tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/search-marketing Latest Search Marketing content from Econsultancy 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69413 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 10 fascinating digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Searches for iPads increase 1.2x YoY</h3> <p>First up, <a href="http://www.hitwise.com/blog/2017/08/hot-back-school-products-age-student/?lang=1&amp;bis_prd=1" target="_blank">Hitwise has revealed</a> what parents have been searching for as their kids head back to school. </p> <p>Parents of children aged 6-11 have been searching for iPads, with online searches for iPad increasing 1.2 times overall year on year. For kids aged 12-17, branded apparel has been in demand, with searches for Gucci belts, Net backpacks and Yeezys by Kanye West all being popular.</p> <p>Lastly, interest in fashion has been much lower for college-age youngsters, while searches for technology such as Nintendo Switch, Apple Watch and HBO Now have been high.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8867/Hitwise.JPG" alt="" width="702" height="380"></p> <h3>More than half of Brits use an ad blocker</h3> <p>In a survey of over 2,000 UK adults, Affilinet has found that more than half of all respondents use an ad blocker while browsing the internet.</p> <p>When it comes to the reasons why, 61.5% say it’s because they find online ads annoying, 41.5% say it’s because they find ads intrusive, while 33.1% say it’s because the ads they used to see were irrelevant.</p> <p>Men are also slightly more likely to use an ad blocker than women, with 48.7% of women stating that they never use them compared to 42.5% of men.</p> <h3>39% of teen YouTube users say it has too many ads </h3> <p>A survey by Forrester Research has found that four in 10 teen users aged 12-17 say there are <a href="https://www.emarketer.com/Article/YouTubes-Teen-Viewers-Complain-of-Too-Many-Ads/1016436" target="_blank">too many ads</a> on YouTube. </p> <p>This is despite the fact that YouTube is accessed by more US teens than any other social platform, with 77% using it on a daily basis compared to 55% who use Facebook.</p> <p>Just 11% of teens think that there are too many ads on Instagram and Snapchat, perhaps proving that native ads are less disruptive than pre or mid-roll ads.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8871/iStock-458931653.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="438"></p> <h3>Brits abandoning £3.4bn in online shopping baskets due to device switching</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="http://www.newsroom.barclays.com/r/3514/_10_5bn_more_in_five_years___that_s_what_uk_retailers" target="_blank">Barclays</a> has revealed that £3.4bn worth of goods are left in online shopping baskets in the UK each year. This is said to be due to device switching, with consumers browsing on their mobile phones before changing to laptops to make the purchase.</p> <p>The report suggests that basket abandonment is also due to a lack of discount incentives and the desire for a variety of delivery options. 38% of consumers say discount codes and 56% say free deliveries would incentivise them to buy.</p> <p>By making online shopping more convenient, Barclays says that retailers could generate £10.5bn more within just five years.</p> <h3>44% of consumers will make a holiday purchase via a voice controlled device</h3> <p>A report by <a href="https://www.walkersands.com/The-Future-of-Retail-2017-Holiday-Report">Walker Sands</a> has predicted that purchases by voice-controlled devices are set to rise this holiday season.</p> <p>Currently, 24% of frequent online shoppers say they ‘often’ or ‘always’ purchase through a voice-controlled device like Amazon Echo. However, 44% of total survey respondents also say that they are ‘somewhat’ or ‘very likely’ to make a product purchase through a voice-controlled device in the next year.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the report also highlights the demand for same-day delivery services, with 66% of frequent online shoppers saying they have used Amazon Prime in the past year, and 39% saying same-day delivery would make them shop online even more.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8868/Voice_controlled_shopping.JPG" alt="" width="666" height="274"></p> <h3>Popularity of mobile payments is rising</h3> <p>A new survey by <a href="https://www.aciworldwide.com/news-and-events/press-releases/2017/september/mobile-payments-rise-in-popularity-reaching-tipping-point-in-some-countries" target="_blank">ACI Worldwide</a> has found that European and American consumers are increasingly embracing mobile payments.</p> <p>While just 6% of US consumers regularly used their mobile devices to make payments in 2014, this has now tripled to 17%. Similarly, 25% of Spanish consumers now use mobile wallets, as do 24% of Italian and 23% of Swedish consumers. </p> <p>Consumer confidence in mobile wallet security is also on the rise, with 37% of UK respondents saying they trust their bank to protect their personal information when paying via their smartphone.</p> <h3>37% of internet users watch Netflix each month</h3> <p><a href="http://blog.globalwebindex.net/chart-of-the-day/netflix-vs-amazon-prime-video-a-global-view/" target="_blank">GlobalWebIndex</a> has been looking into the user-share of both Netflix and Amazon, following on from the latter extending its introductory Prime Video offer across all global markets.</p> <p>It has found that 20% of internet users now use Amazon Prime Video each month, whether on their own account or via someone else’s. However, 37% of people say the same about Netflix.</p> <p>In terms of marketshare, Netflix boasts impressive usage in both Mexico and Brazil, while Amazon Prime reigns supreme in India.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8869/Netflix_vs_Amazon_Prime.JPG" alt="" width="632" height="664"></p> <h3>More than 60% of digital publishers auto-play half of video ads</h3> <p>Despite auto-play ads often being viewed as intrusive or annoying by consumers, <a href="http://www.marketingdive.com/news/mediaradar-61-of-publishers-autoplay-at-least-half-of-video-ads/504417/" target="_blank">MediaRadar</a> has found that 31% of publishers auto-start 75% or more of their on-site video ads. Meanwhile, 60% of publishers auto-play at least half.</p> <p>Small, regional, and B2B publishers have the highest instances of auto-play video ads. Similarly, websites that rely on programmatic advertising are also more likely to employ this type of ad.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8870/MediaRadar.JPG" alt="" width="685" height="346"></p> <h3>Consumers annoyed by disruptive ads</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In other ad news, Inskin Media has been delving into the ad formats that users find the most annoying.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Unsurprisingly, 28% of respondents cited pop-up ads as the most irritating mobile format, closely followed by 26% saying the same for ads that sit in the middle of the screen. 18% said that they are vexed by ads that delay the page loading.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In contrast, ads that that move down the page alongside the content or sit at the top and bottom of the page were found to be much less annoying. In fact, the study also found that people are 134% more likely to remember ads that sit around content compared with the average mobile ad.</p> <h3>Brand activation revenues to reach $357bn this year</h3> <p>According to the <a href="http://www.ana.net/content/show/id/brand-activation-spend-2017" target="_blank">ANA</a> (Association of National Advertisers) and PQ Media, brand activation revenues will reach around $357bn in 2017.</p> <p>This is based on the fact that total marketing operator revenues from brand activation rose by 6.7% in 2016, with further growth now expected.</p> <p>Revenues in content marketing climbed 11.3% last year, while influencer marketing saw the second-highest growth rate, growing 8.7% to $49.1bn. Revenues from experiential marketing also jumped by 6.7% to $50.6bn.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3247 2017-09-08T11:13:37+01:00 2017-09-08T11:13:37+01:00 Mini Masters in Digital Marketing Online <p>If you want to accelerate your career to take a leadership role as a professional digital marketer then the Econsultancy Mini Masters in Digital Marketing is the course that will give you the practical and strategic skills to step up.</p> <p style="background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;">Econsultancy’s Mini Masters is taught online with intensive, challenging, interactive modules taught by the very best in the business. Formalise your existing skills, and come away with the confidence that you really know your stuff – and how to prove it at the highest level. </p> <p style="background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;"><strong>Book your place now! Next course dates are in April and October 2018.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3246 2017-09-08T11:02:07+01:00 2017-09-08T11:02:07+01:00 Mini Masters in Digital Marketing Online <p>If you want to accelerate your career to take a leadership role as a professional digital marketer then the Econsultancy Mini Masters in Digital Marketing is the course that will give you the practical and strategic skills to step up.</p> <p style="background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;">Econsultancy’s Mini Masters is taught online with intensive, challenging, interactive modules taught by the very best in the business. Formalise your existing skills, and come away with the confidence that you really know your stuff – and how to prove it at the highest level. </p> <p style="background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;"><strong>Book your place now! Next course dates are in April and October 2018.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/900 2017-09-04T09:21:20+01:00 2017-09-04T09:21:20+01:00 Briefing: Marketing Trends, Challenges and Opportunities for 2018 <p>If you are going to start working on your marketing plan for 2018, you probably want to know what are the marketing trends, challenges and opportunities for next year. Professor Mark Ritson will be in Singapore on 13th October to share with you his predictions.</p> <p>Join Mark at this 1 hour briefing where he will highlight the key marketing trends, challenges and opportunities for 2018.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69394 2017-09-01T12:18:43+01:00 2017-09-01T12:18:43+01:00 10 stupendous digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please enjoy.</p> <h3>McGregor generates the most social media engagements</h3> <p>He might have lost in the ring, but data from <a href="http://www.4cinsights.com/news/" target="_blank">4C Insights</a> has revealed that Conor McGregor was victorious in generating online media conversation.</p> <p>McGregor saw more than 3,294,078 Facebook and Twitter engagements on fight night, which includes tweets, retweets, replies and likes. In comparison, Mayweather generated 2,986,484 engagements, highlighting McGregor’s ability to generate mass hype and media discussion.</p> <p>The fight amassed 889,705 engagements on Facebook and Twitter in the week leading up to it, before a massive surge on the night itself saw engagements rise 605% to 6,280,562.</p> <h3>Small businesses falling behind on digital transformation</h3> <p><a href="https://www.g2crowd.com/blog/small-business/introducing-crowd-views-iii-small-business-technology/" target="_blank">G2 Crowd</a>’s third quarterly report has revealed that small business owners are failing to effectively market their businesses in a digital world. Research found that 24% of businesses are still largely investing in either newspaper ads and/or billboards, while only 19% of respondents are spending money on Google AdWords. </p> <p>That being said, the report suggests that technology is an area of focus for small businesses interested in scaling growth, with 47% planning to increase IT spending this year.</p> <h3>Number of hours spent checking email decreases 27%</h3> <p>According to Adobe’s third annual <a href="https://blogs.adobe.com/conversations/2017/08/consumers-are-still-email-obsessed-but-theyre-finding-more-balance.html" target="_blank">email survey</a>, people are checking their work and personal email less frequently than they were in 2016.</p> <p>The overall number of hours spent on email per day decreased 27% from last year. Specifically, there was a 28% decrease in consumers checking email messages from bed in the morning, with more than a quarter of consumers now waiting until they get to the office to check their inboxes. </p> <p>The report also suggests one in five consumers never check email outside of normal work hours, and nearly half don’t or rarely check while they’re on holiday. </p> <p>However, this is not the case for millennials. More than half of 18-24 year olds still check their email while in bed in the morning, and 43% of millennials aged 25-34 admit to doing the same.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8676/Adobe.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="311"></p> <h3>Google and Alexa make up 90% of voice commerce market share</h3> <p>The news that Amazon and Google are joining forces could mean big things for voice commerce, according to insight from Walker Sands.</p> <p>Currently, 24% of consumers own a voice controlled device, while 20% plan to purchase within the next year. Together Google and Alexa make up approximately 90% of the market share. </p> <h3>US social ads failing to drive conversions</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://civicscience.com/facebook-ads-affect-purchases-snapchat-twitter-instagram-combined/" target="_blank">CivicScience</a> has found that ads on social platforms like Facebook and Instagram are failing to convert users. </p> <p>In a survey of over 1,900 US consumers, just 1% of respondents aged 13 and older said they have previously made a purchase based on a Snapchat ad, and only 4% said they have bought anything after seeing an Instagram ad. Overall, 45% said that they have never purchased anything based on ads they saw from social media sites, and over a third said they don’t use social media.</p> <p>Facebook was found to be the most influential channel for purchasing behaviour, with 16% of consumers buying a product based on a Facebook ad.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8675/CivicScience.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="394"></p> <h3>Personalisation brings footwear brand 64% increase in ROI </h3> <p>Dune London has revealed that it’s seen a 64% increase in return on investment per customer after personalising its media to real people, in partnership with <a href="http://info.conversantmedia.eu/dune-london" target="_blank">Conversant</a>.</p> <p>Instead of targeting segments or cookies, Dune tailored messages to individual customer’s specific needs and interests. This involves showing complementary products post-purchase, and tailoring ads according to what kinds of products a customer tends to browse and buy the most.</p> <p>As well as a 64% increase in ROI per customer, personalisation also led to a 33% increase in messaged conversion rate.</p> <h3>Push notifications boost in-app spending by 16%</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/leanplums-analysis-reveals-push-notifications-increase-in-app-spend-16-and-drive-96x-more-users-to-buy-300510182.html?tc=eml_cleartime" target="_blank">Leanplum</a>, push notifications can lead to a significant increase in mobile conversions.</p> <p>The Insights to Mobile Revenue report states that push notifications can boost in-app spending by 16% – driving nearly 10 times more users to make a purchase compared to those who did not receive one.</p> <p>Research also found that promotional push notifications sent on a Saturday resulted in over twice as many purchases than notifications sent on Thursday. Meanwhile, push notifications sent during the late afternoon lead to 2.7 times more purchases than any other time of day.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8674/Leanplum.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="509"></p> <h3>One in nine marketers will spend more than £100,000 on influencers in the next year</h3> <p>New research from Takumi has revealed that one in nine marketers plan to spend in excess of £100,000 on influencer marketing in the next 12 months.</p> <p>39% of professionals say they will spend up to £10,000, while a further fifth predict their budget to fall somewhere between £10,000 and £100,000. In contrast, just 4% say they plan to forgo influencer campaigns entirely. </p> <p>This shows the extent to which influencer marketing has grown in popularity, with 26% of marketers now believing it is a more effective way to target consumers than traditional advertising. 43% agree that it is more effective, but only for millennial audiences.</p> <h3>‘In the moment’ searches are on the rise</h3> <p><a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/consumer-insights/consumer-immediate-need-mobile-experiences/?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=promo&amp;utm_team=twg-us&amp;utm_campaign=20170829-twg-micro-moments-email-B&amp;utm_content=cta&amp;mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWlROaE16STJaVE00TkdJdyIsInQiOiI3cVpldDV6cml6S1wvbHlhM0t1SjJzckdyUVZseGQ1NmtjeVwvUmtQXC9mYUVQTmExOEJOZFRNUWJmRkxVcUR0Z0JmcDZNaGMrbFVWNzlDQ2dxYjNia0hjc2FXeEZqd2IwUHFOdVo5N3p5Zk1QM0MxdjBXU1NxUktkNDZ1dVdQWlM0aSJ9" target="_blank">Google research</a> has found that consumers are more impatient than ever before, with increasing expectations for brands to immediately meet their needs. </p> <p>Searches related to ‘same-day shipping’ have grown more than 120% since 2015. Similarly, searches for ‘open now’ have tripled over the past two years, while searches for ‘store hours’ have dropped.</p> <p>Lastly, Google found that travel-related searches for ‘tonight’ and ‘today’ have grown more than 150% on mobile, reflecting consumer demand for spontaneous and in-the-moment bookings.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8673/Open_Now.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="454"></p> <h3>Consumers more likely to make frivolous purchases on touchscreens</h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969698917300024" target="_blank">new study</a> has revealed that consumers are more likely to make purchases when browsing on a touchscreen device, especially when it comes to things they don’t necessarily need.</p> <p>This is because touchscreens create more experiential thinking in users, while desktops evoke rational consideration. </p> <p>An experiment found that participants were more inclined to buy a restaurant gift card than a grocery gift card on a touchscreen, while desktop users favoured the opposite. In this sense, desktop elicits a similar response to shopping in-store, where a series of logical steps means we are less likely to be driven by emotions or impulse.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69384 2017-09-01T10:00:00+01:00 2017-09-01T10:00:00+01:00 SEO David vs. Goliath: How travel sector minnows can overcome their big brand competitors Richard Marriott <p>Perhaps the reason it intrigues me so much is the huge opportunity to grab traffic from the typical head terms, right through to capturing the long tail search queries at the awareness stage in the buying journey. Alongside this is the challenge smaller brands face competing with the giants in the market and having to get smart with leveraging search. </p> <p>During this post, I want to take you through an example overview of part of the travel market and give an understanding on how smaller brands are capturing search traffic against the bigger brands in the industry. </p> <h3><strong>The Goliath Challenge</strong></h3> <p>So, Google has a patent in place in regard to brand weighting and how it is calculated. However, it’s <a href="http://www.seobythesea.com/2015/05/google-site-quality-scores/%20">pretty difficult to understand</a>.<br></p> <p><em>'The system determines a site quality score for the particular site, and might be determined by computing a ratio of a numerator and a denominator, where the numerator is based on the count of unique queries that are categorized as ones that refer to the particular site, and where the denominator is based on the count of unique queries that are just associated with the particular site, just don’t refer to it in the same kind of way.'</em></p> <p>Perhaps something easier to digest is <a href="https://moz.com/blog/rankings-correlation-study-domain-authority-vs-branded-search-volume">this piece</a> by Tom Capper over on Moz, around a ranking correlations study which compares domain authority against branded search volume. Basically, bigger brands seem to rank better and have an uplift due to their authority in the market which is certainly a challenge in the travel industry with giants such as Virgin, Thomas Cook and Thomson.</p> <p>Now I could list at least 20 brands here, but for the purpose of this example I have selected a few that have appeared in a particular SERP that I’m going to be talking about later, with a mixture of big brands, specialists and aggregators.</p> <p>The scale of this can be seen from a simple bit of keyword research along with monthly volumes:</p> <ul> <li>Thomas Cook: 1,400,000</li> <li>Thomson: 992,000</li> <li>Virgin Holidays: 224,000</li> <li>Travel Supermarket: 139,000</li> <li>Lastminute: 75,000</li> <li>Kuoni: 43,000</li> </ul> <h3><strong>Market Landscape</strong></h3> <p>I’m sure you all know how to see where you are in comparison to your competitors, with tools such as Sistrix, SEMrush and Searchmetrics allowing you to see your visibility vs. competitors. We prefer to export all of the keywords that each of the brand ranks for, and then categorise, strip out branded terms and then drop it into a graph to give you a visual.</p> <p>So, for this example we’ve taken a sample set of just over 3,000 keywords, which would equate to just over half a million visits if you were fortunate enough to rank first for them all with conservative CTR assumption.</p> <p>We then pulled just a few of the brands with visibility for these terms, and below you can see the output:</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8639/Competitive-Landscape-Image-1.png" alt="" width="650" height="249"></p> <p>To summarise this, the higher you are the better your average rank across these terms, and the further to the right means the site ranks for a higher number of terms.</p> <p>However, looking at a whole market is perhaps a bit too broad, especially with so many locations and resorts, so if you’ve categorised your keywords well you’ll also be able to run graphs for individual categories. Below is an example for Thailand which contains 480 keywords, which again would equate to 69,000 visits, so still a significant amount of traffic:</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8640/Competitive-Landscape-Thailand.png" alt="" width="650" height="249"></p> <p>We can see that Virgin is out in front with a brand presence of more than five times that of the smallest in the list, Kuoni. So how does Kuoni start to compete or even take market share away from all the other brands with pretty much double the awareness?</p> <p>Let’s take a look...</p> <h3><strong>Links</strong></h3> <p>Like everyone else with any SEO knowledge, I know that it’s not just about number of links. However they are still a very important ranking signal.</p> <p>Below I’ve simply the taken number of referring domains and domain trust from Majestic and charted this in... you’ve got it, another graph:</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Travel-Domain-Trust-and-Linking-Domanins.png" alt="" width="938" height="385"></p> <p>When you correlate the size of brand vs. the volume and quality of links then it’s not representative at all, with Kuoni appearing to do well at earning links and having a higher volume at the same quality as Virgin Holidays. This starts to show that if we took the brand weighting out and relied on authority and links, the market landscape would certainly look different.</p> <p>Next, I’ve looked at links into the key destination landing pages. Interestingly this is a slightly different picture: Virgin Holidays only has nine referring domains and a lower quality of links into its Thailand holiday page and Kuoni has three times the volume of links and significantly more domain trust from those domains.  </p> <p>So more links into the whole domain, individual location directories and a better quality from the smaller brand which is competing against these giants:</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Giants-Domain-Trust-and-Linking-Domains.png" alt="" width="939" height="390"></p> <h3><strong>Engagement</strong></h3> <p>After looking at links I wanted to understand engagement metrics, and for this I used time on site and bounce rate taken from Alexa.  <img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Time-on-Site-and-Bounce-Rate.png" alt="" width="938" height="263"></p> <p>Here’s where some of the bigger brands start to excel and should really be a focus for Kuoni. Interestingly, as they are very bespoke holidays, it links off to a subdomain page potentially making bounce rate inflate and time on site decrease, so would benefit from being all on the same subdomain.</p> <h3><strong>Pages indexed</strong></h3> <p>Next I wanted to understand content depth for pages indexed relevant to Thailand on each of the sites.</p> <p>Here’s how it stacks up (to get the volume simply type site:<em>{url here}</em> inurl:<em>{location}</em></p> <ul> <li>Thomas Cook: 18</li> <li>Thomson: 579</li> <li>Virgin: 136</li> <li>Travel Supermarket: 49</li> <li>Last Minute: 4,440</li> <li>Kuoni: 349</li> </ul> <p><em>**slight caveat alert: lastminute.com has the most amount of pages indexed for /Thailand/ simply due to its broad hotel offering.</em></p> <p>As we saw earlier Kuoni is significantly smaller in terms of overall branded search volume. However, it has the second highest volume of pages ranking for the Thailand keyword set. This shows the brand is making content work hard in order to drive visibility into the keyword set that’s been sampled, and I’m sure if we were to broaden the number of terms then Kuoni would in fact rank for more terms than a lot of the larger brands.</p> <p>A good example to look at is perhaps its multi-centre holidays. This has a reasonable monthly search volume of 590 searches per month. For this term, it outperforms the competitors looked at in this post, and when you look at the pages in comparison to each other you can see why...</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.kuoni.co.uk/thailand/multi-centres">http://www.kuoni.co.uk/thailand/multi-centres</a></li> <li> <a href="https://www.virginholidays.co.uk/destinations/asia-and-far-east/thailand/multi-destination">https://www.virginholidays.co.uk/destinations/asia-and-far-east/thailand/multi-destination</a> </li> <li> <a href="http://www.thomson.co.uk/holidays/multi-centre">http://www.thomson.co.uk/holidays/multi-centre</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://www.travelsupermarket.com/en-gb/holidays/thailand/pattaya/">https://www.travelsupermarket.com/en-gb/holidays/thailand/pattaya/</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://www.thomascook.com/holidays/signature/multi-centre/">https://www.thomascook.com/holidays/signature/multi-centre/</a> </li> </ul> <p>Not only has Kuoni written more content on the main landing page, it has also created lots of other landing pages surrounding this term for each location <em>(Koh Samui/Chiang Mai/Bangkok etc)</em> <em>+ multi centre</em> and along with an internal linking strategy to this content.</p> <h3><strong>Summary...</strong></h3> <p>If you are running the digital strategy for a large brand then you have the ability of exploiting the power of the patent that’s in place for brand weighting in your favour, but don’t rest on your laurels of simply having “the brand” as being enough. </p> <p>As we have seen, despite this patent, smaller brands still have a huge opportunity to capture traffic through building and creating relevant landing pages and driving authority into deeper pages of the site.</p> <p>Below I’ve summarised the findings in a simple table. As we have seen Kuoni is managing to compete with the ‘giants’ of the industry when it comes to visibility of specific locations. While we can see that it is only really competing in the ‘site specifics’ on overall domain authority, Kuoni is focusing on driving deeper authority and creating more location specific content on the site to drive location specific visibility.</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Screen-Shot-2017-08-29-at-11.52.09.png" alt="" width="894" height="152"></p> <p>Despite this relatively small sample keyword set and list of brands analysed, it's clear to me that between them they all could be driving further awareness visibility through content output. While a lot of them are ranking for ‘I want to know’ micro-moments they are all appearing much further down the SERP for these types of terms.  </p> <p>For example, ‘things to do in Phuket’ delivers an average of 3,600 searches per month giving the Davids of this world an opportunity to capture lots of this traffic, right at the top of the purchase funnel.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/seo-best-practice-guide"><em>Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Best Practice Guide</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/seo"><em>SEO training courses</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3243 2017-08-16T04:20:51+01:00 2017-08-16T04:20:51+01:00 Mastering Customer Experience (CX) Management in the Digital Age <p>This 1-day intensive course is designed to give you a holistic understanding of the mind of today’s customer and delivers highly effective strategies to attract and retain them. This new and highly relevant course gives you the edge you need to be successful in today’s complex business environment.</p> <p>Quite simply, without customers you don’t have a business. Winning customers today has a become a lot more complicated as people have changed the way they buy goods and services.</p> <p>Research indicates that typically 80% of your business comes from 20% of your loyal customers.</p> <p>But in today’s customer controlled world, earning loyalty is a real challenge.  This is because we are dealing with a very smart and discerning customer who is looking for immense value, has very high expectations and hyper researching everything.</p> <p>Yet, innovative and smart businesses have created customer experience formulas that work extremely well for them. Zappos, Disney, Airbnb, Virgin, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Hubspot among others continue to deliver amazing experiences and drive sales.</p> <p>This unique and insightful course teaches you how successful companies design and deliver amazing customer experiences. It gives you an insider view and highly effective tips and tricks to deliver amazing experiences at every brand touch point to win and retain your customers.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3242 2017-08-16T04:05:45+01:00 2017-08-16T04:05:45+01:00 Proving Digital ROI <p>A one-day workshop which will demystify the concept of ROI (return on investment)  by instructing participants about the key metrics, calculation, and techniques for reporting marketing performance to management.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69312 2017-08-07T16:40:00+01:00 2017-08-07T16:40:00+01:00 Google's badges for Image Search offer a new reason to use structured data Patricio Robles <p>Last week, Pinterest <a href="https://blog.pinterest.com/en/search-and-lens-move-front-and-center">announced</a> that it has updated its app to put search front and center. According to Pinterest product manager Audrey Tsang, "We're making it easier for people to search for ideas on their phones because that's what an increasing number of people are coming here to do. Monthly mobile text searches are up 40% over last year."</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/8057/search-on-homefeed-v01-us-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="313"></p> <p>Tsang also revealed that "Thanks to our visual discovery features, monthly visual searches have increased nearly 60% over last year. And our search returns 20% more Pins, with nearly 4bn ideas getting served up each and every day."</p> <p>Pinterest's focus on visual search is part of a bold strategy bet that has been in the works for some time. While the popular social platform, which boasts some 175m users a month, is far from a dominant ad player, it's looking to change that.</p> <p>"We're going to be the company that helps you use your phone to search the real world using images," <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/pinterest-visual-search-engine-for-real-world-could-upend-ad-business-2017-6">the company promised</a> at the Cannes advertising festival in June. If it can pull that off, its ad business could boom.</p> <p>But the world's largest search engine, Google, has its own visual search plans too.</p> <p>On Tuesday, the search giant <a href="http://webmasters.googleblog.com/2017/08/badges-on-image-search-help-users-find.html">announced</a> that its Image Search on mobile devices now supports badges that indicate when an image is associated with a recipe, video, product or animation (GIF).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8058/cupcakes-pr3-device.gif" alt=""></p> <p>According to Assaf Broitman, a member of Google's Image Search team, the badges will help Google users who turn to Image Search not knowing exactly what they're looking for. He offers an example:</p> <blockquote> <p>When you want to bake cupcakes, but you don't know what kind, Image Search can help you make a decision. Finding an image with a recipe can be challenging: you might end up on a page that has only pictures of these delicious things, or a cupcake fan site that doesn't have recipes, but everything else about them.</p> </blockquote> <p>Badges address this issue, and to help Google identify content so that it can apply badges where appropriate, the search engine is encouraging publishers to add Recipe, Product and Video structured data markup to their pages using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64778-what-is-schema-markup-and-why-should-you-be-using-it">schema.org markup</a>.</p> <p>Google launched schema.org <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/7603-schema-org-good-for-google-bing-and-yahoo-bad-for-everyone-else">with Yahoo and Bing</a> in 2011. While there is debate over structured data's effect on search engine rankings, evidence suggests that use of structured data can help publishers achieve greater clickthrough rates.</p> <p>As Mary Bowling, co-founder of digital agency Ignitor Digital, <a href="https://blog.searchmetrics.com/us/2016/05/11/searchlove-boston-recap/">explained</a>, use of schema.org markup is "not a ranking signal, but a clarity signal." By helping Google better understand the content of a page, publishers can increase the likelihood that their content will be displayed in the SERPs via a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/61990-the-value-of-rich-snippets-and-structured-data">rich snippet</a>, which can in turn increase the likelihood that users click on it.</p> <p>By using schema.org markup to apply badges in Image Search, Google is giving publishers a new reason to add schema.org markup to their pages if they're not already doing so. And because Pinterest also supports schema.org structured data, publishers can take advantage of Pinterest's growing focus on visual search at the same time.</p> <p><strong><em>To learn more on this topic, book yourself onto our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/seo-training/">SEO Training Course</a>. Subscribers can also download our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/seo-best-practice-guide">SEO Best Practice Guide</a>.</em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69313 2017-08-04T10:26:00+01:00 2017-08-04T10:26:00+01:00 10 thrilling digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Users spend nearly 30 minutes on Instagram every day</h3> <p>Thanks to the popularity of Instagram Stories, which is now a year old, <a href="http://blog.instagram.com/post/163728483085/170802-storiesbirthday" target="_blank">Instagram</a> has revealed that people are spending more time on the platform overall.</p> <p>Users under the age of 25 are said to spend more than 32mins a day on Instagram. Similarly, users aged 25 and older use the app for more than 24mins a day.</p> <p>Stories has 250m daily users, with teenagers consuming four times more stories and producing six times more stories than non-teens.</p> <p>Brands have also been quick to see the value of Instagram Stories – 51% of monthly active businesses have posted a story in the last 28 days.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Celebrating one year of Instagram Stories <a href="https://t.co/GTJaFW7KdW">https://t.co/GTJaFW7KdW</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/892748576195043329">August 2, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Marketers willing to pay Facebook influencers £75k per post</h3> <p>Research by Rakuten Marketing has revealed that UK marketers are willing to pay influencers more than £75,000 for a single Facebook post mentioning their brand. This figure rises depending on the industry, with premium fashion marketers saying they’d be willing to pay up to £160,000 per post. </p> <p>Earnings also differ by platform, as celebrity influencers on Facebook are said to earn an average of 12% more than their YouTube peers. And while Snapchat is ranked fifth in terms of earnings, marketers still say they are willing to pay stars as much as £53,000 per Snap.</p> <p>This news comes despite the fact that 86% of marketers admit they aren’t entirely sure how influencer fees are calculated, and 38% cannot tell whether a campaign drives sales.</p> <h3>Brands must offer more to build loyalty with younger customers</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="http://thoughtleadership.ricoh-europe.com/uk/triple-r/digital-innovation-key-for-smes-pursuing-customer-relationship-excellence/" target="_blank">Ricoh UK</a> has highlighted the generational differences when it comes to attitudes about customer service.</p> <p>Research found that older age groups are less forgiving to brands, with 62% of those aged over 55 saying they would be prepared to walk away from a brand with a laborious sales process compared to 43% of those aged 16-24.</p> <p>Meanwhile, younger customers expect far more information at the consideration stage and post-sales interaction – 43% of those aged 16-24 rated third party reviews and recommendations as the factor that impresses them most, compared to only 20% of people aged 55+.</p> <p>Out of all age groups, 55% of customers say they would abandon a purchase if they found the process difficult.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8088/Capture.JPG" alt="" width="473" height="197"></p> <h3>Brands send more holiday-themed emails despite lower open rates </h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www.yeslifecyclemarketing.com/who-we-are/news-and-events/news/study-q4-2016-holiday-themed-emails-may-produce-lower-open-rates" target="_blank">study</a> by Yes Lifecycle Marketing, which involved the analysis of almost 8bn emails sent in Q4 2016, found that holiday-themed emails generated a 14.6% lower open rate than standard emails.</p> <p>Despite this, brands sent 14.5% more emails to subscribers during the period, with 55% of all brands partaking in holiday-themed campaigns. </p> <p>The research also suggests that customers do not particularly value discounts in holiday-themed emails. Emails that didn't include an offer achieved higher open rates than those that promised money off.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8087/holiday_emails.JPG" alt="" width="738" height="226"></p> <h3>UK’s June heatwave sparked a 200% increase in Fitbit searches</h3> <p>It might feel like a distant memory now, but analysis by Summit has revealed how retailers benefited from the recent spell of hot weather in the UK.</p> <p>As temperatures reached 34.5 degrees this June, consumers purchased more goods relating to fitness and the great outdoors. Argos sold enough paddling pools to hold over 70m litres of water during the heatwave.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Fitbit searches saw a 200% increase in demand, and camping-related search terms increased by 86%, driving the biggest increase in demand in nine years. Lastly, searches for fishing equipment more than doubled, seeing a 193% increase, and demonstrating how changes in temperature can influence purchasing decisions.</p> <h3>Discounts on direct hotel bookings increase average order value</h3> <p>Research conducted by <a href="https://www.hotelchamp.com/blog/boost-direct-bookings-build-guest-relations/" target="_blank">Hotelchamp</a> has shown that discounts can result in higher conversion rate and average order value for direct hotel bookings.</p> <p>It found that hotels offering a 5% discount (rather than no discount) resulted in an 11% increase in conversion rate and a 12% increase in average booking value. When this was increased to a 10% discount, it found a 50% increase in conversion rate and an 11% increase in average booking value. </p> <p>So, despite offering a discount to guests in both instances, the average booking value always increased by over 10%, meaning that customers were naturally more inclined to purchase upsell features such as breakfast or a room upgrade.</p> <h3>A quarter of US consumers stop buying from brands due to political beliefs</h3> <p><a href="https://www.ipsos.com/en-us/knowledge/society/brand-risk-in-new-age-of-populism" target="_blank">Ipsos</a> has found that the political preferences of consumers have an increasing impact on their buying behaviour. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,016 US adults, it found that a quarter of American consumers have stopped using products and services due to boycotts or a company’s political leanings.</p> <p>The study also revealed that there has been an uptick in online search traffic for the term ‘boycott’ since Trump was officially elected in November 2016. Meanwhile, it found that the firms with the highest rate of consumer boycotts also registered the worst stock market performance between November 2016 and February 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8086/boycott.JPG" alt="" width="637" height="298"></p> <h3>UK ad viewability reaches highest level in over a year</h3> <p>According to analysis by <a href="https://www.meetrics.com/en/benchmarks-uk/" target="_blank">Meetrics</a>, UK ad viewability has risen for the first time in nine months.</p> <p>This appears to be due to a significant increase in the amount of banner ads that meet minimum requirements – rising from 47% to 51% of ads in the second quarter of 2017. This is the highest level since Q3 2016, when 54% of ads met the minimum standard. </p> <p>Despite this news, the UK is still lagging behind in viewability levels compared to elsewhere in Europe, where countries like Austria and France have an average of 69% and 58% respectively. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8089/meetrics.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="267"></p> <h3>UK consumers positive about personal job security</h3> <p>In a survey of 2,000 UK consumers, <a href="http://www.lloydsbankinggroup.com/media/economic-insight/economic-research-library/spending-power-report/" target="_blank">Lloyds</a> found that 64% of people were feeling positive about their personal financial situation in June – up from 63% in May and just two percentage points lower than in June of last year.</p> <p>Despite the value of the pound falling since then, UK consumers appear relatively unfazed when it comes to their own personal prospects, with 80% saying they feel optimistic about their own job security, and 53% saying they are positive about employment prospects nationally.</p> <p>Howoever, the survey did highlight some disparity between attitudes about personal finances and the national economy as a whole, with just 33% saying they feel good about the UK’s financial situation compared to 45% in June 2016.</p>