tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/video-rich-media Latest Video Advertising content from Econsultancy 2017-10-23T09:26:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69516 2017-10-23T09:26:00+01:00 2017-10-23T09:26:00+01:00 10 important digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Now, let’s get cracking.</p> <h3>Snapchat and Instagram ad spend up 73% and 55%</h3> <p>New data from 4C Insights has revealed that ad spend was up for both Snapchat and Instagram in Q3 2017, rising 73% and 55% respectively.</p> <p>There was a rise in paid media spend across the board, with a 31% quarterly increase on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Snapchat.</p> <p>Instagram Stories remains a particularly strong channel, generating 220% year-on-year spend growth. Elsewhere, Facebook ad spend grew 27%, travel sector spend on Twitter surged 250% for the quarter, and ad spend on Pinterest grew 33% over the course of the year.</p> <h3>60% of speciality retailers offer loyalty programs compared to 22% of brands</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="https://astoundcommerce.com/us/specialty/">Astound Commerce</a> suggests that specialty retailers are outperforming brands in almost all omnichannel categories.</p> <p>First, 60% of specialty retailers offer programs to inspire customer loyalty, while only 22% of brands have these capabilities. Second, ensuring prices are consistent across channels is more complicated for retailers with many different brands, yet 37% offer these capabilities compared to only 6% of global brands.</p> <p>Lastly, three in four specialty retailers have a mobile app, while less than a quarter of brands can say the same.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9797/Loyalty.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="323"></p> <h3>More than half of Brits plan to buy Christmas gifts online</h3> <p>The latest <a href="https://www.salesforce.com/uk/form/industries/connected-shopper-report-2017.jsp?nc=7010M000000uIke&amp;d=7010M000002MOCH" target="_blank">report</a> from Salesforce suggests that the majority of Brits will be shopping online this Christmas. It found that 56% (or nearly three out of five Brits) plan to do half or more of their holiday shopping via the internet.</p> <p>Alongside a frustrating in-store customer experience, this could be due to online shopping allowing consumers to become increasingly informed. So much so that 56% of Brits claim to typically know more about a product than the store employee.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9793/Salesforce.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="216"></p> <h3>Nearly one in seven companies unprepared for GDPR</h3> <p><a href="https://dma.org.uk/research/the-gdpr-and-you-chapter-four" target="_blank">DMA research</a> has revealed that 15% of companies still have no plan in place to be ready for the new GDPR laws by May 2018.</p> <p>While 77% of marketers now rate their awareness as ‘good’, and 74% describe themselves as feeling somewhat or extremely prepared for the changes, this drops to 58% when it comes to their organisation being ready. </p> <p>Meanwhile, it also appears as if worries are increasing as time goes on. 42% of marketers now feel their business will be “very affected” by the new laws and a further 22% feel they will be “extremely affected”. Lastly, 65% of those surveyed agree that the GDPR will be a hindrance to their marketing.</p> <p><em>Check out our hub page to learn more about <a href="https://econsultancy.com/hello/gdpr-for-marketers/">how GDPR will affect marketers</a>.</em></p> <h3>98% of UK consumers believe in ‘bad personalisation’ </h3> <p>Research by Sitecore and <a href="https://www.vansonbourne.com/client-research/14121601jd" target="_blank">Vanson Bourne</a> has found that brands are failing to use customer data to deliver relevant and personalised customer experiences. In fact, a whopping 98% of UK consumers say that they believe ‘bad personalisation’ exists, with a further 66% believing brands are using out-of-date information about them.</p> <p>While brands say they’re collecting eight different types of data about online customers, 18% of them recognise that they lack the skills needed to properly use or analyse the data collected. </p> <p>Meanwhile, 42% don’t have the capabilities to integrate data collection and only 18% have the ability to collect online data on an individual (vs. consumer segment) level.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9791/Sitecore.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="618"></p> <h3>Click and Collect is driving additional in-store sales</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="http://now.jda.com/European-Customer-Pulse-Report-EMEA.html?srcid=jda-pr" target="_blank">JDA &amp; Centiro</a> suggests that click &amp; collect can be a pivotal driver for additional in-store sales. In a survey of more than 8,000 consumers across the UK, Germany, France and Sweden, 24% of European adults said that they have bought additional products while picking up their item from a physical retail store.</p> <p>UK consumers are particularly ahead of the curve in this area. 54% of UK shoppers say they have used it in the last year, compared to 42% for the European average.</p> <p>Despite this growing convenience, however, many consumers are still reporting frustrations over the online shopping experience. 55% of European adults say they have experienced a problem with an online order at some point in the last 12 months.</p> <h3>Consumers in developed countries are more suspicious of brands</h3> <p>Kantar TNS’s latest research has revealed that consumers in the UK and US are growing increasingly suspicious of brands, while those in emerging countries are more accepting of brand content and messaging.</p> <p>In China and Nigeria, 57% and 54% of consumers trust big global brands, however this falls significantly in developed markets like the USA and France, where just 21% and 15% trust big global brands.</p> <p>This ‘consumer trust divide’ was highlighted in a survey of 70,000 people across 56 countries. It also found that many consumers are choosing privacy over convenience, with 43% of global consumers objecting to connected devices monitoring their activities – even if it makes their lives easier.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9792/Kantar.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="390"></p> <h3>Majority of users happy with Twitter’s longer format</h3> <p>How do people feel about Twitter’s new 280-character limit?</p> <p>According to a survey by <a href="https://morningconsult.com/2017/10/13/u-s-adults-likely-favor-twitters-280-character-expansion/" target="_blank">Morning Consult</a>, people are largely positive, with 41% of users aged 18-29 responding well to the change, and just 14% expressing reservations.</p> <p>Similarly, 30% were somewhat supportive of longer-format tweets, while 17% said the increased character limit made them more likely to tweet themselves. 20% also agreed that they would be more likely to check Twitter for news about current events as a result of the change.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9796/Twitter.JPG" alt="" width="740" height="579"></p> <h3>Adspend on video ads overtake banners ads</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.iabuk.net/research/digital-adspend" target="_blank">Internet Advertising Bureau UK</a> has reported that in the first half of the 2017, advertisers spent more on video ads than banner ads for the first time.</p> <p>Total digital adspend grew 13.8% to £5.56bn in the first six months of the year compared to the same period a year earlier. However, spending on online video ads grew at 46% to reach £699m, while spend on banner ads slowed to just 2%, reaching £685m.</p> <p>Video is now said to be the fastest-growing ad format, accounting for 35% of all spend going on display advertising. Meanwhile, display advertising as a whole grew 18% to £2bn.</p> <h3>Consumers think brands have a responsibility to break gender stereotypes</h3> <p>Finally, a <a href="http://blog.choozle.com/category/other/">Choozle</a> survey has delved into consumer sentiment on the usage of gender stereotypes in digital advertising, and whether or not it affects purchasing decisions.</p> <p>The results indicate that consumers feel it should be the brand’s responsibility to break down gender stereotypes, with 37% of people agreeing that the industry should not use them.</p> <p>Similarly, 36% of respondents said they like a brand more when it runs advertisements that break stereotypes and 25% said they are more likely to purchase from that brand. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9799/Gender_stereotypes.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="378"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69489 2017-10-19T09:52:00+01:00 2017-10-19T09:52:00+01:00 The changing face of consumer trust and the implications for marketers Nick Hammond <p>Always an engaging speaker, Botsman's talks centred on her book <a href="http://rachelbotsman.com/books/" target="_blank">'Who Can You Trust?: How Technology Brought Us Together and Why It Might Drive Us Apart'</a>. The audience was hooked from the start with an anecdote concerning the time her parents accidentally hired a drug dealer to be her nanny; taken in by the woman’s manner with the children and her fake Salvation Army uniform.</p> <p>Botsman's parents used established, learned, ‘trust signals’ to make their decision, but this approach was not insightful enough to see through the pretence. This episode highlighted a key message of her talks – ‘Trust has two enemies, not just one: bad character and poor information’, and ‘the illusion of information is worse than ignorance.’</p> <p>Botsman’s take on the changing shape of trust is less positive than in her previous work <a title="http://rachelbotsman.com/work/" href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/new/" target="_blank">‘What’s Mine Is Yours: How Collaborative Consumption is Changing the Way We Live’.</a> Her story starts with ‘Local Trust’  - the earliest model, where trust was created between people who knew each other personally. </p> <p>The second trust model, that of ‘Hierarchical Trust’, developed between individuals, established institutions and their associated officials – such as bankers, politicians and teachers. As this model crumbled, the replacement model is that of ‘Distributed Trust.’ </p> <p>Using a metaphor of connectivity and power, hierarchical trust involved waves of ‘trust energy’ flowing up from individuals to established institutions. In a distributed model this energy flows laterally between people and between people and contemporary institutions/channels. What we are seeing is the ‘twilight of the elites’ and ‘the inversion of influence.’</p> <p>I liked Botsman’s perspective that trust is a process (not a static entity, in the sense of a belief or conviction) and an active agent that helps us bridge the ‘trust gap’ between the unknown and the known. Trust then, can allow a confident relationship with the unknown. </p> <p>So how is this change in the ecosystem of trust impacting on consumers and how they interact with brands and digital platforms particularly? </p> <h3>Trusting our digital platforms</h3> <p>Developments over the last few years are having an impact on digital platforms, how we perceive them and how they operate. The presidential election in the US and the furore over fake news, allied with the rescinding of Uber’s licence in London, have encouraged different expectations of the role and responsibilities of companies like Facebook and Uber.</p> <p>Traditionally, they have positioned themselves as neutral pathways, or ‘dumb pipes’, that connect people with each other and a service. Events as above have led to pressure for them to change their accountability positioning from: ‘Reactive - within reason, be there when things go wrong’; to ‘Proactive - be responsible for the risks of bad things happening.’ </p> <p>We increasingly outsource trust to machines and algorithms, searching Facebook for news, booking a cab via Uber and asking Alexa what we should do today.</p> <p>From a commercial perspective, this reliance means there are new and different challenges for brands and how they interact with their customers – ‘with great power, comes great responsibility.’</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9772/great_power.gif" alt="" width="498" height="207"></p> <p>Marketeers need to be aware of this changing face of trust. We already know that considerable distributed trust is placed with a wide range of celebrities active across social media, especially on Instagram. This model of distributed trust is also extended to digital brands, platforms, channels, and now algorithms. Consumers rely on these brands and channels – ones that they align with in terms of proposition and delivery, but the price to be paid for breaking this trust can be high, <a title="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-41384789" href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/new/" target="_blank">as Ryanair is finding out to its cost</a>.</p> <p>Technology is playing a big role in developing this new model of distributed trust, and a key area is that of automation and artificial intelligence. I touched on this in my piece '<a href="http://www.brandlearning.com/views-ideas/marketing-capability/the-future-and-eternal-truth-of-marketing-trust/" target="_blank">The Future (and eternal truth) of Marketing</a>'.</p> <p>‘The relationship between brand and consumer, and the transparency with which it is conducted, risks being further confused by the growing influence of bots. "Choice architecture" is changing with the rise of automation, robotics and AI. Bots will refine choices presented, and even make choices on behalf of consumers. Some argue that the intervention of bots will mean that matters of ethics, which are nuanced not binary decisions, will get side-lined. In reality this places even more responsibility on the brand to uphold ethics. Bots may ignore it in the moment of choice, but ultimately, any brand that cannot meet the requirement for transparent ethics, will risk a consumer backlash.’</p> <p>Of course, there is the opportunity for brands to leverage trust positively. Philanthropic gestures are a powerful way to build trust and a good example of this was Target’s $1 billion pledge to support students in need of financial support <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUkO6Gh3w6g&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank">to pursue their education</a>.</p> <p>It can also be derived by encouraging positive interaction around a brand. An example of this was Burberry’s ‘Art of The Trench’ campaign, where users could share and comment on everyday pictures of <a href="http://artofthetrench.burberry.com/upload/" target="_blank">people wearing Burberry products</a>. First Direct has built trust though fabulous customer service since its launch in 1989, in spite of not offering the most competitive financial products. Airbnb, perhaps the perfect brand for world of distributed trust, has shown that travellers can just as easily trust normal people offering accommodation as they can established institutions such as hotels. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9775/Burberry_art_of_the_trench.png" alt="" width="650" height="370"></p> <p><em>Burberry's Art of the Trench</em></p> <p>An associated threat to an effective trust process is that of a reduction in friction. Trust needs friction – ‘time and consideration to operate’ and with a faster pace of life, there is increasing pressure on this space. I covered this dynamic on the Econsultancy blog in this piece – <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69101-why-increasingly-efficient-ux-might-not-always-be-a-good-thing/" target="_blank">‘Why increasingly efficient UX might not always be a good thing’.</a>  </p> <p>‘For brands, the question of how to provide the right amount of friction to unlock reflection but not to hamper experience is critical in building a world that, in addition to doing things, thinks about what it is doing.’ </p> <p>Steve Selzer from Airbnb believes that immediacy and the absence of friction are creating a less tolerant, less self-aware world – 'This is why designers of intelligent, immersive experiences need to build in meaningful friction, encouraging reflection and awareness of the actions themselves as well as their consequences.' </p> <p>The advent of other realities, augmented and virtual, in tandem with reduced friction, may also cause problems. <a href="https://venturebeat.com/2017/04/03/3-challenges-of-developing-bots-for-immersive-environments/" target="_blank">A piece from Venturebeat observes</a>: ‘...reflection is even more important in immersive environments, where you don’t so much “watch” or “use” experiences as really “live” through them. VR experiences are perceived by the brain as actually happening to the user, so their transformative potential — toward self-development or rapture — is quite powerful.’</p> <p>Botsman is not optimistic about the future. Her rather dystopian perspective asks where much needed control or moderation can come from. Could there be a role for a digital ombudsman, a trust kite-mark or an ethical Alexa? The reality is that we will always choose utility over morality and regulation is never likely to be popular – witness the outcry over the Uber decision in London. </p> <p>The more we defer responsibility and abdicate the need for channel accountabilty, the more likely that our trust will be abused.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69491 2017-10-17T10:00:00+01:00 2017-10-17T10:00:00+01:00 Why digital out-of-home advertising is not really digital (yet) Nick Hammond <p>With this investment comes greater impact (e.g. increasing use of video), flexibility and of course income for the vendors. Alongside this burgeoning focus on digital creative delivery, there is attention on how the medium could be sold more efficiently – more like other digital channels and less like traditional out of home. </p> <p>Moving from a cost-per-panel approach and with access to more detailed, real time audience information on the horizon (rather than periodic panel data) the ability to trade on an audience model isn’t far off. For example, in Canada Outfront Media has launched its own real-time analytics platform, having agreed a partnership with mobile network Cellint.</p> <p>By tapping into available data, the platform will allow tracking of hourly impression numbers, including the proportion of those that are unique views. In the UK Transport for London has a considerable amount of data garnered from 5.6m mobile phones connected to Wi-Fi on the Tube. This mobile data can be used to track interchanges, and even walking routes and platform use within a station.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9753/dooh.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="353"></p> <p>Whilst these developments provide considerable opportunities for advertisers and OOH vendors alike, a recent piece <a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/jcdecaux-we-ensure-outdoor-doesnt-fall-pitfalls-digital-media/1446445?bulletin=campaign_breakfast_briefing&amp;utm_medium=EMAIL&amp;utm_campaign=eNews%20Bulletin&amp;utm_source=20171005&amp;utm_content=Campaign%20Breakfast%20">in Campaign</a> highlights how out of home’s convergence with the digital world could have its downsides. </p> <p>OOH vendor JCDecaux has launched a brand charter which is seeking to avoid problems that have been plaguing the mainstream digital sector. These include accountability, viewability, measurability, transparency and brand safety. JCDecaux commented at launch, 'we must ensure outdoor doesn't fall into the pitfalls of digital media'.</p> <p>This charter aims to set a gold standard of best practice across the digital out-of-home industry and in this brave new world JCDecaux will ensure its metrics and measurements are independently verified by Price Waterhouse Coopers; who will provide a quarterly compliance report to ensure transparency.</p> <p>This is an interesting development as out of home has a history of being one of the more opaque advertising channels in terms of the buying process, audience measurement and invoicing.</p> <h3>OOH automation </h3> <p>In the UK, digital buying practices are moving into the OOH sector in the shape of increased automation. </p> <p>From the Campaign piece – ‘Also mirroring the wider digital market, JCDecaux has launched a new external smartsuite platform, SmartBRICS, which allows advertisers and agencies to place their own DOOH campaigns for the first time. The platform has been used internally for the past two years but (now).. will be available to external users through an API. Users will now be able to plan, budget and create their own campaigns based on the platforms in-depth rules and filters on its dashboard.’ </p> <p>So, what are the challenges and opportunities for digital practitioners? We are already seeing digital experts’ influence spreading across traditional channels such as TV, which is increasingly being bought <a href="http://www.thedrum.com/opinion/2017/06/13/get-ready-programmatic-tv-advertising">in an automated fashion</a> (see <a href="https://www.skyadsmart.co.uk/">Sky AdSmart</a>), and this is beginning to happen with OOH as well, as observed above.</p> <p>Clever recent activational examples in DOOH were featured in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69100-six-clever-examples-of-what-dynamic-outdoor-advertising-can-do">this Econsultancy piece</a>. I particularly liked the FT’s use of digital billboards at Heathrow’s Terminal 5 to target passengers travelling to six pre-selected US cities. It was achieved by tapping into Heathrow's flight data via an API.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9752/FT_heathrow.jpg" alt="" width="568" height="400"></p> <p>Guinness devised a dynamic campaign in London that allowed posters to direct RBS 6 Nations fans to nearby pubs to watch the games. </p> <h3>Is DOOH digital?</h3> <p>So, just how digital is digital out of home? For DOOH to become fully digital in terms of trading (as well as delivery of creative), the key area will be around improved audience assessment. It is achieving this, which will allow a mainstream programmatic digital approach including real-time bidding, behavioural and contextual targeting.</p> <p>Because of the size of the OOH medium, the variety of locations and the challenge and cost of quantifying and assessing audience behaviour, the measurement of OOH has traditionally been restricted to periodic panel research – OSCAR, then <a href="https://www.research-live.com/article/news/postar-to-measure-90-of-outdoor-media/id/2000079">POSTAR</a>, and now <a href="http://route.org.uk/research/">ROUTE</a>.</p> <p>The resultant audience information is therefore nowhere as detailed and current as that available across other digital channels. JCDecaux’s charter is well timed, especially in terms of brand safety, but from an audience perspective the PWC verification is only happening on a quarterly basis.  </p> <p>For DOOH to really align with digital media, it will need to achieve accurate, real time, detailed consumption data that can fuel truly digital trading methodologies.</p> <p><strong><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68051-six-case-studies-that-show-how-digital-out-of-home-advertising-is-changing"><em>Six case studies that show how digital out-of-home advertising is changing</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67414-is-this-the-next-step-in-programmatic-out-of-home"><em>Is this the next step in programmatic out-of-home?</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69506 2017-10-13T17:06:59+01:00 2017-10-13T17:06:59+01:00 10 thrilling digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Let’s get down to businesss.</p> <h3>Facebook native videos generate 530% more comments than YouTube</h3> <p>Quintly’s <a href="http://press.quintly.com/159939-530-more-comments-on-facebook-native-videos" target="_blank">latest study</a> involves the analysis of 187,000 Facebook profiles and over 7.5m Facebook posts from January to July 2017.</p> <p>Alongside the discovery that 92% of these profiles used native video, it was found that Facebook native videos resulted in 530% more comments than YouTube videos.</p> <p>Cementing the power of the platform, Quintly also found a 477% higher average share rate for Facebook native videos, and a 168% higher average interaction rate compared to YouTube videos.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9710/Quintly.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="704"></p> <h3>Majority of consumers think AI in marketing should be regulated</h3> <p>On the back of Blade Runner 2049’s release, a survey by Syzygy has revealed US and UK attitudes about artificial intelligence.</p> <p>It found that the majority of respondents think AI in marketing should be governed by a key principle from the movie – i.e. that it should be illegal for AI to hide its real identity and impersonate a human. 85% of Brits agree with this sentiment, as do 79% of Americans.</p> <p>The survey also found that 43% of Americans believe AI poses a threat to the long-term survival of humanity, while 17% feel anxious about the rise of the technology.</p> <p>Meanwhile, 92% of Brits believe there should be regulation with a legally-binding code of conduct, while 75% think brands should need explicit consent before using AI in their marketing.</p> <h3>Negative reviews rise in November and December due to delivery issues</h3> <p><a href="https://marketing.trustpilot.com/hubfs/Content%20Marketing/Consumer%20Behavior%20and%20Expectations:%20The%202017%20Holiday%20Season%20Report%20%5BUS%5D.pdf" target="_blank">Trustpilot</a> has analysed data from over a million online reviews left in November and December in both 2015 and 2016.</p> <p>Results show that delivery was the biggest cause of complaints. The most common two-word phrases in one-star reviews were “customer service,” “days later,” and “still waiting” during October to December 2016. The appearance of “delivery” in one-star reviews rose to more than 19% in December – a 13.27% increase since October.   </p> <p>Finally, there were more negative reviews left on 20th December than any other day of the year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9711/Trustpilot.JPG" alt="" width="662" height="612"></p> <h3>Conversion rates on desktop more than double that of mobile</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="http://www.marketwatch.com/story/qubit-tackles-product-discovery-on-mobile-with-industry-first-ai-powered-solution-2017-10-11" target="_blank">Qubit</a> has found that mobile commerce still lags behind desktop when it comes to discoverability, conversion, and revenue.</p> <p>In the analysis of data across 35 fashion and cosmetics brands since January of this year, it found traffic to each channel to be about the same – 45.87% on desktop and 44.7% on mobile. However, there are stark differences in other areas.</p> <p>Conversion rates on desktop were found to be 3.35%, while conversion rates on mobile were 1.61%. Similarly, revenue per visitor (RPV) is more than double on desktop – £6.10 vs. £2.66 on mobile.</p> <p>Lastly, the average number of products viewed per customer was also far higher on desktop – 17.99 on desktop and 13.65 on mobile.</p> <h3>Music improves the customer experience in-store</h3> <p>A study by <a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171012005445/en/Mood-Media-Sacem-Study-Reveals-Virtues-Music" target="_blank">Mood Media and Sacem</a> suggests that music can improve the customer experience in-store, even in more ‘serious’ sectors such as banking.</p> <p>When measuring the difference music makes in locations where it was not previously used, it found that 70% of customers had a more positive perception of a business’s image when music was playing, and 65% agreed that music helped to differentiate the business from its competition.</p> <p>When sectors like banking and pharmacy were silent, only 33% of customers initially thought adding music would feel appropriate. However, 76% of customers agreed the music was a good addition once it was introduced.</p> <p>Interestingly, customers in banking felt more comfortable having confidential conversations when music was playing in the background.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9709/Mood_Media.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="561"></p> <h3>Global digital payments predicted to reach 726bn transactions by 2020</h3> <p>Capgemini’s <a href="https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.worldpaymentsreport.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cnikki.gilliland%40centaurmedia.com%7C835f7751d319493ccb0408d51089e78e%7Cfdd3bf0d1bfa49198a45f1a311d56753%7C0%7C0%7C636433106849505369&amp;sdata=dbsMKux7oiMO67NmPsmgskeBwudEEaA1xjYvM9ubbqs%3D&amp;reserved=0" target="_blank">World Payments Report</a> says that global digital payments volumes are predicted to increase by an average of 10.9% in the run up to 2020, reaching approximately 726bn transactions.</p> <p>This is said to be heavily influenced by retail customers, who are increasingly willing to use online and mobile channels to adopt next-generation payment methods.</p> <p>The report also revealed that by 2019, it is estimated that around 50% of transactions carried out using a credit or debit card will be made either online or via mobile.</p> <h3>Fewer marketers see CRO as ‘crucial’ to success</h3> <p>Econsultancy’s Conversion Rate Optimization Report, in association with RedEye, has revealed a dip in the perceived importance of CRO. </p> <p>In a survey of 800 marketers and ecommerce professionals, 38% of respondents said they still see it as ‘important’. However, just 50% now see it as ‘crucial’ – a decline from 55% in 2016. </p> <p>This percentage has fallen even further since 2013, when 59% of professionals cited CRO as ‘crucial’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9708/CRO.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="517"></p> <p><em><strong>Subscribers can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/conversion-rate-optimization-report/" target="_blank">full report here</a>.</strong></em></p> <h3>More consumers predicted to shop online this Black Friday</h3> <p>A survey by <a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171011005249/en/Market-Track-Study-Give-Online-Retailers%21-Shoppers" target="_blank">Market Track</a> suggests that more consumers will choose to make online purchases this Black Friday, favouring digital commerce over traditional brick and mortar stores.</p> <p>Out of 1,000 people surveyed, 40% of respondents said they expect to shop in physical retail stores on Black Friday. Meanwhile, 30% said the same for Thanksgiving compared with 50% last year.</p> <p>In contrast, 80% said they are likely to purchases from Amazon this year – an increase of 6% from 2016. And while in-store shopping is likely to decline, Walmart came out on top as the top retail destination for the holiday season.</p> <h3>Snapchat is top social platform for US teens</h3> <p>Despite reports that Snapchat usage is declining among <a href="http://mediakix.com/2017/10/top-influencers-instagram-stories-vs-snapchat-study/#gs.otoiTsI" target="_blank">top influencers</a> (with a 33% decrease in usage over the past six months), <a href="http://www.piperjaffray.com/2col.aspx?id=287&amp;releaseid=2306037&amp;title=Survey+Says+Teens+Prefer+Food+over+Clothing%2c+Nike+is+Losing+Its+Heat+and+Streetwear+is+on+the+Rise" target="_blank">Piper Jaffray</a> suggests US teens still can’t get enough of the platform.</p> <p>In a survey of 6,100 US teenagers across 44 states, it found 47% of respondents cite Snapchat as their favourite social media platform – almost twice as many as those who prefer Instagram.</p> <p>Just 9% of teens said they favour Facebook, while 7% said Twitter, and just 1% said Pinterest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9712/Snapchat.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="563"></p> <h3>Interactive video ads boost viewing time by 49% </h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.magnaglobal.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Tremor-IPG-Media-Trial.pdf" target="_blank">Magna</a>, interactive video ads result in a 47% increase in time spent watching compared to non-interactive ads. </p> <p>What’s more, when consumers interact with a 15-second ad, brands can reportedly triple their time spent with consumers. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69445 2017-09-22T14:24:47+01:00 2017-09-22T14:24:47+01:00 10 exciting digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>On we go.</p> <h3>Media agencies are wasting two days a week on admin-based tasks</h3> <p>New research by 4C suggests that media agency professionals are wasting the equivalent of two days per week performing admin, instead of focusing on creative and strategic tasks.</p> <p>In a survey of over 200 professionals, 84% of respondents said that they feel concerned about the actual value their agency brings to brands, and whether they are truly offering them value for money. </p> <p>The execution of social campaigns appears to be driving this concern, with 36% of respondents admitting that switching between platforms to manage campaigns is the biggest annoyance of their job. Some reportedly spend 17 hours per week doing this. Frustratingly, 63% said they believe the amount of time spent working on social campaigns will only increase over the next few years.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9105/4C.JPG" alt="" width="580" height="372"></p> <h3>Nearly a quarter of digital marketers don’t track marketing spend</h3> <p>According to research by Greenlight, digital marketers are suffering from a worrying level of uncertainty. </p> <p>It found that 36% of survey respondents don’t have confidence in their campaign targeting, while 18% don’t think their campaigns are reaching their desired audience at all.</p> <p>Alongside this, it appears marketers are also unsure about where their marketing spend is actually going. One in ten marketers are not even sure which channels are the most valuable for their campaigns, and 17% are yet to commit their budgets accordingly. Even worse, 23% are failing to track campaign spend whatsoever.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69432-restoration-hardware-bid-on-3-200-keywords-found-98-of-its-ppc-sales-came-from-just-22-brand-terms/">Here's a somewhat-related cautionary tale about PPC</a>.</p> <h3>25% of internet users use a VPN network</h3> <p>In a study of VPN (virtual private network) usage around the world, <a href="http://insight.globalwebindex.net/vpn-usage-around-the-world?utm_campaign=VPN%20Usage%20Around%20The%20World&amp;utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=56524113&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9BFGKHYG9SI5WGcZaWaiorCGsdLV-cu_4llCF9RLxP_1AsqA0w7CJEXzSRH64Kva36hetevTnlUgwRHdG7IcFeZCp-pRXbxikV71F-CczXZzlK0Nk&amp;_hsmi=56549588" target="_blank">GlobalWebIndex</a> has found that 25% of internet users have used a VPN in the past month, and that 42% of these use a VPN daily. </p> <p>When it comes to the motivation for doing so, 50% of people said that they use a VPN for better access to entertainment, 34% said better access to social networks or news services, and 31% said to maintain anonymity while browsing.</p> <p>The study also found VPN usage to be lower in North America and Europe, with the top markets being Indonesia, India, and Turkey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9107/VPN.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="323"></p> <h3>63% of consumers want biometric technology in-stores</h3> <p>Following on from the launch of the new iPhone, a report by <a href="http://www.worldpay.com/us/about/media-center/2017-09/shoppers-give-thumbs-up-to-in-store-biometrics" target="_blank">Worldpay</a> has revealed that consumers are growing increasingly demanding of new payment technology.</p> <p>In a survey of 2,500 consumers across the UK, 63% of respondents said they would like to be able to use a biometric scan to authorise payments in-store. 69% of consumers said they’d be open to using a finger to do so, while 24% said their face, and 33% said they’d be willing to use their eyes.</p> <p>Worldpay also found that consumers expect speed and convenience in other areas. Click-and-collect is highly in-demand, as are automated payments and bots - 65% of consumers said they’d rather pay a robot than waste time flagging down a waiter in a restaurant.</p> <h3>Mobile video ad spend jumps 142% in Q2</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://info.smaato.com/hubfs/Reports/Smaato_Global_Trends_in_Mobile_Advertising_Report_Q2_2017.pdf" target="_blank">Smaato</a>, spend on mobile video ads increased by 142% in Q2 2017, making it the fastest-growing mobile ad format.</p> <p>Rewarded video (full screen video ads that users can view in full in exchange for in-app rewards) was the fastest growing format, with spend increasing by 74%. In-app spending accounted for 94% of total mobile ad spending in Q2, compared with just 75% in 2016.</p> <p>Finally, full-screen interstitials were the most popular ad format among advertisers, accounting for almost two thirds of total mobile video ad spending in Q2.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9106/Smaato.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="392"></p> <h3>60% of 25 to 34-year olds find it easier to chat to brands via text</h3> <p>Mindshare’s <a href="http://www.mindshareworld.com/sites/default/files/FutureofRetailAW.pdf" target="_blank">UK retail trends</a> report has revealed the growing demand for instant and 24-hour customer service.</p> <p>Today, 60% of 25 to 34-year olds say that they find it easier to chat to brands via text message, online chat, or messenger apps. Meanwhile, 27% say they have used a chatbot in order to communicate with a brand.</p> <p>The report also found that consumer’s attitude to data is somewhat conflicted. Despite the demand for personalisation, with 56% of people saying that brands should be doing more with their data, 65% say they are still very selective about the companies they share it with.</p> <h3>Twice as many adults use the internet via a mobile than desktop</h3> <p><a href="http://www.vertoanalytics.com/10024-2/" target="_blank">Verto Analytics</a> has revealed that smartphones are now twice as popular than PC’s when it comes to accessing the internet.</p> <p>When tracking which devices 5,000 UK adults used to go online, it found that smartphones accounted for 57% of people, while traditional PCs accounted for 27%, and tablets for 16%.</p> <p>Smartphone usage was shown to peak during the morning, with this device accounting for 63% of the people online between 8am to 11am – three times as many people using a PC at that time. Meanwhile, desktop computers were found to have the largest audience share of 38% between the hours of 1am and 3am. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9109/Smartphone_PC.JPG" alt="" width="640" height="344"></p> <h3>Online retailers see unexpected growth in August</h3> <p>The latest <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/businessindustryandtrade/retailindustry/bulletins/retailsales/august2017#whats-the-story-in-online-sales" target="_blank">ONS</a> (Office for National Statistics) figures show that the average weekly UK online spend in August was £1.1bn - an increase of 15.6% compared with August 2016.</p> <p>This means that the amount spent online accounted for a total of 16.4% of all retail spending for the month, excluding automotive fuel. This figure is also up compared to 15% in August last year.</p> <p>Despite this year-on-year growth, Salmon has highlighted that shoppers have been predominantly spending on non-necessity and luxury goods and services, with the summer holidays and an increase in tourism contributing to this. As a result, Salmon predicts a dip in online spend as Autumn approaches.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9108/ONS.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="381"></p> <h3>Female influencers favour Instagram over Snapchat</h3> <p>Collective Bias has revealed that female <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers">influencers</a> are uninterested in Snapchat, with zero survey respondents saying that it is the most important channel to them. In contrast, 28.4% of influencers said that Instagram is invaluable.  </p> <p>Perhaps surprisingly, Pinterest came second in the survey, with 26.4% of respondents saying that they favoured the platform the most. </p> <p>Facebook and Twitter fared less well, but this is likely due to the less visual nature of the platforms as well as the subsequent lack of opportunity for sponsored, one-off posts.</p> <h3>Brits spend nearly eight hours per day consuming media</h3> <p>The <a href="http://ipa.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=1f2c3c8034116a764afbdc0a5&amp;id=e6d608e522&amp;e=cf106b3443" target="_blank">IPA Touchpoints</a> report has revealed that adults are spending seven hours and 56 minutes a day consuming media – an increase of 9% from 2016 and 13% from 2005.</p> <p>This means that adults spend just over two hours a day media multi-tasking (which means watching TV or using a laptop or smartphone while doing other things) – or nearly a quarter of that time spent consuming media in total.</p> <p>In terms of medium, television or video remains the most popular, with adults viewing an average of four hours and 35 minutes per week. Meanwhile, out of home media accounts for three hours 28 minutes, and social networking or messaging accounts for two hours and 53 minutes.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69413 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 10 fascinating digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Searches for iPads increase 1.2x YoY</h3> <p>First up, <a href="http://www.hitwise.com/blog/2017/08/hot-back-school-products-age-student/?lang=1&amp;bis_prd=1" target="_blank">Hitwise has revealed</a> what parents have been searching for as their kids head back to school. </p> <p>Parents of children aged 6-11 have been searching for iPads, with online searches for iPad increasing 1.2 times overall year on year. For kids aged 12-17, branded apparel has been in demand, with searches for Gucci belts, Net backpacks and Yeezys by Kanye West all being popular.</p> <p>Lastly, interest in fashion has been much lower for college-age youngsters, while searches for technology such as Nintendo Switch, Apple Watch and HBO Now have been high.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8867/Hitwise.JPG" alt="" width="702" height="380"></p> <h3>More than half of Brits use an ad blocker</h3> <p>In a survey of over 2,000 UK adults, Affilinet has found that more than half of all respondents use an ad blocker while browsing the internet.</p> <p>When it comes to the reasons why, 61.5% say it’s because they find online ads annoying, 41.5% say it’s because they find ads intrusive, while 33.1% say it’s because the ads they used to see were irrelevant.</p> <p>Men are also slightly more likely to use an ad blocker than women, with 48.7% of women stating that they never use them compared to 42.5% of men.</p> <h3>39% of teen YouTube users say it has too many ads </h3> <p>A survey by Forrester Research has found that four in 10 teen users aged 12-17 say there are <a href="https://www.emarketer.com/Article/YouTubes-Teen-Viewers-Complain-of-Too-Many-Ads/1016436" target="_blank">too many ads</a> on YouTube. </p> <p>This is despite the fact that YouTube is accessed by more US teens than any other social platform, with 77% using it on a daily basis compared to 55% who use Facebook.</p> <p>Just 11% of teens think that there are too many ads on Instagram and Snapchat, perhaps proving that native ads are less disruptive than pre or mid-roll ads.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8871/iStock-458931653.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="438"></p> <h3>Brits abandoning £3.4bn in online shopping baskets due to device switching</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="http://www.newsroom.barclays.com/r/3514/_10_5bn_more_in_five_years___that_s_what_uk_retailers" target="_blank">Barclays</a> has revealed that £3.4bn worth of goods are left in online shopping baskets in the UK each year. This is said to be due to device switching, with consumers browsing on their mobile phones before changing to laptops to make the purchase.</p> <p>The report suggests that basket abandonment is also due to a lack of discount incentives and the desire for a variety of delivery options. 38% of consumers say discount codes and 56% say free deliveries would incentivise them to buy.</p> <p>By making online shopping more convenient, Barclays says that retailers could generate £10.5bn more within just five years.</p> <h3>44% of consumers will make a holiday purchase via a voice controlled device</h3> <p>A report by <a href="https://www.walkersands.com/The-Future-of-Retail-2017-Holiday-Report">Walker Sands</a> has predicted that purchases by voice-controlled devices are set to rise this holiday season.</p> <p>Currently, 24% of frequent online shoppers say they ‘often’ or ‘always’ purchase through a voice-controlled device like Amazon Echo. However, 44% of total survey respondents also say that they are ‘somewhat’ or ‘very likely’ to make a product purchase through a voice-controlled device in the next year.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the report also highlights the demand for same-day delivery services, with 66% of frequent online shoppers saying they have used Amazon Prime in the past year, and 39% saying same-day delivery would make them shop online even more.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8868/Voice_controlled_shopping.JPG" alt="" width="666" height="274"></p> <h3>Popularity of mobile payments is rising</h3> <p>A new survey by <a href="https://www.aciworldwide.com/news-and-events/press-releases/2017/september/mobile-payments-rise-in-popularity-reaching-tipping-point-in-some-countries" target="_blank">ACI Worldwide</a> has found that European and American consumers are increasingly embracing mobile payments.</p> <p>While just 6% of US consumers regularly used their mobile devices to make payments in 2014, this has now tripled to 17%. Similarly, 25% of Spanish consumers now use mobile wallets, as do 24% of Italian and 23% of Swedish consumers. </p> <p>Consumer confidence in mobile wallet security is also on the rise, with 37% of UK respondents saying they trust their bank to protect their personal information when paying via their smartphone.</p> <h3>37% of internet users watch Netflix each month</h3> <p><a href="http://blog.globalwebindex.net/chart-of-the-day/netflix-vs-amazon-prime-video-a-global-view/" target="_blank">GlobalWebIndex</a> has been looking into the user-share of both Netflix and Amazon, following on from the latter extending its introductory Prime Video offer across all global markets.</p> <p>It has found that 20% of internet users now use Amazon Prime Video each month, whether on their own account or via someone else’s. However, 37% of people say the same about Netflix.</p> <p>In terms of marketshare, Netflix boasts impressive usage in both Mexico and Brazil, while Amazon Prime reigns supreme in India.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8869/Netflix_vs_Amazon_Prime.JPG" alt="" width="632" height="664"></p> <h3>More than 60% of digital publishers auto-play half of video ads</h3> <p>Despite auto-play ads often being viewed as intrusive or annoying by consumers, <a href="http://www.marketingdive.com/news/mediaradar-61-of-publishers-autoplay-at-least-half-of-video-ads/504417/" target="_blank">MediaRadar</a> has found that 31% of publishers auto-start 75% or more of their on-site video ads. Meanwhile, 60% of publishers auto-play at least half.</p> <p>Small, regional, and B2B publishers have the highest instances of auto-play video ads. Similarly, websites that rely on programmatic advertising are also more likely to employ this type of ad.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8870/MediaRadar.JPG" alt="" width="685" height="346"></p> <h3>Consumers annoyed by disruptive ads</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In other ad news, Inskin Media has been delving into the ad formats that users find the most annoying.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Unsurprisingly, 28% of respondents cited pop-up ads as the most irritating mobile format, closely followed by 26% saying the same for ads that sit in the middle of the screen. 18% said that they are vexed by ads that delay the page loading.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In contrast, ads that that move down the page alongside the content or sit at the top and bottom of the page were found to be much less annoying. In fact, the study also found that people are 134% more likely to remember ads that sit around content compared with the average mobile ad.</p> <h3>Brand activation revenues to reach $357bn this year</h3> <p>According to the <a href="http://www.ana.net/content/show/id/brand-activation-spend-2017" target="_blank">ANA</a> (Association of National Advertisers) and PQ Media, brand activation revenues will reach around $357bn in 2017.</p> <p>This is based on the fact that total marketing operator revenues from brand activation rose by 6.7% in 2016, with further growth now expected.</p> <p>Revenues in content marketing climbed 11.3% last year, while influencer marketing saw the second-highest growth rate, growing 8.7% to $49.1bn. Revenues from experiential marketing also jumped by 6.7% to $50.6bn.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69397 2017-09-05T15:00:00+01:00 2017-09-05T15:00:00+01:00 Fox plans more 6-second ad slots, as digital influences television Patricio Robles <p>Take, for instance, Fox, one of the five largest television networks in the world. In August, <a href="https://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/305158/fox-launches-first-06-units-duracell-mars-first.html">it ran the first short-form, six-second ads</a> for battery brand Duracell and candy manufacturer Mars during the 2017 Teen Choice Awards.</p> <p>Now, Fox has decided to expand its use of the six-second ad format to NFL games it broadcasts this fall, as well as other sports programming, including the baseball World Series and other "marquee events.</p> <p><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/30/business/media/nfl-six-second-commercials.html?_r=0">According to</a> The New York Times:</p> <blockquote> <p>People are used to seeing short video ads on platforms like Snapchat, Facebook and YouTube, but not so much on network TV, where the currency for decades has been 15 and 30-second ads. While TV networks have experimented with shorter commercials in the past, largely as publicity stunts for specific brands, Fox is hoping to make six-second ads an industry standard across broadcasters as consumers in the internet era show less tolerance for frequent, bloated ad breaks during shows.</p> </blockquote> <p>Pricing for the new ad units is not known. Ostensibly, the cost of a six-second ad will be lower than a 15 or 30-second ad, which could be attractive to advertisers given the significant costs associated with television ads, particularly those that are displayed during high-profile sports broadcasts.</p> <h3>The incredible shrinking television ad?</h3> <p>It's hard to imagine but at one point in time, the standard ad format for television was a minute long. The minute-long ad later became the 30-second ad, and today, most television ads are 15 seconds in length.</p> <p>But in the digital age, 15 seconds is a long time and that has led to the proliferation of the six-second video ad, particularly for pre-roll. Leading the push for the six-second ad is Google, which owns YouTube.</p> <p>YouTube's six-second ad unit <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68917-can-brands-tell-a-story-in-six-seconds-youtube-hopes-so">has been dubbed the bumper ad</a> and it has been working to push advertisers to embrace this format. With just six seconds, advertisers <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69108-four-tips-for-creating-effective-youtube-bumper-ads/">have to be very thoughtful, creative and focused</a>. While conveying a message that is effective if not compelling in just seconds might seem virtually impossible, Google says that a number of brands are finding ways to do it.</p> <h3>One ad format to rule them all?</h3> <p>The emergence of the six-second television ad raises the question: will the six-second ad make it possible for advertisers to develop individual ads that are just as effective for television as they are for digital?</p> <p>For years, brand advertisers have been told not to repurpose their television ads for digital. What works for television won't work for digital, advertisers were advised. But does the same wisdom apply now that digital ad formats are driving the creation of new television ad formats? In other words, can advertisers take their YouTube bumper ads and put them to good use on television?</p> <p>That remains to be seen and its worth noting that while Google is strongly promoting the six-second bumper ad format, it also acknowledged that "we've seen Bumper ads work best when combined with a TrueView or Google Preferred campaign." TrueView and Google Preferred campaigns aren't limited to six seconds.</p> <p>For example, a YouTube campaign for the Microsoft Xbox promoting Halo Wars 2 was developed by Microsoft's agency partner, 215McCANN and paired bumper ads with longer-form ads. <a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/advertising-channels/video/youtube-bumper-ads-six-second-format/">Per Google</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>...Xbox started with a Masthead and long-form TrueView content push under the theme 'Know Your Enemy.' Then, as launch day approached, the brand invested heavily in remarketing with chuckle-worthy bumper ads that built on the long-form films' storylines.</p> </blockquote> <p>Since advertisers don't have the same retargeting capabilities on television, there are questions about how such a campaign would have been executed for television. Clearly, experimentation is needed.</p> <p>Which means that, for now, while the six-second ad could soon find itself a fixture on television, advertisers would be wise to recognize that their success with it will probably hinge on how they use it within their campaigns more than anything else.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69291 2017-07-28T10:43:24+01:00 2017-07-28T10:43:24+01:00 How brands are fighting against gender stereotypes Nikki Gilliland <p>(Insert eye-roll emoji here)</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7874/Aurosa.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="470"></p> <p>This kind of sexist advertising is not big news. From cleaning products to yoghurt – brand gender stereotyping has been rife for decades. Even brands that deliberately set out to empower can get it wrong – you’ve only got to look at Dove and its ridiculously unnecessary body-shaped bottles.</p> <p>And it’s not always related to women, of course. Who can forget the infamous <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68212-how-lynx-s-bigger-issues-campaign-helped-reinvigorate-the-brand" target="_blank">Lynx ads</a>, and even more recently, the reinforcement of male gender stereotyping by Miller Lite, who told us that drinking any other type of light beer is unmanly.</p> <h3>Taking a tougher line</h3> <p>The ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) has just announced plans to tackle examples like this. But why now?</p> <p>2015 seemed to spark a turning point. It was the year when <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/67575-our-take-on-the-top-10-most-controversial-ads-of-2015">Protein World unleashed its controversial ‘Beach Body Ready’ ad</a>, resulting in 378 complaints against the brand for being ‘socially irresponsible’. </p> <p>At the time, the ASA cleared the campaign saying that it was ‘unlikely to cause serious or widespread offence’. However, it has since caused the regulatory body to recognise the need for a ‘strong evidence-based position’ when it comes to the portrayal of gender in ads.</p> <p>As a result the CAP (the Committees of Advertising Practice) has recently released a report detailing new guidelines that will come into force in 2018. It has stated that ‘a tougher line is needed’, particularly when it comes to ads that mock people for not conforming to gender stereotypes.</p> <h3>Companies spearheading change</h3> <p>It has to be said, there are many organisations out there already doing work to tackle the issue. Last month, Unilever announced a new alliance to drive out gender stereotyping, teaming up with UN Women, Facebook, and Mars to share knowledge and spread the culture of change. </p> <p>Meanwhile, GoDaddy – which was previously known for sexism in both its ads and internal infrastructure – appears to have turned a corner. Since Blake Irving was appointed CEO, the company has dropped its sexist ads and become a much more inclusive workplace, even being named as one of the top companies for women technologists in the US.</p> <p>One of the most well-known companies to spearhead a shift in perception is Sport England and its ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66469-seven-video-marketing-lessons-learnt-from-thisgirlcan/" target="_blank">This Girl Can</a>’ campaign, which persuaded 1.6m women to start exercising through a series of empowering and inspiring ads. Showing how fear of judgement can hold women back, it also effectively highlighted the gender pay gap. </p> <h3>A shift towards gender-neutrality</h3> <p>Interestingly, it’s not just the stamping out of sexism and outdated stereotypes that has become a focus for brands. Alongside this, some are taking steps to promote a more gender-neutral or fluid image, and redefining who their target market is on this basis. </p> <p>Here are a few examples to highlight what I mean.</p> <h4>CoverGirl</h4> <p>Men have been wearing make-up for decades, but up until recently the beauty industry has only represented women in mainstream advertising. This changed last October when 17-year-old makeup artist and YouTuber James Charles was named as CoverGirl’s first male spokesperson.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7866/Katy_Perry.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="539"></p> <p>James was specifically chosen to be the face of the brand’s ‘So Lashy’ mascara – a product that is designed ‘for anyone wanting to transform their lashes into a bold look - regardless of lash type or starting point’. </p> <p>It was James’ social media presence that caught CoverGirl’s eye, and digital content has undoubtedly contributed to the rise of male beauty in general. Male beauty bloggers and vloggers are amassing huge audiences on platforms such as Instagram and YouTube. </p> <p>There’s clearly a demand for this kind of content, too. A report by Mintel found that 47% of UK males aged 16-24 value the advice of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68087-six-brilliant-blogs-from-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">beauty bloggers</a> more than store staff. As well as CoverGirl, brands including L’Oreal, Maybelline, and Soap &amp; Glory have also taken steps to become more inclusive, using both men and women in campaigns to appeal to all genders.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Jake-Jamie Ward to be first male spokesmodel repping face masks for U.K. beauty brand Soap &amp; Glory via <a href="https://twitter.com/mic">@mic</a> <a href="https://t.co/KUt9Ti2tXd">https://t.co/KUt9Ti2tXd</a></p> — Jake-Jamie (@makeupbyjakej) <a href="https://twitter.com/makeupbyjakej/status/887673332711264256">July 19, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h4>MTV</h4> <p>Advertising is not the only way companies are working towards gender-neutrality. A few months ago, Emma Watson won MTV’s first ever gender-neutral acting award.</p> <p>The decision to introduce it has been described as a watershed moment for equality in entertainment, bravely shining a light on the silos that exist between men and women. </p> <p>However, it’s also been criticised for being a rose-tinted idea rather than a real drive for change. This is because the opportunities for women in entertainment are typically lesser than for men, meaning that it might inadvertently reduce the amount of female wins overall.</p> <p>That being said, MTV’s decision certainly highlights the need for tangible changes elsewhere in the entertainment industry, and is one of the first prominent examples of a company creating inclusivity for actors who do not conform to gender norms.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Thank you for your beautiful Best Actor in a Movie acceptance speech at the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MTVAwards?src=hash">#MTVAwards</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/EmmaWatson">@EmmaWatson</a> <a href="https://t.co/iGN3nQQylL">pic.twitter.com/iGN3nQQylL</a></p> — MTV (@MTV) <a href="https://twitter.com/MTV/status/861449768572035076">May 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h4>Barbie</h4> <p>Barbie has been guilty of perpetuating stereotypes over the years, furthering the ‘pink-ification’ of little girls’ toys. Even when the brand has aimed to set an example for empowerment, it has been criticised for putting females in pigeonholes. </p> <p>‘Engineering Barbie’ is the most recent example of this, with the toy encouraging girls to use engineering skills to build racks for clothes, shoes and jewellery. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7867/Clothing_rack.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="444"></p> <p>That being said, the brand has taken steps to become more progressive in its marketing activity. To promote its collaboration with fashion brand, Moschino, it created an ad that featured a little boy playing with the doll. </p> <p>Aiming to celebrate the fact that all genders love Barbie, it was the first example of the brand veering away from a strategy that solely targets girls.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TULVRlpsNWo?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h4>H&amp;M</h4> <p>According to research by the Innovation Group, 43% of millennials say they know someone who uses gender-neutral pronouns. This figure increases among Generation Z’s, with 56% of those aged 13-20 saying the same. </p> <p>Fashion is one industry that has been taking note of this, with big-name retailers creating unisex clothing lines. </p> <p>Last year, Zara launched its ‘Ungendered’ collection, and more recently <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68351-why-women-are-talking-about-h-m-s-latest-ad-campaign" target="_blank">H&amp;M</a> has followed suit with its unisex ‘Denim United’ range.</p> <p>Interestingly, both collections have come in for criticism, mainly because the clothes appear to veer towards a male-aesthetic (as well as being pretty boring in design). However, H&amp;M <em>has</em> included a number of dresses in its collection, which has prevented the brand receiving the same kind of backlash as Zara. Then again, whether or not the retailer continues the collection is perhaps dependent on sales rather than sentiment.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1LbJjSHIln0?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Could it become a brand gimmick? </h3> <p>While ASA’s decision has been met with a largely positive response, there has been some suggestion that the guidelines will be difficult to implement. As it is arguably a subjective topic – where will we draw the line between stereotypes and standard segmentation? </p> <p>Similarly, will brands that typically target a specific gender feel obliged to err on the side of caution, and could this actually stifle creativity rather than lead to natural diversity?</p> <p>This also raises the question of brands jumping on the gender bandwagon, perhaps even using it purely for the sake of marketing purposes rather than real customer inclusivity.</p> <p>Fortunately, brands like L’Oréal and Unilever do appear serious about long-term investment in gender equality. Meanwhile, as the ASA cracks down on unacceptable stereotyping, maybe 2017 will signal a real sea change in the attitude of brand marketers. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68045-how-global-goals-is-using-social-media-to-highlight-gender-inequality/" target="_blank">How Global Goals is using social media to highlight gender inequality</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68127-a-closer-look-at-dove-s-anti-sexism-mybeautymysay-campaign" target="_blank">A closer look at Dove's anti-sexism #MyBeautyMySay campaign</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68865-will-bad-pr-lead-uber-to-destruction/" target="_blank">Will bad PR lead Uber to destruction?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69210 2017-06-30T16:00:00+01:00 2017-06-30T16:00:00+01:00 Is Reddit on the verge of becoming a bigger player in digital advertising? Patricio Robles <p>The company, Reddit, operates what it calls "the front page of the internet" and the name isn't just marketing buzz: according to Alexa, Reddit is now the fourth most popular site in the U.S., attracting some 250m users a month, and has an average daily time on site of over 16 minutes, nearly six minutes more than Facebook.</p> <p>Despite its popularity, however, Reddit has struggled to build the kind of booming advertising business one might expect a site with so much traffic and stickiness to have. That's largely because Reddit, which is powered by the contributions of users who are referred to as Redditors, is considered <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67619-five-brands-that-proved-marketing-on-reddit-can-work/">a tough nut for advertisers to crack</a>.</p> <p>Not only have the tools it offers advertisers been rudimentary compared to those provided by other ad players, there's a belief that the Reddit community is, by and large, hostile to advertising, making Reddit an uncomfortable and even risky platform for advertisers to invest in.</p> <h3>Trying to change perceptions</h3> <p>Reddit, which was once owned by Condé Nast and then spun off, has raised $50m in funding since the spin-off. Clearly, Reddit's investors want a return and the company is trying to change perceptions in an effort to lure more ad dollars.</p> <p>Reddit recently attended the Cannes Lions ad festival for just the second time ever and co-founder and chairman Alexis Ohanian was busy pitching advertisers on its updated self-serve ad platform, which lets brands more easily manage their campaigns, test creative and obtain analytics data. </p> <p>According to Ohanian, Reddit's self-serve ad platform hadn't been updated in nearly eight years.</p> <p>Reddit, which has thus far offered a limited set of ad formats that include sponsored posts and banner ads, is also <a href="http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/reddit-video-ads-1202477117/">adding a new video ad format</a> that has already been piloted by Universal Pictures and A24 Films.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7127/reddit2.png" alt="" width="865" height="147"></p> <h3>Not Facebook</h3> <p>Despite the fact that Reddit is now competing more aggressively for ad dollars, it isn't comparing itself to social platforms like Facebook. In fact, part of its proposition is that it<em> isn't</em> like other social platforms.</p> <p>"There's no other place on the internet where people all come together because of the conversation," Ohanian <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/reddit-is-pitching-brands-at-cannes-on-why-its-ripe-for-advertisers/">told AdWeek</a>. "Because people aren't worried about their perfect Instagram life, they're just being honest and open. It's a unique place because everyone is self-selected into communities."</p> <p>According to some, Reddit's unique characteristics make it a very valuable ad platform if used correctly. Sherwin Su, associate director of social at digital agency Essence, went so far as to tell the Wall Street Journal, "Reddit is one of advertising's best kept secrets."</p> <p>For years, stories, mostly posted by individual entrepreneurs and small businesses, have circulated, many touting the fact that Reddit ad campaigns can drive a lot of traffic quickly and much more cheaply than other ad platforms.</p> <p>But what about big brands? Over the past year, Reddit <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/why-big-brands-are-suddenly-getting-cozy-reddit-172053/">has been trying to help larger advertisers achieve similar results</a> and there's some evidence the effort is paying off.</p> <p>Netflix used Reddit ads to promote its show, Wet Hot American Summer, and Toyota ran a campaign that invited Redditors to share their stories about their Rav4 vehicles. According to Reddit's VP of sales, Zubair Jandali, the campaign resulted in brand favorability that was six times higher than the category average.</p> <h3>Worth a second look?</h3> <p>While such campaign results are promising, the jury is still out on Reddit's ability to be a meaningful source of digital advertising ROI for brands. But as brands grapple with the risks of a digital advertising ecosystem increasingly dominated by two firms, a more brand-friendly Reddit might be worth a new look.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69184 2017-06-22T13:59:10+01:00 2017-06-22T13:59:10+01:00 Five successful brands on YouTube: From Adidas to Sarson's vinegar Nikki Gilliland <p>Google recently recognised a number of brands who are using YouTube to<a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/intl/en-gb/collections/2017-winners-of-youtube-works-for-brands.html" target="_blank"> deliver exceptional results</a>. So, building on this, here’s a bit of a deep dive into some of those mentioned and more on why they’ve succeeded. </p> <h3>Sarson’s Vinegar</h3> <p>Sarson’s is certainly not the most recognisable brand, and neither is vinegar the most exciting product. In recognition of the public’s dwindling interest, the brand decided to launch a video marketing campaign to target a younger audience – with the aim of showing them that vinegar is not just something you put on your fish and chips.</p> <p>Looking at what younger people were searching for on YouTube in relation to the product, Sarson's found recipes, home cooking and ‘pickling’ in particular to be the biggest trends. On the back of this discovery, they decided to create a series of recipe videos to showcase how vinegar can be used in different ways, such as for sauerkraut, pickled beetroot, and even as an ingredient in cocktails.</p> <p>Sarson’s targeted users based on their demographic, as well as people searching for specific keywords. The brand served short-form content to these users initially, before delivering longer videos to anyone who engaged.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ic62hHcD_F4?list=PLjRELKmqLCAJl97luZvHSM11PezqM-7nj&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>The approach certainly worked - the campaign generated 4m views in 2016, and a growth of 541% on inbound website traffic compared to 2015. It not only succeeded in changing brand perceptions – showing the product in a new light to those already aware of it – but it also opened it up to a whole new audience, making younger people aware of the brand and its potential role in cooking.</p> <p>Since the initial campaign, Sarson’s has further built on this interest from food lovers with a series of recipes inspired by <a href="http://www.greatbritishchefs.com/">Great British Chefs</a>. By recognising a demand for content and delivering it, Sarson's has managed to successfully tap into a new audience and increase its digital presence.</p> <h3>Adidas </h3> <p>Adidas is a brand that has enjoyed a resurgence in recent years, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68860-four-ways-nostalgia-can-help-to-boost-your-marketing-efforts/" target="_blank">tapping into nostalgia</a> and the transformative <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69086-how-adidas-uses-digital-to-enable-powerful-experiences/" target="_blank">power of sport</a> to deliver in both high-fashion and sporting arenas. </p> <p>As the official sponsor of the Champions League, Adidas Football wanted to build on the interest of football fans, turning their love of the game into love and long-term loyalty for the brand. Its target demographic was football-obsessed teens of around 14 to 20 years of age – those who typically use social channels like YouTube to consume media. </p> <p>But what type of content does this demographic desire?</p> <p>Adidas recognised that a lot of football content on traditional TV channels can be quite dry, usually involving serious analysis and commentary about upcoming or past games. In contrast to this, the brand decided to create Adidas ‘Gamedayplus’ - a series of fun and purely entertaining videos featuring big name football clubs and players. Examples include Suarez taking the ‘first touch challenge’ or David Silva testing his target practice. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S081lUbP4t0?list=PLfl6xCUNPx0pMXW-s8CuhXcMDvqWA6aSp&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With an existing and highly active audience of young users already searching for football content, Adidas Football managed to draw in 315,000 new subscribers as a result of the campaign. The channel also saw a 65% increase in organic views, with users typically watching for longer without clicking away. </p> <p>By tapping into the ‘always on’ digital mind-set of young consumers, Adidas is a great example of how to deliver the type of content that’s perfectly suited to both the channel and its audience.</p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>While brands like Adidas use YouTube to target a specific demographic, others, like Tesco, use it to build trust and drive purchases across a large and varied audience.</p> <p>Tesco has traditionally focused on capturing consumer attention with seasonal campaigns, often centred around popular cultural events like Christmas and Halloween. However, with trust in the brand dwindling in recent years, transferring this strategy to YouTube has allowed Tesco to experiment with short form video content, aiming to deliver real value on the promise of ‘every little helps’.</p> <p>Its ‘Spookermarket’ series was the first example of this, involving a video that captured the reaction of customers as Tesco staff played out Halloween-related pranks. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yqWeuBJfxsQ?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>The video went on to become one of the top ten ads of 2015 - a result that also helped to spur on the rest of the campaign. Using its light-hearted nature to capture initial attention, Tesco then served more in-depth and helpful videos to users, including a jack-o-lantern tutorial and other Halloween-related ‘how-to’ content. This staggered approach ensured the campaign’s impact would be much bigger, with consistent content rolled out to reach consumers over time.</p> <p>One reason Tesco has been so successful on YouTube appears to be this considered approach - one that uses data to shape future marketing efforts. Taking into account the type of videos that customers engage with the most, it is able to create content on this basis, delivering value and a real reason for viewers to invest in the brand.</p> <p>With a 9% uplift in purchase intent from its YouTube TrueView Shoppable ads, it is clear that Tesco’s strategy is doing more than just build trust.</p> <h3>Halifax</h3> <p>Another brand that has used helpful content to drive brand awareness is Halifax bank. However, it has also used YouTube to help differentiate itself from competitors. </p> <p>With its series of short, simple and easy to understand ‘jargon buster’ videos, it aimed to deliver a campaign that was both large in scale and hugely valuable for customers, ultimately drawing them away from other banks.</p> <p>Halifax used YouTube’s TrueView platform - meaning ads would play in-stream or alongside related content - in order to gain mass reach. To build momentum, each video followed a distinct and recognisable formula. It involved a single question – such as ‘What’s a lump sum?’ and ‘What’s an ISA?’ – which was then explained in under 30 seconds using both visuals and audible commentary. </p> <p>Its simplicity was key. Nielsen analysis of the campaign found the videos scored 100% for the metric 'easy to understand' and generated a 31% uplift in brand consideration for those who were exposed to the campaign.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XHlKXKFNn9s?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>One reason I also like this example is that is clearly designed for YouTube. While a lot of brands are guilty of adapting or tweaking campaigns to a particular channel, the best results occur when videos or ads are first created with the medium in mind.</p> <p>In the case of Halifax, its short, snappy, and super simple explanations of confusing subjects are perfectly suited to viewer behaviour. It does not disrupt the user, and is both interesting and succinct enough to convey a memorable message. </p> <h3>EE </h3> <p>YouTube has become synonymous with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69161-micro-influencers-how-to-find-the-right-fit-for-your-brand/" target="_blank">social influencers</a>, and as a result, many brands have generated interest from influencer partnerships. EE is a brand that has used this approach on a massive scale, drawing on the combined reach of multiple influencers for a single campaign.</p> <p>The Wembley Cup 2016 was EE's second mini-football tournament involving YouTubers against former FIFA Legends, and culminating in a final at Wembley Stadium.</p> <p>So, why did it choose influencers and not mainstream celebrities? Like previous examples, it wanted to reach a specific demographic, with the aim of becoming the number one provider for a young age range. With this age bracket already highly engaged with influencers on YouTube, EE recognised the potential of creating a campaign that could capitalise on this existing interest.</p> <p>The results were impressive, with the series amassing 40m views and 1.5m watching the live final. In addition, 20,000 people filled the stadium to watch. What’s more, there was a 36% increase in brand search terms following the campaign, with EE succeeding in its aim of becoming the number one choice for young mobile users.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZrL1DTZoLW4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With a focus on episodic content, EE is also a great example of how to reach an increasingly elusive audience. As young people turn away from TV and towards online media, the sheer amount of content out there means it is even harder for brands to create campaigns that resonate. For its 2016 series, EE deliberately involved the digital audience, allowing them to have a say in picking the team and choosing substitutions. </p> <p>Combined with episodic content, this meant EE was able to hook in viewers from the outset and create deeper levels of emotional engagement.</p> <h3>Ingredients for success</h3> <p>So, let’s recap on what we can learn from the aforementioned brand campaigns.</p> <p><strong>Drawing on data:</strong> Whether it’s using search data to inform targeting or using watch times to shape future strategy, it’s vital for brands to consider metrics when creating YouTube campaigns. Brands that do, like Tesco, are far more likely to succeed. Solutions like Google’s DoubleClick allow brands to delve below surface data (such as basic clicks) to gain a much more in-depth picture of how ads and videos impact user behaviour. </p> <p><strong>Finding a niche:</strong> One problem for brands on YouTube is saturation. Take recipes, for instance, where endless channels compete on the same subject matter. In this instance, it is important to create a point of difference based on the brand, finding out how to create content that people are really interested in. I mean, who knew pickling was so big?</p> <p><strong>Creating campaigns specifically for the channel:</strong> Like Halifax’s super short and concise finance videos, the best YouTube campaigns are specifically designed to cater to the digital audience. Taking into consideration the context of the user and what else they’re doing online at that moment, other than watching an ad, can be incredibly powerful.</p> <p><strong>Using episodic content:</strong> Lastly, the campaigns from Adidas and EE show how episodic content can build engagement and brand loyalty over time. Both brands have since gone on to repeat the same formula, with viewers clearly hooked and ready for more.</p>