tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/video-rich-media Latest Video Advertising content from Econsultancy 2017-05-24T14:10:53+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69109 2017-05-24T14:10:53+01:00 2017-05-24T14:10:53+01:00 Why Visit Sweden and other tourism boards are teaming up with Airbnb Nikki Gilliland <p>So, why are tourism boards showing increased interest in the sharing economy? Here’s a bit of elaboration on the topic.</p> <h3>Increasing awareness rather than bookings</h3> <p>It’s unusual for tourism boards to endorse the sharing economy, with most being government-backed and therefore aligned to <a href="http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/document.html?reference=EPRS_BRI(2017)595897" target="_blank">criticism that it can negatively affect</a> local communities and businesses. </p> <p>However, Visit Sweden’s partnership is based on building awareness rather than driving actual bookings. In fact, there are no additional listings for Swedish accommodation since the campaign launched. It is merely a marketing campaign that involves Airbnb posting fictional listings from nine areas of Sweden, including locations like the mountains of Sarek and Skuleskogen National Park.</p> <p>It is based on the 'Allemansrätten' principle, which is a protected law that says people are free to roam in nature. Essentially, it means anyone has the right to walk, cycle, ride, ski and camp on any land, apart from private gardens, near a private residence or on land under cultivation.</p> <p>The content is located on a separate microsite, which is mainly promoted on Visit Sweden's homepage and social media, also meaning there is little endorsement of the Airbnb product itself.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/C6671CL5fFg?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>I’ll scratch your back…</h3> <p>So what’s <em>actually</em> in it for Airbnb?</p> <p>Since the brand expanded into the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68749-why-online-travel-sites-are-focusing-on-tours-and-activities/" target="_blank">tours and activities</a> sector with last year's launch of Trips, it appears to be another way for the brand to market itself as a destination resource rather than a straightforward booking site. </p> <p>As the campaign is fundamentally based on travel ‘experiences’ rather than accommodation, it nicely aligns with this new area of focus.</p> <p>In a more general sense, Visit Sweden’s ethos also matches Airbnb’s branding, with the tagline of ‘belong anywhere’ echoing the ‘free to roam’ principle. Of course, while it's mostly designed to offer inspiration, the campaign does promote real accommodation (in the rest of Sweden) too, allowing users to click through, search, and book if they like.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Sweden's <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/freedomtoroam?src=hash">#freedomtoroam</a> lets you sleep under the stars, indulge in the fish from the lakes or camp on the beach - <a href="https://t.co/LI2GXZmgeI">https://t.co/LI2GXZmgeI</a> <a href="https://t.co/VZiqgbTQ1L">pic.twitter.com/VZiqgbTQ1L</a></p> — Visit Sweden US (@VisitSwedenUS) <a href="https://twitter.com/VisitSwedenUS/status/867002269233033216">May 23, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Attracting open-minded travellers</h3> <p>For Visit Sweden, which perhaps doesn't have a huge budget, the partnership is an opportunity to make use of Airbnb’s influence and indeed its large customer base. </p> <p>The country has a reputation for progressive and creative marketing campaigns. Its ‘Swedish Number’ campaign, which involved setting up a national phone number so that anyone could call up and talk to a random Swede, reportedly generated the equivalent of $147m in international media coverage.</p> <p>By promoting its country as free to stay in, Visit Sweden is clearly banking on creating on yet another PR splash, using Airbnb to increase reach and general visibility of the campaign.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6301/Swedish_number.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="489"></p> <h3>Educating local communities</h3> <p>The campaign is being described as a ‘first of its kind collaboration’ – and while it is in marketing terms - it’s not the first time a tourism board has partnered with Airbnb.</p> <p>The Anguilla Tourist Board recently partnered with the company to promote the Caribbean destination on a global level. It was described as a way for Airbnb to work with the Anguilla government to attract a greater number of visitors, as well as increase levels of employment on the island.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the brand has also partnered with city-based tourism boards, such as the San Francisco Travel Association. The main reason being the opportunity to expand tourism in lesser-known areas, shining a light on small businesses as well as promoting the experience of ‘living like a local’.</p> <p>As well as increasing its positive impact, these partnerships also reflect a desire to educate communities about the sharing economy, reducing any negative perception about brands like Airbnb and instead to capitalise on their growth. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69052-how-visitscotland-is-transforming-the-traditional-tourist-body/" target="_blank">How VisitScotland is transforming the traditional tourist body</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68971-does-airbnb-stand-a-chance-in-china/" target="_blank">Does Airbnb stand a chance in China?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68225-10-examples-of-great-airbnb-marketing-creative/" target="_blank">10 examples of great Airbnb marketing creative</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69108 2017-05-24T13:26:01+01:00 2017-05-24T13:26:01+01:00 Four tips for creating effective YouTube bumper ads Nikki Gilliland <p>In a <a href="https://adwords.googleblog.com/2017/04/say-it-in-six-why-marketers-and.html" target="_blank">study of 122 bumper campaigns</a> (i.e. ads that are six seconds long) it found that - in 70% of cases - bumper ads have caused a 'significant lift' in awareness of the brand. What’s more, it also found that nine in 10 drove ad recall, with an average lift of over 30%.</p> <p>So, what exactly are the elements of an effective bumper ad? Here are just a few points to consider, along with examples that prove why brands could see increased success with this super-short video medium.</p> <h3>Simplify the message</h3> <p>While it might be tempting to use a 30 second ad as a starting point, before finding a way to reduce it to six seconds – this tactic is likely to be difficult to pull off.</p> <p>Not only will it be impossible to make the ad flow in the same way, but cramming in loads of different content is going to confuse and overwhelm viewers. The key is to start from and focus on a core message or idea instead.</p> <p>Recently at SXSW (South By Southwest event in Austin), YouTube challenged agencies and filmakers to re-imagine classic works of literature in six seconds. The results prove that great storytelling doesn’t necessary need an arc or evolving narrative, but a clear and concise message that encapsulates an overarching theme.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cv0lNSY73e8?list=PL9Xlh2Jq9l7Xs88qWNSdmJMLedtJn31Bq&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Focus on a single emotion</h3> <p>In line with this, the most effective bumper ads tend to focus on a single emotion for the most impact. While comedy often works well, it is also useful when the humour is relatable or makes the viewer feel a certain way. </p> <p>The below example pairs a striking visual with a highly relatable scenario, requiring no real explanation or information about the product itself. Its subtlety is what makes it effective, alongside confidence in the viewer that they will understand or piece together the message. Using the same components of an <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68154-16-ad-examples-that-prove-print-isn-t-dead/" target="_blank">effective print ad</a> - the combination of comedy and relatable embarassment is perfectly conveyed,</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bbkiRNoSyUo?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>While the medium is entirely different, we can also compare it to the recent viral image of a bottle of Cooperative olive oil.</p> <p>Ultimately, it shows the difference between a brand that gives the consumer some credit, and one that is intent on hammering home its message to the point of it becoming redundant.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6284/COOP.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="413"></p> <h3>Capitalise on viewer context</h3> <p>As well as the content itself, it’s important to take into consideration the ad's contextual elements, such as watching on mobile or without sound.</p> <p>This is why bumper ads do not necessarily need to be so clever or complex. Instead of capturing the consumer’s attention (so that they do not skip), creating an impact as well as a desire for the product is now the ultimate end goal.</p> <p>This explains why brands like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66153-how-mouth-watering-is-krispy-kreme-s-social-media-strategy/" target="_blank">Krispy Kreme</a> use a more simplistic approach, here focusing on a captivating visual to promote its core product. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OiHy9NVXx4c?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Create <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy/" target="_blank">episodic content</a> </h3> <p>Instead of saying everything in 30 seconds, bumper ads can allow brands to piece together a story over a period of time – the only difference being a series of separate ads as opposed to a single one.</p> <p>In fact, this approach could be why bumper ads are more effective for ad recall, as it allows brands to plant a seed before building momentum. Of course, it also aligns with the short attention span of modern viewers, who are likely to prefer shorter ads in order to get to the desired content as quickly as possible.</p> <p>Whether each ad is entirely different or the continuation of a story, viewers will know what to expect once they have seen the first, ideally becoming hooked as it is repeated. The below example from a showcase at Sundance film festival reflects this idea, using the theme of six-second time travel to deliver a series of related jokes. You can check out the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DOLbULZjI8&amp;index=8&amp;list=PL9Xlh2Jq9l7WCGkS_8btd8mvPvZtWru5V" target="_blank">next ad here</a>.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Jhw-nO6S-c0?list=PL9Xlh2Jq9l7WCGkS_8btd8mvPvZtWru5V&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67675-six-online-advertising-tactics-set-to-rise/" target="_blank">Six online advertising tactics set to rise</a></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64249-what-s-the-perfect-youtube-ad-length/" target="_blank">What's the perfect YouTube ad length?</a></em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69092 2017-05-18T11:10:20+01:00 2017-05-18T11:10:20+01:00 Skoda uses real-time traffic data as part of digital OOH campaign Nikki Gilliland <h3>Targeting travellers in the moment</h3> <p>Part of the brand’s ‘Driven by Something Different’ push, Skoda’s campaign involves digital billboards that highlight the natural beauty of four different locations in the UK, including Rye, Wales, the Lakes and Norfolk.</p> <p>The campaign is designed to encourage drivers to veer away from their day-to-day journeys and reconnect with things that are important in life – in this case nature. So, alongside stunning landscapes, each billboard displays how long it will take to drive from that exact spot to the location in the ad. It also uses Google’s API traffic statistics to update journey estimations in real-time.</p> <p>It’s certainly clever. But do passers-by really take notice of digital ads?</p> <p>According to <a href="http://kineticww.com/us/document/nielsen-2016-ooh-advertising-study/" target="_blank">Nielsen</a>, 91% of US residents who have travelled in a vehicle in the past month have noticed some form of out-of-home advertising. What’s more, 71% of people found these ads to be more noticeable than those seen online.</p> <p>The beauty of digital OOH advertising is that it is far less jarring than online, which automatically makes it more appealing to consumers. Instead of an online ad, which interrupts the user experience to deliver a marketing message, a digital billboard complements a real world experience – with passers-by viewing ads in a highly targeted and specific context. </p> <p>The result is a much more seamless experience, with a guaranteed high level of visibility.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/214814384" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>Providing more than just inspiration</h3> <p>Alongside its clever use of contextual data, another reason this campaign works is that it taps into the consumer’s real-time emotional needs and desires. While many automotive brands use travel-based imagery to engage consumers - as well as highlight a vehicle’s various features – this is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69053-how-maserati-uses-influencers-to-drive-its-instagram-strategy/" target="_blank">often on Instagram</a> or other online channels. </p> <p>Consequently, the separation between the consumer and the actual location feels huge – with the user response often being a passive sense of wanderlust. And naturally, brands hope that this feeling will be enough to prompt consumers to take action.</p> <p>However, Skoda’s campaign not only evokes this response but offers the solution.</p> <p>By delivering inspirational travel imagery to people in busy cities or on motorways, and then informing them exactly how long it would take to get from A to B, the campaign taps into and helps to solve a relatable frustration. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">In the ŠKODA Kodiaq, you'll enjoy the journey. Reconnect with the important people in your life along the way.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DrivenBySomethingDifferent?src=hash">#DrivenBySomethingDifferent</a> <a href="https://t.co/FAcrs2IH6k">pic.twitter.com/FAcrs2IH6k</a></p> — ŠKODA UK (@SKODAUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/SKODAUK/status/849169685656461313">April 4, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>A lifestyle-led campaign</h3> <p>For Skoda, the decision to launch a DOOH campaign aligns with a shift in its general marketing strategy. Instead of focusing on the functional or technical aspects of the car, it is now positioning itself in terms of the lifestyle of the consumer.</p> <p>As a seven-seater the Kodiaq SUV is a family car, which is reflected in the family-friendly locations of Rye and the Lake District. Similarly, by placing billboards in locations such as shopping centres Skoda is able to target a very specific demographic. </p> <p>Along with the theme of focusing on the things that matter most in life, it's a nicely executed campaign all-round.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6094/Skoda_shopping.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="377"></p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68051-six-case-studies-that-show-how-digital-out-of-home-advertising-is-changing/" target="_blank">Six case studies that show how digital out-of-home advertising is changing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68122-skoda-uses-data-to-power-tour-de-france-content-marketing/">Skoda uses data to power Tour de France content marketing</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69094 2017-05-17T10:36:26+01:00 2017-05-17T10:36:26+01:00 Five examples of brands using interactive video Nikki Gilliland <p>This is where interactive video comes in. Instead of a passive user experience, interactive video requires the person watching to take action – e.g. answer a question or make a decision – usually to inform how the rest of the video unfolds.</p> <p>There are many benefits, including longer viewing times, greater engagement, and even data capture.</p> <p>While the technology is certainly nothing new, there appears to have been a surge in brands experimenting with it lately. Here are a few examples and the reasons why it works.</p> <h3>Mended Little Hearts</h3> <p>Mended Little Hearts is a charity for children with congenital heart disease. Its recent campaign, ‘Give a Fuller Life’, uses interactive video to show how donating money can transform the lives of those affected.</p> <p>The animated video depicts a day in the life of 11-year-old Max, who we first see wandering along the street looking lost and lonely. Viewers are prompted to pledge a donation, which results in Max’s life becoming a little brighter each time. Gradually, the street becomes sunnier, and family, animals, and toys also start to appear. </p> <p>The video is simple but surprisingly emotive, effectively highlighting how a small act (which often involves just a few clicks online) can dramatically transform a child’s life.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/T88vbtCsuEw?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Warner Bros.</h3> <p>Focus is a 2015 movie starring Will Smith as a veteran conman. Alongside the standard trailer Warner Bros. released an interactive video to promote the movie before it hit cinemas.</p> <p>It allows viewers to test their own skills as a con artist by making a series of decisions as they go. The potential 'marks' include an internet mogul, an investment banker, and an art dealer, with each one presenting a different challenge for participating viewers.</p> <p>While Focus turned out to be fairly predictable as a film, its interactive video is far more innovative. Combining gamification and movie marketing – it’s a great example of how to pique interest and engage consumers in the run up to a release.</p> <p><a href="http://www.raptmedia.com/customers/warner-bros-focus/" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6108/Focus.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="444"></a></p> <h3>Deloitte</h3> <p>Most recruitment videos tend to be quite dry, however Deloitte chose a more light-hearted tack for its New Zealand graduate recruitment program.</p> <p>Filmed as a ‘day in the life’ of a Deloitte employee, the gamified video allows users to choose how they’d react to a number of different work-based scenarios. From telling a co-worker about spilt coffee on their jacket, to what to do if a printer breaks – each one highlights the various skills and attributes valued by the company.</p> <p>The result is a highly engaging and immersive video experience, which effectively educates viewers about Deloitte while simultaneously prompting them to think about whether they’d be a good fit. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EUw0vzyN9ZM?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Honda</h3> <p>To promote its Civic Type R, Honda wanted to create a video that showcased another side of the typically reliable automotive brand.</p> <p>The result was an interactive, dual-narrative video that allowed viewers to switch between two storylines. The first involved a father picking up his daughter from school and taking her to a party. However, when viewers pressed the ‘R’ key on their keyboard or tablet, the other side of the story was revealed, with the father becoming an undercover cop by night. </p> <p>By controlling exactly how the video can be watched, the user experience immedately changes from a passive to an active one, becoming far more engaging as a result.</p> <p>What’s more, the video is also an example of how to engage a wider audience, with all kinds of people likely to enjoy it, regardless of whether they have an interest in the brand or product itself.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FU5CLg2LAmg?wmode=transparent" width="780" height="439"></iframe></p> <h3>Maybelline New York</h3> <p>While a lot of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67884-seven-ways-social-media-is-shaping-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">beauty-related videos</a> are more interactive than other industries (in that they offer tutorials or advice), Maybelline takes this one step further with its interactive tutorial video for Big Eyes Mascara.</p> <p>For the video, Maybelline teamed up with Kelly Framel, a popular fashion blogger, to create a tutorial of four different looks based around a single core product.  </p> <p>The video allows viewers to navigate different beauty tutorials, choosing the style and context of each one, such as ‘day’ or ‘night’ and ‘club tropicana’ and ‘rebel chic’. While the video isn’t exactly ground-breaking, it shows how interactive video can potentially be used to increase conversion. </p> <p>Unlike buying a car, for example, the nature of shopping for beauty products is much more instinctive and spontaneous, meaning that interactive video can prompt an immediate response from viewers. </p> <p><a href="https://www.raptmedia.com/customers/maybelline-new-york-engagement-conversions/" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6109/Maybelline_video.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="434"></a></p> <p><em><strong>Further reading: </strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67932-the-future-of-video-is-vertical-texted-emotional/" target="_blank">The future of video is vertical, texted &amp; emotional</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68640-why-live-video-was-the-biggest-social-trend-of-2016/" target="_blank">Why live video was the biggest social trend of 2016</a></em></li> </ul> <p><em><strong>For more, you can also check out Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/video-marketing-strategies" target="_blank">Video Marketing Strategy Training</a> course.</strong></em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69063 2017-05-05T13:07:06+01:00 2017-05-05T13:07:06+01:00 10 juicy digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Ecommerce decision-makers bank on new tech</h3> <p>A new study from Salmon suggests ecommerce decision-makers are increasingly investing in new technology like IoT and virtual reality.</p> <p>Research found that 61% are currently investing in IoT (Internet of Things) enablement, while 69% plan to invest in robots and 60% in machine learning within the next five years.</p> <p>What’s more, 74% of decision-makers plan to switch ecommerce platforms in the next 12 to 18 months, with 92% of organisations recognising the need to better analyse data to improve the customer experience. </p> <h3>82% of UK consumers are unaware of the filter bubble</h3> <p>Research from the7stars has found that most consumers are unaware that their online experience is limited by social media and search preference algorithms. In fact, 82% have never heard of the term ‘filter bubble’. The study also found that consumers want more serendipitous content online from brands, with many stating positive emotions when asked how relevant but unexpected ads make them feel.</p> <p>In contrast, when asked what they associate with expected advertising based on recent searches or expressed interests, the majority of consumers chose negative words such as ‘targeted’, ‘intrusive’ and ‘annoying’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5904/the7stars.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="463"></p> <h3>75% of consumers say Amazon would be their go-to physical store</h3> <p>According to new research from <a href="http://www.fujitsu.com/uk/solutions/industry/retail/forgotten-shop-floor/">Fujitsu</a>, four out of 10 consumers in the UK are disappointed by the state of in-store technology. 75% say they would choose Amazon or eBay over traditional names if these retailers had a physical presence on the high street. </p> <p>When it comes to the reasons for this disillusionment, 42% say it is because the technology is slow, while 37% say it is unreliable. Three quarters of consumers say they can access more information than retail employees as a result, with 73% saying they can get it quicker. This means that around 65% of employees are even using their own devices to try to bridge the gap.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5900/Fujitsu.jpg" alt="" width="464" height="336"></p> <h3>360-degree technology is fuelling investment in digital video </h3> <p>A new study by AOL suggests that new advances in technology are contributing to the rise of digital video. Research shows 55% of buyers and sellers in the UK believe immersive formats such as 360-video will provide one of the best revenue streams over the next 12 months. </p> <p>That being said, these formats are still in the early days of adoption. According to the study, 20% of consumers in the UK watch virtual reality video once a week or more, and 68% of Brits say they never watch VR at all.</p> <p>While immersive formats have yet to truly take off, live formats are becoming mainstream – 42% of consumers in the UK now watch live content once or more than once a week versus 55% globally. In truth even these numbers seem quite high.</p> <h3>Eight in 10 shoppers think music makes in-store shopping more enjoyable</h3> <p>A report by <a href="http://moodmedia.co.uk/shopping-with-emotion/">Mood Media</a> has highlighted the importance of improved customer experience in-store. In a survey of 2,000 consumers, 89% said they are likely to revisit a store if it has an enjoyable atmosphere. Eight in ten like background music while they shop in-store, with 75% saying waiting times are less dull if it is playing. </p> <p>When in a shop with enjoyable elements like music, visuals, or scent, the study also suggests that shoppers are more likely to stay longer, revisit, and recommend it to others – as well as choose the store over buying online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5901/Music.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="365"></p> <h3>Ad campaigns using audience IDs predicted to triple by 2020</h3> <p>Audience IDs – which are the online identity profiles used to recognise and match users across different devices and channels – will be used in 58% of total UK online ad spend by 2020.</p> <p>This comes from a new report by Yahoo and Enders Analysis, which also suggests that audience ID ad spend will triple to €7.9bn by 2020, compared with €2.7bn in 2016.</p> <p>Predictions also suggest that growth in the volume of ad spend which uses audience IDs will slow when GDPR comes into effect in 2018. However, it will continue to grow as the industry responds and adapts to the new regulatory requirements.</p> <h3>UK grocery sector grows 3.7%</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.kantarworldpanel.com/global/News/Britains-sweet-tooth-helps-grocery-sales-rise">latest figures</a> from Kantar Worldwide show that all 10 major UK retailers saw growth in the 12 weeks ending 23 April 2017, with the sector growing 3.7% as a whole. Britons spent an extra £1bn this year compared to last, with both Easter and inflation contributing to increased spend. A preference for premium confectionary lines was also a factor, with the average price paid for an Easter egg rising by 8.6% to £1.65.</p> <p>In terms of the big supermarkets, Sainsbury’s sales rose 1.7%, while Tesco's were up 1.9%. Meanwhile, Iceland, Aldi and Lidl saw greater success, with sales rising by 9.3%, 18.3% and 17.8% respectively.</p> <h3>Data privacy of retail apps is still a big concern for consumers </h3> <p>According to Apadmi’s latest <a href="https://www.apadmi.com/pdfs/retail-app-report-2017.pdf">retail report</a>, concerns over data privacy and security are still preventing consumers from downloading retail apps. </p> <p>In a survey of UK 2,000 shoppers, 74% said they were most concerned about the security of their information, while 34% said they don’t like the idea of retailers storing their information and not knowing what it would be used for. </p> <p>It’s not solely a generational worry, either. The report states that 36% of 45-54 year olds, 41% of 55-64 year olds and 44% of over 65s share the same concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5903/Apadmi.jpg" alt="" width="318" height="423"></p> <h3>89% of UK retailers have seen a drop in foot traffic over the last five years</h3> <p>Research by <a href="http://unbouncepages.com/retail-research-517/">LoopMe</a> suggests that the shift to online shopping has resulted in a loss of revenue for high street stores, with 93% of UK retailers agreeing this has been the case. </p> <p>In a survey of over 250 decision-makers within retail, 89% said they have seen a drop in foot traffic over the last five years, and 17% state they have lost between 31% and 50% of income from physical outlets.</p> <p>As a result, AI-powered campaigns could help to bring back footfall, with 74.5% of retailers suggesting the in-store experience is an ‘extremely important’ part of the purchase journey.</p> <h3>Young agency execs place less value on viewability metrics</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://www.turn.com/resources/2017-agency-report-split-opinions-could-impact-videos-evolution">Turn</a> has highlighted how agency executives under 30 are turning their back on current viewability standards, with only 28% viewing it as a key requirement in ad buying.</p> <p>Younger execs are also less likely to see fraud as a major concern, as only a quarter of survey respondents aged under 30 believe fraud-free guarantees will drive future video spend. Meanwhile, almost 40% of brands still consider online conversions and clickthroughs to be the chief measures of video success. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5902/Viewability.jpg" alt="" width="659" height="412"></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69049 2017-05-02T11:25:16+01:00 2017-05-02T11:25:16+01:00 The best social stories and campaigns from April 2017 Nikki Gilliland <h3>Airbnb introduces ‘humanless host’ on April Fool’s Day</h3> <p>Airbnb was just one of many brands to mark April Fool’s Day this year, using the opportunity to introduce the ultimate in home rental innovation – the ‘humanless host’. The ad features Brandon, a robot that – in Airbnb's own words – bridges the gap between ‘what is magical and what is easy’.</p> <p>Despite the convenience, it turns out technology can't always be trusted. Brandon eventually runs out of battery, proving why the human-approach isn’t so bad after all.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vpLy4D8Tg4Q?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Instagram reaches 700m monthly users</h3> <p>Instagram hit yet another milestone last month, announcing that it now has 700m monthly users. </p> <p>The platform’s growth appears to be accelerating at a rapid rate, with the news coming just four months after it reached 600m. This could suggest that it won’t be too long before it joins Facebook and WhatsApp in the one-billion-users club. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">We’re thrilled to announce that our community has grown to 700 million. From all of us at Instagram, thank you! <a href="https://t.co/1ynZNkKf3m">https://t.co/1ynZNkKf3m</a> <a href="https://t.co/9FfCLvz4Fy">pic.twitter.com/9FfCLvz4Fy</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/857218250509340672">April 26, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Pepsi criticised over tasteless ad</h3> <p>At the beginning of April, Pepsi released a controversial ad that appeared to trivialise the Black Lives Matter movement. It involved Kendall Jenner joining some kind of demonstration and magically defusing the situation with a good ol' can of pop.</p> <p>Despite Pepsi defending the ad, saying that it depicts ‘a moment of unity’, it was widely criticised for trivialising social justice in order to sell soft drinks. The ad was eventually pulled from YouTube and the campaign was cancelled.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5829/Pepsi.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="403"></p> <h3>Heineken uses real-life social experiment for ‘Open Your World’ campaign </h3> <p>In contrast to Pepsi's misjudged attempt, Heineken unveiled a campaign based on the premise that having a simple conversation over a beer can help bring people together – even those with jarring political beliefs. </p> <p>The ‘Worlds Apart’ ad involves a real-life social experiment whereby three sets of strangers with opposing beliefs were asked to complete a series of tasks together. Only later did they discover the extent of their differences, before being given a choice to leave or discuss things over a beer.</p> <p>The fact that the ad comes hot on the heels of Pepsi’s recent failure appears to be a coincidence, yet many have praised the beer brand’s mature and meaningful approach.  </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8wYXw4K0A3g?wmode=transparent" width="518" height="301"></iframe></p> <h3>LinkedIn reaches half a billion members worldwide</h3> <p>April was also a good month for LinkedIn, as the networking platform celebrated reaching 500m members worldwide. </p> <p>Brits appear to be particularly active on the platform, with 23m members coming from the UK alone. London also tops the list for the most connected city in the world, with users having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>This comes after the platform unveiled a (controversial) redesigned version of its desktop site, complete with new messaging and search features. </p> <h3>Dolce &amp; Gabbana receives backlash over China campaign</h3> <p>Dolce &amp; Gabbana was another brand on the recieving end of criticism. This time, it was for using stereotypical images in its D&amp;GLovesChina campaign – part of promotional activity for its first Beijing fashion show.</p> <p>Social media users argued that the brand was glorifying ‘backward’ stereotypes instead of showing the progressive side of modern China. As a result, D&amp;G quietly removed the images from its Weibo and WeChat accounts. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5828/Dolce_and_Gabbana.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="450"></p> <h3>Burger King sneakily activates Google Assistants during ad</h3> <p>Burger King released a particularly clever ad last month, designed to activate Google Assistants on viewer’s phones and home devices. The 15-second video involves a Burger King employee leaning into the camera and asking “Okay Google, what is the Whopper burger?”</p> <p>However, Burger King was perhaps a little too sneaky for Google’s liking, as reports suggest that devices stopped responding to the prompt a few hours after the ad was launched.</p> <p>Google has not confirmed whether or not it updated software to prevent it. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/U_O54le4__I?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Facebook unveils developments in F8 event</h3> <p>Finally, Facebook announced a number of developments during F8 last month, including new AR and VR technology.</p> <p>I recommend reading <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69013-what-do-facebook-s-new-vr-and-ar-platforms-mean-for-marketers/" target="_blank">Ben Davis's article</a> for an in-depth breakdown.  </p> <p><strong><em>For more on this topic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/social/"><em>Social media training courses</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-best-practice-guide/"><em>Social media best practice guide</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69042 2017-04-28T11:15:00+01:00 2017-04-28T11:15:00+01:00 Driven by mobile, digital overtakes TV in US ad spend for the first time Patricio Robles <p>The milestone is one that industry analysts and observers have been waiting for and 2016 also brought with it another milestone: for the first time, mobile ads produced more revenue than desktop ads.</p> <p>All told, digital ad revenue in the US hit a record $72.5bn last year, up from $59.6bn in 2015. Mobile ads were responsible for $36.6bn of that, a massive 77% year-over-year gain.</p> <p>A good portion of mobile's gains were due to the growing popularity of mobile video ads. Spend on those skyrocketed by 145% year-over-year to reach $4.2bn, which helped fuel a 53% year-over-year jump in digital video ad spend overall. That figure now stands at $9.1bn.</p> <p>Spend on social ads, which in recent years have become a staple of many advertisers' digital campaigns, grew 50% to $16.3bn. Even search managed to produce a 19% gain to reach $35bn in spend.</p> <p>According to the IAB, mobile's ascendency across all digital channels is not surprising. "This increasing commitment [to mobile] is a reflection of brands’ ongoing marketing shift from 'mobile-first' to 'mobile-only' in order to keep pace with today's on-the-go consumers," IAB president and CEO Randall Rothenberg stated. </p> <p>"In a mobile world, it is no surprise that mobile ad revenues now take more than half of the digital market share," IAB EVP and CMO David Doty added.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5773/iabchart.png" alt="" width="705" height="488"></p> <h3>The rich get richer</h3> <p>While digital's eclipsing of television in terms of ad spend is no doubt good news for the digital economy generally, not everybody is benefiting equally from the growth of digital ad spend. By most estimates, two companies, Google and Facebook, have realized the vast majority of ad revenue growth, leading some to label the two companies a duopoly.</p> <p>According to Digital Content Next's Jason Kint, Google and Facebook took 89% of the growth last year. Brian Wieser of Pivotal Research <a href="http://fortune.com/2017/04/26/google-facebook-digital-ads/">estimates</a> that amazingly the two companies were the beneficiaries of close to 100% of the growth.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">so <a href="https://twitter.com/iab">@IAB</a> just dropped 2016 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/s?src=hash">#s</a>. Duopoly in full force -&gt; takes 89% of growth. "Everyone Else" loses more share courtesy of Facebook. <a href="https://twitter.com/DCNorg">@dcnorg</a> <a href="https://t.co/urglxDrooM">pic.twitter.com/urglxDrooM</a></p> — Jason Kint (@jason_kint) <a href="https://twitter.com/jason_kint/status/857255714678603777">April 26, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>The IAB disputes such claims. "73% of revenues in Q4 came from the top 10 digital companies, but they only contributed 69% of the growth," the IAB's Doty <a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/digital-ad-revenue-surpasses-tv-desktop-iab/308808/">told AdAge</a>. "That means 31% of the growth came from companies outside the top 10." He also stated that some estimates count revenue outside of the US and don't account for traffic acquisition costs.</p> <p>But even if the estimates of how much Google and Facebook are taking as the digital ad spend pie grows are slightly exaggerated, it's clear from the companies' <a href="https://abc.xyz/investor/news/earnings/2016/Q4_alphabet_earnings/">financial</a> <a href="https://investor.fb.com/investor-news/press-release-details/2017/facebook-Reports-Fourth-Quarter-and-Full-Year-2016-Results/default.aspx">reports</a> that advertisers are funnelling increasingly large sums of money to the two internet giants.</p> <p>At the same time, other notable players, like Twitter, are losing. The still-popular microblogging platform has finally managed to grow its monthly users by a meaningful amount, but despite user growth Twitter <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/apr/26/twitter-revenues-fall-first-quarter-results-advertising">just reported its first quarterly revenue decline</a> and acknowledged that it is facing "revenue headwinds."</p> <p>While Google and Facebook face some challenges of their own, including <a href="https://digiday.com/uk/youtube-ad-boycott-concisely-explained/">an advertiser boycott</a> and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/apr/26/facebook-must-step-up-fake-news-fight-before-uk-election-urges-mp">criticism over fake news</a>, every indication is that the two companies, official duopoly or not, will continue to dominate internet advertising. Whether that's ultimately a good or bad thing for digital ad economy remains to be seen.</p> <p><strong><em>For more digital marketing and ecommerce data, download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/">Econsultancy Internet Statistics Compendium</a>.</em></strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69047 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to wet your whistle, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even more.</p> <h3>Two thirds of UK consumers are worried about data privacy</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.gigya.com/blog/state-of-consumer-privacy-trust-2017-fear-hope/" target="_blank">Gigya</a>, 68% of UK consumers are concerned about how brands use their personal information, with two-thirds specifically questioning the data privacy of IoT devices like smartwatches and fitness trackers.</p> <p>The results of a poll of 4,000 consumers also found that the majority of people think privacy policies have become weaker rather than stronger – 18% predict it will worsen under Theresa May’s government.</p> <p>Apprehension over privacy was found to be higher in older generations, with 73% of people aged over 65 expressing concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5812/Gigya.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="409"></p> <h3>Nearly half of parents agree that personalised marketing is the future</h3> <p>A survey by Mumsnet has found that 46% of parents expect personalisation to become a big part of advertising in future.</p> <p>However, there is certainly some resistance, with 58% saying that their data is private and only 26% liking the idea of personalised ads.</p> <p>That does not mean that parents don’t see the value. 35% say they’d be open to seeing ads that apply to their lives, while 24% say that personalised ads would make them more likely to buy. The majority surveyed also said that they’d prefer to see tailored ads based on their previous search behaviour rather than online habits.</p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 13% YoY in March</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-april-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index show solid growth for UK online sales, driven by a rise in the average spend through mobile devices.</p> <p>Mobile retail was up 18% in March 2016, while overall online sales grew 13% year-on-year. More specifically, the home and garden sector saw a 10% YoY growth, while health and beauty sales increased by 15% YoY – most likely driven by Mother’s Day.</p> <h3>19% of professionals have landed a job through LinkedIn</h3> <p>This week, <a href="https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/24/the-power-of-linkedins-500-million-community" target="_blank">LinkedIn announced</a> that it has reached half a billion members worldwide, with 23m of these coming from the UK.</p> <p>As part of the announcement, it also revealed that London is the most connected city in the world, with professionals having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>It also stated that a casual conversation on LinkedIn has led to a new opportunity for 29% of professionals, while 19% have landed a job through using the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5815/LinkedIn.JPG" alt="" width="344" height="469"></p> <h3>UK adspend was 3.6% higher in Q4 2016</h3> <p>According to the Advertising Association/WARC Expenditure Report, adspend was <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">3.9% higher</a> in the fourth quarter of last year, with digital formats driving growth.</p> <p>Internet spending was up 15.3% during Q4 and 13.4% over the entire year. Meanwhile, mobile took a 37.5% share, hitting £3.9bn for the year and accounting for 99% of the new money spent on internet advertising. </p> <p>Lastly, forecasts for the next two years indicate continued growth, with 2.5% predicted in 2017 and 3.3% in 2018.</p> <h3>64% of marketers do not believe it is their job to analyse data</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.bluevenn.com/resources/ebooks/data-deadlock-report-1" target="_blank">BlueVenn</a> has found that nearly two-thirds of UK and US marketers believe it is their role to collect customer data, but not actually analyse it.</p> <p>However, it appears this is due to sheer volume rather than a lack of aptitude, as 93% of marketers say they are ‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ in their ability to analyse complex customer data.  </p> <p>The findings suggest a general discord amongst marketers, with 51% of UK and US marketers feeling that they spend too much time analysing data in their day-to-day work, with too little time left to spend on more creative aspects of the role.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers forget branded content</h3> <p>Upon discovering that eight in 10 consumers forget most of the information in branded content after only three days, while more than half are unable to recall a single detail, a <a href="https://prezi.com/view/RZXW2soO8IFMkzAFoNY7/" target="_blank">new report by Prezi</a> has highlighted the reasons why.</p> <p>Irrelevancy of ads is the biggest reason for a lack of recall, with 55% of consumers citing this reason. 37.7% said a lack of motivation to remember it, while 30% said there is simply too much content to retain.</p> <p>In contrast, content which 'tells the audience something new' was found to be the most memorable, helping 27% of respondents to remember a brand. This was closely followed by content which teaches, inspires, or entertains. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5813/Prezi_report.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="436"></p> <h3>Half of retailers unable to predict shopper traffic</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://d3fi73yr6l0nje.cloudfront.net/Lists/TRS-ResourceAssetsLib/EKN-TYCO_ebook_03-Excellence_Scorecard-20170427.pdf" target="_blank">Tryco</a> has found that retailers are failing to monitor store performance correctly, with 50% unable to predict shopper traffic. Consequently, it is becoming increasingly difficult for retailers to balance operational tasks and customer service. </p> <p>Other findings show 60% of retailers do not consistently manage inventory performance and turnover on a store-by-store basis</p> <p>Lastly, retailers spend 70% of their time on operational tasks as opposed to 30% on customer service, reducing the opportunity to build important relationships with consumers. </p> <h3>eBay sees spike in searches for home and garden sector</h3> <p>eBay has revealed that it saw big spikes in searches within the Home and Garden category around the May bank holidays last year, with online shoppers showing two distinct purchasing mindsets.</p> <p>On one hand, consumers appeared to be looking for quick-fix cosmetic items at the beginning of May, with sales of candles and plant pots leaping by 172% and 214% respectively.</p> <p>On the other, shoppers were planning bigger renovation and DIY projects at the end of the month. This was reflected by sales of saws and lawnmowers rising by more than 1,000%, and sales of sofas jumping by 194%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5816/ebay_search.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>46% of UK consumers open to relevant ads despite surge in ad blocking </h3> <p>Trinity McQueen has revealed that consumers will tolerate relevant online advertising, despite the popularity of ad-blocking.</p> <p>In a study of 1,000 UK adults, it found that 56% of consumers now use ad-blocking software on their laptops and PCs, yet 46% say they don’t mind online advertising as long as it’s relevant to them.</p> <p>The study also highlights the changing ways UK adults consume traditional and digital media. 29% of UK adults would be happy never to watch scheduled TV again, while one third say that scheduled TV does not fit in with their lifestyle.</p> <p>Finally, 41% of UK adults now subscribe to an on-demand service such as Netflix, Amazon Prime or Now TV.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69028 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 10 tremendous digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>UK search data shows surge in ‘snap election’ queries</h3> <p>Following on from the announcement of the snap general election this week, Hitwise has analysed how the UK responded online.</p> <p>Data shows there was a 2,000% increase in searches for Theresa May on print media sites, while three out of five searches on Tuesday 18th were about the election news. Most searches were in the form of questions, with the nation generally appearing unsure about what a ‘snap election’ actually means.</p> <h3>One fifth of retailers are failing to offer preferred delivery options</h3> <p><a href="http://ampersandcommerce.com/insights/yougov-consumer-survey-delivery-2017/" target="_blank">Research from Ampersand</a> has found that many of the UK’s biggest retailers are failing to offer next day delivery, despite a YouGov survey showing that 58% of people favour this method over any other.</p> <p>In comparison to 2014, Ampersand found that most people still favour next day delivery over click and collect and same day delivery, with preference for this increasing 6% within three years. </p> <p>Meanwhile, preference for same day delivery has gone from 21% in 2014 down to 12% this year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5625/Ampersand.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="492"></p> <h3>UK add-to-basket rates on the up in Q4</h3> <p>Monetate's latest <a href="http://info.monetate.com/ecommerce_report_EQ4_2016.html" target="_blank">ecommerce report</a> has revealed that UK add-to-basket rates were 3.75% higher in Q4 2016 than a year previously. </p> <p>The report also shows that both global and UK conversion rates were lower this Q4 than in 2015. However, global and UK conversion rates saw its first increase since Q4 of 2015.</p> <p>Meanwhile, website visits via mobile continued to increase globally, with 44% of UK website visits coming from smartphones.</p> <h3>75% of UK consumers have not spoken to a chatbot</h3> <p>New research from <a href="https://insights.ubisend.com/2017-chatbot-report" target="_blank">Ubisend</a> has uncovered the brand characters people would most like to see turned into chatbots. Compare the Market’s Meerkats topped the poll, followed by the Andrex puppies and Nespresso’s George Clooney. </p> <p>Other research found that 75% of UK consumers have not yet spoken to a chatbot, however, 57% of consumers are aware of what a chatbot is. </p> <p>Lastly, 35% want to see more companies adopting chatbots to solve their queries, with 68% citing ‘reaching the desired outcome’ as the most important factor in their experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5628/chatbots.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="297"></p> <h3>Expedia outperforms other travel brands with 7% market share</h3> <p>Conductor has released its first ever <a href="https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;cad=rja&amp;uact=8&amp;ved=0ahUKEwis1ZyKnbXTAhXOaVAKHc0ZA4EQFggiMAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fww2.conductor.com%2Frs%2F149-ZMU-763%2Fimages%2FConductor-Organic-Online-Market-Share-Report-Holiday-2016.pdf&amp;usg=AFQjCNGO-bWF8Ak2EEpMJ7kZeecHFR3fjA" target="_blank">Organic Market Share</a> report, detailing the brands that excel at reaching consumers from organic search.</p> <p>In the travel category, Expedia was found to be the overall top performer, taking a 7% market share. Meanwhile, TripAdvisor dominates the ‘early stages’ of the consumer journey category with a 10% share. </p> <p>Data shows that airlines, car rental companies and hotel chains (including Hilton) have the potential to increase their visibility. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5627/Online_market_share.JPG" alt="" width="713" height="404"></p> <h3>Consumers prefer traditional advertising to digital</h3> <p>Research by Kantar Media has found that UK consumers feel significantly more positive about advertising on traditional platforms, such as TV and magazines, than they do about online formats.</p> <p>In a survey, 33% said they actively dislike seeing advertising on online video services and search engines, while 30% dislike being served ads in news and articles online. In contrast, only 13% and 14% of consumers dislike seeing ads in printed newspapers and printed magazines.</p> <p>With online ads predicted to account for more than half of all advertising spend in the next few years, this provides food for thought for brands.</p> <h3>Connected shopping driven by Generation Y </h3> <p>New research from Savvy suggests that the mass adoption of smartphones and social media has contributed to a fundamental change in the path to purchase.</p> <p>Data shows that Generation Y is driving changes in retail due to being constantly connected. 66% say they regularly use their smartphone to buy products and 49% regularly use their smartphones while in the supermarket. While this group represents around a third of shoppers at the moment, they are predicted to account for 47% by 2022.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5634/connected_shopper.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK marketers increase budgets in 2017</h3> <p>According to data from the Q1 2017 <a href="http://www.ipa.co.uk/page/ipa-bellwether-report#.WPnTjtLyuUk" target="_blank">IPA Bellwether Report</a>, marketing budgets increased in Q1 2017 with significant growth seen in internet and main media advertising categories.  </p> <p>The report suggests that the overall outlook for 2017/18 is positive, with 26.1% of companies suggesting growth in total budgets for the coming year. Meanwhile, ad spend is now predicted to grow 0.6%, replacing the previous forecast of -0.7%.</p> <h3>Only 55% of Brits associate Easter with religion</h3> <p>New <a href="https://yougov.co.uk/news/2017/04/13/only-55-brits-associate-jesus-christ-easter/" target="_blank">research from YouGov</a> has found that Brits are more likely to think of Easter in relation to chocolate eggs than religious connotations. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,670 UK adults, only 55% said they personally associate Jesus with Easter, while 67% said they associate it with a bank holiday. Chocolate eggs is clearly at the forefront of everyone’s minds, with 76% associating this with Easter above anything else.</p> <p>In a separate study, Captify analysed found that Cadbury products dominate searches for chocolate eggs, with Crème Egg accounting for 29% of searches and Mini Eggs accounting for 18%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5626/YouGov.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="752"></p> <h3>Luxury ad spend predicted to shift online </h3> <p>Zenith's <a href="https://www.zenithmedia.com/product/advertising-expenditure-forecasts" target="_blank">latest report</a> suggests that expenditure on luxury advertising is set to recover, with growth predicted to occur due to an increase in online spend. Zenith predicts a 3.9% rise in 2017 – a welcome figure following a 0.5% decline in 2016.</p> <p>It also predicts that the internet will become the main luxury advertising medium in 2018, despite print currently being the principal medium, accounting for 32.7% of ad spend in 2016 compared to 25.8% for internet advertising.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68988 2017-04-12T14:37:00+01:00 2017-04-12T14:37:00+01:00 Crocs aims to turn around fortunes with celebrity-driven campaign: Will it work? Nikki Gilliland <p>But then again, Crocs could be on the cusp of a comeback. </p> <p>Last year, Christopher Kane actually featured a pair in his catwalk show. Now, the brand is launching a marketing campaign to help change its image, with help from a few well-known celebrities. </p> <p>The question is – will it work? Here’s a bit more on the campaign and why celebrity-driven marketing could prove to be a tricky strategy to pull off.</p> <h3>New brand messaging</h3> <p>Crocs has always marketed itself as a brand that offers comfort, quality and fun. With a focus on the colourful nature of its shoes, it has previously used the tagline ‘Find Your Fun’ to evoke this care-free image.</p> <p>Its new campaign, however, concentrates on a new type of brand messaging. The ‘Come as You Are’ campaign celebrates individuality, instilling the idea that people should reject labels and feel comfortable in their own shoes. Both literally and figuratively, of course.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NS2LwZOLL8g?wmode=transparent" width="578" height="325"></iframe></p> <p>While it’s an undoubtedly positive and empowering campaign, it’s hard to ignore the fact that the brand is also referencing its own struggles to be accepted. There is the sense that it deliberately referencing its uncool image – perhaps even capitalising on it.</p> <p>This is no bad thing actually. In fact, the campaign's slightly ironic element might be the best thing about it. </p> <h3>Using celebrity endorsement </h3> <p>To deliver its new message, Crocs has chosen to feature celebrities in its ads including Drew Barrymore, WWE wrestler John Cena, and Korean celebrities Yoona Lim and Henry Lau. This is where the campaign seems off the mark. </p> <p>Sure, John Cena and Drew Barrymore come across as confident in their individuality, but placing them together seems a somewhat strange and random combination – especially when you add in Lim and Lau who are lesser known outside of Asia.</p> <p>This is the problem with celebrity-endorsement in a nutshell. If, for some reason or another, it doesn’t feel entirely authentic or natural – it just doesn’t work.</p> <p>With more brands choosing to work with social media influencers to build a sense of real relatability – Crocs’ reliance on celebrity endorsement feels a little tired.</p> <p>Similarly, the broad and somewhat sentimental nature of the ad feels too heavy-handed. When you think about it, Crocs fans don’t actually buy the shoe because it showcases their individuality – they do so because it’s the most comfortable pair of shoes they can get their hands on. Surely promoting the functional aspect of the product would be far more authentic.</p> <h3>Personalised and interactive elements</h3> <p>Celebrity-driven ads are not the only part of the campaign. Other online activity includes a GIF generator, allowing users to upload a selfie that celebrates their unique and individual traits.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5398/Crocs_selfie.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="628"></p> <p>The brand will also roll out <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68888-six-examples-of-mother-s-day-marketing-from-online-retailers/" target="_blank">Mother’s Day</a> promotions in time for the US holiday, heavily featuring Drew Barrymore and her own story as a mother.</p> <p>So, will the 'Come as You Are' campaign do much to combat recent losses? With Crocs reporting a $44.5m sales decline in the fourth quarter, as well as the imminent departure of CEO, Greg Ribatt – it’s a pretty tall order.</p> <p>While a few recent posts indicate that Crocs might be delving into the world of influencer marketing to support its social strategy, it remains to be seen whether or not it's too late. Of course, celebrity-driven marketing is still relevant and highly effective when done right, but to use it to turn around a failing brand is perhaps too much of a gamble.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68012-five-key-changes-within-the-world-of-celebrity-marketing/" target="_blank">Five key changes within the world of celebrity marketing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68691-why-iceland-has-replaced-celebrities-with-micro-influencers/" target="_blank">Why Iceland has replaced celebrities with micro-influencers</a></em></li> </ul> <p><em><strong>You can also download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-future-of-celebrity-marketing/" target="_blank">Future of Celebrity Marketing</a> report here.</strong></em></p>