tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/native-apps Latest Native Apps content from Econsultancy 2017-10-16T12:00:00+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69456 2017-10-16T12:00:00+01:00 2017-10-16T12:00:00+01:00 How mobile apps can shape the Premier League fan & player experience Ben Davis <p>In interviewing James Burke, production director, I again got the sense that Swansea City, like many top-flight clubs, are in the middle of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">a digital transformation</a> and have a clear roadmap in place. When it comes to mobile apps, it won't be long before clubs are offering truly personalised, contextual and location-aware experiences, both to fans and to players.</p> <h3>The role of the football club mobile app </h3> <p>The new Swansea City website is responsively designed, so a mobile app really has to offer something different to the website. It was Burke and Other Media's job to look at how they might make better use of the app.</p> <p>Burke told me that "football fans use apps on match days and that accounts for around 80% of visits to the app," though "peaks of traffic during match days and troughs away from match days... is a trend reflected across all touchpoints, app or website."</p> <p>Other Media's job with the Swansea app, says Burke, is "to try to increase the peaks on match day and to reduce the troughs on non-match days – bringing people back in and giving them appropriate content and the chance to follow that further."</p> <p>One very simple example of this is the club's partnership with Opta, which means the app can provide match scores across the Premier League, so if Swansea aren't playing on a particular match day, fans still have reason to engage and seek a wider view.</p> <p>We'll look at some more of the new app's functionality designed to suck people in, but first let's consider the grand vision for mobile apps on match day.</p> <h3>Location-aware and contextual mobile in the stadium</h3> <p>I asked Burke about some of the beacon technology with which American sports teams have experimented. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65221-ibeacon-trials-13-brands-trying-to-find-a-use-case">The MLB added an iBeacon feature</a> to its At The Ballpark app as far back as 2014, enabling fans at 20 baseball stadiums to check-in at games and receive exclusive offers. Despite this early use, the technology has been <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68199-beyond-the-hype-how-should-marketers-really-use-ibeacons/">long-mooted</a> in both leisure and retail but hasn't been popular.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0005/0762/MBL_ibeacon.jpg" alt="mlb location aware app" width="450"></p> <p>Burke picks up the thread, saying "There are plans to look at how we do that, whether it is beacons or whether it’s proximity based on GPS or similar. Swansea want to try to use much more targeting and location awareness, so people at the stadium attending the fixture will get a different experience to those not attending."</p> <p>Promisingly, Burke gives more concrete examples of how contextuality might work, and they don't necessarily involve location-aware technology.</p> <p>"Firstly the ticket that you purchase – if you’re a regular fan you might get one type of notification, if you're a hospitality guest you might get another notification with different content in there. The idea is you would segment users based on their interaction with a beacon and then target them with a particular message."</p> <p>"Swansea also want to look at how they work with merchandising and ticket offerings, and try to capitalise on the euphoria the game can (hopefully) give you. So let’s say the number nine scores the winning goal in the last minute, they can send a notification to everybody in the stadium – get your Tammy Abraham shirt, 10% discount in the megastore now. The data’s not quite there yet, but the plan is, if you’re a match day ticket holder, they’ll know that when you sign in to the app. If you attend the game, maybe there’s a notification for non-season sticket holders saying 'buy your next tickets now'."</p> <h3>Clever use of notifications</h3> <p>Notifications are an important part of any app, and one of the key advantages for marketers using this channel. The new Swansea City FC app includes a range of notifications which the user is invited to set up on first open.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9647/notifications.png" alt="notifications swansea city" width="300"> </p> <p>Some of the more clever uses involve new predictor games where fans can predict starting line-ups (see below) and match scores, with notifications used to prompt people to take part. These games also have a sharing functionality so fans can share the games with friends by text message.</p> <p>Burke tells me that "all of the app content is linked and tagged so relevant content can be surfaced to the user – when they finish an article or video the next piece of content is pushed to them."</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9644/predictor.png" alt="lineup predictor" width="300"> </p> <p>"The uptake of notifications has been very positive," says Burke, "and for Swansea it’s about getting the balance right. They’ve already started to refine their match day notifications so not every match day event is broadcast through notifications – the club is realising the beauty of notifications is in relevance rather than frequency."</p> <p>Fairly obviously, if app users get notifications for every corner or shot on target, many will be tempted to turn them off. But, get them right and notifications can quickly increase interaction and therefore sponsor value, brand awareness, and potentially digital commercial revenue.</p> <h3>Data collection</h3> <p>At time of interview, Swansea hadn't yet implemented a single sign-on solution across each of their different platforms (website, app, ticketing, shop), though this is set to launch soon.</p> <p>In the meantime, with the new app, Burke tells me that Swansea "needed to get around how they might capture data, so we have an on boarding process where we offer newsletter sign-up. Swansea get an interaction there, they get a piece of data if the fan wishes to engage."</p> <p>It should be noted that fans are not forced to register (see below). And Burke adds that "we try not to bombard users straight away, we try to also do it contextually, so if they’re reading a piece of breaking news or if they’ve tapped on a notification, we will know that and then the newsletter option is presented to them at the right time."</p> <p><em><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9646/newsletter.png" alt="newsletter signup" width="300"> </em></p> <h3>Sponsored content</h3> <p>One of the benefits of moving from the Football League Interactive platform to this new mobile app is that Swansea can do more with their sponsors.</p> <p>The match centre is presented by Bet365 and team alert notifications are presented by Low Cost Vans. Burke says "[fans are] interacting with our sponsors, but it’s not an intrusive message."</p> <p>"Sponsorship is done in sensitive way," Burke continues, "with tonal logos, or 'in partnership with', not just sticking big adverts in places." This all ties in with Swansea's goal of getting fans to revisit the app as often as possible.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9648/sponsors.png" alt="sponsors in mobile app" width="300"> </p> <h3>A mobile app for Swansea City's players</h3> <p>There's a final, exciting note to add. There's also a new mobile app for Swansea City players.</p> <p>Where the club used to provide a brochure as a guide to Swansea, including places to visit, schools, estate agents and the like, it now provides an app. The knowledge has been built up from previous players and can now be updated regularly without the expense of printing new brochures.</p> <p>Burke says "we use a platform we developed here at Other Media – it’s effectively a CMS for apps, so we can update the apps without doing wholesale releases through the app store."</p> <p>The player app includes training schedules, has different language options through a simple flag select and, crucially, has quite a big section around emotional support for the players. This part of the app has <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/69456-how-mobile-apps-can-shape-the-premier-league-fan-player-experience/edit/It%20has%20training%20schedules,%20there%E2%80%99s%20different%20language%20options,%20they%E2%80%99ve%20recently%20signed%20a%20couple%20of%20spanish%20players%20so%20we%20have%20a%20spanish%20version%20available%20through%20a%20simple%20flag%20select.%20It%20also%20has%20quite%20a%20big%20section%20around%20emotional%20support%20for%20the%20players%20-%20obviously%20it%E2%80%99s%20at%20the%20forefront%20of%20peoples%20mind%20atm,%20about%20a%20number%20of%20high%20profile%20players%20that%20have%20had%20mental%20health%20issues%20-%20around%20organisations%20they%20can%20contact,%20everything%20from%20charities%20to%20council%20support.%20It%E2%80%99s%20geared%20to%20the%20mental%20health%20of%20the%20player,%20and%20trying%20to%20make%20their%20transition%20to%20swansea%20assembles%20off%20the%20field%20as%20possible.%20%20I%E2%80%99m%20not%20aware%20of%20another%20club%20in%20the%20premier%20league%20doing%20this.%20It%20was%20mentioned%20to%20the%20pre%20at%20the%20start%20of%20the%20season%20-%20they%20were%20very%20keen%20on%20it%20and%20their%20reaction%20suggested%20no%20other%20club%20has%20done%20something%20like%20this%20-%20there%20are%20others%20with%20player%20liaison%20officers,%20but%20in%20terms%20of%20getting%20an%20app%20in%20the%20players%20pockets%20that%20is%20usable%20and%20they%20don%E2%80%99t%20just%20ignore.">won praise from the Premier League</a>, and provides information about organisations players can contact, everything from charities to council support.</p> <p>"It’s geared to the mental health of the player," says Burke, "and trying to make their transition to Swansea as seamless off the field as possible." Let's hope more clubs follow with kind of support enabled by digital technology.</p> <p>Mobile apps have been around for a while but as far as football clubs are concerned, we could be about to see them hit maturity fairly soon, with new functionality helping to make the fan and player experience more rewarding.</p> <p><em><strong>More on this topic:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69441-six-cool-things-about-leicester-city-fc-s-new-website">Six cool things about Leicester City FC's new website</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68696-digital-transformation-in-the-premier-league-southampton-fc-s-fan-first-strategy/">Digital transformation in the Premier League: Southampton FC's fan-first strategy</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69380-arsenal-vs-spurs-which-premier-league-club-offers-the-best-mobile-ux">Arsenal vs. Spurs: Which Premier League club offers the best mobile UX?</a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69455 2017-09-28T15:00:00+01:00 2017-09-28T15:00:00+01:00 Five new and innovative examples of augmented reality in retail apps Nikki Gilliland <p>Let’s take a look at what the new app offers users, as well as a few other examples of brands experimenting with augmented reality on mobile.</p> <h3>Ikea Place</h3> <p>Ikea Place, which was recently launched in the US, allows users to place virtual Ikea furniture into their own home to see how everything might look once assembled. <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/67694-10-examples-of-great-ikea-marketing-creative" target="_blank">Ikea</a> has had a 3D function in its catalogue app for a few years now, however the scale was somewhat questionable, and it required a physical copy of the paper catalogue to work.</p> <p>In contrast, the new Ikea Place app is said to be 98% accurate in scale, rendering 3D images to react to light and shade – ultimately giving consumers a much more realistic portrayal. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/r0ViFTEb8aQ?wmode=transparent" width="475" height="267"></iframe></p> <p>So will it inspire consumers to buy? I think Ikea Place will be effective in this sense, especially during the pre-purchase phase when a lot of deliberation or uncertainty tends to lead to shopper abandonment. With furniture – and especially Ikea’s self-assembly furniture – being somewhat of a guessing game (in terms of the end result), the AR tool will help shoppers to make more informed decisions, which could increase sales through the app.</p> <p>As well as functional elements, the app also looks like it will provide a lot of inspiration, letting users compare over 2,000 Ikea items to see how different furniture might look in the same space.</p> <h3>Sephora Virtual Artist</h3> <p>Cosmetics retailer Sephora didn’t wait around for ARKIt – its ‘Virtual Artist’ app has been available via its main app since earlier this year.</p> <p>Instead of furniture in homes, the AR technology lets beauty consumers see what certain products might look like on their own face. To do so, it uses Modiface technology to scan lips and eyes, before overlaying different lip colours, eye-shadows, false lashes and so on.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9230/Sephora.JPG" alt="" width="241" height="505"></p> <p>The main aim of the app seems to be to boost ecommerce sales, with beauty consumers typically driven in-store due to doubts about what products will look like in real life.</p> <p>While reviews have been mixed – some say it is no match for trying products on actual skin – there is an impressive amount of products to try out. Meanwhile, it also serves as a bit of fun for consumers and yet another way for <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69354-10-brilliant-examples-of-content-marketing-from-beauty-brands" target="_blank">beauty brands</a> like Sephora to provide entertainment and inspiration as well as the products themselves.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Playing with Sephora Virtual Artist. <a href="https://t.co/WZV3kF7diU">pic.twitter.com/WZV3kF7diU</a></p> — caca (@_shafawatimkthr) <a href="https://twitter.com/_shafawatimkthr/status/891297890592669696">July 29, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Dulux Visualiser</h3> <p>Another home interiors-related app, Dulux Visualiser uses AR in a simple but highly effective way – to see what your walls will look like when painted a different colour.</p> <p>Like most AR apps, it works by using your smartphone camera to detect wall edges and surfaces, letting users select the specific area that should be virtually painted.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4lMFxJ4PDXY?wmode=transparent" width="857" height="482"></iframe></p> <p>I downloaded the app and gave it a go, with mixed feelings about the results. While the app itself has a lot of cool features, like the ability to match paint from furniture or fabric, as well as an extensive array of colours to choose from, the actual AR functionality is a bit of a let down.</p> <p>As you can see from the below image, when turning my white wall pink, the colour merged into the frame. Niggles like this are understandable given the technology is still in its early days, however I also found it particularly tricky to stop colour from seeping up the ceiling and elsewhere.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9232/IMG_1910.PNG" alt="" width="400" height="711"></p> <p>AR functionality aside, the idea of the app is still great, and will certainly be a viable option for customers who don't want to head to stores or physically test out multiple paint colours on their walls.</p> <h3>Bic</h3> <p><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69311-six-lessons-we-can-learn-from-the-best-stationery-brands-on-instagram" target="_blank">Stationery brand</a> Bic has turned to AR to solve a very different kind of problem. Its Drawybook app for kids adds a gamification element to colouring – acting as an alternative to standard mobile gaming apps that children often turn to.</p> <p>The app includes storytelling elements, with a number of interactive stories being specially created for the app by children’s author, Elissa Elwich. However, the AR element gives kids a reason to do more than just play games or read. The ‘Draw &amp; Scan’ feature encourages them to create their own art by bringing it to life with special overlaid effects.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yYcntQ6CGEQ?wmode=transparent" width="656" height="412"></iframe></p> <p>Unlike the aforementioned examples, which have been created to drive sales more than anything else, this is a nice example of a retailer using AR to connect and engage with consumers. It offers kids (and parents) something of real value, which in turn is likely to help the brand forge strong relationships with those that use it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9233/Bic.JPG" alt="" width="481" height="378"></p> <h3>Lowe’s</h3> <p>Finally, two new apps using Apple’s new ARkit technology from home improvement retailer Lowe’s, both including new and innovative features.</p> <p>The first, Measured by Lowe’s, acts as a virtual tape measure that enables users to take real life measurements of walls, sofas or other household furniture via their smartphone camera. Interestingly, it can also extend to areas outside of the home, for instance letting you measure your height or an area in a field.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EPJMxeBVlhI?wmode=transparent" width="695" height="391"></iframe></p> <p>The second, Envisioned by Mine, is similar to Ikea Place and a much more comprehensive shopping app for TheMine.com – Lowe’s high-end online furniture store. It allows users to place to-scale 3D versions of furniture in their rooms, and again, re-position or modify to see how it might fit in real life.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9234/Lowes.JPG" alt="" width="290" height="520"></p> <p>Will either take off? Envisioned by Mine sounds fun, but I actually think ‘Measured’ might hold greater appeal – and this is because AR apps tend to succeed when they are able to solve a specific problem. </p> <p>While people might turn to IKEA for AR-driven interior inspiration, Lowe’s cleverly taps into the common problem of measurement, essentially allowing it to become an everyday tool for people involved in home improvement, as well as those who aren't but who happen to find themselves without a measuring tape.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69374-star-wars-uses-ar-experiential-campaign-to-drive-people-in-store" target="_blank">Star Wars uses AR experiential campaign to drive people in-store</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69016-why-beauty-brands-are-betting-on-augmented-reality" target="_blank">Why beauty brands are betting on augmented reality</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67713-augmented-reality-vs-virtual-reality-where-should-brands-focus" target="_blank">Augmented Reality vs. Virtual Reality: where should brands focus?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69394 2017-09-01T12:18:43+01:00 2017-09-01T12:18:43+01:00 10 stupendous digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please enjoy.</p> <h3>McGregor generates the most social media engagements</h3> <p>He might have lost in the ring, but data from <a href="http://www.4cinsights.com/news/" target="_blank">4C Insights</a> has revealed that Conor McGregor was victorious in generating online media conversation.</p> <p>McGregor saw more than 3,294,078 Facebook and Twitter engagements on fight night, which includes tweets, retweets, replies and likes. In comparison, Mayweather generated 2,986,484 engagements, highlighting McGregor’s ability to generate mass hype and media discussion.</p> <p>The fight amassed 889,705 engagements on Facebook and Twitter in the week leading up to it, before a massive surge on the night itself saw engagements rise 605% to 6,280,562.</p> <h3>Small businesses falling behind on digital transformation</h3> <p><a href="https://www.g2crowd.com/blog/small-business/introducing-crowd-views-iii-small-business-technology/" target="_blank">G2 Crowd</a>’s third quarterly report has revealed that small business owners are failing to effectively market their businesses in a digital world. Research found that 24% of businesses are still largely investing in either newspaper ads and/or billboards, while only 19% of respondents are spending money on Google AdWords. </p> <p>That being said, the report suggests that technology is an area of focus for small businesses interested in scaling growth, with 47% planning to increase IT spending this year.</p> <h3>Number of hours spent checking email decreases 27%</h3> <p>According to Adobe’s third annual <a href="https://blogs.adobe.com/conversations/2017/08/consumers-are-still-email-obsessed-but-theyre-finding-more-balance.html" target="_blank">email survey</a>, people are checking their work and personal email less frequently than they were in 2016.</p> <p>The overall number of hours spent on email per day decreased 27% from last year. Specifically, there was a 28% decrease in consumers checking email messages from bed in the morning, with more than a quarter of consumers now waiting until they get to the office to check their inboxes. </p> <p>The report also suggests one in five consumers never check email outside of normal work hours, and nearly half don’t or rarely check while they’re on holiday. </p> <p>However, this is not the case for millennials. More than half of 18-24 year olds still check their email while in bed in the morning, and 43% of millennials aged 25-34 admit to doing the same.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8676/Adobe.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="311"></p> <h3>Google and Alexa make up 90% of voice commerce market share</h3> <p>The news that Amazon and Google are joining forces could mean big things for voice commerce, according to insight from Walker Sands.</p> <p>Currently, 24% of consumers own a voice controlled device, while 20% plan to purchase within the next year. Together Google and Alexa make up approximately 90% of the market share. </p> <h3>US social ads failing to drive conversions</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://civicscience.com/facebook-ads-affect-purchases-snapchat-twitter-instagram-combined/" target="_blank">CivicScience</a> has found that ads on social platforms like Facebook and Instagram are failing to convert users. </p> <p>In a survey of over 1,900 US consumers, just 1% of respondents aged 13 and older said they have previously made a purchase based on a Snapchat ad, and only 4% said they have bought anything after seeing an Instagram ad. Overall, 45% said that they have never purchased anything based on ads they saw from social media sites, and over a third said they don’t use social media.</p> <p>Facebook was found to be the most influential channel for purchasing behaviour, with 16% of consumers buying a product based on a Facebook ad.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8675/CivicScience.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="394"></p> <h3>Personalisation brings footwear brand 64% increase in ROI </h3> <p>Dune London has revealed that it’s seen a 64% increase in return on investment per customer after personalising its media to real people, in partnership with <a href="http://info.conversantmedia.eu/dune-london" target="_blank">Conversant</a>.</p> <p>Instead of targeting segments or cookies, Dune tailored messages to individual customer’s specific needs and interests. This involves showing complementary products post-purchase, and tailoring ads according to what kinds of products a customer tends to browse and buy the most.</p> <p>As well as a 64% increase in ROI per customer, personalisation also led to a 33% increase in messaged conversion rate.</p> <h3>Push notifications boost in-app spending by 16%</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/leanplums-analysis-reveals-push-notifications-increase-in-app-spend-16-and-drive-96x-more-users-to-buy-300510182.html?tc=eml_cleartime" target="_blank">Leanplum</a>, push notifications can lead to a significant increase in mobile conversions.</p> <p>The Insights to Mobile Revenue report states that push notifications can boost in-app spending by 16% – driving nearly 10 times more users to make a purchase compared to those who did not receive one.</p> <p>Research also found that promotional push notifications sent on a Saturday resulted in over twice as many purchases than notifications sent on Thursday. Meanwhile, push notifications sent during the late afternoon lead to 2.7 times more purchases than any other time of day.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8674/Leanplum.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="509"></p> <h3>One in nine marketers will spend more than £100,000 on influencers in the next year</h3> <p>New research from Takumi has revealed that one in nine marketers plan to spend in excess of £100,000 on influencer marketing in the next 12 months.</p> <p>39% of professionals say they will spend up to £10,000, while a further fifth predict their budget to fall somewhere between £10,000 and £100,000. In contrast, just 4% say they plan to forgo influencer campaigns entirely. </p> <p>This shows the extent to which influencer marketing has grown in popularity, with 26% of marketers now believing it is a more effective way to target consumers than traditional advertising. 43% agree that it is more effective, but only for millennial audiences.</p> <h3>‘In the moment’ searches are on the rise</h3> <p><a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/consumer-insights/consumer-immediate-need-mobile-experiences/?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=promo&amp;utm_team=twg-us&amp;utm_campaign=20170829-twg-micro-moments-email-B&amp;utm_content=cta&amp;mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWlROaE16STJaVE00TkdJdyIsInQiOiI3cVpldDV6cml6S1wvbHlhM0t1SjJzckdyUVZseGQ1NmtjeVwvUmtQXC9mYUVQTmExOEJOZFRNUWJmRkxVcUR0Z0JmcDZNaGMrbFVWNzlDQ2dxYjNia0hjc2FXeEZqd2IwUHFOdVo5N3p5Zk1QM0MxdjBXU1NxUktkNDZ1dVdQWlM0aSJ9" target="_blank">Google research</a> has found that consumers are more impatient than ever before, with increasing expectations for brands to immediately meet their needs. </p> <p>Searches related to ‘same-day shipping’ have grown more than 120% since 2015. Similarly, searches for ‘open now’ have tripled over the past two years, while searches for ‘store hours’ have dropped.</p> <p>Lastly, Google found that travel-related searches for ‘tonight’ and ‘today’ have grown more than 150% on mobile, reflecting consumer demand for spontaneous and in-the-moment bookings.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8673/Open_Now.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="454"></p> <h3>Consumers more likely to make frivolous purchases on touchscreens</h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969698917300024" target="_blank">new study</a> has revealed that consumers are more likely to make purchases when browsing on a touchscreen device, especially when it comes to things they don’t necessarily need.</p> <p>This is because touchscreens create more experiential thinking in users, while desktops evoke rational consideration. </p> <p>An experiment found that participants were more inclined to buy a restaurant gift card than a grocery gift card on a touchscreen, while desktop users favoured the opposite. In this sense, desktop elicits a similar response to shopping in-store, where a series of logical steps means we are less likely to be driven by emotions or impulse.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69351 2017-08-18T14:21:00+01:00 2017-08-18T14:21:00+01:00 10 superior digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>59% of Instagram Stories leads to a shopping cart</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://klear.com/blog/instagram-stories-conversion/" target="_blank">Klear</a> shows that 59% of brands' Instagram Stories link to a shopping cart or shoppable page.</p> <p>In contrast, just 23% of brands link their Stories to other social platforms, while 10% link to a blog post.</p> <p>Klear also found that 36% of brand Instagram Stories involve some form of product promotion, making it the most popular type of post. 22% of Stories involve an 'insider look' at the brand, and 14% involve an influencer takeover.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8341/Klear.JPG" alt="" width="705" height="476"></p> <h3>42% of all US business trips extended for leisure</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="https://info.advertising.expedia.com/custom-research-bleisure-travel-market?utm_campaign=2016+Bleisure+Custom+Research&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-95eaQxjOzd1Wm5VMuR1rk8GpeXcXmlEqI5VyE4c0E936EhBaZ413dK_VHQxo3mDwsC1QszbOJw10YgbY-rQbFF3Yc6ZeBPe57BpU9teRl92GzRveM&amp;_hsmi=40388954&amp;utm_content=40388954&amp;utm_source=hs_automation&amp;hsCtaTracking=71e4538a-6c18-405f-9307-1eba7186fefa%7C7e4357af-3125-4efe-831c-afc5ee46c7c9" target="_blank">Expedia Media Solutions</a> has highlighted the growing trend for ‘bleisure’ trips – i.e. travel that combines both business and leisure.</p> <p>It has found that 42% of all business trips within the US are extended for leisure, with this increasing to 52% when employees have to travel overseas for work. Expedia also suggests that trips to attend conferences and conventions are more likely to turn into leisure trips, as opposed to travel for client meetings or presentations.</p> <p>Lastly, it found that the leisure portion of a trip can often equal or exceed the length of the business portion, making ‘bleisure’ trips much longer than a typical business trip.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8332/Expedia_stat.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="284"></p> <h3>55% of consumers prefer shopping direct from brands than retailers</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://astoundcommerce.com/us/2017/08/15/global-brand-research/" target="_blank">Astound Commerce</a> has found that over half of consumers prefer visiting a brand or manufacturer’s website rather than shopping from multi-brand retailers. </p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 consumers, 54% said they would turn to brands over retailers for more comprehensive product information, improved customer service, better value and more chance of personalisation. </p> <p>45% of millennials said they expect a more engaging, holistic experience on a brand’s website than a retailer’s, while 59% of shoppers would visit a physical store to seek out the full brand experience they don’t believe they can get online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8335/Astound.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="325"></p> <h3>UK sees surge in search interest for electric cars</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise suggests that there has been a surge of interest in electric cars in the UK, following on from the launch of Tesla’s ‘Model 3’ car.</p> <p>In July, there was a 345% increase in searches for the new ‘Tesla Model 3’, as well as a 346% increase in people searching for ‘electric cars’ in general. This comes on the back of the news that there has been a 10.3% drop in new car sales and an increase in used cars sales in 2017.</p> <p>Hitwise also found that people aged 18-24 were the demographic most likely to be searching for ‘Tesla’, and the third most-asked question to be: “What electric cars are available in the UK?”</p> <h3>Transparency now a pressing priority for brands</h3> <p>In light of last year’s Media Transparency report by the ANA, a large number of global brands are in the midst of making changes to their media governance practices.</p> <p>In a survey of global marketers in 35 multinational companies, the World Federation of Advertisers found transparency to be a top priority for 47% of brands, while 51% said it is rising up the list. </p> <p>Brand safety is also a hot topic, with 70% saying it has escalated as a priority in the last 12 months. As a result, 74% have suspended investment in ad networks where they felt there was an unnecessary risk to their brands. Meanwhile, 89% are also limiting or plan to limit investment in ad networks that do not allow use of third-party verification.</p> <h3>Global cart abandonment increases 1.3% on previous quarter</h3> <p><a href="https://blog.salecycle.com/stats/the-remarketing-report-q2-2017/" target="_blank">SaleCycle</a> has released its Remarketing Report for Q2 2017, highlighting key cart abandonment stats from April to June.</p> <p>It shows that the global cart abandonment rate for Q2 was 76.9%, which is up 1.3% on the previous quarter. Meanwhile, the average retail conversion rate was 3.29%.</p> <p>In terms of sectors, gaming websites had the lowest abandonment rates at 67.4%, while finance had the highest at 83.7%. This was closely followed by non-profit – a sector which faces ongoing challenges in optimising online conversions. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8333/SalesCycle.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="420"></p> <h3>88% of consumers value speed of delivery over choice of brand</h3> <p>A <a href="https://info.salmon.com/buying-tomorrow-report" target="_blank">new report</a> by Salmon has revealed that 88% of consumers see the speed of delivery as more important than the brand being ordered. Additionally, it found that modern-day consumers also like to shop in new ways, with 45% currently using a digital assistant like Alexa or Google Home to do so.</p> <p>Other stats from the report include the fact that almost a quarter of consumers make all their purchases online, while 37% of total online spend is now done through Amazon.</p> <p>Lastly, it is clear that consumers are becoming more digitally obsessed than ever before, with 57% believing they are more digitally advanced than the retailers that serve them.</p> <h3>Searches for ‘make up’ increase over 200% in three years</h3> <p>According to research by <a href="https://www.pi-datametrics.com/resources/market-performance-reports/beauty/?mc_cid=af12c67cd5&amp;mc_eid=bdac343de4" target="_blank">PI Datametrics</a>, the UK beauty market saw a 76% increase in search volume growth from 2013 to 2016. The term ‘make up’ specifically has grown a whopping 203% in these three years.</p> <p>Insight suggests that this growth can be put down to the popularity of bloggers and vloggers within the category, plus the rise of visual social media and its influencers. With make-up sales being worth an estimated £1bn in the UK in 2017, the opportunity for retailers continues to grow.</p> <p>Interestingly, the report also revealed that the top four performers within the beauty market are all retailers (as opposed to make-up or beauty brands themselves), with Boots.com owning 9.1% of the entire market and competitor Superdrug owning 8.7%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8331/PI_Data.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="509"></p> <h3>77% of APAC mobile ads delivered via apps </h3> <p>A new study by <a href="http://www.vpon.com/en/events/2017H1AsiaReport/index.html?utm_source=VPON_EN&amp;utm_medium=EN_PPR&amp;utm_term=TH&amp;vpadn_src=EN_PPR_TH" target="_blank">Vpon</a> has revealed that mobile advertising in Asia-Pacific heavily relies on apps, with 77% of such ads being delivered in-app, and just 23% via the mobile web.</p> <p>This figure rises to 90% in Indonesia, where app usage is at its highest. Similarly, 86% of ads are delivered via apps in India, while the same goes for 85% in Thailand and 82% in Malaysia.</p> <p>In contrast, countries in East Asia are leaning more towards mobile web, with China and Japan delivering just 34% and 33% of ads in apps respectively.</p> <h3>Private Eye is the UK’s most-read current affairs title</h3> <p>The Audit Bureau of Circulation (<a href="https://www.abc.org.uk/" target="_blank">ABC</a>) has named Private Eye as the most-read news and current affairs magazine in the UK, with a circulation of 249,927 per issue, and a growth of 8.6% year-on-year.</p> <p>For the same category, circulation of the Economist was up 5% in the UK to 248,196, while Prospect grew substantially with a rise of 37% to 44,545.</p> <p>In contrast to the popularity of some news titles, ABC noted a decline in women’s weekly magazines, which dropped almost 11% from the same period last year. Look magazine suffered a 35% drop in circulation to 58,561, while Now fell almost 21% to 84,588.</p> <p>Elsewhere, TV Choice was found to have the biggest readership in the UK overall, with a circulation of 1.2m.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Our circulation is up 9% on this time last year, with an ABC of 249,927. Thanks to all of you for buying/subscribing!</p> — Private Eye Magazine (@PrivateEyeNews) <a href="https://twitter.com/PrivateEyeNews/status/895621655615086593">August 10, 2017</a> </blockquote> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69338 2017-08-17T10:00:00+01:00 2017-08-17T10:00:00+01:00 Five companies using robots and AI to make a difference Nikki Gilliland <p>This is naturally a big concern - but there <em>is</em> a flip side. We’re all aware of how AI technology is changing the ways consumers interact with companies, by making processes faster, easier, and more streamlined than ever before. But more than this, artificial intelligence is starting to have a greater and positive impact on society as a whole.</p> <p>So, putting the aforementioned matters aside for a moment, here are five companies using AI intelligence to make a difference in consumers lives.</p> <h3>No Isolation</h3> <p>For children with a chronic or long-term illness, being unable to attend school doesn’t only mean missing out on vital education. It also means missing out on crucial social interaction, often leading to high levels of isolation and loneliness. </p> <p>A new startup company called No Isolation is aiming to transform the lives of children struggling with this issue with the world’s first ‘telepresence robot’.</p> <p>Essentially, the robot takes the place of the person in the classroom when they cannot attend. It allows them to listen as well as participate by controlling the system through an app while at home. If the child is feeling too poorly or sad to contribute – they can also turn on a blue light on the head of the robot to signify passive learning.</p> <p>While the technology itself is not revolutionary, it is revolutionising the lives of the children using it. By taking away feelings of social isolation, and helping to ease worries about going back to school after prolonged periods, it’s having a direct and positive impact on its target consumer. No Isolation is also working on a product to help senior citizens dealing with loneliness.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GfHBsmswe8s?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Microsoft</h3> <p>From a startup to one of the world’s biggest brands – Microsoft has invested heavily in AI in the past few years. ‘Seeing AI’ is one of the first examples to come to fruition – an app that uses artificial intelligence to help visually impaired people.</p> <p>The app uses an iPhone camera to tell people what’s happening around them, using neural networks to identify people, objects, and even the emotions of others via facial recognition.</p> <p>One of the most functional aspects is its ability to recognise US currency, something that is usually impossible for visually impaired people due to the fact that all bills are the same size and shape. Similarly useful, it helps identify everyday household objects by scanning barcodes, and recites text as soon as it appears in front of the camera.</p> <p>With further research in speech recognition, as well as the agricultural and healthcare industries – it is clear that Microsoft is intent on harnessing the power of AI for positive change.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bqeQByqf_f8?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Darktrace</h3> <p>Cybercrime <a href="http://fortune.com/2017/06/22/cybersecurity-business-fights-back/" target="_blank">reportedly cost</a> the global economy an estimated $450bn in 2016. Now, a new wave of companies is aiming to fight back, with many using AI to identify and prevent digital attacks. </p> <p>Darktrace is one of the most valuable, having recently raised $75m in funding. By using machine learning technology to analyse network traffic and track threats, Darktrace is able to quickly identify anomalies. Moreover, it is able to do so without slowing down or disrupting normal operations.</p> <p>With organisations taking an average of 99 days in 2016 to realise they had been breached, this kind of AI technology can rapidly alter the speed at which attacks are quashed. Meanwhile, as an increasing number of cyber-attacks are now said to involve altering data rather than merely stealing it – AI can help to prevent potentially catastrophic outcomes. For example, in healthcare industries, where altering medical records can lead to the possible misdiagnoses of patients. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Our <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AI?src=hash">#AI</a> tech caught a malicious <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/insider?src=hash">#insider</a> trying to harvest user credentials - learn how in our Global Threat Report <a href="https://t.co/ZDAQQwt7fw">https://t.co/ZDAQQwt7fw</a> <a href="https://t.co/t1B8vQoeIn">pic.twitter.com/t1B8vQoeIn</a></p> — Darktrace (@Darktrace) <a href="https://twitter.com/Darktrace/status/892680454138187777">August 2, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Leka</h3> <p>New <a href="http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/9/393/eaag2882" target="_blank">research</a> from the University of North Carolina and Washington University has found that an AI can identify autistic children before they display overt behavioural symptoms. By training a machine learning algorithm on the behaviour and earlier MRI data of children with autism, scientists then built a model that predicted a number of other autism cases.</p> <p>The potential for early diagnosis is not the only way AI is having an impact. A new motion-sensitive robot named Leka has been developed to help children with autism spectrum disorder, Down’s syndrome and other disabilities develop motor, cognitive and emotional skills.</p> <p>As children with autism struggle with interacting and communicating with others, Leka acts as an intermediary. While it is designed to display some human characteristics, such as facial expressions, it can be customised to adapt to the child’s individual needs for engagement and interaction. Alongside the direct benefits to the children, Leka is also having a huge impact of the lives of therapists, parents and care-givers – helping to reduce anxiety in both learning and day-to-day life.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/luN84iqllIA?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Babylon Health</h3> <p>Machine learning is changing the way the healthcare industry diagnoses and treats serious diseases like cancer and diabetes, with the technology being used to read CT scans and X-rays.</p> <p>In the UK, start up digital healthcare company Babylon Health is aiming to revolutionise the diagnoses of routine conditions, creating an AI doctor that takes the place of a GP.</p> <p>The app, which is currently being used by 800,000 people, allows patients to text their symptoms and receive advice from the AI. Babylon then advises whether or not medical care is needed, also providing the option of a video-consultation with a real doctor.</p> <p>Interestingly, the NHS is currently trialling the service in areas of London as an alternative to the 111 number, which offers free medical advice on the telephone. With the potential to offer cost savings, as well as free up time for busy GP’s – Babylon is being touted as a positive step for healthcare professionals. Meanwhile, with Babylon claiming that its technology can help cut diagnosis time by 50% - it’s also aiming to make the experience more positive and convenient for patients.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CMD6B8h6Pzg?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68722-how-ai-will-impact-marketing-and-the-customer-experience">How AI will impact marketing and the customer experience</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69098-could-ai-revolutionize-high-street-retail-as-well-as-ecommerce/">Could AI revolutionize high street retail as well as ecommerce?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67745-15-examples-of-artificial-intelligence-in-marketing">15 examples of artificial intelligence in marketing</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69250 2017-07-14T10:52:35+01:00 2017-07-14T10:52:35+01:00 Four reasons behind Superdrug's 41% increase in profits Nikki Gilliland <p>So, why the big turnaround? Here’s a look at Superdrug’s strategy, and the reasons why it’s currently enjoying a resurgence.</p> <h3>Targeting younger shoppers </h3> <p>Boots is the largest health and beauty retailer in the UK, with over 2,500 stores compared to Superdrug’s 850 or so. It’s also got the longest history, as well as a large and loyal consumer base that includes people of all ages and budgets.</p> <p>With Boots catering to such a large demographic, Superdrug has changed its strategy to target a more specific set of consumers. While its rival concentrates on its own-brand beauty range of Botanics, as well as more mid to high-end brands such No. 7 and L’Oréal, Superdrug deliberately targets younger consumers interested in more affordable cosmetics. </p> <p>Cheaper brands like MUA, GOSH and Make-Up Revolution, despite being less well-known, are now sold in most stores.</p> <p>So, alongside a general focus on affordability, how exactly does Superdrug entice younger consumers?</p> <p>In the face of low-price beauty launches from the likes of Primark, H&amp;M and New Look, Superdrug’s work with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66560-what-are-influencers-and-how-do-you-find-them" target="_blank">influencers</a> certainly sets it apart. The retailer struck a deal with Zoella in 2014 to sell her beauty range, with the collection going on to break sales records. </p> <p>Upon launch, the Superdrug website saw twice as many visitors as usual, with 25% of new visitors clicking on the Zoella range. Since then, Zoella has gone on to release two new collections, both resulting in similar success for Superdrug.  </p> <p>Other popular influencers such as Tanya Burr and Fleur de Force have also partnered with Superdrug to sell exclusive make-up and cosmetics collections, meaning the retailer has been able to capitalise on their existing and loyal audience. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/Zoella">@Zoella</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/ZoellaBeauty">@ZoellaBeauty</a> I've just picked this up from Superdrug it's so pretty <a href="https://t.co/IKAg0QyMdR">pic.twitter.com/IKAg0QyMdR</a></p> — Jessica newman (@jnew135) <a href="https://twitter.com/jnew135/status/883622463531253760">July 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>In-store experience</h3> <p>Influencers are not the only way Superdrug has aligned itself to younger shoppers. In 2014, it rolled out its new ‘Beauty Studio’ concept, offering beauty services such as threading, manicures and eyelash extensions in-stores. In select locations, it also introduced digital displays and an interactive ‘selfie’ area to encourage shoppers to share their makeovers on social media.</p> <p>Elsewhere, and even in stores that do not include a Beauty Studio, the design and layout of most stores is used to differentiate itself from Boots’ pared down approach. The retailer often uses bright colours and illuminated lettering, bringing a fashionable element into stores. Again, cosmetics is a huge focus, with this area often much larger than other areas.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7455/superdrug_cosmetics.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="431"></p> <p>Another way Superdrug has enhanced the in-store experience is to introduce Wi-Fi and its own radio station. ‘Superdrug Live’ is used to support brand campaigns and promotions, as well as create a unique store environment through music.</p> <h3>Healthcare focus</h3> <p>Alongside its Beauty Studio, Superdrug has also expanded into the healthcare market, placing much more focus on its status as a pharmacy as well as cosmetics retailer.</p> <p>While its stores used to have a 70/30 split between beauty and health products, some stores now have a 60/40 strategy, with the retailer introducing consultation rooms and services from pharmacists and nurses, such as flu vaccinations. </p> <p>Interestingly, Superdrug has also introduced its own brand of morning-after pill, selling it at half the cost of the average pill sold over the counter. The move has been praised by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, which applauded the retailer for giving women greater choice and accessibility. </p> <p>There’s no doubt that Superdrug’s focus on healthcare is succeeding – sales of this category grew 12% last year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7456/wellbeing.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="444"></p> <h3>Rewarding loyalty</h3> <p>Superdrug’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/69250-four-reasons-why-superdrug-is-succeeding/edit/Six%20tips%20for%20loyalty%20program%20success" target="_blank">loyalty program</a> has also grown over the past few years. In fact, membership is said to have doubled over the past two years, with the retailer having 19m registered members by the end of 2016. </p> <p>The Health and Beauty card is a fairly standard retail loyalty system, rewarding shoppers with points that can be exchanged for discounts. However, Superdrug adds value with exclusive offers and perks, also rewarding long-term loyalty members with exclusive gifts. Regular promotions like ‘Treat Thursdays’ – which offers exclusive discounts – provide incentive for members to collect and spend points.</p> <p>The Health and Beauty card also works in conjunction with the Superdrug app, allowing shoppers to collect and monitor points as well as access offers. By aligning the app and loyalty program, Superdrug has also been able to improve targeting, offering deals and promotions to customers based on their location or past purchase history.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Calling all Health &amp; Beautycard members! Get 10% off Diet &amp; Fitness products until 23:59 tonight <a href="https://t.co/pj1ctMQvf7">https://t.co/pj1ctMQvf7</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/treatthursday?src=hash">#treatthursday</a> <a href="https://t.co/qcrKFWzd3g">pic.twitter.com/qcrKFWzd3g</a></p> — Superdrug (@superdrug) <a href="https://twitter.com/superdrug/status/885431137660796928">July 13, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Improved online presence </h3> <p>While most consumers might naturally think of Superdrug in terms of physical stores, the retailer has been making strides to improve its ecommerce capabilities – as well as its general digital presence.</p> <p>With improved delivery and click and collect, it offers customers more flexibility than before – perhaps one of the main reasons its saw a 60% growth in online sales last year.</p> <p>Another reason could be its Online Doctor service, which allows customers to consult with a doctor on various medical issues and arrange prescription for collection or delivery. The popularity of the Online Doctor has spurred on expansion of Superdrug’s healthcare services, with the retailer recently announcing that will open 30 new stores and create 600 new jobs in the UK.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Superdrug uses social media to reach out and interact with consumers. Its Twitter and Facebook strategy involves a lot of user generated content, with the brand also using lifestyle and pop-culture inspired content to engage younger, female consumers.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Chris says he isn’t bothered… but we have a feeling that he is defo bothered! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/draaaaaama?src=hash">#draaaaaama</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/muggymikeisback?src=hash">#muggymikeisback</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/loveisland?src=hash">#loveisland</a> <a href="https://t.co/Tzj24KdgFW">pic.twitter.com/Tzj24KdgFW</a></p> — Superdrug (@superdrug) <a href="https://twitter.com/superdrug/status/885590454573641736">July 13, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>Making both beauty and healthcare accessible, Superdrug has managed to carve out a niche in the market, making its high street presence almost indispensable to consumers.</p> <p>While it previously stood in the shadow of Boots, its strong growth and expansion plans means it is a worthy competitor – possibly even winning in the fight for the attention of today’s young consumers. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67138-native-apps-for-retail-10-reasons-it-s-now-or-never/">Native apps for retail: 10 reasons it's now or never</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66160-how-boots-can-improve-its-customer-journey-from-search-to-checkout/">How Boots can improve its customer journey from search to checkout</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68472-three-reasons-behind-whsmith-s-boost-in-profits/" target="_blank">Three reasons behind WHSmith’s boost in profits</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69246 2017-07-13T14:21:24+01:00 2017-07-13T14:21:24+01:00 Why Adidas is moving into utility marketing with All Day fitness app Nikki Gilliland <p>Its MiCoach app (now Runtastic) aims to help improve users’ fitness performance, while its Adidas Confirmed app lets users know about exclusive product releases.</p> <p>Now, Adidas is taking a broader approach, combining different types of health and fitness tracking technology into a single app. 'All Day' – just launched in the US – is an all-encompassing version designed to help users ‘begin their journey to well-being’. </p> <p>But, is there a market for yet another sports-brand app? More to the point, how will Adidas benefit? </p> <h3>Technology to manage health, not just fitness</h3> <p>From the Nike+ Training Club app to MyFitnessPal and Fitbit, there are a tonne of similar apps on the market. Interestingly, Adidas’s All Day app does not appear to be a carbon copy of other brand examples, instead, focusing much more on health and well-being for women.</p> <p>While it is inspired by sport, the app is tailored around four distinct categories of movement, nutrition, mindset, and rest. This means if the user is not that interested in one category, such as exercise, they’ll still be able to gain value from others like food and sleep.</p> <p>Essentially, it’s an interesting example of utility marketing, with Adidas ensuring that it is there to meet the individuals needs at any time – without directly promoting its core products.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GvQfVjpDTwM?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>Moving into the health industry could prove to be a shrewd move from Adidas. According to research, two-thirds of Americans <a href="http://www.itnonline.com/content/two-thirds-americans-favor-digital-personal-health-management" target="_blank">favour digital health management</a> over physical. Meanwhile, healthcare apps have seen a surge in interest, with a 16% increase in downloads during the past two years.</p> <p>Adidas is not the only brand to veer into this market. Under Armour’s Record app is also geared around general health verticals such as fitness, nutrition, and sleep – capitalising on its ability to track and help users throughout the entire day, not just during moments of exercise. </p> <h3>Using content to inspire</h3> <p>One way the Adidas All Day app differentiates itself from the competition is by going beyond performance tracking, also using content to inspire users. </p> <p>This part of the app is called ‘Discoveries’, with the current selection including recipes and healthy eating tips from food author, Candice Kumai, and a custom music playlist from DJ Nina Las Vegas. </p> <p>As well as capitalising on the authority of influencers, Adidas is focusing on high-quality content to tap into the general lifestyle interests of women. </p> <p>The aim here is to provide more than just utility. So while some people might use fitness apps for a while and then forget about them, or only think of using them in the moment of exercise, Adidas wants to provide the inspiration for maintaining and enjoying a healthy lifestyle.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7415/Adidas_All_Day_2.JPG" alt="" width="580" height="604"></p> <p>Furthermore, instead of focusing on hardcore or lengthy workout programs, it focuses on setting short term goals – where the length and category is chosen by the user.</p> <p>For example, if you’re interested in setting up a healthy eating plan, you can choose a select number of recipes to try – which the app will then remind you about and mark as complete as you go. The same goes for exercise plans and sleep aids. </p> <p>By breaking everything down into manageable chunks, the hope is that users might be more inclined to sustain usage over time.</p> <h3>Expanding digital presence</h3> <p>The app is not the only example of Adidas targeting a female audience or experimenting with other forms of utility marketing. In the UK, it launched a chatbot to let consumers find out information and book fitness classes in its East London studio. </p> <p>The chatbot received 2,000 sign ups with a 60% retention rate after the first week of launch, proving that online users often value practicality over pure entertainment.</p> <p>Adidas appears to be using both to promote the All Day app on social media, pulling in lifestyle-based content from its blog as well as promoting features such as the ability to set mini challenges.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Make every movement count.</p> <p>Take on challenges on the new All Day App: <a href="https://t.co/ZCnUASMOYR">https://t.co/ZCnUASMOYR</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/adidasALLDAY?src=hash">#adidasALLDAY</a> <a href="https://t.co/haamf50fZc">pic.twitter.com/haamf50fZc</a></p> — ADIDAS NYC (@adidasNYC) <a href="https://twitter.com/adidasNYC/status/883037976007024640">July 6, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>It’s also capitalising on influencer involvement, featuring popular lifestyle bloggers on its Instagram channel – another sign that it’s set on widening its target demographic rather than a niche, fitness-focused audience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7413/Adidas_insta.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="478"></p> <h3>Building brand affinity</h3> <p>The main benefit of utility marketing is that it helps to create brand affinity, with users potentially more likely to favour Adidas products when considering a purchase.</p> <p>While this naturally extends to Adidas sportswear and apparel, there’s also the question of whether Adidas will introduce a wearable tie-in.</p> <p>This has been the pattern for many sports brands up until now, starting with Nike+ and its Fuelband. Despite Nike going back to being a third-party app (now compatible with the Apple Watch), others have since entered the market, including Under Armour and its Healthbox wearable, and New Balance and its RunIQ smartwatch.</p> <p>As it stands, the new Adidas app can be paired with Apple’s Health Kit and Google Fit, and it looks like it won’t be long before a new official wearable is launched.</p> <p>It’s been reported that the device featured in the press photos for the All Day app is the all-new Adidas fitness tracker – thought to be called ‘Chameleon’. Said to be a rival for Fitbit, it will include a heart-rate sensor, as well as tie-ins with healthcare partners like Verily and American College of Sports Medicine. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7414/Chameleon.JPG" alt="" width="606" height="344"></p> <p>So, could Adidas take a share of the lucrative wearable market?</p> <p>Fitbit is currently the dominant player, with the brand seeing the most amount of downloads for its accompanying app. That being said, there has been rising concern over privacy rights, with many big wearable companies coming under fire for vague and convoluted T&amp;C’s. </p> <p>Alongside privacy concerns, one of the biggest reasons for wearable abandonment (a <a href="http://www.zdnet.com/article/a-third-of-wearable-devices-abandoned-by-consumers-gartner/" target="_blank">third of all owners</a> are reported to not wear their device) is said to be guilt or frustration for failing to reach their fitness goals. </p> <p>As less of a goal-setting app, and more of a lifestyle support, this is one area that Adidas might be able to capitalise on.</p> <p>By focusing more on flexibility rather than serious workouts, it could appeal to a wider demographic, as well as consumers already interested in its fashion-focused collections such as Adidas Originals.</p> <p><strong><em>Related articles:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69086-how-adidas-uses-digital-to-enable-powerful-experiences/" target="_blank">How Adidas uses digital to enable powerful experiences</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65598-nike-vs-adidas-which-provides-the-best-ecommerce-experience" target="_blank">Nike vs. Adidas: which provides the best ecommerce experience?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68785-how-adidas-originals-uses-social-media-to-drive-sales/" target="_blank">How Adidas Originals uses social media to drive sales</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69244 2017-07-13T10:32:38+01:00 2017-07-13T10:32:38+01:00 Eight inspiring examples of shoppable digital content Nikki Gilliland <p>So, how can retailers capture consumers in the moment?</p> <p>Shoppable content is one effective strategy. This refers to any kind of content – including images, video or blogs – that offers customers a direct opportunity to buy within just a few clicks. The strategy helps to bridge the gap between browsing and buying, effectively engaging consumers and increasing conversion rates in the process.</p> <p>So, what does effective shoppable content look like? Here are just a few inspiring brand cases and the reasons why they work.</p> <h3>Diesel</h3> <p>Shoppable video can be a mixed bag. While the medium sounds great in theory – allowing consumers to click directly on the products they’re seeing on screen – it can actually be a rather jarring user experience, interrupting the video and taking viewers away mid-action.</p> <p>That being said, Diesel’s shoppable video – created as part of its #forsuccessfulliving campaign and in celebration of the brand’s 30th anniversary – is a pretty seamless example. </p> <p>Directed by Alexander Turvey, the short follows various Diesel models as they prepare for their first catwalk show. Calls-to-action appear at certain points throughout, which allows the viewer to save items or go directly to the Diesel store. As the video only involves music, with no real narrative or plot, this means that the experience of ‘in the moment’ shopping is less disruptive.</p> <p><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BKA4Zndgnja/" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7407/Diesel.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="497"></a></p> <p>Meanwhile, the video capitalises on the ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68305-runway-to-retail-how-fashion-brands-are-introducing-see-now-buy-now" target="_blank">see now buy now trend</a>’, selling exclusive items ahead of Diesel’s FW16 runway show in Tokyo to provide extra value for consumers.</p> <h3>Lazy Oaf</h3> <p>Instagram is now the top social media platform in terms of user engagement. Instead of just likes and comments, however, many brands want to transfer this engagement into direct purchases. </p> <p>While Instagram itself has been testing its new shopping features, retailers like Lazy Oaf have been busy finding their own ways to make the user experience more shoppable. It has created its own ‘Insta-shop’ – which lives on its main site, but is also linked to from its Instagram channel.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7397/Instashop.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="273"></p> <p>Essentially, it allows consumers to browse the Lazy Oaf Instagram feed (but on its own website) and means they can directly click on and buy any item they like. By hovering over each photo, users can instantly see whether an item is shoppable, also making it easy for consumers to buy multiple items in one go.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7396/Lazy_Oaf_2.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="442"></p> <h3>Made.com</h3> <p>Made.com’s Unboxed cleverly shows how to merge <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67547-10-excellent-examples-of-user-generated-content-in-marketing-campaigns" target="_blank">user-generated</a> and shoppable content. Building on the idea that people want to see how furniture or homeware looks in real life before investing, it allows customers to upload photos of their Made.com purchases. </p> <p>Alongside this, it also includes links to available items in each photo, encouraging customers to take action instead of just inspiration. Users can even get in touch with the people who have uploaded photos in order to ask questions and hear honest reviews.</p> <p>While it's not the most seamless example of shoppable content (perhaps focusing the user's attention on reviews rather than clicking through to the products themselves) - it still helps to drive purchases in the long run.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7400/Made_Unboxed.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="588"></p> <h3>Net-A-Porter</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68219-four-things-brands-can-learn-about-content-marketing-from-net-a-porter" target="_blank">Net-A-Porter</a> is a retailer that truly understands the importance of shoppable content, using it to drive customer loyalty both on- and offline. Its print magazine, Porter, works in conjunction with a digital-version, allowing users to shop items directly from the page. By downloading the Net-A-Porter app and scanning the magazine, readers can find and buy items as they flip through.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7402/Porter.JPG" alt="" width="453" height="479"></p> <p>Net-A-Porter's weekly online publication, The Edit, uses the same formula, including handy links to all the items featured in the magazine.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7401/Net_A_Porter.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="556"></p> <p>Delivering instant gratification to consumers (and taking away the frustration of seeing something you like and not being able to find or buy it) – Net-A-Porter ensures that there is minimal friction between browsing and buying. </p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>It’s not only fashion or homeware retailers that benefit from shoppable content. Tesco is one supermarket that puts this at the heart of its digital strategy, using its ‘Real Food’ content hub to drive conversions online. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7404/Real_Food.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="429"></p> <p>The reason it works so well is because it makes buying multiple ingredients incredibly quick and easy. Instead of writing down and searching for individual items, users can be one click away from buying everything that’s needed for a recipe. What’s more, Tesco also prompts users in case they don’t have store cupboard items like olive oil or ketchup.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7403/Tesco.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="487"></p> <p>This example also demonstrates how FMCG brands can capitalise on faster purchase intent. Unlike fashion or retail brands – where the path to purchase involves much greater deliberation and comparison – people are much more likely to see and buy when it comes to food and drink.</p> <h3>Kate Spade</h3> <p>Kate Spade is one fashion retailer that has taken shoppable content to a whole new level, launching a series of ads designed to be watched and enjoyed like a TV show.</p> <p>Starring recognisable faces like Anna Kendrick, the #missadventure series is billed as a series ‘about interesting women leading interesting lives.’ Naturally, however, Kate Spade also hopes that people will be just as interested in the clothes and accessories they wear, allowing viewers to find and buy all the clothes featured.</p> <p>In order to avoid disruption to viewers, the brand collates all shoppable items into a list, which can be clicked on during or at the end of the video. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/j8XCi71rwsg?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>By truly immersing viewers into world of Kate Spade, the brand is able to increase the chances of them becoming paying customers.</p> <h3>One Kings Lane</h3> <p>Home décor brand, One Kings Lane, has generated effective results from its shoppable blog. However, that doesn’t mean it focuses on revenue over and above engagement. Instead, it focuses on creating high quality content and photography, providing customers with inspiration and value above everything else.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7405/One_Kings_Lane.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="486"></p> <p>One danger of shoppable content, especially in blog form, is that it can soon become outdated. Products will be sold out or limited, leaving content filled with old or broken links. In order to combat this, One Kings Lane <a href="https://adexchanger.com/ecommerce-2/one-kings-lane-uses-content-convert/">focuses on refreshing content regularly</a>, and ensuring that its shoppable content stays up to date.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Tour the colorful and collected home of the founder of <a href="https://twitter.com/RollerRabbit">@RollerRabbit</a> → <a href="https://t.co/lGLHmOAZJ6">https://t.co/lGLHmOAZJ6</a> <a href="https://t.co/QuRyevrFKW">pic.twitter.com/QuRyevrFKW</a></p> — One Kings Lane (@onekingslane) <a href="https://twitter.com/onekingslane/status/876092396366422016">June 17, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Matches Fashion</h3> <p>Lastly, instead of using shoppable video to create film-like ads, Matches uses industry experts and behind-the-scenes insight to entice viewers to buy,</p> <p>Its ‘Digital Trunk Shows’ series involves a number of designers talking about the inspiration for and creation of their collections. Viewers can simply click on an item for it to be automatically added to their basket.</p> <p>This approach aims to use information and insight to offer real value to consumers, softly encouraging them to make purchases rather than blatantly selling.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/v-fO50XoNNY?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67909-selfridges-unveils-ios-app-with-shoppable-instagram-feed-is-it-any-good/" target="_blank">Selfridges unveils iOS app with ‘shoppable’ Instagram feed: Is it any good?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66625-shoppable-video-the-missing-piece-of-your-marketing-strategy/" target="_blank">Shoppable video: the missing piece of your marketing strategy?</a></em></li> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68275-ted-baker-unveils-shoppable-video-google-voice-search-stunt-for-aw16-campaign"><em>Ted Baker unveils shoppable video &amp; Google voice search stunt for AW16 campaign</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69135 2017-06-02T09:32:24+01:00 2017-06-02T09:32:24+01:00 Dropit review: Is there a demand for a ‘shop and drop’ delivery service? Nikki Gilliland <p>It sounds kind of cool – but is there <em>really</em> a demand for this kind of service? I was intrigued, so decided to download the app and give it a whirl. Here’s my two penneth.</p> <h3>How does Dropit work?</h3> <p>Dropit works via an app which customers can download or access via the POS device in a store. Buying a day pass for £10 allows you to ‘drop’ as many bags as you like in one day, which will then be collected and sent to you in a single delivery at a chosen time.</p> <p>For my trial, I chose to use Dropit in Lululemon’s Regent Street store – one of over 30 that now offer the service in London’s Regent and Oxford Street area. </p> <p>It was all very simple to do. When I went to buy an item in-store, I told the employee I wanted to use Dropit, which meant I just had to enter my details into the POS device, select a delivery time, and wait for them to scan the receipt and a QR code. It didn’t take long, though it obviously meant a bit of extra waiting time than merely buying and walking out of the store.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6467/Dropit.JPG" alt="" width="589" height="524"></p> <p>I chose my item to be delivered to my flat the following evening, and sure enough, it was - packaged inside Dropit's signature bag along with a matching purse that held the day pass and receipt.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6469/IMG_0401.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="799"></p> <p>I was also able to track my item on the app to see its progress. The app also includes a list and map of all participating stores, though there’s not much else to it than that.</p> <p>In terms of who actually delivers the goods, Dropit partners with a third-party service (similar to most retail stores), so it’s not a company like Deliveroo that actually employs people to deliver.</p> <h3>Who is it aimed at?</h3> <p>The value proposition of Dropit is quite straightforward – it means you don’t have to carry around bags while you continue shopping or go straight out for the evening. However, the question really is whether this is a big enough problem for people to pay £10 on top of their goods to have their bags dropped off elsewhere. </p> <p>Personally, I can’t see myself ever using it in my every day life, unless it was a (first world) emergency and I really couldn’t take shopping bags along with me, say if I was going to a gig after work. </p> <p>Consequently, I do wonder if the service is more aligned to luxury shoppers – people that are willing to pay slightly extra for the comfort and convenience. Or, perhaps even tourists who are really serious about shopping but also want to enjoy their day doing other things. </p> <p>The fact that Dropit often cites hotels in its promotional copy suggests that people from out of town are a target customer. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6471/Dropit_insta.JPG" alt="" width="740" height="353"></p> <h3>What’s the benefit for participating stores?</h3> <p>Meanwhile, there seems to be more in it for retail stores. One benefit is the possibility of extra dwell time in-store. If people aren’t weighed down by heavy bags, I guess they might be less worried about carrying things and therefore more inclined to spend.</p> <p>There is also the benefit of accessing data about offline consumers that would usually only be gathered from online purchases. Details such as where people shop and how much they spend could prove massively beneficial for understanding, targeting and retargeting customers. </p> <p>Finally, Dropit’s partnership network means that it also opens up possible marketing opportunities for retailers, including promotion within the app itself or social media. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6470/Dropit_M_S.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="483"></p> <h3>Is it worth it?</h3> <p>Personally, I can’t see much of a demand for Dropit from your average shopper. Most people don’t tend to buy that much in one go – or at least prefer buying online if they do. Similarly, I can’t imagine many people would even think of carrying bags as an issue.</p> <p>Having said that, there’s no doubt that the service does provide real convenience. The app and delivery service itself is also seamless and slick, which definitely adds to its appeal. Ultimately, I think Dropit solves a problem that most people probably don’t even realise they have. Which I suppose is the hallmark of some of the most successful companies out there. </p> <p>For rich people or tourists who are serious about shopping in London, it could be something to consider. Retailers keen to get their hands on untapped data will certainly be keeping their fingers crossed.</p> <p><em><strong>For more on retail, subscribers can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2017-digital-trends-in-retail/" target="_blank">2017 Digital Trends in Retail</a> report.</strong></em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69124 2017-05-31T10:15:00+01:00 2017-05-31T10:15:00+01:00 The best social stories and campaigns from May 2017 Nikki Gilliland <p>Subscribers can also download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-quarterly-q2-2017/" target="_blank">Social Quarterly Q2</a> for a more in-depth look at all the social media news from the past few months.</p> <h3>Instagram launches face filters</h3> <p>First up is the introduction of augmented reality face filters into Instagram’s Stories platform. </p> <p>Hot on the heels of other Snapchat-style features like slideshows and disappearing messages, the eight face filters allow users to jazz up standard selfies with koala ears, nerdy glasses, and butterfly crowns.</p> <p>Despite the almost-identical nature, early reviews suggest that Instagram’s effort isn’t quite as slick as Snapchat’s, with the filters failing to track user movements quite so well.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6424/Instagram_face_filters.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="398"></p> <h3>#Nuggsforcarter sets Twitter record</h3> <p>Early in May, a chap named Carter stole Ellen DeGeneres’ crown for the most-retweeted Twitter post of all time – all in aid of his one-man crusade for chicken nuggets. </p> <p>Carter asked Wendy’s how many retweets he would need to win a year’s supply of nuggs, and while he failed to hit the fast food chain’s target of 18m, he still managed to beat DeGeneres’ former record with a total of 3,632,995 retweets to date. </p> <p>Wendy’s has also given into his request for nuggets every day for a year (probably much to the dismay of his doctor).</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">HELP ME PLEASE. A MAN NEEDS HIS NUGGS <a href="https://t.co/4SrfHmEMo3">pic.twitter.com/4SrfHmEMo3</a></p> — Carter Wilkerson (@carterjwm) <a href="https://twitter.com/carterjwm/status/849813577770778624">April 6, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Snapchat’s growth rate disappoints</h3> <p>May saw Snapchat announce its first earnings report since its public IPO. The results were rather disappointing, as the platform reported 166m daily active users in the latest quarter, with a growth rate of just 5%. Its year-on-year growth rate also fell to 36% – down from 48% in Q4. </p> <p>Despite a slump in its growth, Snapchat did report positive earnings of $4.5m from its Spectacles and ‘other revenues’ in Q4 2016. </p> <h3>Dove’s personalised bottles</h3> <p>Dove is usually known for its <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68127-a-closer-look-at-dove-s-anti-sexism-mybeautymysay-campaign/" target="_blank">positive and empowering</a> campaigns, but its latest ‘Real Beauty’ initiative turned out to be disappointingly patronising.</p> <p>The Unilever brand decided it would be a good idea to create limited edition bottles of its body wash, using six different shapes to represent the diversity of women’s bodies. We say no more.</p> <p>On the plus side, the campaign resulted in some genius tweets.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">thanks dove but i already found a bottle for my shape <a href="https://t.co/asuo1vci0O">pic.twitter.com/asuo1vci0O</a></p> — Carina Hsieh (@carinahsieh) <a href="https://twitter.com/carinahsieh/status/861652635727908864">May 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Sweden lists its whole country on Airbnb</h3> <p>It’s not often a country invites you to stay in it for free, but that’s exactly what Sweden has done with its recent collaboration with Airbnb.</p> <p>In celebration of the ‘Allemansrätten' principle – a law that allows people to roam freely in nature – VisitSweden listed itself on the accommodation site in order to raise awareness of the country’s rugged natural beauty and freedom.</p> <p>You can read more about why the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69109-why-visit-sweden-and-other-tourism-boards-are-teaming-up-with-airbnb/" target="_blank">tourism board partnered with Airbnb here</a>.</p> <h3>Evian babies take over Snapchat</h3> <p>The end of the month saw the return of the Evian babies, with the ‘Live Young’ campaign this time transferring from television screens to digital, out-of-home, and social media channels.</p> <p>The campaign shows the babies wearing oversized grown-up clothes, encouraging adults to remain young at heart. It also includes a Snapchat filter which is set to launch in the next few weeks, but that is already available via a Snapcode on millions of Evian bottles.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6422/Evian_babies.JPG" alt="" width="630" height="561"></p> <h3>#StatusOfMind report reveals best and worst platforms for mental health</h3> <p>Also this month, The Royal Society for Public Health published a survey on the impact social media channels has on young people's mental health.</p> <p>The results suggest that Instagram has the worst impact, with respondents reporting a negative influence on body image, loneliness, and fear-of-missing-out. In contrast, YouTube was rated the best, ranking highly for its sense of community and access to emotional support.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6421/Mental_health_report.JPG" alt="" width="770" height="135"></p> <h3>Walkers Crisps campaign backfires</h3> <p>Finally, a spectacular Twitter fail to end the month, as Walkers Crisps inadvertently featured the faces of notorious criminals in its latest campaign.</p> <p>For the chance to win Champions League Final tickets, users were asked to tweet selfies to be shown in an animated video featuring ex-footballer Gary Lineker. </p> <p>As well as blindly trusting football fans, the brand also made the rookie mistake of automating the competition, meaning that the faces of criminals including Fred West and Rolf Harris appeared in public tweets. </p> <p>Cue a hell of a lot of guffawing on social media.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">There's Gary Lineker with Joseph Stalin. Well done, Walkers. Well done. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/WalkersWave?src=hash">#WalkersWave</a> <a href="https://t.co/7jwMogLOdh">pic.twitter.com/7jwMogLOdh</a></p> — Ben (@Jamin2g) <a href="https://twitter.com/Jamin2g/status/867766729937735680">May 25, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p><strong><em>To learn more on this topic, book yourself on to one of our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/social/">social media training courses</a>.</em></strong></p>