tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/social Latest Social content from Econsultancy 2017-04-26T15:30:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69038 2017-04-26T15:30:00+01:00 2017-04-26T15:30:00+01:00 Shea Moisture's customer backlash was caused by poor brand management, not bad advertising Patricio Robles <h4>The backstory</h4> <p>Shea Moisture was founded by Liberians Nyema Tubman and Richelieu Dennis, who came to the US as refugees. They built a business reportedly valued at $700m by developing natural beauty products that cater to a market historically underserved by large beauty brands – women of color.</p> <p>But with outside investment from Bain Capital and skyrocketing consumer interest in natural beauty products, Shea Moisture's parent company Sundial Brands is betting that there is a bigger market for Shea Moisture's products.</p> <p>With that in mind, the company recently unveiled a 60-second ad developed by agency VaynerMedia as part of its #EverybodyGetsLove marketing campaign. The ad features a black woman, but it also features a blonde woman and two redheads. That did not sit well with some Shea Moisture customers who felt that the ad was a sign the company is moving away from the market segment that made it what it is today.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">SheaMoisture is CANCELLED <a href="https://t.co/T4Dru1JgAq">pic.twitter.com/T4Dru1JgAq</a></p> — NANA JIBRIL(@girlswithtoys) <a href="https://twitter.com/girlswithtoys/status/856563772223365122">April 24, 2017</a> </blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Black women have supported and gave free press to Shea Moisture for YEARS. And then they have a "hair hate" commercial with white women?</p> — no. (@DatGirl_ICEY) <a href="https://twitter.com/DatGirl_ICEY/status/856569496508747777">April 24, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>On Facebook, the company's Page has been inundated with more than 7,000 one-star reviews.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5738/shea.png" alt="" width="774" height="531"></p> <p>The backlash was fast and big enough that the company quickly pulled its ad and Richelieu Dennis, Shea Moisture's founder and the CEO of Sundial Brands, took to social media <a href="https://www.facebook.com/SheaMoisture/photos/a.108636299188014.8145.108628512522126/1495966387121658/">to apologize</a>. "Wow, okay – so guys, listen, we really f-ed this one up," he wrote. "Please know that our intention was not – and would never be – to disrespect our community, and as such, we are pulling this piece immediately because it does not represent what we intended to communicate."</p> <p>He further stated, "While this campaign included several different videos showing different ethnicities and hair types to demonstrate the breadth and depth of each individual’s hair journey, we must absolutely ensure moving forward that our community is well-represented in each one so that the women who have led this movement never feel that their hair journey is minimized in any way."</p> <h4>When marketing mistakes aren't marketing mistakes</h4> <p>While the media coverage of the backlash caused by Shea Moisture's ad largely focuses on the notion that the company made an advertising mistake, this is really a brand management mistake because the truth of the matter is that Shea Moisture is a company that was probably going to have a hard time extending its brand without alienating the customers in its core segment.</p> <p>Strong brands that focus on underserved market segments risk upsetting their customers when trying to expand beyond those segments or to "go mainstream" because the customers in those segments feel strongly about the brands. </p> <p>In Shea Moisture's case, the segment it built its brand serving – women of color – know Shea Moisture as a company that for years has focused on their needs when other beauty brands didn't. That gives them a stronger-than-usual level of perceived investment and ownership in the brand.</p> <p>This can be a powerful asset, and it's one of the reasons there are riches in niches. But with the wrong strategy, this asset can become a liability because loyal customers, when they feel slighted or abandoned, are more likely to speak out. Unfortunately for Shea Moisture, its parent company, Sundial Brands, appears to have made a major brand management faux pas that caused just that to happen.</p> <p><a href="http://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/shea-moisture-ad-falls-flat-after-backlash-n750421">According to</a> CEO Richelieu Dennis, the decision to extend Shea Moisture into new market segments was based on the notion that "we have to grow the business." He elaborated...</p> <blockquote> <p>Brands that didn't service women of color for decades are all of the sudden creating campaigns for them to go after that because of the growth they've seen come from us. The competition that we now see, puts businesses like ours at risk.</p> </blockquote> <p>But it's not clear to this author that trying to extend the Shea Moisture brand to market segments already dominated by the very newcomers he speaks of represents a wise growth strategy because this type of brand extension is very difficult and actually risks brand dilution.</p> <p>In my opinion, a better strategy would have been for Shea Moisture to double down on the market segment that it built its success on by playing to its strengths, which include brand loyalty and a reputation as a pioneer, rather than intentionally trying to bring the Shea Moisture brand to segments that are already saturated by bigger companies that are hoping to make inroads in Shea Moisture's segment.</p> <p>If Sundial Brands truly believed there are opportunities in other market segments, it should have explored launching one or more new brands for the effort. While doing that would not be without its own challenges – building a new brand is never easy or cheap – clearly the company did not fully grasp how risky the attempted extension of the Shea Moisture brand to new customer segments would be.</p> <p>Risking customer segments in which you have a strong position for new, competitive segments is usually not a pillar of sensible brand management. </p> <h4>It's too easy to blame advertising</h4> <p>At the end of the day, had Shea Moisture better managed its brand, it never would have produced a backlash-inducing ad in the first place.</p> <p>So while many are focusing on the company's ad, it's important for brands to remember that good advertising can't fix bad brand management, and advertising shouldn't be blamed for consumer backlash when poor brand management all but ensured that advertising couldn't be good in the first place.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69007 2017-04-25T15:00:00+01:00 2017-04-25T15:00:00+01:00 Allergan Facebook initiative shows the risks of social media for pharma marketers Patricio Robles <p>For instance, patient testimonials posted on Facebook received "more than 3.5 million views, while the overall work generated 35 million impressions and resulted in a 10.5% lift in ad recall."</p> <p>But when looking at the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/RESTASIS/">Restasis Facebook Page</a>, I couldn't help but notice that many of the responses to the company's Facebook posts were complaints about cost.</p> <p>"Can not afford cost with savings card. Do you have any help. I am on social security," one person wrote. "Sad, my dad has severe dry eye and Restasis could certainly help, but he's got Medicare and can't afford it. Your savings program excludes Medicare recipients and he's got no other options," another wrote.</p> <p>The team managing the Restasis Facebook Page responded to these comments, in most cases apologizing for the situation and directing the individual to call a toll-free number or visit a page on which they can obtain information about a patient assistance program that they might be eligible for. But many consumers aren't eligible for patient assistance, leaving them out of luck.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5482/restasisfb.png" alt="" width="537" height="399"></p> <h4>Pharma almost always takes the blame</h4> <p>Allergan's team deserves credit for responding to comments complaining about cost and availability, but such comments also serve as a reminder of one of pharma's biggest challenges: even when it effectively markets its drugs directly to the consumers who need them, there's no guarantee that those consumers will be able to access them. </p> <p>On social media, consumers have a voice, and for an already <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67747-pharma-marketers-should-use-storytelling-to-improve-the-industry-s-reputation">reputationally-challenged industry</a> grappling with outrage over drug prices, that means that social initiatives like Allergan's Restasis Facebook Page come with the risk of highlighting these issues, as consumers who find themselves unable to obtain the drugs they need have a platform for speaking out about their experiences.</p> <p>Of course, drug pricing and availability are complex issues and pharma companies aren't always responsible when consumers aren't able to obtain particular drugs. Healthcare providers and insurance companies play a big role in pricing and access. But because much of the frustration and outrage over these issues is frequently directed at pharma companies, they are most frequently the target of consumer complaints and that's bound to be true in social media.</p> <p>To be sure, the risk that consumers will post complaints about pricing and access on their social accounts doesn't mean that pharma marketers should avoid social channels, which are <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67993-why-pharma-marketers-are-increasingly-turning-to-social-media">increasingly popular with pharma marketers</a> and have the potential to be <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68846-three-effective-ways-pharma-brands-have-used-facebook-for-marketing">quite effective</a>. But as the Restasis Facebook Page demonstrates, pharma marketers should be prepared to deal with these when launching social initiatives. At a minimum, this includes being ready to field complaints, including those difficult ones related to cost and access.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2017-04-21T12:55:00+01:00 2017-04-21T12:55:00+01:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to two sector-specific reports, B2B and Healthcare &amp; Pharma) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet statistics and digital market research with data, facts, charts and figures. The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need - a huge time-saver for presentations and reports.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Sector-specific data and reports are available under the following areas:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-and-pharmaceuticals-internet-statistics-compendium/">Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Financial Services and Insurance Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/financial-services-and-insurance-internet-statistics-compendium/">Financial Services and Insurance</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Retail Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/retail-statistics-compendium/" target="_self">Retail</a></strong></li> </ul> <p><strong>Regions covered in each document (where data is available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69009 2017-04-20T11:31:51+01:00 2017-04-20T11:31:51+01:00 Can Wells Fargo's new brand platform help it restore consumer trust? Patricio Robles <p>Wells Fargo recently revealed that new checking account openings have dropped by 43% year-on-year and new credit card applications have plunged by an even greater amount – 55%.</p> <p>According to some observers, dealing with the fallout from this scandal represents perhaps the biggest challenge the bank has faced since it was founded in 1852. Ironically, the scandal could have been avoided if the company had heeded the advice of its largest shareholder, Warren Buffett. The legendary investor famously once stated, "It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you'll do things differently."</p> <p>Now faced with the task of rebuilding its reputation, Wells Fargo <a href="https://stories.wf.com/new-brand-platform-wells-fargo-building-better-company-every-day/">has unveiled</a> a new brand platform dubbed Building Better Every Day.</p> <p>According to Jamie Moldafsky, Wells Fargo's CMO, "Our research clearly shows our customers are ready to hear a different message from us, and the 'Building Better Every Day' platform behind this advertising came directly from the research results. In addition to showing our customers how we are building a better bank – fixing things, and making them right – this effort is focused on how we are helping customers achieve their financial goals."</p> <p>The Building Better Every Day platform will rely on marketing across virtually all channels, including digital, television, print, radio and billboard. It aims to highlight how Wells Fargo is helping customers through "customer-centric" technological innovation, guidance and personalized service, security and community involvement.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WJGAO63-IKs?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>Phil Wang, a marketing manager who was involved in the platform's development, says that the ads will focus a lot on interactions between Wells Fargo and its customers. "Team members are front and center in these spots, and portrayed as helping customers in a way that's in keeping with our vision and values."</p> <p>To hammer home the bank's commitment to the diverse communities it has a presence in, Wells Fargo is even creating ads for specific audiences in other languages, including Mandarin, Cantonese and Spanish.</p> <h4>All of this sounds like a textbook plan from a marketing perspective, but will Wells Fargo's new brand platform really heal the damage caused by its scandal?</h4> <p>There are reasons to be skeptical because not only was the scandal itself really, really ugly in nature, the timing couldn't have been worse for the banking behemoth.</p> <p>First, big banks are among consumers' least favorite institutions today thanks in large part to the financial crisis of 2008, which was widely blamed on out-of-control financial institutions. While Wells Fargo had the most pristine reputation of any big bank following the crisis, having emerged from the Great Recession largely unscathed, the unauthorized account scandal plays right into Wall Street critics' argument that big banks are out of control and simply can't be trusted. </p> <p>Secondly, and perhaps more importantly, banks find themselves under attack from fintech startups that are attempting <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68159-five-ways-fintech-upstarts-are-disrupting-established-financial-institutions/">to disrupt</a> their business models. From consumer, business and mortgage lending to brokerage services and everything in between, many of the financial services that consumers used to obtain from the bank where they kept their checking and savings accounts are increasingly acquired through standalone non-bank service providers in an unbundled fashion. By some estimates, this <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68981-could-established-financial-services-firms-lose-a-quarter-of-their-revenue-to-fintechs/">could soon cost established financial institutions a quarter of their revenue</a>.</p> <p>In fact, that Wells Fargo employees were opening unauthorized accounts to meet aggressive sales quotas hints that it is increasingly difficult for banks to successfully cross-sell to their customers <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68334-wells-fargo-scandal-shows-why-banks-are-vulnerable-to-fintech-startups/">in the age of unbundling</a>. </p> <p>Unfortunately for Wells Fargo, the damage caused by the actions of thousands of its employees probably won't be undone with a new brand platform and an aggressive and expensive marketing campaign. While it's not too soon for the bank to start employing marketing in an effort to re-engage consumers, ultimately Wells Fargo will probably have to accept that the old Buffett nugget of wisdom is pretty accurate.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69013 2017-04-20T10:00:08+01:00 2017-04-20T10:00:08+01:00 What do Facebook's new VR and AR platforms mean for marketers? Ben Davis <h3>AR: The Camera Effects Platform</h3> <h4>Snapchat on steroids gives creative power to the consumer</h4> <p>The best way to think of the Camera Effects Platform is as Snapchat on steroids. Take a look at the BuzzFeed video below and you'll see the platform takes the idea of Snapchat lenses and extends this functionality to other objects and parts of the scenery.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FBuzzFeedTech%2Fvideos%2F1298622390258734%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <p>The video is compelling because it shows how photo and video sharing might be taken to the next level. One can imagine the creative lexicon of Facebook and Instagram users expanding quickly.</p> <p>My first thought was: 'What does this mean for Photoshop?' Creative content production is becoming ever easier. With the Camera Effects Platform open to developers, these effects will multiply. Much like the app model, effects have to be submitted and reviewed by Facebook before being made available.</p> <p>As the platform becomes richer, will we see consumers creating an even greater share of the most popular content online, just by using their social apps? Where brands were slightly slow to get to grips with Snapchat and perhaps justified this by thinking of it as a small(ish) walled garden, the same rationale cannot be applied to any camera app developed by Facebook.</p> <p>The possibilities for brands to produce their own magical AR content are exciting, but so too are the possibilities of harnessing newly AR-literate <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer/">influencers</a> to create some of this stuff on their behalf.</p> <h4>Big advertising opportunities</h4> <p>We've already seen the potential for sponsored Snapchat lenses and filters. With Facebook's Camera Effects Platform, this potential is multiplied many times.</p> <p>With any object recognisable, not just a face, the relevance for brands increases greatly. From cars to clothes, furniture to buildings, food to scenery, the creative applications should allow Facebook to create some snazzy branded experiences. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5575/feeding_time.gif" alt="feeding time gif" width="203" height="360"></p> <h4>Adding sticky notes to real world objects</h4> <p>One of the immediate uses of the AR Studio (one part of the Camera Effects Platform open to developers) is to add information cards to real world objects. In his keynote, Mark Zuckerberg described the scenario of visiting the Coliseum and learning about the building by holding up your phone.</p> <p>The implications of this are broad but are particularly interesting in education. The smartphone has long been touted as a way of making real-world learning more fun, but apps <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63197-pedigree-teams-with-zappar-for-augmented-reality-children-s-annuals/">such as Zappar</a> have had limited success in this area. Facebook's use of precise location data and not just visual triggers looks like it might expand the possibilities for annotating the real world.</p> <p>These virtual sticky notes are of obvious interest if they can be updated regularly and provided in multiple languages. They may have uses in providing product information, too. The still below from Facebook's example shows a card applied to a bottle of wine when the user clicks the highlighted blue dot as they look through their phone.</p> <p>Again, companies such as Blippar have so far failed to combine the physical and the virtual in this way – Facebook's tech will prove if those pioneers were hampered by lack of users or something more fundamental.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5574/pinot.jpg" alt="pinot AR" width="320" height="569"></p> <h4>Are creative uses as exciting as functional ones?</h4> <p>Though the labelling of real world objects is a functional use, many have pointed out that the real sweet spot in AR is actually identification and search – pointing your camera at something (let's say a plant) and being told what that thing is and either where to get it or what to do with it.</p> <p>This is functionality that has been around in admittedly limited form for some time (Amazon Firefly, Google Goggles, Bing visual search) but hasn't taken off (perhaps because of device and functionality limitations). As Pinterest and other tech companies enter this space again in pursuit of visual search, it's interesting that Facebook is concentrating on fun. Indeed, the fun side of AR is probably the only proven use case on a large scale, so Facebook is arguably putting its money on the right horse.</p> <p>Of course, search has never been a big thing for Facebook, but sharing content has.</p> <h3>VR - Facebook Spaces</h3> <p>In the great tradition of tech product launches, Facebook's explainer video for Spaces is cringey beyond belief, but it's probably the quickest way to understand the platform. It's a heady mix of communication through avatars, 360-degree scenery, content sharing and 3D drawing.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FFacebookTips%2Fvideos%2F10155260579068466%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h4>A premium on 360-degree content</h4> <p>Facebook's new release says: "You and your friends can relive personal memories from your own Timelines, or even make new ones as you explore things that interest you from people and Pages you follow."</p> <p>There's an obvious opportunity for publishers and brands here. Spaces needs 360-degree photos and videos for people to explore, and brands can provide this. Yes, there are brands that have already experimented here (e.g. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67766-10-examples-of-great-travel-marketing-campaigns/">Thomas Cook</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68900-ted-baker-uses-360-video-and-instagram-stories-for-new-ss17-campaign/">Ted Baker</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67877-how-automotive-brands-are-blurring-the-lines-between-digital-reality/">Renault</a>) but the addition of social interaction makes for an interesting prospect.</p> <p>Even from an experiential/events marketing point of view, rather than simply whacking a headset on a person, a salesperson can interact with the consumer within the content, leading to much more personable and enjoyable experiences.</p> <h4>Patience, everyone need a headset</h4> <p>VR headsets are few and far between at the moment (among the general populace), which means that as Facebook Spaces is rolled out, many interactions must necessarily be between one caller in real life and one in VR. Will these interactions work?</p> <p>I know you've just watched one cringey video, but I'm going to make you watch another that illustrates one of these interactions.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FFacebookTips%2Fvideos%2F10155247823158466%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>I don't think it's such a terrible experience for the non-headset person as they can enjoy the cartoon avatar and relative novelty of the experience. However, I'm unsure of the benefit for the person calling in VR – all they see is a projected video call, just as they would do if they were looking at their smartphone.</p> <p>Truly social experiences in VR will depend on headset penetration increasing dramatically. Brands don't need to worry about this in the wild for a while yet.</p> <h4>Is there an appetite for animation?</h4> <p>The unknowable is whether people will enjoy these types of experiences. Whilst I can relate to millennials and youngsters who want to hide behind an avatar, I also know that bitmoji isn't for everyone. That Groove Armada lyric comes to mind – "<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOI-zEwjdEQ">if everybody looked the same...</a>"</p> <p>Personally, I would use social VR over Skype (or webinar tech) in a heartbeat, if the animations and the mouth movement are indeed convincing. However, much further down the line, it's not hard to imagine a world of AR and VR making <em>real</em> experiences all the more valuable.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69011 2017-04-19T15:00:00+01:00 2017-04-19T15:00:00+01:00 Jumping on the bandwagon: How brands capitalised on Coachella Nikki Gilliland <p>Last weekend, the Californian desert was home to music, merriment, and a whole heap of marketing - with brands taking the opportunity to capitalise on the ‘coolest’ event in the calendar.</p> <p>Here’s a few examples of how brands of all kinds capitalised on it.</p> <h3><strong>Pop-ups and parties </strong></h3> <p>This year, brand involvement began even before Coachella started, with ecommerce retailer Revolve taking advantage of inevitable excitement and pre-festival buzz.</p> <p>Revolve’s Social Club typically holds exclusive and members-only events, however, it launched a special pop-up shop – which was also open to the general public – a week before the festival started.</p> <p>Selling limited edition items inspired by the festival, its aim was to generate excitement for people going as well as those who might be missing out.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5525/Revolve_social.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="491"></p> <p>Pre-festival events like these are just the beginning of the story, of course, with most pop-ups and parties occurring during the festival weekend itself.</p> <p>While sponsorship is also commonplace at concerts and sporting events, festivals are the perfect environment to go one step further with an <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66908-10-inspiring-experiential-marketing-examples/" target="_blank">experiential marketing</a> approach. Heineken is one example of a brand that delivers an ‘experience’ for festival-goers, using its ‘Heineken House’ concept to entertain visitors and bring a sense of fun along with its brand message.</p> <p>This year, the pop-up included a sustainable dancefloor – powered by the movement of dancers during musical sets – and a free water initiative designed to encourage responsible drinking.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Our <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HeinekenHouse?src=hash">#HeinekenHouse</a> lineup is finally here, and it's looking like our most impressive line-up yet! You're not going to want to miss this. <a href="https://t.co/SvbMMmEPcI">pic.twitter.com/SvbMMmEPcI</a></p> — Heineken US (@Heineken_US) <a href="https://twitter.com/Heineken_US/status/851438114526695424">April 10, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3><strong>Freebies </strong></h3> <p>It’s ironic that the more famous people become, the more freebies they're able to get their hands on. Coachella is no exception, providing the perfect spotlight for brands for showcase their products, with the knowledge that the images will be circulated in the media and fashion magazines.</p> <p>Meanwhile, luxury brands are willing to give away products simply because the Coachella demographic is exactly the type of consumer they would normally target. For instance, tequila company Casa Dragones partnered with a startup helicopter service to offer consumers a journey like no other. (Yes, I did say 'startup helicopter service'. Moving swiftly on.)</p> <p>Offering free shots to all passengers, it ensured brand visibility at a time when consumers would be most receptive to it. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5526/Casa_Dragones.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="412"></p> <p>With transportation company Tesloop also reportedly offering free rides home from after-parties, it appears companies of all kinds are vying just for the opportunity to have a presence at the festival.</p> <h3><strong>Fashion inspiration</strong></h3> <p>While high-end fashion designers are typically seen at Coachella, high street brands still try to emulate the festival look with items inspired by the event itself – even if they aren’t directly affiliated with it.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66292-how-urban-outfitters-can-improve-in-joining-offline-with-online/" target="_blank">Urban Outfitters</a> landed in hot water last month over its recent Coachella-themed range, so much so that the festival filed a lawsuit against the retailer for exploiting the trademark without authorisation. Free People were also hit with the lawsuit, suggesting that the items falsely implied the brand was an official sponsor.</p> <p>Regardless of the outcome, this demonstrates just how synonymous Coachella has become with fashion, with brands using its name to drive sales as well as directly influence designs.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5527/Urban_Outfitters.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="528"></p> <h3><strong>Social media influencers </strong></h3> <p>These days, brands don’t only want to see their products promoted by celebrities, with some choosing to pay for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68409-four-key-trends-within-the-world-of-influencer-marketing/" target="_blank">social media influencers</a> to attend festivals like Coachella instead.</p> <p>This is because, instead of counting on third-party publications to cover the event, brands are able to rely on influencers dedicating posts or even entire blogs or vlogs to them. Keihl’s took several beauty influencers to Coachella this year, featuring them on its own social media channels as well as capitalising on their combined audiences.</p> <p>Fleur de Force, just one influencer involved, has over 1.4m subscribers on her second YouTube channel. By working with influencers like Fleur, whose dedicated audience is likely to trust her advocacy, the brand is able to ensure extra visibility and greater authenticity – as well as a strengthened relationship with the influencers themselves.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/os_DqBG6Xm4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><strong>To find out more about influencer marketing, check out Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/" target="_blank">Rise of Influencer</a> report.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69004 2017-04-18T14:55:00+01:00 2017-04-18T14:55:00+01:00 As Facebook cracks down on a major spam operation, USA Today loses millions of Likes Patricio Robles <p>The social network <a href="https://www.facebook.com/notes/facebook-security/disrupting-a-major-spam-operation/10154327278540766/">also announced</a> that it disrupted a major spam operation it had been fighting for half a year. According to Facebook, the operation was "made up of inauthentic likes and comments that appear to come from accounts located in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, and a number of other countries. We found that most of this activity was generated not through traditional mass account creation methods, but by more sophisticated means that try to mask the fact that the accounts are part of the same coordinated operation. They used tricks to avoid detection, including redirecting their traffic through 'proxies that disguised their location."</p> <p>Facebook believes that the accounts created by the operation, which were still largely dormant, would later have been used to send mass spam to real users.</p> <p>Shabnam Shaik, a member of Facebook's Protect and Care team, explained that "Our systems were able to identify a large portion of this illegitimate activity – and to remove a substantial number of inauthentic likes." He added, "As we remove the rest of the inauthentic likes, we expect that 99% of impacted Pages with more than 10,000 likes will see a drop of less than 3%. None of these likes were the result of paid ads from the affected Pages."</p> <h4>But there apparently was an exception to that: USA Today.</h4> <p>According to social media monitoring platform CrowdTangle, USA Today had more than 15m Likes on Facebook as of last Thursday. By Friday, that figure had dropped to around 10m, and today, USA Today's Facebook Page has well under 10m Likes.</p> <p>As The Daily Caller's Alex Pfeiffer <a href="http://dailycaller.com/2017/04/14/facebook-discovers-major-spam-operation-usa-today-likes-plummet/">observed</a>, based on CrowdTangle's data, "no other major publisher appears to have experienced the same drop."</p> <p>While one might jump to the conclusion that the drop indicates USA Today was somehow involved in an effort to artificially inflate its Like count, that isn't the case. In fact, USA Today parent Gannett <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/04/14/facebook-breaks-up-fake-account-ring-targeting-publisher-pages/100451010/">reported</a> suspicious account activity to Facebook, which helped spark the social network's crackdown.</p> <p>According to Maribel Wadsworth, Gannett's chief transformation officer, "USA TODAY NETWORK takes great pride in our journalism and the trust our consumers and advertising partners have in us. Since we first brought this issue to Facebook’s attention, we have been in close communication with them and look forward to a swift solution that prevents this illegitimate activity from happening on our Facebook page in the future."</p> <p>There is irony in this story, however. In January, Jamie Motttram, then USA Today's social chief, bragged on Twitter about the growth of the publisher's Facebook Page, noting that it was the "fastest-growing FB page in news."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">The <a href="https://twitter.com/USATODAY">@USATODAY</a> Facebook page passed the 10 million-fans mark! Big milestone for the fastest-growing FB page in news. <a href="https://t.co/ceNeCtcqYM">pic.twitter.com/ceNeCtcqYM</a></p> — Jamie Mottram (@JamieMottram) <a href="https://twitter.com/JamieMottram/status/824991639961747456">January 27, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>The precipitous drop in Likes on the USA Today Facebook Page following Facebook's crackdown suggests that much of that growth was the result of fake account activity, which offers two points publishers active on Facebook might want to mull: </p> <p>1) Clearly, publishers have a limited ability to determine how much of the activity on their Facebook Pages is legitimate, and without Facebook's help, there's little they can do to crack down on bad behavior.</p> <p>2) While Facebook noted that the "illegitimate activity" was in no way related to paid ads, one has to wonder whether investment decisions have been influenced by such activity. After all, publishers are almost certainly influenced by metrics like Likes when determining how much to spend on the social network, directly and indirectly. To the extent that those metrics are inflated, publishers risk increasing spend when it isn't necessarily justified and/or seeing some of their spend go to waste.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68724-marketers-plan-facebook-audits-following-metrics-faux-pas/">Marketers plan Facebook audits after metrics faux pas</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68996 2017-04-13T15:22:31+01:00 2017-04-13T15:22:31+01:00 10 cracking digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>28% of marketers still feeling unprepared for the GDPR</h3> <p>With just over a year until the GDPR comes into force, a <a href="https://dma.org.uk/infographic/infographic-b2b-marketing-and-the-gdpr" target="_blank">new infographic</a> from the DMA shows that many marketers are failing to prepare.</p> <p>While general awareness of the GDPR is up, 28% of B2B marketers still feeling unprepared – down just 2% from previous figures. Only two-thirds of survey respondents said their business would be GDPR compliant in time for 2018.</p> <p>In terms of the causes of concern, 37% of marketers said profiling, while 50% said it was legacy data. The biggest was by far consent, with 70% agreeing that it would change under the GDPR.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5442/DMA_infographic.JPG" alt="" width="618" height="324"></p> <h3>Three fifths of marketing graduates have no knowledge of affiliate strategies</h3> <p>Affilinet has been researching how well marketing students are prepared for a career in the industry, with results showing that many are graduating with little or no knowledge of affiliate or performance-based marketing.</p> <p>In a survey, 41% of graduates said that they have studied modules related to affiliate marketing. Out of these, however, 67% stated that the information taught was ‘outdated and unhelpful’.</p> <p>52% admitted that they’d needed to teach themselves to progress in their career, with 22% learning through courses later on. The remaining 26% of marketing graduates said that they still had no knowledge of affiliate practices whatsoever.</p> <h3>Mobile drives digital ad spend past £10bn</h3> <p>According to a new report from <a href="https://iabuk.net/about/press/archive/mobile-drives-digital-ad-spend-past-10-billion-threshold" target="_blank">IAB and PwC,</a> digital advertising grew at its fastest rate for nine years in 2016, increasing 17.3% to £10.3bn.</p> <p>Mobile video is now the fastest-growing ad format, with spend on mobile video ads doubling to £693m. Consequently, it now accounts for 29% of the total growth in ad spend.</p> <p>Insight suggests that the rise reflects the increasing amount of users watching video clips on their smartphones, with two in five people reportedly saying they now watch mobile video more than they did a year ago.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5440/PwC_IAB.png" alt="" width="780" height="480"></p> <h3>Just 13% of employees able to name their company CMO</h3> <p>New research by eShare suggests that chief marketing officers are one of the least recognised board members, with just 13% of employees able to identify the CMO of their organisation.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 UK employees, just 8% were able to identify the chairperson and 14% were able to identify the chief information officer and chief financial officer. In contrast, 36% were able to name the CEO, making this the most visible board member to UK employees.</p> <h3>66% of beauty shoppers use Instagram for inspiration</h3> <p>Facebook and Instagram has revealed how beauty shoppers are increasingly turning to social media to help inform their purchases.</p> <p>The Mobile Makeover Report states that 66% of beauty shoppers look to social media for inspiration on how to achieve their perfect look, 70% for learning make-up techniques and 62% for advice on products. </p> <p>Tutorials are among the most popular types of video, with 74% of beauty viewers watching ‘how-to’ content. You can read more about how mobile is impacting the beauty industry <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68992-three-ways-mobile-is-impacting-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">in this article</a>. </p> <h3>41% of UK shoppers will spend more to make Easter special</h3> <p>Savvy has been exploring how consumers will spend their money over Easter, with 62% of UK shoppers planning to celebrate over the bank holiday weekend.</p> <p>In a survey, 41% of respondents said they don’t mind spending more in order to make their Easter celebrations special. That being said, shoppers will still be on the hunt for a discount, with 60% saying they already know where they’ll can find the best value Easter eggs.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, eggs will be the most popular item to buy, followed by chocolate in general, and the ingredients for a roast dinner. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5441/Savvy.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="452"></p> <h3>62% of ecommerce brands don’t personalise digital experiences</h3> <p>Episerver’s <a href="http://www.episerver.com/learn/resources/research--reports/seven-digital-commerce-trends-for-retail-2017/" target="_blank">State of Digital Commerce</a> report suggests that just 38% of ecommerce brands are incorporating personalisation into their current marketing strategies. Despite 70% of companies using email marketing, only 28% are using triggered emails to re-engage non-converting customers.</p> <p>What’s more, despite the abundance of data available, 46% of marketers admit they wouldn’t be able to create an omnichannel campaign due to a lack of insight into the customer journey.</p> <h3>Paddy Power generates the most social engagements during Grand National</h3> <p>4C has analysed the level of social engagement generated from TV ads during the Grand National. Results show that Paddy Paddy stole the show, with its two ads generating 59,527 engagements from public mentions, retweets, comments and likes on social channels – double the engagement of competitors.</p> <p>SkyBet saw 16,840 engagements and Coral saw 18,733. Meanwhile, despite its close association with horse racing, William Hill saw just 2,812 over the course of the event.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Looking for some guidance on how to pick the winner of the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GrandNational?src=hash">#GrandNational</a>? Watch this video to find out how the experts do it. <a href="https://t.co/27q9DPQJP0">pic.twitter.com/27q9DPQJP0</a></p> — Paddy Power (@paddypower) <a href="https://twitter.com/paddypower/status/850644686096281600">April 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Consumers see Snapchat as a passing trend for brand communication</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://uk.mailjet.com/blog/guide/email-innovations-research-report/" target="_blank">Mailjet</a> has revealed that consumers are displaying a lack of faith in new platforms like Pinterest and Snapchat and their role in brand communication.</p> <p>41% of consumers believe that email is the platform most people will be using in 10 years’ time, followed by 26% of consumers saying the same for Facebook and WhatsApp. In contrast, just 11% of people are certain that Pinterest and LinkedIn will be used in a decade and only 14% are confident that Snapchat will still exist. </p> <p>Despite many brands getting involved, major updates to platforms are also going unnoticed by consumers, with just 6% of people noting Instagram’s ‘buy button’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5443/Instagram_shop_now.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="452"></p> <h3>Supermarket promotions fall to lowest level in 11 years</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/uk/en/press-room/2017/supermarket-promotions-at-lowest-level-for-11-years.html" target="_blank">Nielsen</a>, supermarket promotions have fallen to their lowest level in 11 years in the UK, with just 26% of consumer spend going towards temporary discounts or multi-buy offers in the four weeks up until 25th March 2017.</p> <p>Nielsen suggests that this is due to supermarkets becoming increasingly price competitive, turning temporary price reductions into permanent cuts as a result.</p> <p>Year-on-year supermarket sales have also fallen, with the late Easter period said to have contributed to a 2.6% decrease in the four-week period to March 25th.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68992 2017-04-13T11:13:00+01:00 2017-04-13T11:13:00+01:00 Three ways mobile is impacting the beauty industry Nikki Gilliland <p>With stats taken from Facebook’s <a href="https://www.facebook.com/business/m/mobile-makeover" target="_blank">Mobile Makeover</a> report, here are a few reasons why.</p> <h3>Building personal connections</h3> <p>Mobile has now officially overtaken desktop, with 61% of time online in the UK being spent on a smartphone device. This means that there is now little distinction between the web and the ‘mobile’ web – they are seen as one and the same for many people.</p> <p>But why is mobile the preferred option? Facebook suggests that it's because our connection to mobile is much more personal and intimate than it is to television screens or even desktop computers. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5415/mobile_is.JPG" alt="" width="340" height="498"></p> <p>We can switch from interacting with real life friends to our favourite brands, meaning there’s also very little difference in how we engage with them. </p> <p>For beauty brands, mobile enables them to build a much more direct and intimate connection the consumer. Or essentially, to become their friend too.</p> <p>Just like someone might 'like' a shared photo on Facebook, the same person wouldn’t think twice about doing so on a brand’s Instagram account. Brands such as Glossier capitalise on this seamless browsing behaviour, continuously putting relatable and shareable content into followers' news feeds.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5416/Glossier.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="484"></p> <h3>Sharing in real-time</h3> <p>Facebook states that 46% of beauty consumers use social media to share the results of something they’ve bought. It seems more so than any other industry, users are willing to offer their own feedback or share their opinion way past the point of purchase.</p> <p>This reflects the changing nature of the beauty industry in general, which is veering away from the unattainable to something much more authentic and real. Instead of looking to glossy fashion magazines for inspiration, consumers can check out an influencer online or read reviews from a fellow consumer – all directly from mobile.</p> <p>Meanwhile, since anyone can take and upload a selfie, beauty brands now have millions of advocates at their disposal.</p> <p>User-generated content is widely used by everyone from Kylie Cosmetics to Sephora, allowing brands to promote a sense of authenticity as well as foster a community online. Beauty fans apparently have 2.5 times the average number of followers on Instagram and follow four times the average number of accounts – it also enables brands to continue the cycle of advocacy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5417/Kylie.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="375"></p> <h3>Shopping on mobile</h3> <p>So, we’ve established just how important mobile is for capturing consumer engagement – but what about sales? Europe’s leading online beauty retailers reportedly get 50% of their <a href="https://www.raconteur.net/lifestyle/digital-is-key-to-beauty-industry" target="_blank">business from mobile devices</a>. </p> <p>This demonstrates the importance of a multichannel shopping experience, with brands being able to prompt consumers to purchase in the very moments they are researching, browsing or merely consuming content. </p> <p>Lastly, with Instagram recently allowing brands to test taggable or buyable products in photos, we could soon be moving into a whole new world of social commerce. Where, undoubtedly, mobile will be key.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68689-how-the-beauty-industry-is-embracing-the-internet-of-things/">How the beauty industry is embracing the Internet of Things</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68205-how-three-beauty-ecommerce-sites-integrate-editorial-content/">How three beauty ecommerce sites integrate editorial content</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68987 2017-04-12T14:42:34+01:00 2017-04-12T14:42:34+01:00 Why Instagram is the ideal platform for fitness brands Nikki Gilliland <p>So, which fitness brands are winning on the platform, and why exactly does it work so well? Here are a few reasons and examples.</p> <h3>Offers instant gratification</h3> <p>Visual content is an incredibly memorable medium, with people typically <a href="http://www.brainrules.net/vision" target="_blank">recalling 65% more</a> of a piece of information if it is paired with a relevant image. </p> <p>Another reason it is so effective is that it also provides instant gratification without the need for any wider context. For fitness brands, this means it is a low effort but a highly effective medium, allowing them to reach followers in moments of real-time need. This is most often a motivational quote or image that taps into the user’s specific goals.</p> <p>With fitness hashtags also incredibly popular on Instagram, brands know that users will search specifically using keywords like ‘fitness’ or ‘fitspo’. Under Armour Women often uses this approach, using motivational and empowering quotes to engage users but also demonstrate its own brand values and beliefs.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5380/Under_Armour_women.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="499"></p> <h3>Builds communities</h3> <p><a href="https://selfstartr.com/instagram-marketing-tips-ecommerce/" target="_blank">68% of Instagram users</a> are said to engage with brands on a regular basis compared to just 32% of users on Facebook. This demonstrates how the platform is highly effective for building and maintaining a strong audience, with many brands fostering a sense of real community.</p> <p>SoulCycle has garnered a reputation for being more of a cult than a brand – a fact emphasised by how it engages with fans on Instagram. It regularly posts videos and images that are localised, showcasing activity in various gyms or pop-up events across the US. This gives users the sense that they are part of the brand, simultaneously providing motivation and an incentive to get involved.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5381/SoulCycle.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="495"></p> <h3>Capitalises on influence</h3> <p>SoulCycle also capitalises on the fact that its instructors are seen as mini-celebrities in their own right, often with huge audiences on their personal accounts. This approach is popular across the board, with fitness brands commonly <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">using influencers</a> as a key part of their Instagram marketing strategy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5382/soulcycle_influencers.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="555"></p> <p>With research suggesting that <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahweinswig/2016/10/05/influencers-are-the-new-brands/#103c92a77919">92% of consumers</a> now trust an influencer recommendation over an ad or celebrity endorsement, it’s a great way for brands to build authority. Meanwhile, many are also realising the power of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67807-is-micro-influencer-marketing-viable/" target="_blank">micro-influencers</a> – those with a smaller but highly engaged audience – to establish a highel level of credibility.</p> <p>While it’s not a fitness company per se, sparkling water brand LaCroix has recently been tapping into the health market by getting involved in Whole30 – a month long clean eating program popularised on Instagram. As well as using hashtags like #whole30approved, it has also been partnering with fitness and health micro-influencers to help expand its own customer base.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5378/lacroixwater.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="571"></p> <h3>Promotes a lifestyle rather than a product</h3> <p>Finally, the most successful fitness brands on Instagram take a subtle approach to selling, focusing on posts that tap into the user’s desire for a certain lifestyle – not a product.</p> <p>It’s pretty likely that if a consumer is interested in sport, they’re also going to be interested in nutrition, health and general well-being, too. Consequently, it’s important that brands view users in this light, ensuring that their posts aren’t too repetitive or dull.</p> <p>ClassPass regularly mixes up its feed with a combination of actual exercise, food and pop culture references. From smoothies to movies, it demonstrates a real understanding of its audience as well as what type of posts they’re engaging with elsewhere on the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5379/ClassPass.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="515"></p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68245-seven-examples-of-motivational-copywriting-from-fitness-brands/" target="_blank">Seven examples of motivational copywriting from fitness brands</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67786-10-great-sports-digital-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">10 great sports digital marketing campaigns</a></em></li> </ul>