thinkbox.tv/News-and-opinion/Newsroom/TV-accounts-for-94-percent-of-video-advertising" target="_blank">Thinkbox</a> has revealed that TV accounted for 93.8% of video ads viewed in the UK in 2016. This is the equivalent of 18 minutes and 53 seconds a day.</p> <p>These figures are slightly down on 2015, when TV saw a share of 94.4%. However, other forms of video advertising saw far less engagement, with YouTube accounting for 0.7% of viewed video ads in 2016, while other online video (including Facebook) collectively accounted for 5.2%.</p> <p>The average person is said to have watched 20 minutes of video ads a day in 2016, while total daily video consumption increased to 4 hours, 37 minutes in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4562/Thinkbox.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="435"></p> <h3>Wearables now at an all-time high</h3> <p>The International Data Corporation has revealed that the global wearables market reached a new <a href="http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS42342317" target="_blank">all-time high</a> in the fourth quarter of 2016. In this period, 33.9m units were shipped, representing a year-on-year growth of 16.9%.</p> <p>A total of 102.4m wearable devices were shipped in 2016 – a figure up 25% year-on-year. Insight suggests this could be due to single purpose devices evolving into hybrid ones, fusing together multiple health and fitness capabilities with smartphone technology.</p> <p>In terms of brand dominance, Fitbit continued to reign supreme, with 22.5m shipments being made over the course of the whole year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4560/IDC_wearables.JPG" alt="" width="457" height="396"></p> <h3>64% of decision-makers say sales and marketing teams could be more aligned</h3> <p>According to a YouGov survey of 725 business leaders, commissioned by Huthwaite International, 92% of respondents believe sales and marketing teams should work closely together.</p> <p>Despite this fact, 64% also say that sales and marketing teams need to do more to facilitate this alignment. </p> <p>When it comes to the benefits of working more closely, 52% cited a consistent message delivered to clients and prospects, while 50% said the opportunity to gain new customers. Just 8% of respondents said they didn’t believe there was any benefit.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68875 2017-03-08T11:03:24+00:00 2017-03-08T11:03:24+00:00 Lloyds Bank: ‘Advertisers need to do more to reflect Modern Britain' Nikki Gilliland <p>Here is what she had to say.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4427/Ros_King.jpg" alt="" width="400" height="400"></p> <h4> <em>Econsultancy:</em> Do you feel that advertising accurately reflects modern Britain? </h4> <p><em>Ros King:</em> I believe that the industry is very well intentioned, but our research suggests that advertising needs to do more to reflect modern Britain. </p> <p>For example, nearly 18% of the population is aged over 65, however, only around 6% of the people represented in advertising fall into this age bracket. Less than 1% of people in advertising appear to be single parents, yet 25% of families with dependent children are single parents. Similarly, one in six people in the UK has a disability, yet they are represented by less than 1% of the people featured in advertising.</p> <p>When we asked consumers if they felt they were accurately portrayed in advertising, only 47% agreed. This percentage was lower amongst respondents from minority groups, and was as low as 21% amongst gay women. 41% of respondents aged over 65, 43% of single parents, and 55% of two-parent families also felt they weren’t accurately portrayed. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Do you think the industry is even aware that there is an issue?</h4> <p><em>RK:</em> Yes. I believe the advertising industry is aware that there is still more work to be done. A survey undertaken by Marketing Week in 2015 highlighted that 42% of marketing professionals believe the work they produce doesn’t reflect contemporary society.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Why do you think advertisers have failed to be representative?</h4> <p><em>RK: </em>Advertisers don’t make conscious decisions to exclude people in minority groups, or portray them in a way that feels stereotypical. </p> <p>Under-representation is likely to be driven through fear of getting it wrong and causing offence to minority groups. This may be coupled with unconscious bias, which is linked to challenges we know exist around the composition of the industry. The good news is there’s a widespread understanding of the challenges ahead, meaning increasing focus, with additional support by bodies like the IPA and the AA.  </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How can these challenges be overcome? How should the ad industry go about changing?</h4> <p><em>RK:</em> One of the biggest challenges for any advertiser is how to reflect and represent diversity without stereotyping.  </p> <p>Our Reflecting Modern Britain report highlighted some important insights, which we hope will help people feel more confident in developing more inclusive communications. It is not as simple as re-writing a script to include a protagonist from a minority group - authentic storytelling is crucial. It is important to ensure that the advertisement is written with the person featured at the heart. You cannot just write a script and then deliver diversity in the casting.</p> <p>Finally, and most importantly, demonstrate inclusivity - not just diversity. Singling out minority groups can create feelings of segregation and make some audiences feel they are being educated on prejudice.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How are you approaching this issue at Lloyds?</h4> <p><em>RK:</em> Inclusion and diversity are fundamental pillars of our Helping Britain Prosper plan, they run deeply throughout our organisation. As one of the UK’s biggest banks we have a responsibility to better represent the diversity of the customer and communities we serve. </p> <p>Our Modern Britain report helps us understand how advertising currently reflects our society, and how in turn we could improve. Findings from this research have inspired us to look at every stage of the communications process. From research and customer insights, through to creative briefing, media planning and evaluation. Starting with the customer at the outset, we will hopefully develop more inclusive advertising that feels authentic.  </p> <p>The Lloyds Bank ’For your next step’ campaign is a demonstration of how we are translating this into our advertising. One of the most memorable scenes is a proposal between two gay men – ‘He said yes’. This recently won a MAA #DoDifferently award, which showcases adverts featuring diverse and innovative marketing. Customers, colleagues and the LGBT community have been hugely supportive of this campaign via social media.  </p> <p><strong><em>Don't forget to sign up for <a href="http://www.marketingweeklive.co.uk/" target="_blank">Marketing Week Live</a> on March 8-9 in London.</em></strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:RoundtableEvent/853 2017-03-03T10:58:50+00:00 2017-03-03T10:58:50+00:00 Online Video Strategy <p>It’s impossible to ignore the extraordinary growth in online video. Almost a third of smartphone users watch at least one online video per day, and video is predicted to account for three-quarters of web traffic this year. But while marketers are well aware of the power of video, it’s not always easy to integrate it into your content strategy.</p> <p>This roundtable discussion will allow attendees to share their experiences using online video, including their main challenges, opportunities and successes.</p> <h4><strong>Talking points will largely be decided by attendees on the day, but could include:</strong></h4> <ul> <li>Getting your video strategy off the ground. What resources do you need?</li> <li>How to make online video a business-as-usual marketing activity rather than a novelty.</li> <li>How video can impact each stage of the customer journey.</li> <li>Different formats and distributions channels. </li> <li>Tools, analytics and KPIs.</li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68841 2017-02-27T15:17:42+00:00 2017-02-27T15:17:42+00:00 YouTube to remove 30s unskippable ads: What does it mean for brands? Nikki Gilliland <p>Here are a few reasons why.</p> <h3>Taking context into consideration</h3> <p>YouTube’s 30 second ads have become a go-to option for brands, with many simply transferring their television ads online.</p> <p>However, this means that many fail to take into consideration the differences between the mediums of TV and online video, as well as what users have come to expect from both. </p> <p>While an unskippable ad can be frustrating at the best of times, this is bound to become heightened when the user is watching on-the-go or on a small screen.</p> <p>With more than half of YouTube’s views reportedly coming from mobile, a 30 second ad could naturally result in people abandoning their activity, and even lead to negative perceptions about the brand who created it.</p> <p>By scrapping the format, the move will force marketers to consider the digital context, in turn leading to more creative and original content. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4180/youtube.jpg" alt="" width="740" height="463"></p> <h3>Greater impact on consumers</h3> <p>As a result of this focus on quality, ads are much more likely to have a positive impact on consumers.</p> <p>Though YouTube will continue to promote its new six-second format and 20 second ads (both unskippable), it’s likely to be more beneficial for brands to create ads with the skip button still in mind. </p> <p><a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/articles/creating-youtube-ads-that-break-through-in-a-skippable-world.html" target="_blank">Google suggests</a> that brands who already do this see better results, with tone being one of the most effective tools for grabbing the viewers’ attention.</p> <p>Specifically, Google’s study found that humour generates greater ad recall, brand awareness, and time spent watching. If the comedy factor is inappropriate, suspense or emotion is said to be similarly effective.</p> <p>It’s also useful to note that while the 20 second ad is likely to remain popular in the wake of a longer alternative, skippable ads also enable brands to measure success much more easily (the percentage of viewers who choose not to skip after 5 seconds).</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/g0zJNjGM5Dw?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Increasing competition from Facebook</h3> <p>It’s not just YouTube that has made recent changes to video ads. It comes on the back of Facebook’s announcement that it is to allow publishers to insert an ad 20 seconds into a video clip.</p> <p>While Facebook’s update presents its own challenges for marketers – namely how to create ads that don’t entirely disrupt the user experience – it also means increasing competition for YouTube. </p> <p>This means that instead of merely adapting to the changes, brands need to take advantage of them, particularly when it comes to the six second ad format.</p> <p>With Google suggesting that <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2016/apr/20/google-youtube-ads-tv" target="_blank">80% of YouTube ads</a> are far more effective than TV ads for driving sales – it’s a medium that's clearly worth investing in.</p> <p><strong><em>More on YouTube:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66941-five-helpful-tips-for-youtube-pre-roll-ads/" target="_blank">Five helpful tips for YouTube pre-roll ads</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66678-how-the-top-five-uk-ecommerce-brands-use-youtube/" target="_blank">How the top five UK ecommerce brands use YouTube</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67862-how-jamie-oliver-harnessed-the-power-of-youtube/">How Jamie Oliver harnessed the power of YouTube</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68832 2017-02-24T10:05:00+00:00 2017-02-24T10:05:00+00:00 10 staggering digital marketing stats we've seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please note, we've linked to all original studies where possible. Unfortunately not all of these studies are published online, they often come to us as press releases.</p> <h3>60% of millennials have used chatbots</h3> <p>A new study by Retale has delved into how UK millennials feel about chatbots.</p> <p>From a survey of over 500 consumers aged 18 to 34, nearly 60% of respondents were found to have used a chatbot in the past. Out of the percentage of people that had not, 53% said they were still interested in trying them. </p> <p>Interestingly, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/68805-are-brands-failing-to-promote-chatbots/" target="_blank">branded chatbots</a> appear to be growing in popularity, with 71% of millennials saying they’d be happy to try a chatbot from a consumer brand. Lastly, 86% of respondents agreed that brands should use chatbots to promote deals, discounts and offers. </p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68800-pizza-express-launches-booking-chatbot-is-it-any-good/" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4128/Pizza_Express_5.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="678"></a></p> <h3>Retailers increasing investment in store technology</h3> <p>The <a href="http://now.jda.com/CEO2017.html" target="_blank">latest report</a> from JDA/PWC has found that 69% of CEOs plan to increase investment in digital technologies to improve the in-store customer experience. </p> <p>76% of CEOs have or are planning to invest in personalised mobile ‘push offers’ and beacons, while 79% are also investing or planning to invest in smart mobile devices for staff in stores. Despite this, 52% of respondents have not yet defined or started implementing <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">a digital transformation strategy</a>. </p> <h3>68% of British retailers have no Brexit plans in place</h3> <p>According to new research from Global-e, 68% of retailers have yet to start planning for Brexit, despite 51% also saying that the vote to leave the EU has already impacted UK sales. The study, which involved a survey of 250 top British retailers, also found that 32% of those selling internationally have seen an increase in online orders from outside the UK. </p> <p>Additionally, 46% of UK retailers were found to be in favour of a soft Brexit, while 36% agreed that a hard Brexit - with no access to the single market - would be better for UK retailers.</p> <h3>Ad blocking levels stabilise</h3> <p>According to the Internet Advertising Bureau's UK <a href="https://iabuk.net/about/press/archive/iab-uk-reveals-latest-ad-blocking-behaviour" target="_blank">Ad Blocking Report</a>, the proportion of British adults online currently using ad blocking software has remained at around 22% for the last year.</p> <p>Despite a predicted rise in ad blocking, this has failed to materialise, perhaps due to many publishers working hard to promote a value exchange.</p> <p>24% of people cited not being able to access online content as the biggest reason for switching off their ad blocker - a figure up from 16% a year ago. Meanwhile, 24% said that it is because they have since switched to a new device.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4122/ad_blocking.png" alt="" width="750" height="453"></p> <h3>Travel brands expected to benefit from Oscar hype</h3> <p>Data from Lastminute.com suggests that travel brands have seen an increase in search interest on the back of this year’s Oscar nominations. Searches for flights to Los Angeles shot up by 21% on the day of La La Land’s release. Meanwhile, Martin Scorsese’s Silence prompted an even bigger surge, with searches for flights to Japan up 82% from the week before, and increasing a further 46% in the subsequent two days.</p> <p>Though it hasn’t been nominated for any Academy Awards, Brit flick Eddie the Eagle also prompted greater interest in ski holidays, with on-site searches jumping 10% after its release.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4123/Lastminute.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="424"></p> <h3>56% of CRM managers lack firm objectives</h3> <p>In a survey of 500 leading CRM managers, <a href="http://news.wiraya.com/news/crm-managers-dont-believe-theyre-generating-revenue-222319">Wiraya found that CRM</a> is perceived as a key business driver for over 30% of businesses. Despite this fact, it seems many still lack the data and strategy to support their goals and create profitability.</p> <p>While 91% of businesses are currently measuring aspects of their CRM work, 56% do not have firm objectives in place. What’s more, just 17% say that their CRM work is clearly contributing to the company’s overall revenue. This proves that major improvements still need to be made, as just 31% currently consider themselves ‘ambitious’ in terms of CRM maturity.</p> <h3>One in six UK shoppers have switched supermarkets in the past year</h3> <p>In light of Aldi becoming the nation’s fifth largest supermarket, <a href="http://www.tccglobal.com/en/blog/article/uk-shopper-loyalty-study">TCC Global has undertaken a study</a> on the state of consumer loyalty to grocery stores. It found that 32% of UK discount shoppers and 16% of all shoppers have switched their main grocery store in the last 12 months. Meanwhile, 39% of shoppers said that it wouldn’t matter to them if their usual grocery store closed.</p> <p>The research also found that growing convenience is making it even easier to switch between retailers, with shoppers having an average of 11 ‘reachable’, 10 ‘easily reachable’ and five ‘very easily reachable' stores.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4124/Aldi.jpg" alt="" width="720" height="480"></p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 12% year on year in January</h3> <p>The latest figures from <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/" target="_blank">IMRG Capgemini</a> has revealed that UK online retail sales were up 12% year-on-year in the first month of 2017, with retailers seeing the highest average January spend since 2010. The average basket value was recorded as £85 in January 2017, up from £79 a year earlier. </p> <p>In terms of sectors, growth for gifts reached an eight-year high, with an increase of 62% year-on-year. Meanwhile, electricals were down 9%, falling for the second month in a row.</p> <h3>Consumers struggle to identify British brands</h3> <p>A recent <a href="https://www.spreadco.com/blog/uk-baffled-by-the-origins-of-their-favourite-brands">poll by Spread Co</a> has found that the majority of consumers are baffled by the origins of their favourite brands. 50% of consumers believe Tetley Tea to be British, when it is in fact owned by a foreign company. Similarly, 42% think the same about Branston Pickle and 37% about HP Sauce, when they are actually Indian and Japanese.</p> <p>The survey also found that 61% of UK adults don’t know that The Body Shop is part of L’oreal, while 19% think Tesco is the biggest company in Britain (even though it only represents 0.84% of the market share).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4127/body_shop.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="490"></p> <h3>Mulberry and Burberry are the most searched-for brands during LFW</h3> <p>Captify has revealed that the top three searched for designers during London Fashion Week were Mulberry, Burberry and JW Anderson. Other designers saw online searches go through the roof, with Ryan Lo experiencing a jump of 2,000% over the week, followed by surges for Topshop Unique and Sadie Williams.</p> <p>In terms of the most searched-for items, designer trainers rose by 60%, followed by minimalist clothing and 90’s style, which both rose 20%.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68831 2017-02-23T11:48:06+00:00 2017-02-23T11:48:06+00:00 How brands are tapping into the trend for a digital detox Nikki Gilliland <p>Now, we are able to use mobile technology to encourage creativity and enhance entertainment – but arguably at the expense of our productivity and general well-being.</p> <p>This topic was recently highlighted in Mindshare’s 2017 <a href="http://www.mindshareworld.com/uk" target="_blank">Trends report</a>, which also cited how certain companies are tapping into the consumer’s desire to switch off.</p> <p>Here’s a bit of elaboration on the subject, and a few more examples of how brands are (ironically) using technology to combat technology overload.</p> <h3>Dolmio Pepper Hacker</h3> <p>Last year, Dolmio used the notion of ‘too much tech’ as the basis of its own marketing campaign. It was built around the idea that technology has hijacked dinner time, with children becoming so absorbed in tablets and smartphones that they are completely unaware of everything going on around them. </p> <p>So, it created the ‘pepper hacker’ - a device that automatically disables surrounding Wi-Fi - to help families reclaim dinner time. </p> <p>It was a well-executed campaign, incorporating an amusing advert, a competition and a related creative – all hosted on a dedicated website. As well as using a relatable topic to target its core demographic of families, the brand was also able to show care and concern for the people who typically buy its products.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dN04OO67_do?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Apple</h3> <p>Apple included a whole host of sleep-related features in its iOS 10 update, recognising the growing problem of users being able to switch off from their phones at night. Putting ‘Bedtime’ into its own dedicated tab, it now allows users to configure alarms to remind them when to go to bed and when to wake up, emphasising that a regular pattern can help aid restful sleep. </p> <p>More recently, there’s been talk that Apple is to introduce new apps for the Apple Watch, including similar sleep and fitness trackers. If it does, this demonstrates the brand's greater intent to infiltrate the health industry, as well as perhaps recognition that it is intrinsically linked to users’ increasing sleep troubles.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4100/Apple_bedtime.jpg" alt="" width="625" height="539"></p> <h3>GE</h3> <p>Another brand to tap into sleep-related issues is GE, with its range of C-Sleep light bulbs.</p> <p>Designed to prevent harsh light from interrupting natural rhythms in the brain, the lightbulbs can be toggled between three settings – one for night, one for morning and one for any time in-between. By changing the light intensity, people will be able to prevent melatonin levels from being disrupted, as well as create a more calming and sleep-inducing bedtime environment.</p> <p>This is a good example of a brand demonstrating that it’s not always about a reaction against technology itself – but finding ways to use technology in smart ways in order to facilitate a modern lifestyle. The fact that the lightbulbs can be controlled via an app proves that balance is key.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4101/GE.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="416"></p> <h3>Meantime Brewing Company</h3> <p>Another content marketing campaign, this time from Meantime Brewing Company, based on the idea that technology is disrupting socialising and our ability to enjoy down-time. As part of its 'Make Time For It' campaign, it challenged six talented craftsmen from six cities to each create one element of a pop up bar. The premise being that it takes time to both create and enjoy a good beer.</p> <p>Meantime’s London bar, also the smallest ever pop-bar, opened last October with one stipulation – everyone entering had to hand over their mobile phone so that they could enjoy a pint, technology-free. </p> <p>It’s not unusual for beer brands to use ideas of patience and calm – Guinness’s famous tagline is course “good things come to those who wait”. However, Meantime’s strict no-smartphone rule proved that more brands are cottoning on to the idea (as well as how it can be used to drum up a good bit of PR).</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jIn0N2mpbKw?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Headspace</h3> <p>Lastly, just one example of a brand that would not exist if there wasn’t a desire to switch off.</p> <p>Headspace is one of the most successful mindfulness apps, designed to help users take a break from the treadmill of life and instead take a well-earned breather. Now reported to be worth £25m, there has been some suggestion that Headspace goes against the traditional, spiritual premise of true mindfulness. After all, not all of its features are free.</p> <p>This is a pretty cynical view, however, and perhaps one that is beside the point here. What Headspace shows us is that mindfulness is now mainstream. Brands, whether they are already established or not, are merely finding more ways to capitalise on it.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Life is easier with technology. But is it happier? <a href="https://t.co/sEEs4t62jI">https://t.co/sEEs4t62jI</a> <a href="https://t.co/6FHyxFG9eW">pic.twitter.com/6FHyxFG9eW</a></p> — Headspace (@Headspace) <a href="https://twitter.com/Headspace/status/833858035336425473">February 21, 2017</a> </blockquote>