tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/real-time-bidding Latest Real-time bidding content from Econsultancy 2016-08-25T11:52:00+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68227 2016-08-25T11:52:00+01:00 2016-08-25T11:52:00+01:00 What is the Financial Times' approach to programmatic advertising? David Moth <p>Sacha Bunatyan, global B2C marketing director at the Financial Times, is among the expert speakers who will be in attendance.</p> <p>Ahead of Get With The Programmatic, we spoke to Sacha to get her views on how the FT uses programmatic and how the technology has impacted the marketing industry. </p> <p>You can watch her answers in full in this video, and I’ve also summarised them below.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UEZ89uB1bLs?list=PL1-kPkZBw50FexVdl4i94-lQdSVnsN7A1&amp;wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>How has the FT used programmatic to promote the brand and sell subscriptions?</h3> <p>According to Sacha, programmatic advertising is hugely important to The FT, as demonstrated by the fact that it recently appointed Elli Papadaki as head of programmatic sales.</p> <p>Furthermore, The FT’s chief data officer sits on the board of directors and the company employs more than 30 <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67203-data-analysts-vs-data-scientists-what-s-the-difference/">data scientists and analysts</a>.</p> <p>To ensure this analytical talent is not wasted, the subscriptions and ad sales teams work closely together using “one set of data, one set of segmentation.”</p> <p>At Get With The Programmatic, Sacha will be able to discuss a programmatic campaign that resulted in a 300% uplift in subscriptions versus the average week. </p> <h3>What do you think makes for an effective programmatic campaign?</h3> <p>Sacha said that effective campaigns require the right balance of a strong message combined with effective use of media.</p> <p>The data and insights that come out of each campaign should then be evaluated to aid ongoing optimisation and improve decision-making.</p> <h3>How do you think agencies should be responding to brands bringing programmatic in-house?</h3> <p>The thorny question of how agencies fit into the programmatic landscape is one that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66639-the-boom-of-the-programmatic-gong/">we’ve discussed a lot in the past</a>.</p> <p>Sacha said there is “no one-size-fits-all approach”, and the trend at the moment is for businesses to take greater control of their data in order to better understand their audiences.</p> <p>At the same time Sacha describes the agency role as “multifaceted”, with the core expertise being in connecting brands with the right media.</p> <p>In future she predicts that we’ll see a hybrid solution where brands will invest more in core competencies and link up with agencies for key partnerships around specific projects or campaigns.</p> <p>For The FT, a good agency partner is one that can offer a custom, tailor-made approach.</p> <p><em><strong>To learn more about the FT’s approach to automated media buying, come to <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get With The Programmatic</a> in London on September 21st.</strong></em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68210 2016-08-22T14:57:44+01:00 2016-08-22T14:57:44+01:00 How programmatic advertising is helping drive the digital transformation agenda Seán Donnelly <p>By combining automation and data, programmatic can enable marketers to make use of everything they know about their audience to send them personalised advertisements and customised messaging in real time.</p> <p>For this reason, the implications for marketing professionals, marketing departments and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68066-top-100-digital-agencies-2016-the-state-of-the-industry/">the agency landscape</a> are revolutionary. </p> <p>The reality though is that many marketers have been slow in getting to grips with this new approach.</p> <p>To try and understand why, I caught up with Head of Digital at Disrupt the Market Ltd and Econsultancy trainer Andy Letting. </p> <p>Andy, an established senior digital leader, has worked across a range of digital transformation projects supporting traditional businesses to adapt to the fast paced world of digital marketing.</p> <p>He will be delivering a programmatic workshop prior to Marketing Week and Econsultancy’s <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get with the Programmatic 2016</a>, taking place on September 21.</p> <h4>Programmatic has been around for several years now. Is there are a reason why some organisations have been hesitant about making it a part of their marketing activities? </h4> <p>“If I put a digital hat on, the process is straightforward in terms of data and technology. </p> <p>"For marketers schooled in traditional marketing and non-marketers within a business, it might be easy to get confused by the vocabulary used to describe programmatic and so it can be difficult to get your head around. </p> <p>"My background is all digital and so I am used to thinking about data, reaching the right audiences and rigorous measurement.</p> <p>"I can however understand how programmatic may not have evolved as quickly within mainstream marketing departments due to organisational structures, marketing skillsets and leadership teams which may not have come from a digital background."</p> <h4>Digital transformation is a topic that we spend a lot of time thinking about at Econsultancy. Is it fair to say that programmatic is another lever driving the transformation agenda? </h4> <p>“Digital is disruptive by its own nature; whether that's from a customer’s perspective or within an organisation.</p> <p>"I think programmatic could be seen as disruptive within the media buying space but then again digital as a whole is disruptive. Mobile has been disruptive for many years now.</p> <p>"There are different areas of digital from website design, media buying, tracking customer journeys, operations and ecommerce.</p> <p><em>A hub and spoke model for organisational structure</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8319/hub_and_spoke.png" alt="" width="336" height="323"></p> <p>"Programmatic is just another iteration that to some extent is simplifying a way of buying media that was fairly clunky and not straightforward."</p> <hr> <p>Andy makes a good point. Programmatic is another step along the path to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">digital transformation</a>.</p> <p>Another theme that regularly surfaces from Econsultancy research, analysis and client discussions is the requirement to become more customer centric.</p> <p>A key barrier in becoming more customer centric cited by many businesses is that of organisational structure. </p> <p>Econsultancy publishes a very popular report called “<a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-marketing-organisational-structures-and-resourcing-best-practice-guide/">Digital Marketing: Organizational Structures and Resourcing Best Practice Guide</a>” which offers guidance to companies on organisational restructuring and digital transformation.</p> <p>The report first came out in 2011 but has been revised since. Among other things it proposes a digital maturity model which has five stages of evolution:</p> <ol> <li>Dispersed</li> <li>Centralised</li> <li>Hub and spoke</li> <li>Multiple hub and spoke</li> <li>Fully integrated</li> </ol> <p>The end vision for ‘digital’ is essentially that it becomes so much part of the organisation that it ceases to exist as a separate function.</p> <p>Many organisations though, are currently somewhere between the centralised and hub and spoke stages. This means that they still have separate marketing and digital teams.</p> <p>I asked Andy how the separation between digital and marketing teams might impact upon the effectiveness of programmatic campaigns.</p> <hr> <h4>You mention the separation of digital and marketing teams. Could there be an issue where programmatic campaigns are run separately to other marketing initiatives?</h4> <h4>Or could there be an issue where digitally minded people are able to structure a programmatic campaign but may not have the same marketing and commercial awareness as their colleagues in the marketing team? </h4> <p>“Yes that's a good point. From my experience programmatic has always been a nice to have. I've generally seen it sit within the digital team.</p> <p>"How closely the digital team works with the marketing team depends upon the organisation.</p> <p>"I think you'll find that because it's perceived as technical, you will find traditional marketers may be wary either because of a lack of exposure or knowledge. </p> <p>"As digital becomes more immersed within the marketing department and the marketing framework, we still start to see the two working in more harmony. </p> <p>"Until digital is fully integrated into the business and the marketing team has been skilled up on digital, that knowledge gap and challenge will remain.</p> <p>"The reality is you need both. You need to know who your customer is and also the technical know-how of how to reach those people.</p> <p>"If you take an FMCG company like P&amp;G or Unilever that owns multiple brands, one approach to integrating programmatic into other marketing activities may involve testing.</p> <p>"One brand could test programmatic by having an internal sponsor who can put the building blocks in place and take other business stakeholders on a journey. </p> <p>"Ultimately though, programmatic is all about focusing on the customer and pulling together skillsets within the organisation to reach that customer in ways that you haven't done before.</p> <p>"That means getting brand buy in and support. You will also need to bring together legal and data teams.”</p> <h4>In <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2016-digital-trends/">Econsultancy’s 2016 Digital Trends report</a>, 7 out of 10 marketers said that optimising the customer journey across multiple touchpoints was going to be very important for their marketing over the next few years.</h4> <h4>Is there an opportunity for programmatic to serve different kinds of advertising depending on where somebody is along that journey? </h4> <p>“So there are a number of things here. Of course, advertising needs to be relevant.</p> <p>"If you are in the infancy of your programmatic journey, you will have your lookalike models, CRM models and your prospecting models and you'll put them into the data pot (DMP) to try and get them all to work together. </p> <p>"I think the reality is that relevance is the utopia but at the same time that is only as good as your data.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8318/touchpoints.png" alt="" width="700" height="583"></p> <p>"From my experience, a lot of brands have really struggled in terms of getting <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65425-what-is-the-single-customer-view-and-why-do-you-need-it/">a single customer view</a> and (so) have been very reliant on partnership data, second-party data and even third-party data.</p> <p>"Ultimately where the real value lies is in creating unique data sets that are so refined to that customer and that need that ultimately you are driving greater conversion and greater revenues.</p> <p>"There are many different scenarios that you play out that you then have to adapt and make use of the learnings. For instance, programmatic buying on Facebook is probably one of the most advanced in terms of data available.</p> <p>"The data that Facebook has on people is phenomenal. That's why there's this huge head-to-head between Facebook and Google. </p> <p>"My point is that programmatic can help marketers to see opportunities. For example, you can do A/B testing and seed videos on Facebook for 24 hours.</p> <p>"Then, Facebook can scale up the video that gets the most traction after 24 hours to meet your budget automatically. It's all done in an automated fashion. </p> <p>"Also, what can actually happen is that brands find out that they've inspired audiences that they never knew were interested in their brand and so suddenly they get all of this insight back from testing that can completely reshape their customer profiling and awareness. </p> <p>"For me it's about bringing that insight back into the business to reform campaigns.”</p> <h4>If marketers are going to launch and optimise ad initiatives as opportunities emerge, does this suggest that the process of setting advertising budgets on quarterly cycles may not be appropriate for managing campaigns that need to be managed in real time?</h4> <p>“The Financial Controller will give you a budget but it’s important that you make some of that budget available for some sort of innovation. You take a percentage of your budget and that's your innovation pot.</p> <p>"If you don’t make budget available for testing, you won’t be able to benefit from programmatic and other new tactics."</p> <hr> <p>As organisations continue to respond to digital and the opportunities available through tactics like programmatic, we can expect to see a new marketing model that marries the ability of marketers to think creatively with the precision of utilising multiple data sets to create a single customer view and deliver automated campaigns that can be adapted on the fly.</p> <p>For this reason, marketers may need to embrace programmatic and the opportunities it brings or they risk being left behind.</p> <p>To continue your programmatic education, why not attend <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get with the Programmatic</a>, Econsultancy and Marketing Week’s conference on the topic, taking place on in London on September 21.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68198 2016-08-17T10:06:00+01:00 2016-08-17T10:06:00+01:00 How ‘people-based marketing’ is redefining effectiveness in programmatic ad buying Maeve Hosea <h3>How is programmatic allowing you to move forward with your advertising strategy?</h3> <p>Crucially, programmatic enables us to have more transparency.</p> <p>Historically, we didn’t get a lot of information out of the media buys we were doing through large media agencies.</p> <p>We weren’t aware of where the inventory was being served and therefore unable to learn about where customers were and what type of messaging and content they were interacting with.</p> <p>We were paying lots of money but not taking the learnings away from it in terms of how to optimise – spending hundreds of thousands but none the wiser.</p> <p>The advantage of programmatic is that you are making that investment, you are seeing media buys that are working, how that changes over the course of a year, how it is affected by seasonality and so forth.</p> <p>That is then valuable knowledge that the business retains.</p> <h3>What do you think are the most exciting programmatic developments across media?</h3> <p>The line Facebook is currently touting about people-based marketing is something that I am passionate about.</p> <p>The programmatic solution in Facebook today means you can upload lists and very specifically target people.</p> <p><em>MBNA has been buying Facebook ads programmatically</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8109/MBNA_programmatic_ad.jpeg" alt="" width="715" height="449"> </p> <p>So it seems it is only a matter of time before we see the next evolution of programmatic display, TV buying and whatever else programmatic evolves into.</p> <p>Programmatic will increasingly become about audiences rather than cookies and pixels.</p> <h3>What can you say about fraud and the challenge that poses?</h3> <p>Fraud as an issue is ever-evolving. We have to watch that just as we have to watch ad blocking and anything else that fundamentally changes the area we are operating in.</p> <p>Our way of dealing with it has been to change our success metric. We have been working on changing the KPI to look at incrementality as a way to help mitigate risk from fraud.</p> <p>We are now using our non-viewed display conversions – of which we have a lot, like everybody else – to get our baseline conversion rate.</p> <p>Success is the incremental between the impressions we serve that don’t get viewed and the impressions that do get viewed.</p> <p>That shows us the true performance of our display advertising.</p> <h3>Where do value, creativity and effectiveness meet?</h3> <p>For us it is about [defining the right audience segments for a campaign] but it is also about tailoring the message to what we know about people.</p> <p>My approach, with our provider Infectious Media, is to think about different treatments where advertising is more likely to resonate with people, based on information that I can acquire from across social or various third parties.</p> <p>Programmatic is a strange field in that it increasingly requires numbers people but ultimately the output for all those numbers and analysis – the segmentation that you are running – is still creative and requires creative people.</p> <p>We do some of that work in-house but we also reach out to specialist agencies to push the boundaries of creative thinking.</p> <h3>Which media channels are next for programmatic and why?</h3> <p>The obvious one is TV. The guys at Sky are kind of there with AdSmart but it is a little on the expensive side.</p> <p>You would think that the players will bring that element to the table soon enough and we are going to be able to buy TV advertising programmatically.</p> <p>That is the challenge for the industry: helping people feel a bit better about marketing by delivering marketing that is more aligned to their wants, needs and interests.</p> <h3>What are the pressing issues in the programmatic sphere moving forward?</h3> <p>Cross-device marketing is crucial. There are lots of people trying to do deterministic measurement models within display advertising [where a consumer is identified by linking browsing behaviour with personal login data] and I have a big issue with a way a lot of those are set up.</p> <p>I am not convinced by the accuracy or transparency that sits within that. It is still a bit of a bugbear and I think the industry still has a lot of work to do on solving that cross-device piece.</p> <p>Programmatic needs to evolve by moving away from cookies and pixels and I think the people-based marketing approach has the power to tip the whole industry on its head.</p> <p><em><strong>Back for a third year, Marketing Week and Econsultancy’s <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get With the Programmatic</a> conference and workshop will take place in London on 20 and 21 September. </strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>Nic Travis is one of the brand experts sharing insights into how to make the programmatic landscape work for you.</strong></em></p> <p><em>This article was originally <a href="http://www.marketingweek.com/2016/08/16/how-people-based-marketing-is-redefining-effectiveness-in-programmatic-ad-buying/">published on Marketing Week</a>.</em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68063 2016-07-14T10:15:00+01:00 2016-07-14T10:15:00+01:00 Can we overcome the tension between programmatic and creativity? David Moth <p>Creatives would ask how an artificial intelligence could possibly understand the artistry and emotional levers that underpin a truly great ad campaign?</p> <p>Would programmatic buying have improved the Guinness Surfer or the Cadbury Gorilla?</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kAOZ14Tjg7A?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>I’m being overly simplistic here, but these sorts of concerns do exist.</p> <p>I’ve heard several agency bods fret about the impact on creative ideas, particularly when it comes to brand advertising.</p> <p>However, I’m confident that we’ve almost reached a tipping point in terms of industry knowledge and understanding around programmatic.</p> <p>It feels as if marketers are finally comfortable enough with the concept of programmatic buying to understand the huge opportunities it provides, rather than simply dwelling on the potential limitations.</p> <p>I recently attended a panel session where <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67599-31-opinions-on-the-future-of-programmatic-advertising/">marketers debated whether programmatic targeting impedes creativity</a>.</p> <p>POKE co-founder Nic Roope felt that too much targeting and personalisation can “erode the feeling of the art.”</p> <blockquote> <p>It’s the usual tension between art and the machine. Take a film and personalise it. Are all personalised results more resonant than the original unedited film?</p> </blockquote> <p>Nic was referring in part to an Axe deodorant commercial called Romeo Reboot, which broke the brand’s target audience into four segments and offered each 25,000 different permutations of the video ad.</p> <p>The interchangeable elements ranged from simple things like the music, up to whether viewers saw a crime story or a sci-fi action scene.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/131929702?color=fcfbfa&amp;title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <p>Nic’s thoughts were echoed by Charles Vallance from VCCP, who said that agencies weren’t keen on programmatic as they “like to unite with a single idea, not create 78 versions of something.”</p> <p>From the client point of view, Topman’s Tom Lancaster talked about the “mind-boggling” amount of ad creatives required to implement a programmatic campaign based around five interest personas.</p> <p>But while it might all seem like a lot of hard work, it was noticeable that Tom didn’t suggest that the programmatic campaign had been a wasted effort.</p> <h3>Programmatic does not equal ultra-atomisation</h3> <p>Romeo Reboot is an extreme example of what programmatic can do and the campaign has received a lot of attention from the trade press.</p> <p>But in spite of the fanfare, we’re yet to hear any actual results from the campaign.</p> <p>In my opinion, the Romeo Reboot campaign is something of a red herring in this debate.</p> <p>Nobody really thinks that programmatic buying will require marketers to come up with 100,000 different permutations for each campaign.</p> <p>Instead the focus should be on where programmatic can aid the delivery of contextual, relevant ads, with a few elements personalised to make the creative more effective.</p> <p>For example, the specific product, price or offer might be altered based on factors such as the user’s profile, the time of day, their browsing behaviour or their location.</p> <p>This needn’t have any major impact on the overall tone and idea behind the campaign.</p> <p>In an article <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67835-bringing-data-into-creativity-in-a-programmatic-world/">published on the Econsultancy blog</a>, Affectv CEO Glen Calvert argues that as programmatic has matured, a lot of the processes have been streamlined.</p> <p>As a result, “the ‘plumbing’, or logistics, side of programmatic is becoming less of an obstacle to using data and creative to tell a good brand story.”</p> <p>The situation will only improve as marketers become increasingly familiar with programmatic and aware of its ability to meet the creative requirements necessary to tell their brand story.</p> <h3>The Economist leads the way</h3> <p>Now seems a good point to highlight a creative programmatic case study that produced some really excellent results, just to prove that it can be done.</p> <p>Back in October 2014 <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67447-the-economist-finding-new-readers-with-creative-programmatic-display/">The Economist ran a campaign aimed at driving new subscriptions among liberal ‘young progressives’</a>.</p> <p>It was felt that this demographic saw the publication as one that was only read by the corporate elite.</p> <p>The task for this campaign was to target 650,000 unseen prospects and allow them to discover The Economist’s progressive liberalism for themselves.</p> <p>Using the rationale 'There is nothing more provocative than the truth’, the aim was to show user relevant content that would help alter their view of the publication.</p> <p>Using subscriber data, the marketing team built seven lookalike segments that reflected the different sections of The Economist. </p> <p>More than 60 executions were created, many in near real time (from its live newsroom). </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6972/economist_programmatic.png" alt="" width="640" height="401"></p> <p>Economist ads led with topics like the CIA's use of torture within hours of the story breaking.</p> <p>Having piqued reader curiosity, The Economist not only wanted the prospect to read the related article, but to read yet more targeted content (knowing it takes four to five articles before a prospect considers subscription).</p> <p>Ads pulled readers directly through to The Economist bespoke content hub. On serving the next article likely to be of most interest, the reader was nudged to register and, ultimately, subscribe.</p> <p>From a media budget of £1.2m, the campaign successfully got 3.6m to take people action, sample The Economist in context, and become re-targetable contacts.</p> <p>A campaign ROI of over 10:1 was achieved from the initial revenue stream brought in by these prospects.</p> <h3>So...</h3> <p>The increasing reliance on machine-driven ad buying certainly presents some interesting challenges for creatives.</p> <p>But those who suggest that programmatic might kill creativity have probably misunderstood how the technology works.</p> <p>Campaigns will always require a strong central idea and a compelling story that runs through all the various channels.</p> <p>Programmatic is really just a new delivery method that enables marketers to optimise different elements to make that particular message more relevant or appealing to that specific consumer.</p> <p>The Economist case study shows that creativity coupled with programmatic targeting can yield excellent results.</p> <p>The best campaigns are those that create an emotional connection with a brand, and as yet that requires a level of creativity that’s beyond even the smartest artificial intelligence.</p> <p>So although programmatic has begun to revolutionise ad buying and optimisation, it will be some time before we read an agency press release celebrating the new hire of a pair of creative bots.</p> <p><em>This article was originally published in Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/top-100-digital-agencies/">Top 100 Digital Agencies 2016 Report</a>.</em></p> <p><em><strong>To find out more, why not attend <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get With the Programmatic</a>, Marketing Week and Econsultancy's one-day conference on 21st September in London, to hear from brand and agency experts.</strong></em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67835 2016-05-19T11:21:14+01:00 2016-05-19T11:21:14+01:00 Bringing data into creativity in a programmatic world Glen Calvert <p>Data isn’t sexy, consequently, it isn’t loved by brand advertisers. In their minds, data is the preserve of the far less noble direct marketing realm.</p> <p>The idea of putting data at the core of campaigns, which the direct marketer does, is an anathema to the brand advertiser.</p> <p>A neat illustration of this thinking is through <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/personalisation-enhancing-the-customer-experience/">personalised advertising</a>. Brand marketers can’t deny that they’d like to connect with us all individually.</p> <p>The “Share a Coke” campaign in which cans and bottles were personalised was a huge brand success.</p> <p>Around 1,000 name variations were available on shelves and over 500,000 available through the online store.</p> <p>So, why do brand advertisers seem reticent to deploy personalisation techniques online – a media tailor-made for such activity due to data?</p> <p>Why do we so rarely see good examples of this type of campaign in the digital environment?</p> <h3><strong>Falling in love with data?</strong></h3> <p>The answer to the previous question is branding’s lack of love for data. However, this mind-set could be changing due to a couple of factors.</p> <p>Brands love TV because it’s a wonderful platform to tell stories at scale.</p> <p>In comparison, online platforms for telling good brand stories at scale using data and creative have been more constrained.</p> <p>With smaller screen sizes and more limited ad ‘real estate’, brand banner advertising is more of a challenge.</p> <p>However, the skills and appetite for meeting this challenge and using data efficiently are increasing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4847/share-a-coke.jpg" alt="Share a Coke Bottles" width="460" height="330"></p> <p>This improvement in the banner format is combining with a growth in other branding-type formats in display advertising, such as video and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63722-what-is-native-advertising-and-do-you-need-it/">native advertising</a>.</p> <p>The IAB’s latest <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67746-10-action-packed-digital-marketing-stats-from-this-week" target="_blank">digital ad spend figures</a> showed both video and native spend grew around 50% last year to account for nearly half of display ad spend.</p> <p>These two parallel developments in display prove its increasing allure as a branding medium - FMCG advertisers, historically considered the least relevant in regards to online ads, are now the dominant spender on display, accounting for nearly £1 in every £5.</p> <p>We’re seeing this increasing willingness to embrace data manifested by clients taking control of their data destiny.</p> <p>A number of high profile brands are taking on long-term software contracts with data management platforms (DMPs), showing the appetite clients have to both control and exploit the data opportunity.</p> <h3><strong>Programmatic plumbing</strong></h3> <p>Alongside the rise in online branding formats, the other factor changing mind-sets among brand advertisers, rather surprisingly, could be <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/">programmatic</a>.</p> <p>Something originally seen as even less sexy than data.</p> <p>The “plumbing”, or logistics, side of programmatic is becoming less of an obstacle to using data and creative to tell a good brand story.</p> <p>The amount of heavy-lifting required is reducing in terms of time, resources and money among agencies and vendors to connect the data, the creative and the inventory.</p> <p>Consequently, there’s a growing sense of enthusiasm about take-up among brands.</p> <p>So, as programmatic matures, many of these growing pains are less pronounced.</p> <p>As the plumbing between creative, data and buying becomes more automated, it means the industry can move more towards programmatic as a creative solution.</p> <h3><strong>Programmatic as creative</strong></h3> <p>In turn, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67554-2016-the-year-of-programmatic-creative/" target="_blank">programmatic creative</a> has become more advanced and more flexible, without compromising scale and automation, to meet the specific creative requirements and nuances that advertisers have for being able to tell their brand story.</p> <p>Programmatic creative is now flexible and advanced enough to insert dynamic and personalised elements into online ads to enable the idea of “mass personalisation”, which was essentially what the big idea “Share of Coke” brand campaign was shooting for.</p> <p>These developments hopefully thaw the relationship between brand marketers and data, particularly as they open up exciting and innovative brand campaign ideas that can be brought to life in this brave new world.</p> <p>Take, for example, Netflix’s campaign to promote the addition of all ten seasons of Friends to its library.</p> <p>Conceived by Ogilvy Paris, it’s a pre-roll video campaign that responds dynamically to videos watched on YouTube by inserting a clip from Friends that relates to the video topic searched for.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/K_3uKmLFHRI?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>Essentially, it uses data to relate Friends to almost anything you search for on YouTube.</p> <p>What will be your big brand idea this year that comes alive through data?</p> <p><em>To learn more on this topic, book yourself onto Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/">Programmatic Training Course</a>.</em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67654 2016-03-16T14:25:45+00:00 2016-03-16T14:25:45+00:00 Google courts enterprise marketers with launch of Analytics 360 Suite Patricio Robles <p>To do all of this, the search giant has combined six products into a single platform:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Audience Center 360</strong>, a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-role-of-dmps-in-the-era-of-data-driven-advertising">data management platform</a> (DMP).</li> <li> <strong>Optimize 360</strong>, a website testing and personalization solution.</li> <li> <strong>Data Studio 360</strong>, a data and visualization tool that can be used to analyze data collected by all of the Google Analytics 360 products.</li> <li> <strong>Tag Manager 360</strong>, which is based on Google's existing tag management solution.</li> <li> <strong>Analytics 360</strong>, the professional analytics solution that Google previously offered under the name GA Premium.</li> <li> <strong>Attribution 360</strong>, an attribution platform that marketers can use to evaluate the performance of their campaigns across channels.</li> </ul> <p>Google says that Analytics 360 Suite has been several years in the making, and was developed based on feedback it received from enterprise marketers, many of whom complained that their existing marketing analytics tools were not meeting their needs.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/3052/blog_images__62_-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="392"></p> <h3>Integration, integration, integration</h3> <p>Google believes it is delivering on those needs, and early customers like L'Oreal Canada, which says it has doubled anticipated revenue with Google's new offering, are already singing Analytics 360 Suite's praises.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ETGsJfYb-gw?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p><strong>But Google's secret sauce might not be breadth or depth, but rather integration.</strong></p> <p>Audience Center 360 offers native integration with DoubleClick and over 50 third-party data providers.</p> <p>Tag Manager 360 plays nicely with a variety of third-party vendors, including Turn, comScore, Criteo and Marin Software.</p> <p>Attribution 360 is capable of distributing data to DSPs and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/rtb-buyers-guide/">RTBs</a>, can pull in data automatically from DoubleClick Campaign Manager, and offers an Offline Conversion Connector to help marketers attribute in-store sales to digital campaigns.</p> <p>Analytics 360 works with all Google ad products, and can be used to create remarketing lists that are automatically available in AdWords and DoubleClick Bid Manager.</p> <p>Because many marketers are already so heavily invested in Google's ad-related services, all of the integrations Analytics 360 Suite offers could give Google an edge when trying to win over marketers who are currently using competing solutions from a variety of vendors, some of whom only provide one or two of the functions in Analytics 360 Suite.</p> <p>That makes Analytics 360 Suite a threat to many companies, including Adobe, which offers a DMP, Adobe Audience Manager, and Tableau, which offers a business intelligence data visualization solution.</p> <p>Analytics 360 Suite likely won't be cheap – reports suggest pricing will be in the six-figure range – but if Google can lure enough enterprise customers with a one-stop shop proposition, it could prove to be one of Google's most important product launches in some time.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67554 2016-03-01T15:48:00+00:00 2016-03-01T15:48:00+00:00 2016: the year of programmatic creative? Glen Calvert <p>However, far less attention has been paid to the innovative element of this automated buying and selling of digital media – the creative.</p> <p>And herein lies the seed to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67574-has-programmatic-advertising-killed-creativity-in-marketing/">merging of programmatic and creative</a>; which is the next wave of disruption and innovation to impact the digital ad industry – <a href="https://econsultancy.com/events/creative-programmatic/">programmatic creative</a>.</p> <h3>So, what is programmatic creative?</h3> <p>The software powered, automated, algorithmic approach to media buying, enabling pinpoint accuracy of people-based targeting with advanced optimisation is half the story.</p> <p>Programmatic creative is the enabling of intelligent creative, where each person is exposed to a brand’s message that adapts, changes and is personalised to them, regardless of the device or site they’re on.</p> <p>Programmatic creative enables the content of an ad to be programmatically manipulated so it’s more relevant and personal to the person it’s being served to, with a continuous feedback loop for optimisation.</p> <p>The same application of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64743-predictive-analytics-machine-learning-and-the-future-of-personalization/">machine learning algorithms</a> to decide who to target, when and on what site, will be applied to the creative messaging as well.</p> <p><strong><em>How will Programmatic Advertising impact the role of marketing professionals?</em></strong></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/k93THhdXIIw?wmode=transparent" width="615" height="346"></iframe></p> <p>Programmatic creative optimisation enables the ad elements to adapt from various data points – such as the user’s previous surfing behaviour, their location, the time of day etc. – to change the message, font or colour in an ad.</p> <p>Programmatic creative also (and more interestingly) utilises user-specific data to enhance the messages themselves for that very individual.</p> <p>For example, showing the exact product they may like, and changing the price and offer based on who they are.</p> <p>In short, programmatic creative enables the intelligent manipulation of the creative based on what you know about that cookie ID, and the automated use of live data inside the creative so it’s increasingly personalised for the individual.</p> <p>It’s important not to confuse programmatic creative with serving dynamic ads via programmatic channels or dynamic creative optimisation.</p> <p>Programmatic creative goes beyond serving dynamic ads programmatically, it has the potential to adapt messages to individuals in real time on an on-going basis for true one-on-one communication, compared to delivering dynamic creative that is served to user segments that are predefined by the marketer.</p> <p>The critical benefit of programmatic creative is that it’ll be the only way to truly 'talk' to millions of people individually, and reach that previously mythical land for advertisers of "mass personalisation."</p> <h3>The ramifications</h3> <p>Software that can automatically build ads, optimise and personalise them, will have significant ramifications on the entire advertising value chain. It means traditional owners of marketing communications need to be prepared.</p> <p><strong><em>Has Programmatic Advertising killed creativity in marketing? </em></strong></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7fEj3_hG5mc?wmode=transparent" width="615" height="346"></iframe></p> <p>It’s not going to be easy. It’s a pretty well-known fact that creatives – the people designing the ad – don’t talk with the programmatic delivery teams and, therefore, don’t know if their work was effective or not.</p> <p>Some of the blame for this lies with marketers who could do more to teach creatives how their work is impacted by programmatic media plans, and the potential benefits ad tech provides without impinging on the creative process.</p> <p>Much of the focus of start-ups and innovation with digital advertising has been focused in the infrastructure, the plumbing hidden beneath that no one sees. However, with the increasing need to thwart <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">the threat of ad blocking</a>, 2016 will see much more focus on how technology can impact what we actually see, that which is delivered to consumers.</p> <p>Relevance and usefulness, without overstepping the delicate privacy line, is the key to a viable and successful online ad model.</p> <p>The impact on our industry will be huge and creative agencies should be the first to be prepared.</p> <p><strong><em>Tickets are currently on sale for Econsultancy and Marketing Week’s <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get With The Programmatic</a> conference.</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>The event takes place in London on September 21st.</em></strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67574 2016-02-24T15:03:00+00:00 2016-02-24T15:03:00+00:00 Has Programmatic Advertising killed creativity in marketing? David Moth <p>And it’s also commonly criticised for relying too heavily on automation, thus removing the creative element from marketing campaigns.</p> <p>To see whether this is the case, we spoke to two seasoned digital experts, namely:</p> <ul> <li> <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/clare-deloford-4694b342">Clare Deloford</a>, Digital Development Associate Director at ‎Starcom MediaVest Group</li> <li> <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/janmikulin">Jan Mikulin</a>, Global Head of Digital Marketing at Grayling</li> </ul> <p>You can watch their answers below, or read a brief summary of what they had to say.</p> <p>And to learn more about programmatic advertising, come along to our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/events/creative-programmatic/">Creative Programmatic</a> event in London next week.</p> <p>These videos were created in partnership with <a href="https://wooshii.com/">Wooshii</a> and are the first in a series of interviews we’ve carried out with senior digital marketers from various agencies and brands.</p> <p>Now, on with the show...</p> <h3>People often accuse programmatic of killing creativity. Do you agree with this point of view?</h3> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7fEj3_hG5mc?wmode=transparent" width="615" height="346"></iframe></p> <p>Clare and Jan both strongly disagreed with the suggestion that programmatic kills creativity.</p> <p>According to Jan, it’s incumbent upon marketers to think about how the technology can enable them to be more creative.</p> <p>The technology has a momentum around it which in turn creates a need and a desire for more creativity.</p> <p>Clare said that the ability to run targeted, personalised ads actually encouraged greater creativity. </p> <h3>How do you think programmatic will impact the role of marketing professionals?</h3> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/k93THhdXIIw?wmode=transparent" width="615" height="346"></iframe></p> <p>Clare said that programmatic has been quite difficult for marketers to understand, which creates fear and apprehension, however people now realise that it’s a very important technology.</p> <p>And by automating the buying process, marketers will have more time to invest in content creation and richer experiences which are really important for every brand.</p> <p>Jan suggested that programmatic has seen a similar cycle to other advancements in advertising and communications.</p> <p>There was initially a flurry to understand how it worked, then marketers gradually got to grips with it, now we're beginning to use it as a standard operating procedure, and that process will start again soon when a new marketing technology appears.</p> <h3>How has programmatic affected the relationship between agencies &amp; clients? Are there misgivings over transparency?</h3> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eyCkp5Kx6yo?wmode=transparent" width="615" height="346"></iframe></p> <p>Another major criticism of programmatic is that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65860-13-interesting-quotes-from-our-programmatic-marketing-panel/">the process isn’t transparent</a>, which can lead to mistrust between agencies and their clients.</p> <p>Jan said that things will only turn sour if the agency had a poor relationship with their clients in the first place and wasn’t being upfront and honest.</p> <p>However, he also referenced an IAB report which shows that only 45% of people who use programmatic in agencies actually understand the technology and the concept behind it.</p> <p>That lack of knowledge can potentially impact the entire industry in terms of trust and failure to generate ROI.</p> <p>Clare said that Starcom MediaVest tries to educate its clients to ensure everyone understands how the technology works.</p> <p>For example, it has an online tool where clients can run a dummy campaign and take a look “under the hood”.</p> <p>Marketers are more comfortable with programmatic once they see how it works.</p> <p><em>And finally, to learn more on this topic book yourself onto Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/">Programmatic Training course</a>.</em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67517 2016-02-11T11:08:00+00:00 2016-02-11T11:08:00+00:00 How to embrace creativity in the programmatic age Maeve Hosea <p>These personas include an understated man who wants to look stylish but not fashionable, ‘aspiring fashionistas’ and ‘extreme fashionistas’.</p> <p>Tom Lancaster, senior creative manager at <a href="http://www.topman.com/">Topman</a>, oversaw the development of multiple creative executions, which then ran in parallel media placements online. The one that attracted the most interactions became optimised.</p> <p>“Programmatic allows you to run segmented work that will appeal to all of your audiences – it then optimises the creative to the version that best suits a media channel’s audience,” comments Lancaster.</p> <blockquote> <p>Taking the creative programmatic route gives you a much bigger brief and a lot more work to do, but the benefit is that when you are building that creative you can make it the right kind of thing for each target audience.</p> </blockquote> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/">Programmatic advertising</a> is currently gaining momentum because of the attractive promise to brands of data-led real-time relevancy and accuracy in who they can target.</p> <p>By leveraging the capacities of programmatic display advertising, Topman not only targets people on key demographics such as age and profession but has found a relevant way to reach consumers on publisher and lifestyle sites beyond the usual fashion media.</p> <p>However, although creative programmatic strategy is a part of the ongoing picture for Topman, it has its limits.</p> <p>The first is the cost factor: “You have to think how much of your budget you want to spend on your creative versus your media buy,” explains Lancaster.</p> <p>“And obviously your media buy has to be sizeable enough to want to spend money on all those additional creative executions.”</p> <p>It is not only about the budgets for individual campaigns either: if a brand is taking a programmatic approach, it has to make sure it has a tailored experience to take them through to post click.</p> <blockquote> <p>If you capture someone with quite understated style but then take them to somewhere where there isn’t any of that available to them, then you may have acquired someone but you might not be showing them something that converts them.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Topman</h3> <p>Looking ahead, Lancaster sees a considerable untapped opportunity in the creative programmatic sphere. He would like to exploit the ability to embed live text with an advert, updating the copy for each type of customer and their lifestyle habits.</p> <p>He also sees the potential for serving different creatives in relation to the weather at a given IP address.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/1698/Screen_Shot_2016-02-11_at_11.02.16.png" alt="" width="800"></p> <p>“It is all the sort of things people have wanted to do for a really long time and if you had this granular level of media buying and creative production then you would do it,” says Lancaster.</p> <p>“However, the challenge is having all those matrix of options at the same quality level: getting that ‘hero creative’ finish lots and lots of times.”</p> <h3>Right Time, Right Place</h3> <p>While some fear the implied threat to creativity that the automated nature of programmatic brings, Nicolas Roope, founder and creative director at Poke London sees it as timely.</p> <p>“It is newly available inventory coming together with concepts that already have personalisation and contextuality built in that makes programmatic exciting now,” comments Roope.</p> <blockquote> <p>Programmatic is a natural extension of storytelling in the digital space: always about some degree of interaction, some degree of personalisation, some degree of contextuality and timeliness.</p> </blockquote> <p>With creative programmatic, those key principals of time, place and context can be applied at scale, giving mass reach to personalised advertising.</p> <p>Essentially, it allows brands to get more relevant and creative and Roope sees that creativity flourishing in the work of Unilever’s Axe brand in Brazil.</p> <p>The brand recently leveraged programmatic adverts to serve online viewers with up to 100,000 variations of its “Romeo Reboot” advert.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/131929702?color=fcfbfa&amp;title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="615" height="346"></iframe></p> <p>Those variations in soundtrack, setting and plotline were part of a personalisation drive that allowed for changes to six out of the eleven scenes in the advert.</p> <p>“Fundamentally programmatic is interesting,” says Roope. “Because it highlights how limp, unintelligent advertising in a digital interactive space just doesn’t make any sense.”</p> <p>If successful, he argues, it delivers compelling creative, connecting people with the brand at the opportune moment. Roope also cites Google’s work with billboards as a valuable example of an inspiring creative approach to programmatic.</p> <p>Google trialled its DoubleClick ad technology last year, allowing premium billboard ads to be bought programmatically and passers-by to see the most relevant adverts for the time of day and location.</p> <p>“The real time quality of weather, sports and travel news was quite a surprise and interesting for people,” comments Roope. “That contextuality can be really powerful.”</p> <h3>Affinity and Desire</h3> <p>The antagonism with programmatic tends to come when you examine the formats used in most programmatic deals, which are currently much more constraining than the formats used in broadcast media.</p> <p>Within creative programmatic, you need to have very quick, low-cost adaptability for the best campaigns to work. This may call for a hundred different versions of a very similar idea and so the construct tends to be more limited and more mechanical.</p> <p>Programmatic has its place for Charles Vallance, co-founder and chairman of integrated agency VCCP, but it shouldn’t be at the expense of building a brand in full view.</p> <p>He argues that brand values and brand affinity are inextricably linked to bigger budget brand awareness campaigns.</p> <p>“We must value the advantages and efficiencies of programmatic,” he says. “But we must not have that at the expense of the colossal value of building a brand and building affinity that is shared and appreciated by a broader audience.”</p> <p>Vallance says that there are two things that communication can do: the short-term goal of selling things and the longer terms one of creating an environment of ‘buyability’ around a brand.</p> <p>“If I only ever communicate to people with the precision of programmatic, I might never make them want to buy,” he cautions.</p> <blockquote> <p>The two go hand in hand: you need broadcast or mass communication to create a collective sense of why this brand is desirable, what this brand means, what this brand stands for, and then programmatic can harness and exploit that.</p> </blockquote> <p>Shared real-time experience will never go out of style and is arguably much more valuable than automised, fragmented ones, however accurate they may be.</p> <p>“There is nothing very programmatic about Star Wars,” offers Vallance. “You don’t want 100 different versions: you want the one version that everyone is talking about.”</p> <p><strong>Creative Programmatic Conference</strong></p> <p>Charles Vallance, Tom Lancaster and Nicolas Roope will be speaking on a panel debate at Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/events/creative-programmatic/">Creative Programmatic</a> event on 2nd March.</p> <p>The session will examine the opportunities and challenges of harnessing programmatic in the creative process.</p> <p><em>Please note that this article was <a href="http://www.marketingweek.com/2016/02/08/how-to-embrace-creativity-in-the-programmatic-age/">originally published on Marketing Week</a>.</em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67288 2015-12-07T14:03:51+00:00 2015-12-07T14:03:51+00:00 Programmatic trends in 2015: the big picture Ben Davis <p>And if you want to learn more on this topic, book yourself a place at our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/">Programmatic Training Course</a>.</p> <h3>Is there a creativity vacuum?</h3> <p><strong>David Carr, Strategy Director at DigitasLBi </strong></p> <p>As we all raced to keep up with the exponential increases in options and terminology, maybe new realism began to creep in. </p> <p>Had media left creative behind? Was programmatic only about cheaper buys and cheaper dynamic creative optimization with production efficiencies, real-time price updates and maybe a “personalized” colour-way and call to action based on someone’s browsing history?</p> <p>When you asked around the industry for great creative examples the same ones would come back: Axe Brasil’s Romeo Reboot with its 100,000 dynamic videos, Diesel Decoded’s 400 bespoke copylines and the Amanda Foundation’s digital “Pawprint” work. </p> <p>Yet programmatic is not just about direct response and CPAs. Programmatic is people. Programmatic allows creative to build a tailored story arch for the individual.</p> <p>This makes brand ideas and human truths more important than ever to stimulate and organize the work making it consistent, relevant and distinct.</p> <p>It means rethinking storytelling through a lens of data and technology to give personalization at scale and enable a brand relationship that learns – not just buying on a DSP.</p> <p><em>Axe Brasil’s Romeo Reboot was an example of dynamic video.</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0006/9737/romeo_reboot.jpeg" alt="romeo reboot" width="366" height="205"></p> <h3>Brands seek transparency and control</h3> <p><strong>David Carr, Strategy Director at DigitasLBi </strong></p> <p>It is this technology lens that means new ways of organizing an agency are needed along with new client-agency relationships.</p> <p>Creative, media and technology need to be re-integrating or at least work far more closely together. This way savings from spend can be used to create more effective work and technology can give greater transparency.</p> <p>When at most 45 cents in the dollar reaches publishers and even an in-house or managed service on a shared platform leads to unknown ad-tech, DSP sell-side, reseller SSP and primary SSP fees plus data leakage to competitor algorithms, transparency is vital.</p> <p>Taking a brand-first approach where clients control the bidding strategy AND the tech roadmap while not being lumbered with platform development and management might be a solution here?</p> <p><strong>Chris O'Hara, VP Strategic Accounts at Krux Digital (author of Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/programmatic-branding">Programmatic Branding</a> report)</strong></p> <p>More and more, we are seeing big marketers decide to “take programmatic in house.”</p> <p>That means hiring former agency and vendor traders, licensing their own technologies, and (most importantly) owning their own data.</p> <p>This trend isn’t as explosive as one might think, based on the industry trades - but it is real and happening steadily.</p> <p>What brought along this shift in sentiment? Certainly concerns about transparency; there is still a great deal of inventory arbitrage going on with popular trading desks.</p> <p>Also, the notion of control. Marketers want and deserve more of a direct connection to one of their biggest marketing costs, and now the technology is readily available.</p> <p>Even old school marketers can license their way into a technology stack any agency would be proud of.</p> <p>The only thing really holding back this trend is the difficulty in staffing such an effort. Programmatic experts are expensive, and that’s just the traders!</p> <p>When the inevitable call for data-science driven analytics comes in, things can really start to get pricey! But, this trend continues for the next several years nonetheless.</p> <p><em>Only app development is outsourced more than display advertising (source: <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-marketing-organisational-structures-and-resourcing-best-practice-guide/">Organisational Structures and Resourcing Best Practice Guide</a>)</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0006/9541/Screen_Shot_2015-11-27_at_17.15.05.png" alt="outsourced disciplines" width="615"></p> <h3>Users suffer (especially on mobile) without union of creative, data and tech</h3> <p><strong>David Carr, Strategy Director at DigitasLBi </strong></p> <p>As all media continued to go mobile in 2015 the underbelly of programmatic was exposed. Hundreds of competing cookies on a page with javascript that bloated page weights above 1mb – if they even allowed the page to render at all – became a too common occurrence.</p> <p>In this context programmatic became not just the future of ad buying but perhaps the best advert for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">Adblockers</a> you could have. </p> <p>Creative, data and technology consolidation for a mobile world is one potential solution but ultimately the only way that programmatic can live up to its promise is for all three to work together.</p> <p>That way we can get back to people. Where do they go, what are they interested in, how do they respond to content and messages and how do we offer them something useful, usable and delightful? </p> <h3>Targeting with purchase data improves segmentation</h3> <p><strong>Chris O'Hara, VP Strategic Accounts at Krux Digital</strong></p> <p>Remember when finding the “household CEO” was as easy as picking a demographic target?</p> <p>Marketers are still using demographic targeting (Woman, aged 25-44) to some extent, but we have seen them shift rapidly to behavioral and contextually based segments (“Active Moms”), and now to Purchase-Based Targeting (PBT).</p> <p>This trend has existed in categories like automotive and travel, but is now being seen in consumer packaged goods.</p> <p>Today, marketers are using small segments of people who have actually purchased the product they are marketing (“Special K Moms”) and using lookalike modeling to drive scale and find more of them.</p> <p>These purchase-defined segments are a more precise starting point in digital segmentation - and can be augmented by behavioral and contextual data attributes to achieve scale.</p> <p>The big winners here are the folks who actually have the in-store purchase information (such as Oracle’s Datalogix, 84.51, Nielsen’s Catalina Solutions, INMAR, and News Corp’s News America Marketing).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0006/9738/archery.jpeg" alt="archery targets" width="354" height="235"></p> <h3>Programmatic direct as a route through complexity</h3> <p><strong>Chris O'Hara, VP Strategic Accounts at Krux Digital</strong></p> <p>For years we have been talking about the disintermediation in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-new-mobile-display-ecosystem">the space between advertisers and publishers</a> (essentially, the entire Lumascape map of technology vendors), and how we can find scalable, direct, connections between them.</p> <p>It doesn’t make sense that a marketer has to go through an agency, a trading desk, DSP, an exchange, SSP, and other assorted technologies to get to space on a publisher website.</p> <p>Marketers have seen $10 CPMs turn into just $2 of working media.</p> <p>Early efforts with “private marketplaces” inside of exchanges created more automation, but ultimately kept much of the cost structure.</p> <p>A nascent, but quickly emerging, movement of “automated guaranteed” procurement is finally starting to take hold. Advertisers can create audiences inside their DMP and push them directly to a publisher’s ad server where they have user-matching.</p> <p>This is especially effective where marketers seek an “always on” insertion order with a favored, premium publisher. This trend will grow in line with marketers’ adoption of people-based data technology. </p> <p><em>For more on programmatic in 2015, see other <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/search/?q=chris%20o%27hara">blog posts and research by Chris O'Hara</a>.</em></p>