tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/reputation-management Latest Reputation management content from Econsultancy 2016-08-10T05:00:41+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/2961 2016-08-10T05:00:41+01:00 2016-08-10T05:00:41+01:00 Econsultancy's Certificate in Digital Marketing & Google AdWords Qualified Individual Certification - Singapore <h3><strong>Course benefits</strong></h3> <p>Econsultancy and ClickAcademy Asia are proud to launch the first world-class Certificate in Digital Marketing programme in Singapore catering to senior managers and marketing professionals who want to understand digital marketing effectively in the shortest time possible. Participants who complete the programme requirement will be awarded the <strong>Econsultancy's Certificate in Digital Marketing</strong> and <strong>Google AdWords Qualified Individual</strong> <strong>Certificate</strong>.</p> <p>The double certification programme is uniquely positioned to deliver these benefits:</p> <ul> <li>Course content and curriculum provided by Econsultancy of UK, the world leading digital marketing best practice community and publisher with 250,000+ subscribers</li> <li>Certification in Google AdWords, a highly sought-after professional qualification by Google for digital marketing professionals</li> <li>3 free credits to download 3 Econsultancy reports (worth USD695/report) from Econsultancy's portal containing 500,000+ pages of digital marketing resources, reports and best practice guides</li> <li>Short 8-week course with lesson once or twice a week</li> <li>Practical and real-life training by certified digital marketing practitioners</li> <li>Conducted locally in Singapore with ‘live’ face-to-face training, and not webinars or online learning</li> </ul> <h3>Econsultancy's Reports (Complimentary)</h3> <p>FREE 3 Credits to download Econsultancy's reports from Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/">portal</a> containing 500,000+ pages of digital marketing resources, reports and best practice guides.</p> <h3><strong>Course Details</strong></h3> <p>This double certification course is a 8-week part-time programme for working professionals who intend to upgrade their knowledge in digital marketing. Upon successful completion of the programme, participants will obtain a double certification, and are awarded the Certificate in Digital Marketing (powered by Econsultancy) and the Google AdWords Individual Qualification. </p> <p>This is a part-time programme with 64 contact hours (total 8 days) spread over 8 weeks. Participants will only be certified after passing the Google AdWords exams and the digital marketing project, and complete at least 52 contact hours. </p> <p>The part-time programme covers topics ranging from the overview of digital marketing, customer acquisition channels to social media marketing. </p> <p><strong>Start Date:</strong> 11 Oct 2016</p> <p><strong>Venue:</strong> Lifelong Learning Institute, Singapore, #04-02</p> <p><strong>Course Fee:</strong><strong> SGD 5,880/pax</strong><br>(SGD2,000 discount for Econsultancy’s paying subscribers at SGD 3,880/pax.)</p> <p>To find out more and register, click <a href="http://www.clickacademyasia.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/doublecert-brochure-sg-my-2H2016.pdf" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> <h4>For enquiries, please contact us<strong> </strong>at +65 6653 1911 or email<strong> <a href="mailto:%20apac@econsultancy.com" target="_blank">apac@econsultancy.com</a></strong> </h4> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68098 2016-07-21T09:53:00+01:00 2016-07-21T09:53:00+01:00 Twitter announces application process for verified accounts: what marketers need to know Patricio Robles <p>Twitter announced a public verification application process that allows any brand or individual to request a verified account.</p> <p>According to Tina Bhatnagar, Twitter's vice president of User Services, "We hope opening up this application process results in more people finding great, high-quality accounts to follow, and for these creators and influencers to connect with a broader audience."</p> <p>Here's what marketers need to know about this development...</p> <h3>It's open to all</h3> <p>Twitter's new verification application process is available to all Twitter accounts that have a valid phone number and email address, and a bio, website, profile photo and header photo. In addition, accounts must be public and accounts for individuals must have a birthday specified.</p> <p>Applications for verification can be submitted through a form at <a href="http://verification.twitter.com">verification.twitter.com</a>.</p> <h3>Twitter looks for certain characteristics</h3> <p>While accounts meeting the above criteria are eligible for consideration, in deciding which requests to approve, Twitter looks for accounts that have certain characteristics.</p> <p>These include an account name that reflects the real name of an individual or company, as well as profile and header photos that are of the individual or associated with the company's branding. As such, marketers looking to submit an application for verification should ensure that the Twitter account in question meets these criteria.</p> <p>Brand accounts must be associated with a company email address, and Twitter may ask individuals to supply a government-issued ID.</p> <h3>There has to be a good reason for verification</h3> <p>Twitter won't verify accounts unless it believes there's a reason to.</p> <p>Specifically, Twitter requires verification applications to explain why verification is appropriate. "If the account represents a person, we want to understand their impact in their field. If it represents a corporation or company, let us know their mission," the company explains. </p> <p>To help support a rationale for verification, requests can and should include URLs to pages, such as news articles, that "help express the account holder’s newsworthiness or relevancy in their field."</p> <h3>Content marketing and engagement FTW</h3> <p>While not stated, it would seem that marketers behind active Twitter accounts that regularly publish unique, compelling content and engage with followers would be more likely to win Twitter's approval than accounts that aren't adding value to the Twitter community.</p> <p>While it probably wouldn't make sense for a brand to up its investment in Twitter just to win Verified Account status, those that are already investing in the platform probably have few reasons not to try to take advantage of the new application process. </p> <h3>There are no guarantees</h3> <p>Even when an account looks like a legitimate candidate for verification, Twitter isn't necessarily going to approve a verification request.</p> <p>Case in point: Hunter Walk, a former Google employee who now runs a venture capital firm, has tweeted more than 45,000 times since joining Twitter in 2006 and has more than 110,000 followers, but his application was denied.</p> <p>At the same time, a user with 7,500 tweets who joined Twitter in 2014 and has less than 9,000 followers received Verified Account status.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">wanted to see what would happen if i used new Twitter Verification process. Answer: NO <a href="https://t.co/h3T2kggzD1">pic.twitter.com/h3T2kggzD1</a></p> — Hunter Walk (@hunterwalk) <a href="https://twitter.com/hunterwalk/status/755836108953444352">20 de julio de 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>Applications that are denied can be re-submitted after 30 days, so marketers that aren't able to win Twitter's approval the first time around should be proactive in making adjustments and trying again.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68015 2016-06-29T14:48:59+01:00 2016-06-29T14:48:59+01:00 Chipotle launches a loyalty scheme to win customers back Patricio Robles <p>That hasn't proven easy. As Warren Buffett once observed... </p> <blockquote> <p>It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it.</p> </blockquote> <p>Chipotle ostensibly doesn't have 20 years to rebuild its reputation, so it's turning to something it once shunned in an effort to win back customers: a loyalty scheme.</p> <p>And it's being incredibly generous with that loyalty scheme.</p> <p>In fact, according to Peter Saleh, an analyst at financial services firm BTIG, Chipotle's new scheme, dubbed Chiptopia, is one of the most generous offered by a restaurant.</p> <p>Under Chiptopia, customers earn free entrées after their fourth, eighth and eleventh visits each month, and receive free chips and guacamole when they join and make their first purchase.</p> <p>Customers who visit 11 times in three consecutive months earn "Hot" status and are rewarded with free catering for a party of 20.</p> <h3>Will it work?</h3> <p>While loyalty schemes are virtually ubiquitous today, their efficacy is subject to debate.</p> <p>Research conducted by The Logic Group and Ipsos MORI <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/8554-consumers-want-discounts-and-special-treatment-in-return-for-loyalty">found that loyalty schemes don't do a very good job at driving loyalty</a>, at least as far as supermarkets are concerned.</p> <p>Loyalty schemes can also be tricky to change. Starbucks learned that the hard way <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67568-starbucks-shows-perils-of-loyalty-program-changes/">when it updated its Starbucks Rewards scheme</a> earlier this year.</p> <p>Previously, Starbucks rewarded customers based on the frequency of their visits, but like companies in other markets, such as the airline industry, the company realized that rewarding customers based on dollars spent made more financial sense.</p> <p>Not surprisingly, tying rewards to spend instead of purchase frequency was not beneficial for many loyalty scheme participants, and Starbucks' change was thus met with criticism.</p> <p>Chipotle is clearly trying to avoid a similar backlash by putting a huge asterisk next to Chiptopia: the scheme is not permanent. Instead, it will run for only three months.</p> <p>If the company has its way, Chiptopia's generous rewards will lure customers back into its stores over that three-month period, and those that had been avoiding Chipotle following the E. coli outbreaks will soon forget the past.</p> <p>But there's no guarantee Chipotle will have its way.</p> <p>After all, it's not clear that customers who have come to question Chipotle's quality will be enticed by a loyalty scheme that offers free food they don't trust.</p> <p>At the same time, it's possible that Chiptopia will primarily appeal to the customers who have stuck with Chipotle despite the outbreaks, doing little to solve the chain's real problem.</p> <p>Despite the possibility that Chiptopia won't have the intended effect, Chipotle is in a difficult position.</p> <p>It needs to regain customer trust, and it can't do that unless it gets customers through the doors.</p> <p>Short of giving away food – something the company <a href="http://fortune.com/2016/03/16/chipotle-burritos-giveaway/"><em>has</em> tried</a> – a generous, time-limited loyalty scheme is probably worth a shot.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67923 2016-06-09T14:43:00+01:00 2016-06-09T14:43:00+01:00 Influencer marketing is becoming a joke: What can brands do about it? Patricio Robles <p>That dark side was on display for all to see recently when Scott Disick, a television personality best known for his relationship with reality TV star and socialite Kourtney Kardashian, was caught posting an ostensibly paid promotion for Bootea protein shakes.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/5705/oops-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="" width="415" height="738"></p> <p>As the screenshot above demonstrates, Disick's Bootea Instagram post was about as far from authentic as is possible and not surprisingly, Disick was subsequently teased and lambasted for his embarrassing faux pas.</p> <p>Brands should take note and heed the following advice to ensure their influencer marketing campaigns don't become a joke.</p> <h3>1. Align your brand with the right influencers</h3> <p>With 16.4m Instagram followers, Scott Disick's ability to reach a large number of people is hard to dispute.</p> <p>But why would Bootea, a health and wellness brand, align itself with a celebrity who is known for his hard-partying ways and who has made headlines for his struggles with drug and alcohol abuse?</p> <p>While Disick shouldn't be shamed for those struggles, it's hard not to think that Bootea would have been better off aligning itself with influencers whose lifestyles are more consistent with its values.</p> <p>Long-term, that is a much safer bet.</p> <h3>2. Think bigger than paid posts</h3> <p>For obvious reasons, paid posts are not going away.</p> <p>But any good influencer campaign should be more thoughtful and comprehensive than paid posts that are the social web equivalent of product placement.</p> <p>The reason for this is that paid posts alone are probably not going to move the needle, especially if those paid posts are not compelling and not clearly aligned with the influencer's persona. </p> <h3>3. Trust your influencers</h3> <p>If a brand can't trust an influencer to write his or her own 140-character tweet or caption for an Instgram post, the influencer relationship needs to be reassessed.</p> <p>Influencer content, even when paid for, should at least <em>appear</em> to be somewhat authentic.</p> <p>Here, an influencer was directed to publish a post referencing a morning protein shake in the afternoon. #fail</p> <h3>4. Co-create, and demand more</h3> <p>Naturally, brands are going to want to have some say in what influencers post.</p> <p>But a brand shouldn't have to direct an influencer to write something as simple as "Keeping up with the summer workout routine..."</p> <p>Instead, they should <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/influencing-the-influencers-the-magic-of-co-created-content">co-create content</a> with their influencers to ensure that they stay on message without compromising the influencer's authenticity and creativity.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5752/disick.jpg" alt="" width="578" height="370"></p> <p>And they should demand the latter to ensure that they don't get lazy, uninspired content like the above, which is another paid post Disick published for Bootea several weeks ago.</p> <p>Note the similarity to the botched paid post, and the fact that neither post even suggests that Disick is actually using the product. There isn't a glass in sight in either photo.</p> <h3>5. Don't ignore the rules</h3> <p>Although Disick fixed his Instagram faux pas and included the hashtag #ad to identify his post as a paid advertisement, brands looking to ensure their influencer marketing campaigns don't fail should remember not to ignore <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67368-what-advertisers-need-to-know-about-the-ftc-s-new-guidance-on-native-ads/">the guidances provided by the Federal Trade Commission</a> vis-à-vis advertising disclosures.</p> <p>While the FTC obviously can't take action against every violator, <a href="https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2016/03/lord-taylor-settles-ftc-charges-it-deceived-consumers-through">the agency recently settled</a> with Lord &amp; Taylor after alleging that the retailer, among other things, paid Instagram fashion influencers to post pictures of themselves wearing a dress it sold.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67881 2016-05-26T13:42:32+01:00 2016-05-26T13:42:32+01:00 Seven big challenges facing healthcare marketers Patricio Robles <h3>1. Digital underinvestment</h3> <p>By some estimates, healthcare spending in the US is close to 20% of GDP, but healthcare marketers aren't funneling much of their marketing dollars into digital. </p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67131-pharma-s-mobile-social-efforts-aren-t-as-healthy-as-they-should-be">According to</a> Deloitte Consulting, healthcare and pharma marketers spent just $1.4bn on digital ads, a figure that lags marketers in other industries.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0006/8525/deloitte1.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>One of the consequences of this digital underinvestment is that this has created opportunities for third parties to become the go-to resources for consumers and physicians looking for healthcare information online.</p> <p>This is despite the fact that, in many cases, healthcare marketers' organizations have valuable, proprietary data and content.</p> <h3>2. Measurement &amp; metrics</h3> <p>While measurement is top-of-mind for most marketers, it hasn't been as important in healthcare because of the role marketing has played historically in healthcare organizations.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67863-healthcare-marketers-making-progress-on-measurement-metrics/">That's changing</a>, and many organizations have adopted a number of sensible growth and brand-related metrics.</p> <p>But adoption of metrics related to stakeholder engagement and marketing communications, including patient satisfaction and paid media, are still undervalued, which can make it more difficult for healthcare marketers to "connect the dots."</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5068/hccforating.png" alt=""></p> <h3>3. Market structure</h3> <p>Healthcare is not a typical market. In the US, few consumers pay directly for care and drugs; instead, third parties like insurers pay the bills and control where, when and how consumers access the healthcare system.</p> <p>For marketers, this presents a number of challenges. One of the biggest: even if you can persuade a consumer that your hospital provides the highest quality of care or that your drug is the most effective, the consumer might not be able to access your product or service.</p> <p>So in many cases, healthcare marketers find themselves playing a game of triangulation involving consumers and care providers, like hospital systems and physicians.</p> <p>For obvious reasons, this makes developing an effective marketing strategy a more complicated proposition.</p> <h3>4. The trust gap</h3> <p>The healthcare industry, and pharma in particular, doesn't have the best reputation thanks in part to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67590-can-targeted-social-ads-help-pharma-overcome-drug-pricing-controversy">controversies over subjects like drug pricing</a>.</p> <p>That has created a trust gap in which consumers as well as physicians are less likely to trust ads and information that come from healthcare marketers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0006/8526/deloitte2.jpg" alt="" width="635" height="467"></p> <p>To rectify this, healthcare marketers <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67747-pharma-marketers-should-use-storytelling-to-improve-the-industry-s-reputation">will need to become more adroit at storytelling</a>.</p> <p>Unfortunately, as Alexandra von Plato, group president of North America for Publicis Healthcare Communications Group, has observed, "We neglect the origin story. Instead we run these dumb ads," referring to the ubiquitous and oft-parodied television ads promoting prescription drugs.</p> <h3>5. Lawmakers</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Those <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67227-ban-on-consumer-ads-could-make-pharma-s-digital-shortcomings-more-costly">"dumb ads" haven't made fans of physicians</a>, and the aforementioned drug pricing controversy has made pharma companies Enemy #1 for some lawmakers in the US.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">That could soon have a dramatic impact on healthcare marketers as lawmakers consider reigning in how healthcare marketers promote their wares to professionals and the public.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Given how reliant pharma marketers in particular have become on television ads, and how underinvested they are in digital, greater restrictions on advertising could make life very difficult.</p> <h3>6. HIPAA</h3> <p>Consumer adoption of wearables is growing but healthcare marketers are struggling to take advantage of wearable opportunities.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67074-is-the-healthcare-industry-prepared-for-wearables">There are a number of reasons for this</a>, but one might be HIPAA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which regulates the use of Protected Health Information (PHI).</p> <p>Healthcare organizations regulated by HIPAA <a href="http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/are-wearables-violating-hipaa">must receive consent</a> from patients before their PHI is used for marketing purposes, and there are many grey areas, particularly as far as innovative technologies such as wearables are concerned.</p> <p>That means healthcare marketers realistically don't have the same flexibility as marketers in other industries that aren't subject to HIPAA.</p> <h3>7. Data</h3> <p>Out of necessity, healthcare organizations may be adept at dealing with issues related to data security.</p> <p>However, as a recent Econsultancy and Ogilvy CommonHealth report - <em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-study-organizing-marketing-in-the-digital-age/">Organizing Healthcare Marketing in the Digital Age</a> -</em> discovered, a majority are unprepared to deal with emerging data sources or to collect high volumes of data at speed.</p> <p>Furthermore, a surprising large number of organizations (44%) aren't even prepared to use their CRM data in marketing campaigns.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0006/7696/Screen_Shot_2015-10-05_at_18.50.56.png" alt=""></p> <p>Because effective collection and use of data is increasingly integral to successful digital marketing, healthcare marketers' capabilities around data will need to improve.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67863 2016-05-23T15:09:42+01:00 2016-05-23T15:09:42+01:00 Healthcare marketers making progress on measurement & metrics Patricio Robles <p>According to the <a href="http://www.shsmd.org/">Society for Healthcare Strategy and Marketing Development</a> (SHSMD), there are a number of reasons for this.</p> <p>One is that historically, executives at healthcare organizations have considered marketing to be a cost center and not a profit center.</p> <p>Another is that in healthcare, marketing has a narrower purview and marketers are disconnected from strategy and product management.</p> <p>But times are changing and SHSMD says that tightening margins are forcing healthcare marketers to prove that their efforts are paying off.</p> <p>To help healthcare organizations quantify the effects of their marketing campaigns, SHSMD, which is a personal membership group of the American Hospital Association, formed a Marketing Metrics Committee to help establish a standard framework and metrics for measuring healthcare marketers' contributions.</p> <p>SHSMD recently released a white paper, <em><a href="http://www.shsmd.org/resources/marketing/reports.shtml">Life Beyond Promotion: Core Metrics for Measuring Marketing's Financial Performance</a></em>, that details the committee's recommendations.<em><br></em></p> <p>The committee identified four areas where marketing plays a role – growth, brand and image, stakeholder engagement, and marketing communications – and sought to define where marketing has responsibility and influence.</p> <p>It then developed a list of 17 core metrics that financial executives and healthcare marketers believed were of the greatest importance and how frequently they should be evaluated.</p> <p>These metrics include Volume Change, Increased Revenue, New Patient Acquisition, Brand Awareness and Patient Satisfaction.</p> <p>Metrics related to Marketing Communications, which seek to "influence utilization and loyalty," distinguish between different types of media (paid, earned, owned, etc.).</p> <p>Not surprisingly, a poll of 34 senior healthcare marketers reveals that growth and brand metrics like Volume Change and Organizational Reputation have been widely adopted, while adoption of a number of Marketing Communications metrics, namely Owned and Paid Media, lag. </p> <p>Most worringly, just 57% of the healthcare marketers surveyed indicated Patient Satisfaction is being measured.</p> <p>This suggests that many healthcare organizations may not currently be connecting the dots between how customer perception of their services can work for or against marketing efforts that directly and indirectly influence the metrics they weigh the most.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/5066/hcmetrics-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="486"></p> <p>Also not surprising is the fact that CFOs were big on measuring marketing's contribution to growth, brand and image, but weren't as enthusiastic about measuring its contribution to stakeholder engagement and marketing communications.</p> <p>Again, this suggests that there could be a disconnect between how all of these areas relate to and impact each other.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5068/hccforating.png" alt="" width="239" height="206"></p> <p>The good news is that the SHSMD's white paper provides healthcare organizations and marketers with practical, actionable recommendations and next steps that can be used to advance the measurement conversation in a meaningful way.</p> <p>As the white paper's authors note, "marketing, like any discipline, needs a solid context within its organization" and "the absence of measurable standards is no longer acceptable."</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67806 2016-05-11T11:39:45+01:00 2016-05-11T11:39:45+01:00 Are customer reviews becoming less important to local businesses? Patricio Robles <p><a href="http://seekingalpha.com/article/3970873-love-einhorn-yelp-much">According to</a> Scott Tzu of Orange Peel Investments, some local business owners are starting to doubt Yelp's sway:</p> <blockquote> <p>...many restaurant owners that we have spoken to over the last six months to a year have reiterated their lax attitude on Yelp reviews to us.</p> <p>The potential anonymity of Yelp and its use as a punching bag for hated figures in the media has given owners and customers alike a healthy dose of skepticism when approaching reviews on any particular restaurant.</p> </blockquote> <p>Tzu continues...</p> <blockquote> <p>Formerly, Yelp was in a position of power because restaurants would pay it to be able to manage its page, and restaurateurs were extremely interested in the reviews they got and maintaining high ratings. Yelp was the go-to spot on the web to try and get a heads up on a dining establishment.</p> <p>Now, customers share some of the same doubts that owners share...</p> </blockquote> <h3>As the market matures, consumer behaviors change</h3> <p>While some data <a href="http://www.wiideman.com/blog/local-seo/study-how-important-are-yelp-reviews-really">supports</a> Tzu's argument that "Yelp is beyond its prime years already," that might be due to growing competition in the space from other players, including Google, Facebook and TripAdvisor.</p> <p>On the whole, more consumers are now turning to online reviews more than ever before.</p> <p>But their behavior is also changing. <a href="https://www.brightlocal.com/learn/local-consumer-review-survey/">According to</a> BrightLocal's 2015 Local Consumer Review Survey, "Consumers appear to be forming an opinion faster now than ever before."</p> <p>40% of consumers will trust a local business after reading just one to three reviews, and 90% of consumers are ready to make a decision after reading 10 positive reviews.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4816/how-many-reviews-do-you-need-to-read.png" alt="" width="555" height="323"></p> <p>At the same time, consumers are becoming a tad more skeptical. The vast majority are willing to trust online reviews as much as a personal recommendation, but only if the reviews are thought to be authentic.</p> <p>This increased skepticism is not surprising given the rise of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/10923-yelp-s-answer-to-fake-reviews-a-badge-of-shame">fake reviews</a>.</p> <h3>Strength in numbers</h3> <p>Also not surprising is the fact that consumers rely more heavily on star ratings than they do on specific reviews. The implication for businesses: unreasonable reviews from disgruntled customers probably don't require the legal calvary.</p> <p>As long as a business is maintaining good ratings on the whole, consumers are probably going to ignore the review by the person who gave a one-star rating because a restaurant didn't provide free bread.</p> <p>Some businesses are even having fun with complaints, incorporating them into marketing campaigns, menus and the like.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/4815/yelpmenu-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="264"></p> <p>Put simply, now that online reviews are ubiquitous, the name of the game for most local businesses is to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67005-four-ways-to-encourage-more-positive-online-customer-reviews/">encourage more positive online feedback</a> and gain a critical mass of reviews (and ratings) so that the negative reviews are just noise.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67779 2016-05-04T14:55:23+01:00 2016-05-04T14:55:23+01:00 How Donald Trump is using social media Patricio Robles <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4579/trumptwitter.png" alt="" width="577" height="289"></p> <h3>Stats-at-a-Glance</h3> <ul> <li> <strong>Twitter followers:</strong> 7.91m</li> <li> <strong>Facebook fans:</strong> 7.3m</li> <li> <strong>Instagram followers:</strong> 1.4m</li> <li> <strong>YouTube views:</strong> 5.3m</li> </ul> <p>Donald Trump is no conventional candidate for the US presidency and his use of social media has been anything but conventional as well.</p> <p>Social media has <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/03/donald-trump-internet-success-twitter-us-election-media">been dubbed</a> the "real Trump card in the US election" by professor John Naughton and the numbers demonstrate why: according to an analysis by social media management firm SocialFlow, Trump <a href="http://www.socialflow.com/social-trends-trump-dominated-twitter-trending-in-january/">has dominated</a> the political conversation on Twitter, where he has posted more than 30,000 tweets.</p> <p>By <a href="http://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/The-Donald-trumps-Clinton-Sanders-on-social-media-7227611.php">the company's estimate</a>, between March 2015 and February 2016, US social media users spent more than 1,200 years reading about The Donald on social media.</p> <p>The billionaire businessman would have had to spend $380m if he sought to generate the same amount of attention through paid ads.</p> <p>There's a caveat though: much of the attention Trump has garnered on social media has been generated with controversial tweets and retweets like the one below, which took aim at the wife of his then-competitor, Ted Cruz.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">"<a href="https://twitter.com/Don_Vito_08">@Don_Vito_08</a>: "A picture is worth a thousand words" <a href="https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump">@realDonaldTrump</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LyingTed?src=hash">#LyingTed</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NeverCruz?src=hash">#NeverCruz</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/MELANIATRUMP">@MELANIATRUMP</a> <a href="https://t.co/5bvVEwMVF8">pic.twitter.com/5bvVEwMVF8</a>"</p> — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) <a href="https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/712850174838771712">March 24, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>Trump's own wife has <a href="http://www.news.com.au/finance/work/leaders/melania-wishes-trump-would-stop-tweeting/news-story/7437e3f32240556bf8a45d9b27e5186a">publicly revealed</a> her wish that her husband ease up on his tweeting, a sentiment likely to be echoed by many social media experts.</p> <p>But despite the fact that he has taken "authenticity" to a whole new level, embracing posts that contain everything from controversial subject matter to amusing misspellings, Trump's success in the Republican primaries suggests that perhaps there really is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67765-is-there-such-a-thing-as-bad-publicity-on-social-media/">no such thing as bad publicity on social media</a>, at least for the time being.</p> <p>Interestingly, despite his unique approach to social media, Trump isn't without counsel.</p> <p>But unlike the Democratic candidates, Trump's social media advisor, 29-year-old Justin McConney, doesn't have political campaign experience.</p> <p>He began working with Trump in 2011, before his White House bid began, and appears to have encouraged but not controlled the presumptive Republican nominee's prolific social media use.</p> <p><a href="http://www.politico.com/story/2015/09/trumps-social-media-guy-214309">According to</a> Politico, Trump "functions as his own communications strategist" and calls the shots...</p> <blockquote> <p>[Trump] takes occasional tweet suggestions from those around him but composes most himself, tapping them into his Samsung smartphone, calling them into his office or dictating them to a nearby aide.</p> <p>He also decides which of his supporters to retweet, a hallmark of his Twitter feed.</p> </blockquote> <p>So far, it's hard to argue that Trump's unconventional approach to social media hasn't been successful, but as the general election nears, we'll check in to see how the candidates' respective social media campaigns evolve and fare.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67796 2016-04-28T13:56:46+01:00 2016-04-28T13:56:46+01:00 Are brands ruining #EdBallsDay? Andrew Chrysostom <p>Firstly, a potted history of the Twitter phenomenon that is ‘Ed Balls day’.</p> <p>Five years ago, the former Labour shadow secretary was shopping in a supermarket for ingredients to make a slow cooked pulled pork shoulder. That’s right, Ed Balls was pulling pork before you.</p> <p>He had searched for an article about himself on Twitter using his phone and then at 4.20pm accidentally tweeted his own name.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Ed Balls</p> — Ed Balls (@edballs) <a href="https://twitter.com/edballs/status/63623585020915713">28 April 2011</a> </blockquote> <p>Then the internet happened.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Happy <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/EdBallsDay?src=hash">#EdBallsDay</a>. Here is a poem entitled "Ed Balls". <a href="https://t.co/7EkVVISWGp">pic.twitter.com/7EkVVISWGp</a></p> — Brian Bilston (@brian_bilston) <a href="https://twitter.com/brian_bilston/status/725576230322462721">April 28, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>Naturally, it gathered thousands of retweets with users keen to showcase a classic ‘dad on social media’ moment.</p> <p>But after five years, there’s a feeling that #EdBallsDay has become too commercialised.</p> <p>Much like Christmas, has enthusiasm dulled as the spirit of the holiday is gradually being taken over by brands?</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">It's a shame Ed Balls Day has lost its true meaning. Too commercialised these days. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/EdBallsDay?src=hash">#EdBallsDay</a></p> — David Wriglesworth (@Wriggy) <a href="https://twitter.com/Wriggy/status/725573267243864064">April 28, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>Recently, the death of Prince put a lot of corporate social media channels <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67781-why-do-brands-continue-to-make-stupid-social-media-decisions/">under scrutiny</a> for attempting to make themselves relevant in a context that has nothing to do with their brand values.</p> <p>While corporations joining in on this Twitter in-joke is nowhere near as insensitive, there’s an overwhelming feeling of... why?</p> <p>Laboured puns desperately trying to shoehorn either ‘Ed’ or ‘Balls’ into a product, corporate handles tweeting their own names – there’s an overwhelming feeling that brands are joining conversations that they were neither invited to, nor welcome in.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">TwistED DoughBALLS. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/EdBallsDay?src=hash">#EdBallsDay</a> <a href="https://t.co/FwTWc82XHD">pic.twitter.com/FwTWc82XHD</a></p> — Domino's Pizza UK (@Dominos_UK) <a href="https://twitter.com/Dominos_UK/status/725595851708596224">April 28, 2016</a> </blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/MetroUK">@MetroUK</a> Stop it.</p> — Oscar Tollast (@DorsetEchoOscar) <a href="https://twitter.com/DorsetEchoOscar/status/725583884973395968">April 28, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>The meta-culture of social media is one of the things which gave prominence to its rise.</p> <p>From the days of using forum acronyms <a href="http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=IRL">IRL</a>, there has always been a unique element to nuances that develop purely in niche communities.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Google</p> — Google UK (@GoogleUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/GoogleUK/status/725579001318793216">April 28, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>These in-jokes quickly become stale when either the subject of them becomes too aware of the publicity, or when they feature in advertising campaigns.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PrSPuBYm-Cw?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>Fortunately for the online community, the politician took the fame in good humour and even joined in on the joke, integrating the spike in awareness to his political campaign (sadly Ed lost his seat in the last election).</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Here we go again… ! RT @edballsmp: Ed Balls <a href="http://t.co/EhIPfbmQRo">pic.twitter.com/EhIPfbmQRo</a></p> — Ed Balls (@edballs) <a href="https://twitter.com/edballs/status/593072495395282944">28 April 2015</a> </blockquote> <p>Brands tweeting about Ed Balls feels a bit like your parents liking a Facebook status about a messy night out you’ve been on.</p> <p>So mum, dad, Metro. Let the kids have their fun, and don’t spoil the party.</p> <p>Having said that, we’ve just written an entire blog post about Ed Balls day.</p> <p>Far from trying to join the branded party, just know that at Econsultancy we celebrate the true spirit of Ed Balls day.</p> <p>Whilst we won't be tweeting 'Ed Balls' or 'Econsultancy' at 4.20pm today, we will be watching this. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CVaaiwjRGNw?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67781 2016-04-25T17:08:00+01:00 2016-04-25T17:08:00+01:00 Why do brands continue to make stupid social media decisions? Patricio Robles <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4258/princetweet.jpg" alt="" width="281" height="250"></p> <p>Case in point: last week, Cheerios, the cereal brand owned by General Mills, found itself in hot water after the Minnesota-based company posted a tweet in response to the death of Prince.</p> <p>It contained a "Rest in Peace" graphic in which the dot in the letter <em>i</em> was a Cheerio. Not surprisingly, many in the Twittersphere found the tweet to be in very poor taste.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Can't believe that Cheerios Prince ad. Incredibly poor taste to use his death for self promotion. smh</p> — Harbinger (@veebex) <a href="https://twitter.com/veebex/status/723600959960698884">April 22, 2016</a> </blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Offensive and tasteless aren't always the same thing. Inserting your brand into your memorial is the latter <a href="https://t.co/iQejKtzbRH">https://t.co/iQejKtzbRH</a></p> — Foodmancing® (@Foodmancing) <a href="https://twitter.com/Foodmancing/status/723636799986237440">April 22, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>While numerous other brands paid their respects to Prince on social media, the Cheerios tweet rubbed many people the wrong way because instead of keeping things simple and respectful, it incorporated the brands into the memorial.</p> <h3>When you have a brand, every event is not a cow</h3> <p>Why did Cheerios do such a thing? Welcome to branding in the age of social media.</p> <p>Marketers are more focused than ever on promoting their brands, and social media channels like Twitter provide plenty of opportunities to insert a brand into the conversation without much effort.</p> <p>In some cases, these opportunities are worthwhile.</p> <p>For example - and apologies for harking back to this again - when the power went out during the Super Bowl, Oreo used its <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63140-eight-great-examples-of-agile-marketing-from-oreo">agile marketing savvy to seize the moment with the perfect tweet</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4257/oreotweet.jpg" alt="" width="335" height="472"></p> <p>But obviously, the death of a beloved public figure is <em>not</em> the same as a blackout at a sporting event.</p> <p>The Cheerios tweet demonstrates that too many marketers are so focused on branding anything and everything that they're not using common sense or recognizing that some things just shouldn't have a brand imprint.</p> <h3>Common sense still isn't so common</h3> <p>Unfortunately, common sense still isn't so common in social media. </p> <p>While it is true that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67765-is-there-such-a-thing-as-bad-publicity-on-social-media/">bad publicity frequently doesn't have long lasting effects in social media</a>, brands shouldn't make a habit of tweeting without thinking.</p> <p>That's precisely what Cheerios did when it attempted to turn a death into a branding opportunity.</p>