tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/personalisation Latest Personalisation content from Econsultancy 2016-09-22T12:17:52+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/833 2016-09-22T12:17:52+01:00 2016-09-22T12:17:52+01:00 Festival of Marketing <p>The Festival of Marketing is a unique experience where ambitious marketers can discover, learn, celebrate and shape the future together. As the largest global event dedicated to brand marketers, the Festival reflects the very nature of marketing – seamlessly blending inspiration and practical application.</p> <p>This is a place for professionals to experience everything they need to find success – the ideas, the connections and the practical skills. It is both inspiring and hands on learning. Marketing is creative, strategic and tactical and the Festival is built in this spirit.</p> <p>We do this through an expert conference programme boasting more leading marketing minds than anywhere else on the planet, along with workshops, training, awards and networking opportunities.</p> <p>Whether you’re attending the conference at the Festival, celebrating your successes at the Masters of Marketing awards or joining our partners at the Official Festival Fringe, you’re part of an experience like no other.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68303 2016-09-20T02:00:00+01:00 2016-09-20T02:00:00+01:00 Four ways to avoid 'creepy' personalisation Jeff Rajeck <p>So what can marketers do to get the benefits of personalisation without the backlash?</p> <p>To find out, Econsultancy held a roundtable event, Understanding the Customer Journey: Optimising Engagement Levels for Greater Customer Acquisition &amp; Loyalty in Melbourne, Australia. Dozens of client-side marketers came to discuss the trends, best practices, and issues they are facing in CX.</p> <p>The roundtables were moderated by subject matter experts from Econsultancy and our event sponsor <a href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/en/ibm-marketing-cloud">IBM Marketing Cloud</a>. Participants brought their own experiences, questions, and challenges to the table for open discussion.</p> <p>Below are recommendations from brand marketers about how to personalise without being 'creepy'.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9290/p2.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>1) Be clear about the data you are collecting</h3> <p>According to participants, the first step to avoid being creepy with personalisation efforts is to<strong> let consumers know what data is being collected about them.</strong></p> <p>Many jurisdictions, such as the EU and Australia, have well-defined privacy laws which, when followed, go a long way toward satisfying this requirement.</p> <p>Brands can do more, though. Instead of burying the data collection policy on a privacy page, a simple banner at the top or bottom of the page lets consumers know that their browsing or purchasing behavior may be used to enhance their customer experience.</p> <p><strong>Doing so can pay off in greater engagement.</strong> A recent study published in The Journal of Retailing, <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022435914000669">Unraveling the Personalization Paradox</a>, found that firms who used overt data collection were able to use the data more effectively.</p> <p>In a controlled experiment, <strong>participants were more likely to click on personalised ads when the brand disclosed its data policy to consumers.</strong></p> <p>The graph below shows that in the study, click-through intention online increased when the brand was open ('overt') with its data gathering policies.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9285/graph.png" alt="" width="532" height="387"> </p> <h3>2) Know the acceptable limits of data collecting and usage</h3> <p>Telling consumers how you are going to collect and use data is not enough, however.<strong> Brands should also keep a close eye on what is currently acceptable to consumers</strong>, according to attendees.</p> <p>Though what consumers find acceptable changes over time, it is likely that <strong>consumers currently appreciate a lot less personalisation than most marketers believe.</strong></p> <p>In a <a href="https://www.asc.upenn.edu/sites/default/files/TradeoffFallacy_1.pdf">2015 survey of over 1,500 American consumers</a>, researchers at University of Pennsylvania reported some surprising findings:</p> <ul> <li>91% of respondents disagree that "If companies give me a discount, it is a fair exchange for them to collect information about me without my knowing."</li> <li>55% disagree that "It’s okay if a store where I shop uses information it has about me to create a picture of me that improves the services they provide for me."</li> <li>84% agree that "I want to have control over what marketers can learn about me online."</li> </ul> <p>Also, RichRelevance, an omnichannel personalisation provider, <a href="http://www.richrelevance.com/blog/2016/07/creepy-cool-second-annual-richrelevance-survey-shows-consumers-want-store-shopping-experience/">recently conducted research</a> in the US and the UK to discover what consumers find 'cool' and what they think is 'creepy'.</p> <p>Whereas mobile product scans are deemed 'cool' by 76%, <strong>facial recognition technology is still largely seen as 'creepy' by three people in four (75%).</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9287/2016-09-19_13_53_35-blank.pptx_-_PowerPoint.png" alt="" width="575" height="736"> </p> <p>Both reports are worth reading before launching a personalisation project.</p> <h3>3) Use only some of the data that you have</h3> <p>Participants felt that consumers respond well to some personalisation but are turned off by too much. </p> <p>One attendee said that <strong>seeing their first name in an email is fine, but they don't want to see their name in an ad on the website.</strong></p> <p>A <a href="http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/Papers.cfm?abstract_id=2725251">recent study conducted at Stanford Graduate School of Business</a> shows that simply adding a first name to an email has a profound effect.</p> <p>Researchers found that adding the name of the message recipient to the email’s subject-line... </p> <ul> <li>increased the probability of the recipient opening it by 20%,</li> <li>increased sales leads by 31%</li> <li>and reduced unsubscribes by 17%</li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9289/p1.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"> </p> <h3>4) Personalise without personal details</h3> <p>Finally, another way attendees suggested that <strong>brands can use personalisation is to provide a 'personalised' service without identifying a consumer personally.</strong></p> <p>Though it may seem like using less data would be less effective, <strong>avoiding the creepiness factor altogether may produce the best results.</strong></p> <p>Pampers, the US diaper brand, recently A/B tested content for consumers on China's ecommerce platform Tmall.</p> <p>Existing customers saw discounts and exclusive deals, whereas new moms saw content about brand reputation and its loyalty programme. The results were then compared to consumers who saw the standard brand page instead of 'personalised' content.</p> <p>According to a <a href="https://www.l2inc.com/pampers-proves-personalization-works/2016/blog">report from L3</a>, post-personalization conversion rate more than tripled for consumers who saw the targeted content. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9288/pampers.png" alt="" width="800" height="531"></p> <h3>So...</h3> <p>Personalisation is certainly the next frontier for marketers to explore. Offering one-on-one messaging and offers is a great way to grow awareness and increase conversions.</p> <p>It comes at a cost, however. Brands who overdo personalisation risk being perceived as creepy which puts customers off from engaging.</p> <p>Through arriving at a careful balance of the potential of personalisation while avoiding creepy tendencies, attendees agreed, marketers should be able to use personalisation without damaging the brand.</p> <h3>A word of thanks</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank all of the client-side marketers who participated on the day and especially our table moderators for the Personalisation table, <strong>Mallory Martel, Marketing Manager, Sidekicker.</strong></p> <p>We'd also like to thank our sponsor for the event, <a href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/en/ibm-marketing-cloud">IBM Marketing Cloud</a>, and we hope to see you all at future Melbourne Econsultancy events!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9236/moderators.JPG" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68282 2016-09-15T14:00:00+01:00 2016-09-15T14:00:00+01:00 Black Friday & Christmas: How to make the most of early seasonal shoppers Saima Alibhai <p>According to some recent research from shopping channel QVC, 1.5m Londoners have already started their Christmas shopping.</p> <p>That’s a substantial pre-season opportunity, but you must act now to engage with early bird shoppers or risk missing out to the competition.</p> <p>The traditional Christmas shopping season has seen upheaval in recent years, including ever-longer seasonal sales promotions and the growing popularity of online shopping. And most recently,<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67159-are-we-doing-black-friday-in-the-uk-or-not/"> the emergence of Black Friday </a>has thrown the cat amongst the pigeons.</p> <p>Black Friday was introduced to the UK by Amazon in 2010. Although fairly new, this sales event reaped £1.1bn last year in 2015, up 33% on the year before.</p> <p>With such lucrative revenues, you might have already launched your own Black Friday promotions in recent years, but now you must be prepared to serve seasonal shoppers even earlier in the year. </p> <p>So what are the main tactics you can use to make the most of this opportunity? </p> <h3>Gear up for ‘peak’ performance</h3> <p>The growth of the Christmas peak in spending now spans over two months of sales, so be prepared to deliver exceptional service and maximise profits throughout the entire time.</p> <p>In the UK, the Black Friday sales period isn’t punctuated at the end with the Thanksgiving public holiday as in the US, so your promotions can run all the way to Christmas and even through to January. </p> <p>In addition to sustaining promotions, reward the loyalty of your returning and longstanding customers.</p> <p>With the increased competition between online and physical retailers, you must create compelling reasons to keep them coming back for more.</p> <p>Unique offers and content for specific customer segments demonstrates that you appreciate their loyalty and helps deepen their emotional connection to your brand.</p> <p><em>Argos' extended sale.</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9164/blue_friday.png" alt="argos black friday promotion" width="615" height="357"></p> <h3>Cater to all shopping habits</h3> <p>On Black Friday, there will be many different kinds of shoppers hunting for bargains, some for altruistic reasons and others more selfish.</p> <p>Research from delivery firm Doddle showed that instead of purchasing gifts for those on their Christmas list, 40% of Brits make personal purchases on Black Friday.</p> <p>As well as creating promotions for gift ideas, analyze your customers’ past purchases and browsing preferences over the year so you can deliver the right offers for self-gifters in the lead up to Black Friday, and then for those buying gifts for others in the weeks that follow. </p> <p>Brexit and the resulting currency fluctuations have attracted more shoppers from overseas markets, such as China.</p> <p>Factor in this potentially increased demand, and make your website navigation and checkout process, including shipping details, as easy as possible for international shoppers. </p> <h3>Get ready for Black Friday 2.0</h3> <p>Consumers are becoming even more tech savvy. They use social media to research products and are browsing and buying products across multiple devices.</p> <p>In fact, some of our own research showed that 37% of shoppers use their smartphones to complete a purchase, while almost a third (30%) use their tablets.</p> <p>You need to be able to track these customers across the entire purchasing journey and provide the right encouragement to convert initial interest into sales, and avoid customers leaving items lingering idly in baskets.</p> <p>The Black Friday phenomenon has already delivered success for many retailers, but as with the retail market, it is constantly evolving.</p> <p>Understand your customers and their purchasing journeys to maximise revenue between now and the year’s end. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67061-seo-black-friday-how-are-brands-preparing-their-landing-pages">Black Friday is casting a longer shadow</a>, but by making the most of the entire seasonal shopping period, you can significantly increase your annual sales results.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68285 2016-09-15T02:00:00+01:00 2016-09-15T02:00:00+01:00 Six things to consider when implementing personalisation Jeff Rajeck <p>And in our global <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2016-digital-trends/">2016 Digital Trends report</a>, 'targeting and personalization' was the most popular response when marketers were asked about top priorities for their organisation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9062/2016-09-13_10_25_03-charts.pptx_-_PowerPoint.png" alt="" width="778" height="254"></p> <p>But what's the reality? <strong>How much are marketers actually using personalisation?</strong></p> <p>In one recent survey, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/state-of-email-and-marketing-automation-in-south-east-asia">The State of Email and Marketing Automation in South-East Asia</a>, less than one in ten (8%) of respondents said that they were able to do content personalisation, beyond using the customer's name.</p> <p>And in a different survey, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census">Email Marketing Industry Census 2016</a>, only 8% of marketers surveyed said that they 'can send emails based on individual activities and preferences'.</p> <p>So despite its popularity, <strong>personalisation does not seem to be used very much by marketers.</strong></p> <p>If the interest in personalisation is there and it's still not being used, then there must be problems with the implementation. <strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>So what should marketers do when they are implementing personalisation?</strong></p> <p>To find out, Econsultancy recently held a roundtable event on Understanding the Customer Journey in Sydney, Australia.</p> <p>Dozens of client-side marketers came to discuss the trends, best practices, and issues they are facing in CX.</p> <p>The roundtables were moderated by subject matter experts from Econsultancy and our event sponsor <a href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/en/ibm-marketing-cloud">IBM Marketing Cloud</a>. Participants brought their own experiences, questions, and challenges to the table for open discussion.</p> <p>Below are recommendations from the table at which brand marketers discussed implementing personalisation.</p> <h3>1. Decide what personalisation mean to you and your organisation</h3> <p>When asked what personalisation means, participants came up with a number of definitions.</p> <p>Some felt that personalisation is a campaign technique which produced ads which were more relevant to the target market.  </p> <p>Others said that it was a way to ensure that the brand's content was more relevant for visitors to its website.  </p> <p>And some felt that personalisation meant changing how marketing was carried for a particular segment or geographical location.</p> <p>Whatever the definition, <strong>it is critical that marketers agree on the direction and scope of a personalisation program before starting.</strong></p> <p>One attendee added that all personalisation programmes should have similar goals though, including:</p> <ul> <li>increased relevance for the consumer,</li> <li>an improved customer experience,</li> <li>and an increase in conversions or more sales for the business.</li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9063/Personalisation1.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>2. Involve the customer when devising a personalisation strategy</h3> <p>One of the most important next steps, according to participants, was to map the customer journey.  </p> <p>Many felt that <strong>it is best to understand how customers interact with the brand, both online and off, before developing personas and segments.</strong></p> <p>There are many ways of determining the customer journey, but one of the most important techniques is to<strong> talk to your customers.</strong>  </p> <p>Using surveys and interviews, marketers can find out in which parts of the customer journey would personalisation be most meaningful.</p> <p>Questions which you should be able to answer: </p> <ul> <li>Who are our customers?</li> <li>What customers are we missing out on on?</li> <li>What is it they need and how can we serve that need?</li> <li>Through which channels can we continue to help them?</li> </ul> <p>Knowing the answers to these questions will also expose opportunities for nurturing customer relationships on an ongoing basis, as well.</p> <h3>3. Get senior buy-in from the start</h3> <p>Improving customer experience is a company-wide effort. Often, the whole business will need to change from a product-focused culture to one where the customer is at the center.</p> <p>One participant said that<strong> a good way to get this started is to embark on an education project about the business benefits of personalisation.  </strong></p> <p>Key performance indicators (KPIs) which link the proposed company changes to a distinct business benefit should be included as well.</p> <p>One attendee said that <strong>providing metrics such as Net Promoter Score (NPS), customer acquisition cost (CAC), and customer lifetime value (CLV) are useful in winning the business over.</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9064/Personalisation2.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>4. Having the right data is key</h3> <p>It is well-known that data underpins most new marketing efforts these days. Personalisation, however, requires more data than possibly any other marketing tactics.</p> <p>Personalisation is unique because it can leverage many different data sets - including demographic, financial, and behavioral - and even combine them to improve the bottom-line.  </p> <p>Because of this, it is best to<strong> make sure that all departments who 'own' the data understand the personalisation programme, how the data will be used, and the benefits for the company.</strong></p> <p>Testing is also very important. One participant added that they test whether personalisation improves performance on their website using A/B tests and the test results have been incorporated into many of their design decisions.</p> <h3>5. Personalising content is much harder that people think</h3> <p>According to one attendee, <strong>many marketers underestimate the difficulty in providing personalised content on an ongoing basis.  </strong></p> <p>For their personalisation programme, website users were identified according to the content they read by a points system, through which they were able to create user segments.  </p> <p>The really hard part, though, was deciding what content to show them once they had identified their customer type.</p> <p>One way to address this problem, one participant noted, would be to <strong>identify the most lucrative opportunities first and concentrate on content relevant to them</strong>.  </p> <p>Another suggestion was to <strong>start with people who are nearest to buying, </strong>which may be more sensible than trying to personalise for those at the top of the funnel.</p> <p>Relevancy, however, is key and offering meaningful content to people who have already shown interest to your brand is a great opportunity for personalisation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9065/Personalisation3.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>6. Learn as much as you can</h3> <p>Finally, participants noted that marketers should learn as much as they can about innovative marketing technology in order to help with their personalisation efforts.</p> <p>Besides subscribing to Econsultancy (as mentioned by a few participants - thanks!), where should marketers go to find out more on the topic?</p> <p>The first suggestion was to read as much as you can. There are numerous tomes written on the broad subject of personalisation and countless blog posts on the topic so marketers should seek these out to start off.</p> <p>Another place<strong> marketers can learn about personalisation technology is from other marketers</strong>. Attending conferences is one way to do so.  </p> <p>The conversations which happen over coffee at events are invaluable for finding out what other people are doing.</p> <p>Technology providers can help, too. When reviewing a particular platform or solution, <strong>marketers should ask technology providers for customer references and ask the referees about their experiences.</strong>  </p> <p>Typically, these customers will be far ahead of those just evaluating the product and can offer advice about what worked well and what should be avoided during implementation.</p> <h3>A word of thanks</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank all of the client-side marketers who participated on the day and especially our moderator for the Personalisation table, <strong>Dominic Byrne, Head of Digital &amp; Ecommerce at Coco Republic.</strong></p> <p>We'd also like to thank our sponsor for the event, <a href="http://www-03.ibm.com/software/products/en/ibm-marketing-cloud">IBM Marketing Cloud</a>, and we hope to see you all at future Sydney Econsultancy events!</p> <p> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9059/hosts.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3084 2016-09-06T12:24:54+01:00 2016-09-06T12:24:54+01:00 Usability and Persuasion in E-commerce <p>Usability and persuasion techniques are proven to increase e-commerce conversion rates. From search and navigation through to product pages, shopping bag and checkout, this course will arm you with a wealth of insights that you can begin using on your own e-commerce customer experience.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68222 2016-08-30T10:34:00+01:00 2016-08-30T10:34:00+01:00 Ecommerce product filters: Best practice tips for a great UX Greg Randall <p>There are best practice guidelines to the use of filters that retailers should consider following. This is the purpose of this article.  </p> <p>It will address issues and present the best methods to construct filter behaviour in the context of enhancing online experiences. </p> <p>Due to the size of this topic which must span the various screen sizes, this article only focuses on desktop screens (and makes some references to tablet screens).</p> <p>For retailers who have large product ranges, filters are an essential part of improving online experiences.  </p> <p>If retailers can present and treat filters in the right manner, it enables consumers to quickly refine a large product range by the product attributes he/she deems important and aligned to his/her intent.  </p> <p>Some would call this act of<strong> empowering consumers with the means to manipulate content by their own hand, a personalised experience.</strong></p> <p>In order for filters to add value to a consumer’s journey, there are a core set of “filtering characteristics” to consider:   </p> <ol> <li> <strong>Filter placement:</strong> Where should filters be located on a page?</li> <li> <strong>Presenting relevant filters by product range:</strong> Different products with different attributes demand different filter options.</li> <li> <strong>Presenting the filtering options:</strong> How should a long list of filter options display as a default? </li> <li> <strong>Visually validating selected filters:</strong> When consumers select a filter, how should this be presented to provide consumers the confidence the site has reacted to this request?</li> </ol> <p>This narrative is based on the assumption that the integrity of a retailer’s product master data is to a high standard.  </p> <p>If not, this becomes the first challenge the business must overcome.  </p> <p>Some recommendations in this article are reliant on this business function.</p> <h3>Filter Placement </h3> <p><a href="https://www.nngroup.com/articles/horizontal-attention-leans-left/" target="_blank">NN Group’s eye-tracking study back in 2010</a> found 69% of consumers spend most of their time focusing on the left hand side of the page.</p> <p>There is no shortage of examples of well-known retailers placing their filters on the left hand side of the page, one of which is ASOS:</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/8402/asos_filter-blog-flyer.png" alt="asos" width="470" height="516"></p> <p>From the perspective of filter placement on a page, most retailers are doing a great job.  </p> <p>This is the easy part done. </p> <h3>Presenting relevant filters by product range</h3> <p>Filters have the potential to become an enabling ingredient for consumers to shop in their own individualised way based on their unique personal needs and preferences.  </p> <p>For retailers to make the most of this opportunity there is a need to deliver relevant and unique filtering options for each category.  </p> <p>This requires retailers to have a good understanding of how consumers want to buy from them. There is an increased need for <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/3052337/why-genuine-empathy-is-good-for-business">consumer empathy.</a>  </p> <p>One good example of relevant filtering per category is Sephora which has provided a number of different refinement options for consumers interested in Moisturisers.</p> <p>Within the Sephora Moisturiser category consumers can filter by:</p> <ol> <li>A consumer’s age (something consumers might not be comfortable discussing in a physical retail setting).</li> <li>Brand.</li> <li>Concerns (another topic some consumers might not be comfortable discussing).</li> <li>Ingredient preferences.</li> <li>Size of the product (travel vs value). Some consumers may want this product to remain in their purse/handbag while others may want to purchase something larger to save money.</li> <li>Skin type.</li> <li>Sun protection.</li> <li>Price Range.</li> </ol> <p>Notice how <a href="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8404/sephora_moisturiser_filter.png">price range is the last of the filters in presentation</a>. This is done intentionally.  </p> <p>If the consumer finds a product perfectly matching her needs, does price matter?</p> <p>Though there are over 450 moisturiser products to choose from, but with the comprehensive filter options on offer this range could grow in size and consumers would still have a good experience. </p> <h3>The Presentation of Filters </h3> <p>The majority of retailers <a href="https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2015/04/the-current-state-of-e-commerce-filtering/" target="_blank">present filters in four different ways</a>.  </p> <p>They are: </p> <ol> <li>Displaying all filters at once.</li> <li>Applying scrolling capability within each filter type.</li> <li>Presenting filter titles with no filter options to select.</li> <li>Truncate filters (abbreviate the presentation by displaying a sub set of the filters and provide a “See more” or “See all” hyperlink to present all other filter options).</li> </ol> <h3>Displaying All Filters</h3> <p>When displaying all filters the list becomes too busy for the consumer’s eye, making it difficult to identify and absorb all options presented. </p> <p>An example of this in action is Gamestop.com.</p> <p>While the filters are styled blue to indicate they are hyperlinks, the list is long, the font is small and the spacing is tight.  </p> <p>This style of filter presentation also makes for difficult finger targets when this is translated to tablet screens.</p> <p><em>Click to see the full list of filters</em></p> <p><a href="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8405/gamestop.png"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8492/gamestop_small.png" alt="" width="179" height="395"></a></p> <h3>Apply scrolling capability for filters </h3> <p>A good example of filters with scrolling capability is found at Sephora.com.</p> <p><em>Click to see the full list of filters</em></p> <p><a href="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8404/sephora_moisturiser_filter.png"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8494/sephora_moisturiser.png" alt="" width="179"></a></p> <p>The issue with this approach is the scroll bar itself.  </p> <p><a href="https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2015/04/the-current-state-of-e-commerce-filtering/" target="_blank">Usability research completed</a> on this type of filter presentation found the following issues:</p> <ol> <li>The fixed height of the filter frame will only ever present four to five options for selection.</li> <li>Small finger target on tablet screens.</li> <li>“Scroll Hi-jacking”. This is a term used to describe the consumer’s need to be <a href="https://www.smasbhingmagazine.com/2015/04/the-current-state-of-e-commerce-filtering/" target="_blank">constantly aware of his/her mouse</a> when using the scroll bars. </li> <li>Slow page load speed.  </li> </ol> <h3>Only presenting filter titles </h3> <p>Presenting only filter titles and not showing any options may sound like a good idea for retailers with many filter types, but it comes with issues.  </p> <p>For example, Staples.com does this across its entire site, below is what you see when you select the Laser Printer sub category. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8495/staples_filter.png" alt="" width="179"></p> <p>The issues with this approach:</p> <ol> <li>Sometimes the naming of the filter may not be intuitive and the filter options help to explain what it means. </li> <li>The display of filters can prompt consumers to make a selection.</li> <li>Hiding filter types increases the <a href="https://www.nngroup.com/articles/interaction-cost-definition/" target="_blank">physical effort</a> of a consumer in making a selection (more clicking is required).   </li> </ol> <h3>Truncating filters</h3> <p>“Truncating filters” is a fancy term for partially displaying a selection of filtering options for each filter type with a clear “See/Show More” hyperlink prompting that action if necessary.  </p> <p>This filter presentation option has the most benefits, but there are conditions to this approach in order for it to be effective.</p> <ol> <li>Retailers will know what brands are the most popular and should display these first. Once a user selects “See More” the list of filters would then present in alphabetical order.</li> <li>“See More” or “See All” hyperlinks are clear and obvious.</li> <li>In order to manage interaction cost there needs to be clear and obvious visual cues so users know their filter selection has been honoured. It is also important to present intuitive methods to deselect filters.  </li> </ol> <p>Macy’s has the right idea by providing visual cues to the selected filters, and repeats the selected filters at the top of the page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8500/macys_filter_large.png" alt="" width="750" height="996"></p> <p>One of the better examples of visual filter validation in action is Newegg.com.  </p> <p>The selected filters are repeated and presented at the top of the page, they are visually strong, and simple to deselect.  </p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/8411/new_egg_filter-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="294"> </p> <h3>The end...</h3> <p>That wraps up our quick tour of filters on desktop.  </p> <p>I hope you enjoyed reading this article as much as I enjoyed creating it!</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68231 2016-08-26T14:22:00+01:00 2016-08-26T14:22:00+01:00 Five ways to utilize your data to increase sales Shaun Haase <p dir="ltr">Only <a href="http://www.technologyreview.com/news/514346/the-data-made-me-do-it/">0.5% of data available is used</a>, as the sheer amount and complexity of the data intimidates companies.</p> <p dir="ltr">Many believe that only large enterprises have the resources to utilize big data, yet small businesses can easily take advantage of it as well.  </p> <p dir="ltr">Making sense of this information can be overwhelming, but once you discover a way to integrate it into your own decision-making process, you’ll quickly realize the myriad of new sales opportunities that are now at your disposal. </p> <h3 dir="ltr">1. Analyze old data</h3> <p dir="ltr">Your historical sales data holds valuable information that can be leveraged to improve sales efforts at each stage of the funnel.</p> <p dir="ltr">By identifying which sales tactics work best, you’ll be able to gradually refine your approach and improve conversion rates each time.</p> <p dir="ltr">In order to do this, gather all of your data from past leads, opportunities and sales transactions and input them into <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-role-of-crm-in-data-driven-marketing/">a CRM software</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">With all of your historical data stored and organized in one place, you’ll be able to analyze which strategies worked best for each customer or product segment.</p> <p dir="ltr">Historical data can also be used to improve sales forecasts, allowing you to identify high-value targets and better allocate potential opportunities and new leads.</p> <p dir="ltr">Having your sales team concentrate on only the most promising opportunities will rapidly increase the efficiency and effectiveness of your sales efforts.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">2. Optimize pricing</h3> <p dir="ltr">Pricing can be one of the biggest challenges of introducing a new product.</p> <p dir="ltr">Pricing too high can drive customers away, yet pricing too low can erode your profit margins and even customer perception.</p> <p dir="ltr">In addition to external research (e.g. tracking the competitive landscape and market opportunity), carefully analyze past transactions and your customer base.</p> <p dir="ltr">Using data from your CRM (or similar analytics software), segment your customers by different price points to help narrow down the ideal price range based on each group’s price tolerance, behavior and demand.</p> <p dir="ltr">Combining both internal and external data points arms you with the necessary insights needed to determine an optimal pricing structure for maximum sales potential.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">3. Refine your messaging</h3> <p dir="ltr">Customers have their own set of attributes and require communications that are tailored to their specific needs, preferences and desires.</p> <p dir="ltr">Most businesses do this by creating <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62303-how-to-effectively-segment-your-data/">customer segments</a> based on a wide range of attributes such as geographic location, age, sex, marital status, etc.</p> <p dir="ltr">But how do you determine which message works best for each customer segment?</p> <p dir="ltr">By A/B testing the various elements of each message, you can analyze how customers respond to different headlines, offers, images and copy to find that works best.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">4. Visualize the data</h3> <p dir="ltr">Raw data can be confusing to interpret and time-consuming to sift through, especially when you have a large amount of it.</p> <p dir="ltr">Instead, visualize the data through centralized dashboards that provide a constant stream of information.</p> <p dir="ltr">One example is <a href="https://www.geckoboard.com/">Geckoboard</a>, a dashboard app that displays real-time data in a visual and dynamic manner, making it simpler for teams to reference relevant data when making critical decisions.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sales teams can easily use this visual data to track progress and monitor any relevant metrics.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">5. Create compelling case studies  </h3> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://econsultancy.com/case-studies/">Case studies</a> are an effective way to inform potential customers of your capabilities and recent accomplishments; they highlight real world examples and serve as facilitators when closing new deals.</p> <p dir="ltr">Web apps such as <a href="http://sketchdeck.com/">SketchDeck</a> can pull specific data points into case studies to effectively communicate value to your customers.</p> <p dir="ltr">Beyond incorporating core data points, be sure to include visual elements such as charts and graphs that clearly highlight the key points and benefits.</p> <p dir="ltr">Keeping your case studies brief and concise with visual data will help you create impactful selling points.</p> <p dir="ltr">Extracting value from your data takes some time and effort, but once you do, the benefits are endless.</p> <p dir="ltr">Regardless of the size of your business, learning to incorporate data into your sales processes will not only help you become a much better decision maker but also drive revenue growth.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>To learn more, check out Econsultancy’s range of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/data-analytics/">data and analytics training courses</a>.</em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/806 2016-08-25T08:15:50+01:00 2016-08-25T08:15:50+01:00 The Rise of Customer Experience & Customer Journey: Optimising Engagement Levels for Greater Customer Acquisition & Loyalty <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: justify;">In collaboration with IBM Marketing Cloud, this <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Customer Experience (CX) India Roundtable Series</strong> is brought to you by Econsultancy.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">A carefully designed buyer journey can lead to an excellent customer experience and help you drive value, reduce cost, and build competitive advantage.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><em style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">"The most important thing today is to think about the customer journey mapping and think about it in structures, and in specific areas and architect all those maybe four or five touch points for digital marketing, product and retention."</em> (Dave Walters, Product Evangelist - IBM Marketing Cloud)</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">By attending this <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">roundtable</strong> session, you will not only be able to learn about latest in developments, trends and best practices, but also exchange forward thinking ideas around some of the top-of-mind<strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"> </strong>issues with like minded peers.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Attendance is <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">limited to 30 attendees</strong> to ensure maximum interaction and sharing of insights.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">As part of the <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">CX Roundtable</strong> series, we are also running sessions in <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><a href="https://econsultancy.com/events/cx-rt-series-mumbai/" target="_blank">Mumbai (18 October)</a> </strong>and<strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"> </strong><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/events/cx-rt-series-delhi/" target="_blank">New Delhi (20 October)</a></strong>.</p> <h3 style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004e70;">The Roundtable Format</h3> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">The roundtable allows you to discuss a number of related subjects <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">(select 2)</strong> that are most relevant to you and allows you to find out from your peers how they are addressing similar challenges / opportunities.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">1. Personalisation</strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">2. Customer Experience Management - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practices</strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">3. </strong><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Joining Up Online and Offline Channels Data</strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Each roundtable is moderated by Econsultancy and focused on a particular topic with delegates proposing specific questions or challenges they wish to discuss on that topic in the time available.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">There are 2 roundtable sessions of 60 minutes each, <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">please select 2 most relevant topics when registering.</strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Led by Econsultancy and IBM Marketing Cloud's cross industry subject matter experts, this roundtable session is a 'hands-on' participatory event driven by your priority areas and pain points, enabling you to learn through discussion and debate, gather marketing insights driving effective business decisions, and network with like-minded peers.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/807 2016-08-25T07:19:44+01:00 2016-08-25T07:19:44+01:00 The Rise of Customer Experience & Customer Journey: Optimising Engagement Levels for Greater Customer Acquisition & Loyalty <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; text-align: justify;">In collaboration with IBM Marketing Cloud, this <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Customer Experience (CX) India Roundtable Series</strong> is brought to you by Econsultancy.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">A carefully designed buyer journey can lead to an excellent customer experience and help you drive value, reduce cost, and build competitive advantage.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><em style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">"The most important thing today is to think about the customer journey mapping and think about it in structures, and in specific areas and architect all those maybe four or five touch points for digital marketing, product and retention."</em> (Dave Walters, Product Evangelist - IBM Marketing Cloud)</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">By attending this <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">roundtable</strong> session, you will not only be able to learn about latest in developments, trends and best practices, but also exchange forward thinking ideas around some of the top-of-mind<strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"> </strong>issues with like minded peers.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Attendance is <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">limited to 30 attendees</strong> to ensure maximum interaction and sharing of insights.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">As part of the <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">CX Roundtable</strong> series, we are also running sessions in <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><a href="https://econsultancy.com/events/cx-rt-series-mumbai/" target="_blank">Mumbai (18 October)</a> </strong>and<strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"> </strong><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/events/cx-rt-series-delhi/" target="_blank">New Delhi (20 October)</a></strong>.</p> <h3 style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004e70;">The Roundtable Format</h3> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">The roundtable allows you to discuss a number of related subjects <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">(select 2)</strong> that are most relevant to you and allows you to find out from your peers how they are addressing similar challenges / opportunities.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">1. Personalisation</strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">2. Customer Experience Management - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practices</strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">3. </strong><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Joining Up Online and Offline Channels Data</strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Each roundtable is moderated by Econsultancy and focused on a particular topic with delegates proposing specific questions or challenges they wish to discuss on that topic in the time available.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">There are 2 roundtable sessions of 60 minutes each, <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">please select 2 most relevant topics when registering.</strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Led by Econsultancy and IBM Marketing Cloud's cross industry subject matter experts, this roundtable session is a 'hands-on' participatory event driven by your priority areas and pain points, enabling you to learn through discussion and debate, gather marketing insights driving effective business decisions, and network with like-minded peers.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68175 2016-08-18T15:17:00+01:00 2016-08-18T15:17:00+01:00 Will Facebook’s artificial image creation solve our stock photo woes? Dr Janet Bastiman <p style="text-align: justify;">Imagine if you could find the image you have in your head, immediately, without having to search through your content library?</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">What if there was a way to search for your image online in real time? Where you could just describe what you wanted and a perfect high-definition image was returned to you within seconds? </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">While we are able to imagine any situation, we currently rely on manual photo manipulation to turn this into an image that we can share.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">But could we get to a point where we ask our computer: “Show me a picture of me riding a bicycle on Mars,” and a realistic representation is produced?</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">That’s why marketers value creative photographers so highly.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">And there is no doubting the value a modern genius like Rankin has brought to campaigns as celebrated as Dove’s major worldwide hit campaign ‘Real Women’.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8209/rankin_dove.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="362"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Some of the most exciting research I have seen in this area is coming out of the Facebook Artificial Intelligence Team and is based around artificial image creation. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Facebook’s team is trying to create 100% computer-generated images that fool humans into thinking that they’re real. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In 2015, Facebook published some <a href="http://arxiv.org/pdf/1506.05751v1.pdf">results</a><a title="" name="_ednref1"></a> which indicated that it could create very small images (64x64px) of landscapes from a random 8x8px grid. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">When those images tested alongside real images downscaled to the same size, the artificial images were judged to be real 40% of the time by the test panel. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8596/Facebook-Deep-Generative-Image-Models.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="425"> </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Earlier <a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/1511.06434.pdf">this year</a><a title="" name="_ednref2"></a>, the team built on their earlier success by generating more complex scenes, including bedrooms.  </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">While the images were still very small, they do look very realistic as the examples above show and it feels like we are on the edge of a breakthrough in this field.  </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Personally I expect within the next 6-12 months we’ll start to see images at a larger resolution and slowly there will be the ability to create a realistic image from a text description.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">There is no doubt that this is a very exciting area of research and, while it is a few years away from practical application, it’s something we should watch closely. </p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Until then I don’t see any immediate move away from human-generated content.</p> <h3 style="text-align: justify;">User-generated content</h3> <p style="text-align: justify;">One of the best ways of currently finding an image for your campaign that resonates with your target audience is by using user-generated content (UGC).</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">UGC is one of the most trusted forms of marketing; from YouTube stars promoting products to companies paying people to push their content on social media, this is a form of marketing that actually drives measurable sales.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">UGC is more trusted and more effective for a company than traditional advertising and with new methods popping up all the time, it looks set to continue.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Using on-open live UGC in email can result in a 43% increase in click-through rates, up to 3x conversion rate improvement, and 86% consumer trust rating as an indicator of product/service quality.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Studies show that UGC is 50% more trusted than any other content<a title="" name="_ednref3"></a> and, combined with brand content, can result in a more authentic, personalised and connected <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/creating-superior-customer-experiences/">customer experience</a>.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">One large brand already using UGC in their summer email and social campaign <em>#myholidayhabits</em> is Teletext Holidays, the UK’s longest established digital travel agency in the UK, with nearly 300,000 customers last year.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Kelly Maher, Head of CRM at Teletext Holidays explains: “Since using UGC, we have seen an unprecedented 2x increase in customer engagement in our campaigns.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">"My team and I are now able to use up-to-the-second user generated content from all major social channels including Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter to populate our emails with truly personalised, highly engaging content for every user on-open.”</p>