tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/personalisation Latest Personalisation content from Econsultancy 2017-05-18T15:00:00+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69083 2017-05-18T15:00:00+01:00 2017-05-18T15:00:00+01:00 Let’s put the ‘personal’ back in personalization by using living profiles Glen Hartman <p>It’s obvious that one of marketing’s widely used crutches – the segment-centric approach – isn’t up to the job anymore (but when was it ever). Given that the top 20% of customers typically represent 80% of the profits, companies cannot afford to treat people – especially their most valuable customers – as segments.</p> <h3>“I’m not a segment!” </h3> <p>Let’s not forget customers’ growing frustration with the way they are treated. For example, the websites of many retailers and brands take a one-size-fits-all approach – they offer a flood of options that cause many customers to simply abandon the pages and go elsewhere to get information or make a purchase, according to research from Accenture Interactive. </p> <p>The same research tells us that half of the customers in the US and UK have never(!) bought something recommended to them on a retailer’s website. This is customers’ way of telling brands, “I’m not a segment!”</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6203/orange_segment.jpg" alt="" width="640" height="360"></p> <p>At the same time, people constantly share what they want and need. It’s in each of the choices they make, the products they buy, and the way they contact and comment on companies and brands. </p> <p>Brands should hone their abilities to decode these interactions und use the information to the benefit of the customer. This is no longer just a matter of technology. Rather, it requires shifting the focus from the ‘What’ to the ‘Why’ – from identifying correlations of consumers’ socio-demographics and purchase histories to understanding motivations. </p> <h3>From customer segments to living profiles – and true personalization  </h3> <p>Brands can accomplish this by getting from segments to individual, ‘living’ profiles of their customers. </p> <p>Customers base their buying decisions on various aspects such as features, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/9366-ecommerce-consumer-reviews-why-you-need-them-and-how-to-use-them/">ratings and reviews</a>, and brand name. These product attributes make up the product’s DNA.</p> <p>In addition, each interaction a customer has with a brand (such as mobile app usage, email responses, social interactions, poll submissions, in-person events attended, etc.) is also characterized by descriptive attributes that shed light on their unique preferences, motivations and passions. </p> <p>Combining attributes across all interactions creates a living profile of the most unique aspects of each individual as they evolve in real time. </p> <p>For example, as a customer decides to purchase new clothing her living profile may reveal preferences for a casual fit, scoop neck shirts with motivational sayings, that are machine washable and also goes well with jeans.</p> <p>This approach takes customer insight way beyond segments and the ‘people who bought, also bought’ logic. From here, it’s only small step to offering experiences to customers that are personalized in the true sense of the word, starting with recommendations that are much more accurate and relevant. </p> <p>The opportunity, however, is much bigger. Think of offering what you know about your customers back to them, as a digital service acting like a personal assistant or shopper. Building living profiles of your customers can also help you drive innovation not just in marketing but in business, including the development of new products, services, and, most importantly, experiences.</p> <p>Brands’ biggest battles for a place in customers’ lives and hearts are fought with experiences. And the best experiences are when a brand knows us better than we know ourselves – and makes it easier for us to engage with what we want on our terms versus theirs.</p> <p><em>The author would like to thank Jeriad Zoghby, global personalization lead at Accenture Interactive, for his contribution to this post. </em></p> <p><em><strong>For more on this topic, see:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69065-five-advanced-data-and-segmentation-tactics-for-marketing-and-sales/"><em>Five advanced data and segmentation tactics for marketing and sales</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68431-how-to-combine-attribution-and-segmentation-data-to-achieve-marketing-success/"><em>How to combine attribution and segmentation data to achieve marketing success</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69095 2017-05-18T14:10:00+01:00 2017-05-18T14:10:00+01:00 How Coca-Cola is using smartphone data to personalise in-store ads Nikki Gilliland <p>It’s not such a far-fetched notion. Recently, Coca-Cola started using Google technologies to target consumers in US grocery stores. So, how does it work exactly? Here’s a bit more on the story.</p> <h3>Ads in grocery aisles</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68051-six-case-studies-that-show-how-digital-out-of-home-advertising-is-changing/" target="_blank">Digital out-of-home advertising</a> typically uses contextual data to display relevant ads, e.g. a Coke billboard that changes depending on the weather. Digital signs (such as those at bus stops or in buildings) also use data in this way.</p> <p>The problem for brands like Coca-Cola, however, is the high cost of these ads, combined with a lack of any real <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67070-why-personalisation-is-the-key-to-gaining-customer-loyalty/" target="_blank">personalisation</a> or targeting to individual consumers. This is where Google-integrated ‘endcaps’ come in – a term used to describe advertisements at the front of grocery store aisles. (Endcaps are fairly common in the US, but less so in the UK.) </p> <p>These endcaps serve ads to passing consumers based on their smartphone data, using a combination of Google’s DoubleClick and location-based technologies.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6150/Endcaps.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="439"></p> <p>The data includes anything from your basic gender or age demographic to previous browsing history. So, an ad could change from Coke Zero to Glacéau Smartwater if it recognises a preference for healthier products, for instance.</p> <p>The aim is to connect and engage with consumers to drive sales of the brand in retail stores – however Coca-Cola has also suggested that it benefits other brands and products within the same category (in this case soft drinks). This sounds somewhat improbable, but moving on. </p> <h3>Creepy or enhanced customer experience?</h3> <p>The real question is: Will consumers will be happy to receive super targeted ads, or does this level of personalisation veer into creepy territory? This generally remains one of the biggest issues for marketers, with <a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/01/14/privacy-and-information-sharing/" target="_blank">research from Pew</a> suggesting that consumers do not want to trade privacy for personalisation. </p> <p>It found that people are particularly negative about targeted ads if they are unaware of what is happening or do not provide outright consent. However, the study also found that consumers are more willing to accept data tracking if ads are highly relevant or beneficial, e.g. offering discounts or coupons.</p> <p>Fortunately, Coca-Cola’s endcaps also involve communicating wirelessly with devices to send tailored offers or coupons, also meaning people do not have to log-in or stand still. This could be one benefit, but it is unlikely to satisfy all consumers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6151/Google_tech_Coca_Cola.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="544"></p> <h3>Will it catch on?</h3> <p>While this example from Coke appears to be a first, it’s clear that tracking physical consumers is becoming a pressing concern for the retail industry as a whole. </p> <p>Online retailers can easily hone strategies based on metrics like click-throughs and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">basket abandonment rates</a> – so it’s understandable that offline retailers want to build a similar picture of consumer behaviour. </p> <p>Interestingly, a report by <a href="https://dxc.turtl.co/story/55ee93d8bbfd077f2d4e22ee" target="_blank">CSC</a> recently suggested that as many as 30% of retailers are now using facial-recognition technology to track customers in-store. By comparing certain facial characteristics with browsing or buying behaviour, retailers are able to predict intent and deliver relevant ads. Unsurprisingly, CSC also reports that 33% of consumers think the technology is intrusive, while 56% do not even know what it is.</p> <p>Whether consumers are creeped out or keen for this kind of in-store tech – with Coca-Cola set to roll out endcaps to thousands of US stores – we could be seeing much more of it in future.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67705-what-s-now-next-for-digital-technology-in-retail-stores/">What's now &amp; next for digital technology in retail stores?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67418-what-is-location-based-advertising-why-is-it-the-next-big-thing/" target="_blank">What is location-based advertising &amp; why is it the next big thing?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67038-11-ways-to-track-online-to-offline-conversions-and-vice-versa/" target="_blank">11 ways to track online to offline conversions (and vice versa)</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69078 2017-05-18T10:55:05+01:00 2017-05-18T10:55:05+01:00 How brands are tapping into the transformation economy Nikki Gilliland <p>So, what brands are taking this approach? Here are just a few examples. </p> <h3>Nike</h3> <p>While <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63129-10-awesome-digital-marketing-campaigns-from-nike/">Nike’s branding</a> has always evoked notions of self improvement and positivity, this has been in more of an inspirational sense rather than in terms of the actual product offering. Of course, sports gear can be a key tool when it comes to physical transformation, but examples like the Nike+ app offer a much more tangible way of achieving it.</p> <p>Through the Nike+ app users can join local running clubs, track and monitor progress, and even set goals based on personal ability. By offering data in return, customers are essentially able to use the Nike brand to help make getting and keeping fit a much richer personal experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5979/Nike_.JPG" alt="" width="752" height="633"></p> <h3>Selfridges</h3> <p>According to the 2014 Boston Consulting Group report, of the $1.8trn spent on ‘luxuries’ in 2013, nearly 55% was spent on luxury experiences. More often than not, these experiences tend to be rooted in a quest for health or wellness – which is also the idea behind retail initiatives like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68034-how-selfridges-s-body-studio-blurs-the-lines-between-digital-in-store/" target="_blank">Selfridges’ Body Studio</a>.</p> <p>Located in the London Oxford Street store, the space includes a clean-eating café and a hair studio. It also holds regular fitness events and motivational talks.</p> <p>You could argue that the Body Studio is more of a marketing exercise, simply a selection of products packaged up and sold under the umbrella of ‘wellness’. After all, shoppers aren’t going to feel all <em>that</em> different after a visit. Having said that, I think it still demonstrates how brands and retailers are using the power of transformation and related experiences to drive the sales of products.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uObtsABLuhY?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>District Vision</h3> <p>While District Vision is largely an ecommerce brand – selling eyewear for runners – it also sees its events and experiences as part of its product offering.</p> <p>The company, which began in New York, is based on the idea that ‘mental wellbeing is the foundation of every form of physical exercise’. As a result, it also offers a meditation and running program that helps runners to – you guessed it – run and meditate at the same time.  </p> <p>So, as both a wellness company and an ecommerce business, District Vision is one of the first real examples of a brand set up to be transformative - rather than as a by-product of a marketing strategy. By using its values as the very basis of its product research and development – as well as the paid-for events it offers on top – it is able to offer consumers a way to better themselves both physically and mentally.</p> <p>It’s a tall order, of course, but it’s certainly a bit more enticing than just paying for a designer logo.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5978/District_Vision.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="462"></p> <h3>Headspace</h3> <p>Headspace, the mindfulness app, proves that meditation can be the basis of a viable business model. In fact, it has used a subscription-based service – which offers unlimited access to sessions for £7.96 a month – to generate a reported annual revenue of over $50m.</p> <p>Naturally, this would not be possible if there was not the demand from consumers. And with the increase in technology and social media, issues relating to anxiety, mental health, self-esteem, and exhaustion are also on the up.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">What are you trying to cram into your day that could wait until tomorrow? <a href="https://t.co/vNsT7zoaIi">pic.twitter.com/vNsT7zoaIi</a></p> — Headspace (@Headspace) <a href="https://twitter.com/Headspace/status/861279481318617088">May 7, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>While the transformative aspect of Headspace is clear – with the aim of reducing the stresses and strains of everyday life – it could also be seen as revolutionary in a wider sense. By helping to bring awareness to mental health issues, it has also helped to change common perceptions, while making meditation a widely accepted part of modern life. </p> <p><em><strong>Related article:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68701-the-impact-of-the-sharing-economy-on-retail/" target="_blank">The impact of the sharing economy on retail</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69091 2017-05-17T14:19:02+01:00 2017-05-17T14:19:02+01:00 How Mr & Mrs Smith differentiates itself from digital competitors Nikki Gilliland <p>I recently heard Tamara Lohan, the CTO and co-founder of Mr &amp; Mrs Smith, speak at Abode Summit on the subject. Here are a few key points from her session.</p> <h3>Carefully curated hotels</h3> <p>Mr &amp; Mrs Smith originally began after a disastrous hotel stay, whereby Tamara and her then-boyfriend (now husband and business partner) were met with a decidedly different experience than the one they’d imagined. </p> <p>Realising that most travel agencies skip over what actually makes a holiday special - i.e. the little but memorable details – they set out to create a company which has the customer’s needs and desires in mind.</p> <p>With the core aim of inspiring people to travel to extraordinary places, it researches the best and most overlooked boutique hotels, which are often unique in terms of design and architecture. The company also values hotels that are environmentally-friendly or dedicated to local issues. Its selection of hotels in the Maldives is a clear example of this. With waste management becoming an increasing issue on the island, Mr &amp; Mrs Smith only chooses eco-friendly and sustainable hotels that aim to counteract the problem. </p> <p>Alongside this, one aspect that also sets Mr &amp; Mrs Smith apart is the fact that its hotels go through a rigorous testing and review process, with employees visiting each one to ensure it delivers a truly memorable experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6074/MR___MRS_Smith_Insta.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="568"></p> <h3>Creating loyalty</h3> <p>So, while its value proposition is clear, how does Mr &amp; Mrs Smith capture clicks – crucially even before customers turn to search? Instead of serving intent, the brand aims to create it by fostering loyalty.</p> <p>It differentiates itself from competitors like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68505-a-closer-look-at-booking-com-s-customer-focused-strategy/" target="_blank">Booking.com</a> and On The Beach by being a ‘travel club’ rather than an online booking platform. This idea builds on customer’s long-term interest in travel as well as their desire to forge relationships with like-minded people.</p> <p>While membership to Mr &amp; Mrs Smith only means booking through the website (there is no cost or fee to become a ‘member’), this idea aligns with the brand’s promise of offering something extra special. Booking with the brand means customers can enjoy perks such as being met with champagne on arrival, as well as exclusive offers and experiences throughout the year. </p> <p>Not only does this evoke a sense of exclusivity – making members feel recognised and inspired – but the included benefits mean consumers are much more likely to return again in future.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Bye <a href="https://twitter.com/FoxhillManor">@FoxhillManor</a>, it's been epic! <a href="https://twitter.com/smithhotels">@smithhotels</a> <a href="https://t.co/tp1GTjGuwt">pic.twitter.com/tp1GTjGuwt</a></p> — Olivia von Halle (@OliviavonHalle) <a href="https://twitter.com/OliviavonHalle/status/819945671620968449">January 13, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Delivering unique content</h3> <p>‘Does everything have to be digital?’ was the title of Tamara’s talk. The answer is pretty obvious, of course, with Mr &amp; Mrs Smith typically partaking in both online and offline marketing activity to ensure it reaches customers in multiple ways.</p> <p>But while not everything has to be digital, it <em>does</em> have to be unique – which is a philosophy reflected in branded events like the ‘Smith Boutique Hotel Awards’. </p> <p>The annual awards ceremony honours the best hotels in the industry, with voters being made up of tastemakers, specialists and industry insiders. Unlike typically stuffy or corporate award ceremonies, it is consumer-facing, inviting customers and influencers to also attend. </p> <p>As well as forging one-to-one relationships with consumers, the awards are also a great way to create valuable content. Two weeks before this year's event, the company sent photographer Polly Brown on a whistle-stop tour of the winning hotels, documenting the results on both Instagram and a printed newspaper that was sent to a few select and loyal customers. </p> <p>Just like the travel experiences found in its hotels, it is special and meaningful touches like this that truly sets Mr &amp; Mrs Smith apart. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6075/Punch_Room.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="369"></p> <p><em><strong>Recent travel articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69052-how-visitscotland-is-transforming-the-traditional-tourist-body/" target="_blank">How VisitScotland is transforming the traditional tourist body</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69018-how-airline-brands-are-improving-customer-experience-in-flight/" target="_blank">How airline brands are improving customer experience in-flight</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68989-three-ways-language-can-affect-conversion-rates-on-travel-sites/" target="_blank">Three ways language can affect conversion rates on travel sites</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69086 2017-05-16T11:20:00+01:00 2017-05-16T11:20:00+01:00 How Adidas uses digital to enable powerful experiences Nikki Gilliland <p>This might sound like a rather lofty notion, but when it comes to a brand like Adidas – whose core belief is to inspire individuals to harness the power of sport – it’s slightly more believable. </p> <p>At Summit I also heard Adidas’s VP of digital strategy &amp; delivery, Joseph Godsey, speak about how the brand uses digital to enable powerful experiences. Here are a few key points from what he said.</p> <h3>Building relationships</h3> <p>For Adidas, digital is the best way to build direct relationships with consumers. To be successful, it must create an experience that is premium, connected, and personalised.</p> <p>So, what does this mean exactly? Premium is about inspiring love for the brand and a desire for the products. In other words, to create excitement and enthusiasm about sports, whether it’s on a small personal level – such as fitting in a spin class before work – or on a highly competitive or team-oriented basis, like professional football.</p> <p>Connected means taking all the touchpoints that a consumer can interact with and making it consistent. So much so that it does not matter where they started or where they finish, but that they always have a seamless experience. </p> <p>Lastly, personalised means connecting the consumer – taking into account their individual love of sports - with content that they want to hear about. By using data and customer insight, Adidas is able to deliver on its promise of this unified, multichannel and unique experience. </p> <h3>Engaging the ‘creator consumer’</h3> <p>According to Joseph, Adidas considers the customer as the starting point for everything it creates. Whether this involves focus groups or online reviews, customer feedback helps to inform and shape the entire brand.</p> <p>Joseph also went so far as to say that it views this person as the ‘creator consumer’. Essentially, this is someone who wants to be given the tools to co-create <em>with</em> the brand – to be able to tell their own stories and connect with others – rather than simply be sold to. </p> <p>So, who is this target consumer? Adidas considers digital natives – or <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68554-how-retailers-are-targeting-generation-z/" target="_blank">Generation Z</a> – to be its embodiment. After all, by 2020, this demographic will make up 40% of the world’s population and have the buying power of two trillion dollars.</p> <p>With this generation typically viewing sport as intrinsic to culture – or as a mindset rather than an activity – a brand like Adidas has a real opportunity to connect with them in new and meaningful ways.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6036/IMG_0112.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="585"></p> <h3>Using technology to fuse online and offline</h3> <p>This aim is all well and good, of course. But how exactly does Adidas reach customers? Taking into account the fact there is no longer a linear customer journey, the brand aims to interact with people on a one-to-one level across all touchpoints – including mobile, social, and physical retail.</p> <p>It created Adidas Confirmed with this in mind – an app that allows customers to reserve products for pick-up in store. It also alerts them about new product launches and asks for feedback on purchases, allowing Adidas to create an experience that bridges the online and offline worlds. </p> <p>Another example is Glitch – a football boot with a changeable inner and outer shoe. It’s also the first product built with an entirely digital business model, only being available to buy through a dedicated app. As well as facilitating the mobile experience, it also offers a premium one – allowing consumers to talk to others, arrange a customised fitting session, or get same day shipping. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6037/Adidas_glitch.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="646"></p> <p>By creating memorable experiences such as this – while Adidas might not be able to make consumers actually participate in sport – it’s hard not to feel inspired enough to want to.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68785-how-adidas-originals-uses-social-media-to-drive-sales/">How Adidas Originals uses social media to drive sales</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67859-adidas-creates-b2b-content-to-help-with-recruitment/">Adidas creates B2B content to help with recruitment</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68467-nike-vs-adidas-vs-under-armour-email-signup-welcome/">Nike vs. adidas vs. Under Armour: Email signup &amp; welcome</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69047 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to wet your whistle, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even more.</p> <h3>Two thirds of UK consumers are worried about data privacy</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.gigya.com/blog/state-of-consumer-privacy-trust-2017-fear-hope/" target="_blank">Gigya</a>, 68% of UK consumers are concerned about how brands use their personal information, with two-thirds specifically questioning the data privacy of IoT devices like smartwatches and fitness trackers.</p> <p>The results of a poll of 4,000 consumers also found that the majority of people think privacy policies have become weaker rather than stronger – 18% predict it will worsen under Theresa May’s government.</p> <p>Apprehension over privacy was found to be higher in older generations, with 73% of people aged over 65 expressing concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5812/Gigya.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="409"></p> <h3>Nearly half of parents agree that personalised marketing is the future</h3> <p>A survey by Mumsnet has found that 46% of parents expect personalisation to become a big part of advertising in future.</p> <p>However, there is certainly some resistance, with 58% saying that their data is private and only 26% liking the idea of personalised ads.</p> <p>That does not mean that parents don’t see the value. 35% say they’d be open to seeing ads that apply to their lives, while 24% say that personalised ads would make them more likely to buy. The majority surveyed also said that they’d prefer to see tailored ads based on their previous search behaviour rather than online habits.</p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 13% YoY in March</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-april-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index show solid growth for UK online sales, driven by a rise in the average spend through mobile devices.</p> <p>Mobile retail was up 18% in March 2016, while overall online sales grew 13% year-on-year. More specifically, the home and garden sector saw a 10% YoY growth, while health and beauty sales increased by 15% YoY – most likely driven by Mother’s Day.</p> <h3>19% of professionals have landed a job through LinkedIn</h3> <p>This week, <a href="https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/24/the-power-of-linkedins-500-million-community" target="_blank">LinkedIn announced</a> that it has reached half a billion members worldwide, with 23m of these coming from the UK.</p> <p>As part of the announcement, it also revealed that London is the most connected city in the world, with professionals having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>It also stated that a casual conversation on LinkedIn has led to a new opportunity for 29% of professionals, while 19% have landed a job through using the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5815/LinkedIn.JPG" alt="" width="344" height="469"></p> <h3>UK adspend was 3.6% higher in Q4 2016</h3> <p>According to the Advertising Association/WARC Expenditure Report, adspend was <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">3.9% higher</a> in the fourth quarter of last year, with digital formats driving growth.</p> <p>Internet spending was up 15.3% during Q4 and 13.4% over the entire year. Meanwhile, mobile took a 37.5% share, hitting £3.9bn for the year and accounting for 99% of the new money spent on internet advertising. </p> <p>Lastly, forecasts for the next two years indicate continued growth, with 2.5% predicted in 2017 and 3.3% in 2018.</p> <h3>64% of marketers do not believe it is their job to analyse data</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.bluevenn.com/resources/ebooks/data-deadlock-report-1" target="_blank">BlueVenn</a> has found that nearly two-thirds of UK and US marketers believe it is their role to collect customer data, but not actually analyse it.</p> <p>However, it appears this is due to sheer volume rather than a lack of aptitude, as 93% of marketers say they are ‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ in their ability to analyse complex customer data.  </p> <p>The findings suggest a general discord amongst marketers, with 51% of UK and US marketers feeling that they spend too much time analysing data in their day-to-day work, with too little time left to spend on more creative aspects of the role.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers forget branded content</h3> <p>Upon discovering that eight in 10 consumers forget most of the information in branded content after only three days, while more than half are unable to recall a single detail, a <a href="https://prezi.com/view/RZXW2soO8IFMkzAFoNY7/" target="_blank">new report by Prezi</a> has highlighted the reasons why.</p> <p>Irrelevancy of ads is the biggest reason for a lack of recall, with 55% of consumers citing this reason. 37.7% said a lack of motivation to remember it, while 30% said there is simply too much content to retain.</p> <p>In contrast, content which 'tells the audience something new' was found to be the most memorable, helping 27% of respondents to remember a brand. This was closely followed by content which teaches, inspires, or entertains. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5813/Prezi_report.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="436"></p> <h3>Half of retailers unable to predict shopper traffic</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://d3fi73yr6l0nje.cloudfront.net/Lists/TRS-ResourceAssetsLib/EKN-TYCO_ebook_03-Excellence_Scorecard-20170427.pdf" target="_blank">Tryco</a> has found that retailers are failing to monitor store performance correctly, with 50% unable to predict shopper traffic. Consequently, it is becoming increasingly difficult for retailers to balance operational tasks and customer service. </p> <p>Other findings show 60% of retailers do not consistently manage inventory performance and turnover on a store-by-store basis</p> <p>Lastly, retailers spend 70% of their time on operational tasks as opposed to 30% on customer service, reducing the opportunity to build important relationships with consumers. </p> <h3>eBay sees spike in searches for home and garden sector</h3> <p>eBay has revealed that it saw big spikes in searches within the Home and Garden category around the May bank holidays last year, with online shoppers showing two distinct purchasing mindsets.</p> <p>On one hand, consumers appeared to be looking for quick-fix cosmetic items at the beginning of May, with sales of candles and plant pots leaping by 172% and 214% respectively.</p> <p>On the other, shoppers were planning bigger renovation and DIY projects at the end of the month. This was reflected by sales of saws and lawnmowers rising by more than 1,000%, and sales of sofas jumping by 194%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5816/ebay_search.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>46% of UK consumers open to relevant ads despite surge in ad blocking </h3> <p>Trinity McQueen has revealed that consumers will tolerate relevant online advertising, despite the popularity of ad-blocking.</p> <p>In a study of 1,000 UK adults, it found that 56% of consumers now use ad-blocking software on their laptops and PCs, yet 46% say they don’t mind online advertising as long as it’s relevant to them.</p> <p>The study also highlights the changing ways UK adults consume traditional and digital media. 29% of UK adults would be happy never to watch scheduled TV again, while one third say that scheduled TV does not fit in with their lifestyle.</p> <p>Finally, 41% of UK adults now subscribe to an on-demand service such as Netflix, Amazon Prime or Now TV.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69044 2017-04-28T10:00:00+01:00 2017-04-28T10:00:00+01:00 Five reasons behind Boohoo’s 97% increase in profits Nikki Gilliland <p>So, is Boohoo’s success merely a reflection of the dwindling fortunes of the British high street? Perhaps somewhat, but with other online retailers struggling to capture interest, there’s a reason why Boohoo is head and shoulders above the rest.</p> <p>Here’s what it’s been doing in order to drive online sales.</p> <h3>1. Influencer marketing</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/" target="_blank">According to research</a>, budgets for influencer marketing were predicted to increase by a whopping 59% last year.</p> <p>Boohoo has evidently ramped up activity in this area, with influencer marketing now a huge part of its strategy to target its core demographic of girls aged 16-24. </p> <p>The retailer has partnered with multiple influencers and bloggers to promote Boohoo across popular platforms like Instagram and Snapchat. One particularly successful example has been its collaboration with model Jordyn Woods on a new range of plus-size clothing. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5790/Jordyn_Woods.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="490"></p> <p>The reason it worked so well was not only due to Woods’ personal social media following, but also her connection to other high-profile media influencers like Kylie Jenner and Justine Skye – names that Boohoo’s Generation Z-consumers are likely to be aware of.</p> <p>More recently, Boohoo has also generated buzz from <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69011-jumping-on-the-bandwagon-how-brands-capitalised-on-coachella/" target="_blank">influencers attending Coachella</a> – a festival that typically fills social media news feeds during April.</p> <p>For more on influencers, download these Econsultancy reports:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">The Rise of Influencers</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer/">The Voice of the Influencer</a></li> </ul> <h3>2. Mobile mind-set</h3> <p>Google suggests that <a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/interactive-report/gen-z-a-look-inside-its-mobile-first-mindset/" target="_blank">68% of teenagers now shop via their smartphone</a>, while 63% of millennials are said to shop on their mobiles every single day.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, two-thirds of online visits to Boohoo come from mobile, with the retailer subsequently taking steps to ensure that the user experience is as slick and seamless as possible. </p> <p>Last year, it launched apps in international markets as well as a new and improved version for the UK.</p> <p>Personally, I’ve always been a big fan of Boohoo’s app. In fact it’s one of the only examples from a fashion retailer that I turn to over its mobile site. Features like the ‘wishlist’ – which allows you to save items to revisit later – are perfectly aligned with the mobile experience, meaning browsing on the app is even easier than online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5791/bohoo.PNG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>3. International expansion</h3> <p>As well as strong UK growth, Boohoo has also seen a rise in profits in international markets, with revenue rising 140% in the US and 40% in the rest of the world.</p> <p>What’s more, the brand looks set to increase expansion plans even further, acquiring Nasty Gal in February – a retailer with a large and existing customer base in the US. Combined with the fact that Boohoo also took over smaller rival, PrettyLittleThing, earlier this year, it looks set to capitalise on these takeovers with further international growth.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Fries before guys. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NastyGalsDoItBetter?src=hash">#NastyGalsDoItBetter</a> <a href="https://t.co/wYGU0PmtrR">pic.twitter.com/wYGU0PmtrR</a></p> — NASTY GAL (@NastyGal) <a href="https://twitter.com/NastyGal/status/856032866492334080">April 23, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>4. Fast and affordable fashion</h3> <p>Another draw for online consumers is undoubtedly Boohoo’s dedication to fast fashion – meaning the prices are low and the turnover is high. </p> <p>Unlike <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67870-why-asos-is-still-leading-the-online-retailing-pack/" target="_blank">ASOS</a>, which is well-known for carrying a broad and expansive range of designers at a higher price point, Boohoo focuses on stocking key seasonal trends at low prices. While 11% of ASOS products are in the £5 to £9.99 category, this rises to 23% for Boohoo. </p> <p>With consumer expectations rising, and millennial shoppers developing an ‘I want it now’ mindset, Boohoo's business model enables it to deliver a rapid and continuous cycle of affordable fashion trends.</p> <p>Its ‘test and repeat’ strategy allows it to quickly find out what items are selling online before ordering and stocking more.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">This <a href="https://twitter.com/boohoo">@boohoo</a> dress FINALLY came back in stock long enough for me to grab one...Happy Friday!!<a href="https://t.co/xKexqUAbkQ">https://t.co/xKexqUAbkQ</a> <a href="https://t.co/UapfEFbDHr">pic.twitter.com/UapfEFbDHr</a></p> — Halinalinalina (@viechoufleur) <a href="https://twitter.com/viechoufleur/status/850231762961571840">April 7, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>5. Harnessing social media and commerce</h3> <p>Its product offering is not the only reason Boohoo has such a large online customer-base. Its dedication to delivering high quality service – both pre- and post-purchase – has helped it to retain strong levels of customer loyalty.</p> <p>One way it does this is through social media, using platforms like Twitter and Facebook to communicate and resolve customer service issues. </p> <p>Of course, it also uses social to drive engagement, continually asking for feedback and opinions, as well as offering incentives such as promotions and competitions. </p> <p>Meanwhile, its also appears to be veering into the world of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69041-social-commerce-why-basic-bots-and-buy-buttons-are-not-enough/">social commerce</a>, notably including new shoppable elements in a number of recent Facebook posts. While other examples of social commerce have failed to live up to expectations, Boohoo’s ability to resonate and relate to a young and fashion-hungry demographic could mean that its one of the first to truly take off.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5792/facebook_boohoo.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="392"></p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68659-three-reasons-behind-the-white-company-s-boost-in-profits/">Three reasons behind The White Company’s boost in profits</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68472-three-reasons-behind-whsmith-s-boost-in-profits/">Three reasons behind WHSmith’s boost in profits</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4457 2017-04-19T09:00:00+01:00 2017-04-19T09:00:00+01:00 Email Marketing Industry Census 2017 <p>The 11th annual <strong>Email Marketing Industry Census</strong>, published in partnership with <a href="http://www.adestra.com">Adestra</a>, is based on the largest UK survey of email marketers.</p> <p>The census takes an in-depth look at email practices being adopted, the resources being dedicated to email and the channel's effectiveness compared to other types of marketing.</p> <p>Personalisation, marketing automation, optimisation for different devices and the future of email are all themes that are revisited in this year's Census, and there are also new questions about the <strong>use of metrics</strong>, the <strong>application of artificial intelligence</strong> and the <strong>impact of Brexit</strong> on how companies are approaching the <strong>EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)</strong>.</p> <p>With <strong>11 years' worth of data to assess</strong>, this provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the state of the industry and find out how those at the coalface of email marketing are operating.</p> <p>Over 1,000 respondents took part in the 2017 Census, which took the form of an online survey in February and March 2017.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>Find out how a variety of trends around email practices, budgets and opinions have changed over 11 years.</li> <li>Discover other marketers' opinions on what the future of email will look like.</li> <li>Benchmark your own practices with the activities of marketers maximising their email efforts.</li> <li>Understand the challenges organisations are facing in improving their email capabilities.</li> </ul> <h2>Key findings from the report</h2> <ul> <li>Marketers get to grips with automation, helped by improved technology</li> <li>Email reigns supreme when it comes to delivering ROI, though companies must do more to measure success</li> <li>Companies are still under-investing in a channel which drove an estimated £29bn in UK online retail sales in 2016</li> <li>Companies continue to adapt to consumer use of different devices</li> <li>True personalisation at scale remains elusive for many businesses, though more companies are starting to reap the benefits</li> <li>Census shows signs of inertia and lack of understanding around EU data law changes</li> <li>Segmentation continues to deliver</li> <li>Responsibility for email shifts from the individual to the team</li> <li>Artificial intelligence can improve email marketing performance</li> </ul> <h2>Expert insight</h2> <p>The <strong>80-page</strong> 2017 report contains insight and comment from leading experts in the email marketing world and associated digital sectors, including:</p> <ul> <li>Andrew Campbell, Martech Director, First 10</li> <li>Chris Combemale, Group CEO, DMA</li> <li>Riaz Kanani, Joint MD and Co-Founder, Radiate b2b</li> <li>Dave Littlechild, Email, Ecommerce and Sales &amp; Marketing Consultant</li> <li>Kath Pay, Founder and Senior Consultant, Holistic Email Marketing</li> <li>Jordie van Rijn, eCRM and Email Marketing Consultant, eMailMonday</li> <li>Philip Storey, Email Marketing and CRM Strategy Consultant, CEO at Enchant Agency</li> <li>Tim Watson, Email Marketing Consultant, Zettasphere</li> </ul> <h2>Features of the report</h2> <ul> <li>Approach to email</li> <li>Email effectiveness</li> <li>Place in the organisation</li> <li>Optimising for different devices</li> <li>Personalisation</li> <li>Marketing automation</li> <li>Improving email marketing for the future</li> </ul> <p><strong>You can download a free sample of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68977 2017-04-07T10:00:00+01:00 2017-04-07T10:00:00+01:00 10 notable digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Before we kick things off, remember that you can also download the <a style="font-weight: normal;" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more.</p> <h3>A third of B2B marketers are tracking sales from social</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://immediatefuture.co.uk/resource/b2b-report-what-has-social-media-ever-done-for-us/?utm_source=PR&amp;utm_medium=Msr&amp;utm_theme=&amp;utm_term=&amp;utm_campaign=B2B_Report17#sf_form_salesforce_w2l_lead_22" target="_blank">report by IF</a> has found that 33% of marketers are tracking sales through social media, with social platforms driving sales upwards of £50,000 per month. </p> <p>However, some B2B marketers are less adept at measuring social value, with 58% not rating their ability to measure social at all. More than one in 10 marketers also appear nonchalant about the benefits - 13% suggest that social media measurement is neither important or unimportant.  </p> <p>Senior marketers are much more optimistic, with 67% being confident that their ability to measure social will improve in the next two years, and 50% of them planning to increase resource and budget investment in the next 12 months.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5309/IF_report.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="480"></p> <h3>More marketing teams planning to restructure in 2017</h3> <p>An increasing number of marketing teams are restructuring to cope with technological challenges, according to new research by Technology for Marketing, the IDM and Pure360.</p> <p>In a survey, 33% of marketing teams said they expect to become more specialist in 2017, with just 3% becoming generalist in their expertise. However, just 12% of marketers said they exclusively ‘own’ the marketing technology they rely on, instead turning to partnerships with IT and external technology teams to get results. </p> <p>This highlights the need for restructuring, with marketing teams having to move away from all-purpose marketing managers towards specialist roles, agencies and freelancers.</p> <h3>UK consumers more trustworthy of familiar brands</h3> <p><a href="http://lp.outbrain.com/research-unconscious-content-bias-uk/?utm_source=press&amp;utm_campaign=research-content-bias&amp;utm_medium=pr" target="_blank">Outbrain suggests</a> that UK consumers place greater trust in familiar brands, with 77% of survey respondents citing them as a reliable source of information.</p> <p>In comparison, 67% say they trust content shared by their own friends on social media, while three in five people believe relevant content from even unfamiliar brands to be trustworthy.</p> <p>Research also shows that consumers place more trust in traditional publishers as opposed to social media or blogs, with two-thirds of respondents believing that content from the likes of The Guardian or The Sun is reliable.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5310/Outbrain.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="670"></p> <h3>Traffic to betting websites surge ahead of the Grand National</h3> <p>Hitwise has analysed the key data behind last years’ Grand National, looking at its demographic in comparison to other racing events.</p> <p>It found that betting websites saw a 35% increase in online traffic in the week of the race last year, with those searching for betting and racing sites most likely to be between the ages of 25 and 34.</p> <p>It also discovered that people who earn over £100,000 are 161% more likely to visit racing and betting sites in the week of Royal Ascot. Meanwhile, people aged 18-24 years old are most likely to visit Sky Bet over the week of Royal Ascot, whereas those aged 55 and over are more likely to choose At The Races.</p> <h3>37% of smartphone owners are using voice technology</h3> <p>According to a new report by <a href="http://www.mindshareworld.com/uk/about/speak-easy" target="_blank">Mindshare</a>, voice technology has the ability to drive a greater emotional connection with brands. </p> <p>A study carried out by Neuro Insight found that emotional activity was twice as high when consumers voiced a brand question rather than typing it out. People also find it much easier to use, as 50% less brain activity occurs when processing an answer delivered by voice.</p> <p>The technology is already becoming prevalent among smartphone users, with 37% using voice technology of some kind at least once a month and 18% using it at least weekly.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5312/SpeakEasy.JPG" alt="" width="599" height="357"></p> <p><em>Reasons for using voice technology</em></p> <h3>Aldi and Lidl are struggling to build shopper loyalty </h3> <p>An ICLP survey has revealed that Aldi and Lidl are struggling to build consumer loyalty despite an ever-growing market share. In a survey of over 1,000 people, 37% of Tesco shoppers and 34% of Sainsbury’s shoppers felt that their custom and loyalty was rewarded. In contrast, just 16% of people said the same for Lidl and just 9% for Aldi. </p> <p>Similarly, only one in four Brits believe that they get something back when they share their personal information with a supermarket. 52% of Sainsbury’s shoppers and 35% of Tesco shoppers said that they have benefited from sharing data, compared to 26% of Aldi shoppers, and 20% of Lidl shoppers.</p> <h3>UK retailers are failing to invest in AI and machine learning</h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.qubit.com/research/catalysts-of-change" target="_blank">Qubit report</a> on the future of retail tech suggests that the majority of brands are failing to invest in artificial intelligence, despite recognising its potential.</p> <p>While 82% believe that machine learning will have an impact on the retail sector, just 48% are currently using it in their business. As a result, 82% of companies are planning to invest less than £1m to introduce new tech, while 22% are planning to invest less than £50,000. </p> <p>Effective data collection appears to be hindering AI, with just a third of retailers having a strategy to collect and analyse data across all their channels. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5311/Qubit.JPG" alt="" width="588" height="618"></p> <h3>Digital performance of luxury brands is improving</h3> <p>Research by <a href="http://contactlab.com/en/more/reports/digital-competitive-map-march-2017/?step=step2" target="_blank">ContactLab</a> shows that there’s been a significant improvement in many luxury brand’s digital performance over the past year.</p> <p>The Digital Competitive Map found that Burberry still has the strongest digital presence of 32 international fashion and luxury brands, with Louis Vuitton and Gucci also remaining stable in comparison to the previous year.</p> <p>An overall 5% increase in the digital performance of 32 brands is said to be due to a focus on geographical localisation, a wider range of languages used on brand websites, and strong email campaigns. However, some are still lagging behind on social, with only half of the 32 brands using Instagram and only 10 having Snapchat accounts.</p> <h3>Consumer loyalty reduced by the threat of security breaches</h3> <p>A report by <a href="https://www.retail-week.com/analysis/retailers-face-losing-battle-in-fight-against-hackers/7019678.article" target="_blank">Retail Week and Cisco</a> has highlighted the impact of data breaches on both consumers and retailers.</p> <p>In a survey of 2,000 consumers, 72% said that they would be unlikely to do businesses with a company that has experienced a data breach. If their own personal data had been breached, nearly nine out of 10 respondents said they would reduce spend if the retailer did not take steps to quickly correct the problem.</p> <p>Lastly, only 9% of consumers would rule out taking legal action against a company if a data breach has occurred. However, 53% said they would definitely consider it and 38% would give it due consideration.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5308/Retail_Week.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="404"></p> <h3>US news consumption on the rise</h3> <p>Finally, a <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html" target="_blank">study by Nielsen</a> has found a rise in news consumption in the US. Consumers spent 73.5bn minutes consuming news content in the average week last year – an annual increase of 18%.</p> <p>Insight suggests that the rise is due to an ‘unrelenting flood of stories’ resulting from events like the presidential election. To put this into context, the typical consumer dedicated 18.5 hours to this activity a week in 2016, compared to just over 16 hours in 2012 when the last presidential election was held.</p> <p>National cable television has been the main beneficiary of the rise, claiming 20 additional minutes of weekly attention in the first month of this year compared with the average from last year as a whole.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68901 2017-03-24T12:10:34+00:00 2017-03-24T12:10:34+00:00 Top tips to drive more engagement with data-driven native ads Ray Jenkin <p>This quote nicely sums up the reason for this forecast: “Native advertising looks like a rare win-win for the industry: more effective for advertisers, more valuable for publishers, and more acceptable for users”, says Joseph Evans, digital media analyst at Enders Analysis.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5022/native_spend.png" alt="" width="470" height="470"></p> <p>To deliver this sort of scale and growth over the years, the programmatic buying protocol will be key; and with this in play, a whole plethora of opportunities emerge; from the use of data to dynamically adjusting the creative elements in native.</p> <h4><strong>Why native ads? </strong></h4> <p>Consumer consumption is changing and so is our attitude to “traditional” digital advertising. Display click-through rates are decreasing year on year, while engagement with native ads is up to six times higher than traditional display.  </p> <p>The native ad experience is personalised to the specific site and context where the ads appears, providing a more integrated experience for the ads and content. Furthermore, the format extends meaningfully across all major devices.</p> <p>Not only is native preferable for the users; the creative execution of native ads is quick and easy to deploy with most native supply being very similar to the specs of Facebook’s native ads, so little additional work is required and creative approvals should be significantly faster.</p> <h4><strong>Strengthening native: a data-driven tactic</strong></h4> <p>TripleLift, a programmatic native vendor, saw the number of ad impressions traded through its platform grow more than sevenfold in <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/programmatic-native-ads-are-growingbut-banner-habit-is-hard-to-break-1484737200">2016 to 23bn</a>. This increase in supply in the programmatic environment means marketers can start to focus on a user centric approach to native. Applying both contextual and behavioural data to native buys means there can be even more relevance and value applied to the native experience. </p> <p>It is an exciting time to match this trusted ad format with the blend of data, but you should be aware of several key considerations to really take full advantage of data driven native:</p> <h4><strong>1. Not all native supply is created equal </strong></h4> <p>Consider what native supply you are tapping into for your campaigns. Look for supply partners that give a meaningful or exclusive share of voice within website content; sharing your space with other native placement only dilutes the potency of your content.</p> <p>Alignment alongside questionable ads and click bait news stories also does not engender trust in your brand. Understand how the supplier’s ads typically render on sites. Also make sure they comply with best practice on ad disclosure, failure to do so means a great opportunity to engage consumers turns into perceived trickery.  </p> <h4><strong>2. Native supply and audience reach: a balancing act</strong></h4> <p>Balance inventory access with audience reach. If you want to use behavioural or contextual data to help further enhance your segmentation and improve engagement, make sure you tap into native supply that provides the audience reach you need to benefit from data based targeting.</p> <p>If you are only interested in cherry picking a few properties for your native ads then you are better off not mixing data tactics into the buy as your audience and inventory overlaps will be too small. However, some promising programmatic native integrations with large portals and popular vertical publishers over the last few months mean there is increasingly good scale to blend audience and inventory tactics. </p> <h4><strong>3. What data and when?</strong></h4> <p>In using data-driven native, data recency is key to engagement. If you are not serving ads to consumers based on recent behavioural actions, all the benefit of native placement is lost on those consumers.</p> <p>Behaviourally targeting a consumer with automotive ad content will seem misplaced if the data of that user browsing auto-related content is two-weeks-old. Work with data partners who can demonstrate the ability to build and refresh audiences quickly or ideally in real-time.  </p> <p>Consider the use of both contextual and behavioural data to provide both scale and improve relevance. Site buys may be good for a demographic segmentation but drilling down into the content of that page or URL can be a great way to enhance your data-driven native campaign. </p> <h4><strong>4. Creative Relevance</strong></h4> <p>If you utilise audience data for your native ads, headlines, images and copy need to be more relevant than ever before. Make sure you are matching your audiences and relevant data points with the most compelling creative. Being native and therefore in content means you need to be truly relevant to be noticed. You can’t fall back on the standard ad slot and call to action to gain attention.</p> <p>Dynamically served native ads: this is still in its infancy but as this becomes more prevalent, it will provide exciting opportunities for brands to have a more scaled approach to matching out the context of the page and/or the behaviours of the consumer with the most relevant content or product in real time.</p> <p>Native ads are much more than headline, copy and static image, with video and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67507-30-stunning-cinemagraphs-that-will-blow-your-mind/">cinemagraph formats</a> now becoming more prevalent in native placements. Improve relevancy and engagement by learning about and experimenting with these formats and how they might interplay with data-driven native opportunities.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/4705/data_driven_native_ops-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="271"></p> <h4><strong>In conclusion...</strong></h4> <p>Those that move quickly and begin to experiment and learn more about combining data to drive their native activity stand to benefit; not just from short term gains in engagement but also by preparing themselves for the long term changes in the digital ad market.   </p> <h4><em>Related resources:</em></h4> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/">Programmatic Training</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/">The CMO's Guide to Programmatic</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/">A super accessible beginner’s guide to programmatic buying and RTB</a></em></li> </ul>