tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/social-2 Latest Social content from Econsultancy 2017-03-14T11:00:00+00:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4438 2017-03-14T11:00:00+00:00 2017-03-14T11:00:00+00:00 Financial Services and Insurance Internet Statistics Compendium <p>Econsultancy's <strong>Financial Services and Insurance Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a comprehensive collection of the most recent financial services and insurance statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media.</p> <p>Like our main <a title="Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium">Internet Statistics Compendium</a>, this report has been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the financial services and insurance internet statistics you need.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p>Areas covered in this report include:</p> <ul> <li>Digital financial services and insurance market trends</li> <li>Financial Technology (Fintech) and investments</li> <li>Digital strategy and transformation</li> <li>Online banking</li> <li>Mobile banking, mobile payments and the mobile wallet</li> <li>Customer experience</li> </ul> <p><strong>A free sample document is available for download.</strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4434 2017-03-10T16:00:00+00:00 2017-03-10T16:00:00+00:00 Social Quarterly: Q1 2017 <p>Social media evolves rapidly, and the <strong>Social Quarterly</strong> provides an overview of the latest trends in the industry. It contains information which can be translated into your own documents, allowing you to prepare a pitch or use internally at a moment's notice.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly examines the current social media landscape, trends and updates on various social platforms and considers what will happen next. Updated four times per year, it will help to quickly surface statistics and trends you can use and react to immediately.</p> <p>This year's <strong>first edition of the Social Quarterly </strong>looks at Instagram's new stickers and carousal features, Pinterest's new visual discovery tool, the introduction of Snapchat-like features to Facebook-owned platforms, how Twitter is combatting online abuse as well as social engagement stats on the Super Bowl. Plenty to whet your appetite!</p> <p>Bringing to life data from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> and the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/">Econsultancy blog</a>, the Social Quarterly is the best of social in an easy-to-digest format.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly will allow you to:</p> <ul> <li>Stay up to date with regular developments across multiple social media platforms.</li> <li>Present and pitch at short notice with clear and effective data.</li> <li>Pinpoint areas in which you want to find out more and use the linked Econsultancy resources and blog posts to do this.</li> <li>Spot potential ways your company could be using social media but is not currently.</li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3139 2017-03-10T08:20:38+00:00 2017-03-10T08:20:38+00:00 Content Marketing for Web, Mobile and Social Media - Malaysia <p>Brands are increasingly turning to content driven marketing strategies to gain marketplace attention and increase customer engagement in a multi-channel environment. For your marketing to be effective in 2015 and beyond, you will need to provide content that's useful to your customers and that advances your business objectives in a measurable way. It is also vital to create high engagement by building and maintaining a community around your content. </p> <p>The discipline of content marketing provides the framework for ensuring that your content delivers on these essential requirements across all relevant traditional and digital platforms. In addition to covering the basic principles of content marketing, this 3-day workshop seeks to address the challenges of marketers in developing a content strategy and help marketers to create a realistic and sustainable content plan.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3136 2017-03-10T08:15:51+00:00 2017-03-10T08:15:51+00:00 Content Marketing for Web, Mobile and Social Media - Malaysia <p>Brands are increasingly turning to content driven marketing strategies to gain marketplace attention and increase customer engagement in a multi-channel environment. For your marketing to be effective in 2015 and beyond, you will need to provide content that's useful to your customers and that advances your business objectives in a measurable way. It is also vital to create high engagement by building and maintaining a community around your content. </p> <p>The discipline of content marketing provides the framework for ensuring that your content delivers on these essential requirements across all relevant traditional and digital platforms. In addition to covering the basic principles of content marketing, this 3-day workshop seeks to address the challenges of marketers in developing a content strategy and help marketers to create a realistic and sustainable content plan.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:RoundtableEvent/854 2017-03-03T12:03:16+00:00 2017-03-03T12:03:16+00:00 Social Media Tools, Analytics and Measurement <p>There are a huge number of social media tools on the market, but how do you know which one is right for your business? And once you chosen a tool, how can you make the most of the data it gives you?</p> <p>This roundtable discussion will give attendees the chance to compare notes on social media tools, and share their experiences on the best way to track and measure their social activity.</p> <h4><strong>Talking points will largely be decided by attendees on the day, but could include:</strong></h4> <ul> <li>Which social media tools are worth the money, and which ones shouldn’t be touched with a barge pole.</li> <li>Making the most of the tools you’re paying for.</li> <li>Moving beyond vanity metrics.</li> <li>Turning social data into relevant insights.</li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68846 2017-03-01T14:46:59+00:00 2017-03-01T14:46:59+00:00 Three effective ways pharma brands have used Facebook for marketing Patricio Robles <h3>VAYA Pharma buys targeted Facebook ads</h3> <p>To market Vayarin, a prescription "medical food" used in the dietary management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), VAYA Pharma <a href="http://www.dmnews.com/social-media/pharma-company-succeeds-using-social-media/article/638864/">turned to</a> social marketing firm Adaptly, which determined that Facebook, thanks to its targeting capabilities, was the ideal platform on which VAYA could reach parents who have children with ADHD.</p> <p>Adaptly's campaigns, which used Facebook Link Ads and the Facebook Audience Network, ran between May and July 2016 and targeted parents between the ages of 35 and 54. Keyword interest categories were used to identify interest in ADHD.</p> <p>The result: the campaigns delivered nearly 100,000 visitors to the VAYA's Vayarin website and generated more than 270,000 downloads of the company's consumer-focused Vayarin infosheet. What's more, by using the Audience Network, which allows Facebook advertisers to target users outside of Facebook, Adaptly says that it was able to beat its target cost-per-link-click by nearly 50%.</p> <p><strong>Key takeway: </strong>Pharma companies looking to reach well-defined target audiences have plenty of opportunities to do so with Facebook's ad offerings.</p> <h3>Novartis supports a Facebook Live event</h3> <p>Big pharma doesn't have the best reputation these days, potentially making it even more difficult for pharma marketers to cut through the clutter when attempting to reach consumers directly through digital channels like social.</p> <p>But there are ways to deal with this, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68403-pharma-company-novartis-taps-facebook-live-event-to-promote-heart-failure-drugs/">as pharma giant Novartis demonstrated</a> when it teamed up with the American Heart Association and actress/singer Queen Latifah as part of its <em>Rise Above Heart Failure</em> initiative. One component of the initiative was a Facebook Live panel discussion featuring Queen Latifah and medical doctor Karol E. Watson, a professor of medicine/cardiology and the co-director of the UCLA Program in Preventive Cardiology.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0425/Screen_Shot_2016-10-17_at_17.13.28.png" alt=""></p> <p>Nearly 1,000 people tuned into the event, and the recording has since been viewed some 36,000 times. </p> <p><strong>Key takeaway:</strong> Pharma companies can gain positive exposure by creating or supporting the creation of informative and educational health content on Facebook. This includes Facebook Live content that is produced and distributed in partnership with other organizations.</p> <h3>Johnson &amp; Johnson builds a Facebook app</h3> <p>Facebook launched the Facebook Platform in mid-2007, giving third parties the opportunity to build apps that are integrated with Facebook for the first time ever.</p> <p>One of the earliest pharma companies to embrace the Facebook Platform was Johnson &amp; Johnson, which through a division of its Johnson &amp; Johnson Vision Care, Inc. subsidiary, <a href="http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/vistakonr-brings-acuminder-to-facebook-users-895672.htm">launched a Facebook application</a> for its Acuminder service, which sends important reminders to contact lens wearers. The Acuminder Facebook app, which is no longer active, allowed users to receive those reminders in their Facebook news feeds.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4222/acuminder.png" alt="" width="727" height="315"></p> <p>As of February 2009, Johnson &amp; Johnson said that nearly 20,000 users had signed up to receive Acuminder alerts, and that "bi-weekly contact lens wearers using Acuminder reported a marked improvement in their contact lens behavior."</p> <p><strong>Key takeaway:</strong> While Facebook apps are no longer the most prominent fixture on the service, Johnson &amp; Johnson's early embrace of the Facebook Platform to extend its Acuminder service to the world's largest social network demonstrates that pharma companies do have opportunities to deliver value to consumers through utilitarian apps. </p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68737 2017-02-06T14:32:00+00:00 2017-02-06T14:32:00+00:00 Why brands are increasingly creating experiences & adventures to woo consumers Patricio Robles <p>In partnership with Momenta, a photojournalism non-profit that offers workshops around the world, Leica is inviting individuals who love photography the rare opportunity to travel to India or Myanmar later this year with professional photographers as part of <a href="http://momentaworkshops.com/workshops/leica-destinations-travel-photography-workshops/">its new<em> Destinations</em> program</a>.</p> <p>The two trips, which take place in October and November, consist of "off-the-beaten-path" journeys "without tour buses or large groups."</p> <p>The professional photographers will serve as tour leaders and be available for "one-on-one private editing sessions" with participants. Participants do not need to own Leica equipment, but not surprisingly, "Leica gear...will be made available for those who would like to experience the joy of a rangefinder or elegant point-and-shoot cameras." This includes new Leica equipment, such as the company's $8,000-plus model SL camera.</p> <p>Each trip costs $6,995, excluding international airfare, and is limited to 15 participants. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3623/leica.png" alt="" width="778" height="297"></p> <p>Attendees are promised the experience of a lifetime. As Jamie Rose, the COO of Momenta told Bloomberg about a recent workshop the organization held in Myanmar, "We found out about a novice monk induction ceremony the day before it happened, and we were able to get into it. That’s something nobody else would have had."</p> <p>Leica's <em>Destinations</em> program is an extension of <a href="http://leicaakademieusa.com/">Leica Akademie</a>, which hosts a number of events and has offered a <em>Landscape</em> program that offers photography trips to National Parks.</p> <h3>A way for high-end brands to connect with customers and aspirational consumers</h3> <p>Even though only 15 individuals will be able to participate in each of Leica's <em>Destinations</em> trips, that isn't the point. The mere fact that Leica is offering a program like this helps reinforce its brand and position in the marketplace.</p> <p>Increasingly, that's critically important for companies that compete in the high-end of their markets and often appeal to aspirational consumers. For Leica, a company that sells cameras routinely costing thousands of dollars, and some costing tens of thousands of dollars, experience is indeed one of the most potent ways to reinforce its brand.</p> <p>Leica isn't the only high-end brand taking advantage of experience.</p> <p>Lamborghini, for example, offers the Lamborghini Esperienza, a "tailor-made program [that] allows participants to experience the brand’s values." It includes a visit to the Lamborghini factory in Italy and gives participants the ability to get behind the wheel of some of the company's vehicles on the Autodromo di Imola race track.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3622/lamborghini.png" alt="" width="852" height="259"></p> <p>The luxury car brand also runs Lamborghini Accademia, which offers training programs for those who want to learn how to drive Lamborghinis in a variety of settings.</p> <p>The company's Winter Accademia, which takes place later this month, gives participants the opportunity to learn how to drive Aventador and Huracán vehicles costing hundreds of thousands of dollars in "extreme winter-driving conditions." The program is open to anybody; no ownership of a Lamborghini is required.</p> <h3>The convergence of product and experience</h3> <p>Leica and Lamborghini are two examples of high-profile brands that manufacture and sell physical products and that are building experiences around those products. But what about companies that are focused on experience?</p> <p>Interestingly, some of those are getting into the business of creating products to go along with their experiences. Case in point: <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68333-what-brands-need-to-know-about-snapchat-spectacles/">Snapchat Spectacles</a>.</p> <p>Spectacles hints at a future in which brands, no matter what they sell, ultimately seek to cement their position in the markets they serve by combining product and experience.</p> <p>While not every brand has the ability to do this in the same fashion as brands like Leica, Lamborghini and Snapchat, expect to see more and more brands moving in this direction in years to come.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68768 2017-02-02T14:41:08+00:00 2017-02-02T14:41:08+00:00 What marketers need to know about Pinterest's new search ads Patricio Robles <p>Here's what marketers need to know about Pinterest's new ad offering, which had previously been tested by a number of major brands.</p> <h3>The ads are inserted as Pins into the search results page</h3> <p>On Pinterest, when a user enters a search query, Pinterest displays a search results page consisting of pins that match the query. On average, there are about 55 pins displayed per search results page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/3619/pinterest-target-ad-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="313"></p> <p>Search ads are simple: they insert advertiser pins into the search results page and are marked as being promoted. Pinterest dynamically determines the number of ads that appear on a search results page.</p> <h3>Search ads are auction-based</h3> <p>Pinterest sells search ads the way Google sells its search ads: through an auction-based system in which advertisers specify how much they're willing to pay for each click on their ads.</p> <h3>There are two campaign types</h3> <p>Pinterest's search ads come in two campaign types: keyword campaigns and shopping campaigns.</p> <p><strong>Keyword campaigns</strong> allow advertisers to target their ads using keywords, which can optionally be grouped. Because the keywords that users search with on Pinterest might be different from other search engines given the visual nature of the service, Pinterest will suggest keywords that might be appropriate for a particular image.</p> <p><strong>Shopping campaigns</strong> give advertisers the ability to auto-generate ads from product feeds they supply to Pinterest via FTP. In the future, advertisers will also be able to use feeds through integrations with feed management providers. Shopping campaigns, because they are feed-based, give advertisers an easy way to quickly create campaigns at scale.</p> <p>To help advertisers manage shopping campaigns, Pinterest allows advertisers to dynamically update these campaigns as inventory changes.</p> <h3>The size of the opportunity could be large</h3> <p>Pinterest says that every month it handles around 2bn search queries. While that pales in comparison to Google, which handles over 3.5bn searches per day, it's still not an insignificant number.</p> <p>What's more, Pinterest isn't Google. It's a visual search tool, so the value of a search to brands, particularly those in industries like retail and fashion, differs from the value of a Google search.</p> <p>While it remains to be seen just how productive search ads will be for advertisers, a volume of searches in the billions should give advertisers more than enough to work with.</p> <h3>Most searches are unbranded</h3> <p>The news gets better for brands active on Pinterest: according to Pinterest, 97% of its searches don't include a brand name, giving advertisers the opportunity to reach consumers who might be interested in a particular type of product but who haven't already decided on a specific brand or product.</p> <p>Pinterest's global head of partnerships, Jon Kaplan, <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/pinterest-rolls-out-search-ads-1485950403">told</a> the Wall Street Journal that this has produced "new demand" for advertisers who participated in early testing of search ads.</p> <h3>Pinterest is targeting the upper funnel</h3> <p>Pinterest sees its search ads a powerful tool for marketers looking to reach consumers in the upper funnel. According to Kaplan...</p> <blockquote> <p>When people come to Pinterest, they’re starting earlier in their decision-making process. We saw this with the holidays — people were pinning holiday ideas as early as August. For brands, the implications to our business, that’s an amazing opportunity to reach someone at the earliest stages of decision-making.</p> </blockquote> <p>So while it's possible that clicks on Pinterest's search ads will convert quickly, Pinterest is positioning search ads as a driver of awareness, not conversions.</p> <h3>Search ads are now available to Kenshoo clients<br> </h3> <p>Initially, search ads are available to advertisers who are using the marketing software suite offered by Kenshoo, which is used by many search advertisers. Thanks to its integration with Kenshoo, Pinterest is now listed as an option alongside other search providers Kenshoo clients can run campaigns with, including, of course, Google.</p> <p>Pinterest will reportedly add partnerships with other companies that operate ad buying platforms in the near future.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68753 2017-01-30T14:31:08+00:00 2017-01-30T14:31:08+00:00 What brands need to know about Facebook's long-form video push Patricio Robles <h3>It's changing the way video completion rates are factored into News Feed ranking</h3> <p>In a blog post, Facebook product manager Abhishek Bapna and research scientist Seyoung Park <a href="https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2017/01/news-feed-fyi-updating-how-we-account-for-video-completion-rates/">explained</a> that Facebook is changing the way it factors the <em>percent completion</em> metric for video into how it ranks content for placement in user News Feeds:</p> <blockquote> <p>If you watch most or all of a video, that tells us that you found the video to be compelling — and we know that completing a longer video is a bigger commitment than completing a shorter one. As we continue to understand how our community consumes video, we’ve realized that we should therefore weight percent completion more heavily the longer a video is, to avoid penalizing longer videos.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Distribution changes are expected to be small</h3> <p>Despite the tweak, Bapna and Park say that Facebook's distribution changes are not expected to be significant.</p> <p>"Longer videos that people spend time watching may see a slight increase in distribution on Facebook — so people who find longer videos engaging may be able to discover more of them in News Feed. As a side effect, some shorter videos may see a slight dip in News Feed distribution," they stated.</p> <h3>This is (probably) mostly about advertising</h3> <p>Facebook obviously has an interest in ensuring that the content it delivers to users is relevant and engaging, but the decision to more heavily weight video completion percentage for longer videos, however slight, is probably designed to help Facebook's video ad business.</p> <p>Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is not a fan of pre-roll ads, and thus his social network has to date refused to employ them. Facebook is, however, <a href="http://www.recode.net/2017/1/9/14211466/facebook-video-advertising-midroll">testing mid-roll ads</a>, that display after users have watched a video for at least 20 seconds.</p> <p>For mid-roll ads to be successful, Facebook will realistically need to ensure that it has enough inventory of videos that are not super short. That's where the new update and its theoretical incentive to publish longer videos comes in.</p> <h3>Facebook is reportedly going to pay for content</h3> <p>Facebook <a href="http://www.recode.net/2016/12/14/13955348/facebook-original-video">is said to be in talks</a> with television studios and other content creators about the licensing and production of original content, which would seem to be related to a desire to increase the volume of longer-form video content available to its users.</p> <h3>Brands should think twice before they jump on the long-form video bandwagon</h3> <p>While Facebook suggests that changes in distribution won't be significant as a result of its update, in the ultra-competitve Facebook ecosystem, any update that could give brands a slight edge in capturing eyeballs might entice marketers into changing their behavior.</p> <p>But given the cost of producing longer-form video, and the risk that users won't stay engaged with this content no matter how much Facebook hopes they will, brands active on Facebook should be cautious about pursuing the creation of longer-form video in the hopes that it will help them eek out gains on the social network.</p> <p>Even brands that Facebook lures with payments have reason to be cautious. After all, to drive adoption of its livestream feature, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live">Facebook Live</a>, Facebook struck deals with publishers and celebrities to create live video content. The company reportedly allocated $50m to these deals, with some individual deals being worth seven figures.</p> <p>But a year later, reports indicate that Facebook will not renew these deals, and even if it wanted to, some of the publishers have no interest in renewing because the deals did not prove worthwhile financially.</p> <p>That is a reminder that what Facebook wants today, it might not want tomorrow, especially once it gets what it needs. There's no reason to believe that won't be true for long-form video content too.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68747 2017-01-30T11:47:08+00:00 2017-01-30T11:47:08+00:00 From buzzword to bullsh*t: celebrating 144 years of ‘influencer marketing’ Ian McKee <p>Yeah, you read that right — 1873. Jules Verne, a hugely influential author, was known to be writing another adventure novel <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Product_placement#Origins">when he was lobbied by transport companies for mentions</a>.</p> <p>Perhaps if Jules had been a millennial, then ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ would have been an Instagram Story featuring definitely-not-awkward contract-fulfilling selfies taken on the Orient Express. </p> <p>I’m sure the world would have been a richer place. </p> <h3>New tricks for old dogs</h3> <p>You can see my point, through the dripping sarcasm — <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">influencer marketing</a> is not a new thing. </p> <p>In the decade I’ve been in PR, I’ve been involved in activity that today you might term ‘influencer marketing’ from day one. And I’m a relative whippersnapper compared to the transport industry lobbyists of the 1870s. </p> <p>It goes like this — this person holds sway over our audience. Give them free stuff, or some other compensation, to talk about our brand. Bingo, consider that audience influenced. </p> <p>Coining new terms for old tactics is something we love doing in the internet age. Look at fake news (or, propaganda), <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63722-what-is-native-advertising-and-do-you-need-it/">native advertising</a> (what we used to call advertorial) and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy">content marketing</a> (all marketing involves content, people). </p> <p>Just because the media has changed immeasurably doesn’t mean the ways we use it have. And influencer marketing is another buzzword coined more for tech companies to sell software than it is to describe anything new. </p> <h3>Rule of diminished returns</h3> <p>Which isn’t to say it’s not of value. There’s a reason marketers have been using this tactic for over a century. </p> <p>However, gaining buzzword status has inevitable negative effects. Just as in B2B content marketing when it started getting harder and harder to attract attention to your latest white paper, if everyone’s employing the same tactic then the rule of diminishing returns comes into play. </p> <p>In the case of influencer marketing, if it continues to grow there are only two routes we’ll plausibly go down.</p> <p>The first is a world where literally everyone’s an influencer to some degree. Like in the Black Mirror episode <a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5497778/">Nosedive</a>, whether you can live in a certain place, buy your coffee from a certain café or do a certain job will all depend on your influencer score. Social media armageddon, basically.</p> <p>The second (and far more likely) outcome is a backlash. Consumer cynicism reaches the point where your average Instagram user can spot a plug from a mile off, and the returns of influencer marketing are significantly diminished. </p> <p>I think it’s fairly obvious that we’re approaching the second outcome right now. Stories like <a href="http://digiday.com/agencies/confessions-social-media-exec-no-idea-pay-influencers/">confessions of a social media exec on influencer marketing</a>, or from the other side, Bloomberg’s <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2016-11-30/confessions-of-an-instagram-influencer">confessions of an Instagram influencer</a> show the cracks are forming. </p> <h3>Gaming the system</h3> <p>Of course, I’m aware of the long tail argument — don’t pay over the odds for a superstar ‘influencer’, go with the person that has 10,000 genuinely engaged followers, or even 1,000 but they’re all actual friends and acquaintances. </p> <p>There’s Brian Solis's ‘<a href="http://www.briansolis.com/2012/03/the-pillars-of-influence-and-how-to-activate-them-in-business/">Pillars of Influence</a>’ — reach, relevance and resonance. Make sure your strategy is balanced. </p> <p>The problem is that at the moment, consumers are becoming more cynical, destroying the trust that these pillars are founded on. And this is not helped by the fast-growing phenomenon of the self-made influencer — those that are gaming the system. </p> <p>As any social media guru knows, you can game followers, likes and shares, and plenty of self-proclaimed ‘influencers’ are doing just that. All this makes it harder for any software tool to tell true influence.</p> <h3>Human intuition</h3> <p>Cue influx of software vendors protesting that their tool is super intelligent and can weed out the bogus influencers. </p> <p>I’m sure some of them do, to some degree. But just as in the earlier days of influencer marketing when it was just choosing which media outlets to send a product to, human intuition and experience come into play. </p> <p>I would always tell clients that when choosing media targets that circulation (reach) was one metric, audience (relevance) was another, but so was our own intuition and knowledge. And not just in ‘resonance’ — that should come from the story, the message, or the content. </p> <p>I’m talking about understanding who really knows what they’re talking about and commands attention on a topic. </p> <p>For this there’s no substitute for reading, interacting with and working with the media full time. And the same applies whether you’re talking about a steel industry trade mag or a health and fitness Instagrammer. </p> <h3>‘Influencer marketing’ won’t die</h3> <p>As much as I wish the buzzword would disappear, at the very least the practice will continue. But hopefully it will be <a href="https://www.marketingweek.com/2016/05/26/more-must-be-done-to-educate-brands-on-online-ad-rules-says-asa/">under better-observed regulations</a>, and with growing consumer cynicism the market will bottom out to a more measured approach. </p> <p>If you’re planning an influencer outreach programme anytime soon, obviously you won’t just cream off the top 10 Instagrammers using a relevant hashtag. But hopefully, you also won’t just use what your fancy software’s proprietary algorithm tells you are the top 10 either. </p> <p>By all means take those factors into account, but also spend time reading and reviewing content, understand the audience you want to reach and work transparently with people you know they’ll trust. </p>