tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/multichannel Latest Multichannel content from Econsultancy 2016-10-28T14:06:05+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68431 2016-10-28T14:06:05+01:00 2016-10-28T14:06:05+01:00 How to combine attribution and segmentation data to achieve marketing success James Collins <p>Ultimately, being shrewd about how you segment your marketing data gives you the opportunity to become more effective at targeting the right people at the right time.</p> <p>Here, I share just some of the ways you can use attribution and segmentation to unlock even more value from your marketing efforts.</p> <p><strong><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0493/different-customer-groups-shopping-online.jpg" alt="Different customers shopping online" width="800" height="500"></strong></p> <h3>Understand the journeys of converting <em>and </em>non-converting users</h3> <p>As the name suggests, the data captured by traditional CRM systems is based on <strong>customers</strong>: On people who have completed a conversion.</p> <p>However, there will always be far more people browsing your products and services only to walk away.</p> <p>It’s here, in these non-converting journeys, that marketers are able to uncover where their efforts are falling flat.</p> <p>Effective user journey analysis and attributed reporting provides you with not only an understanding of the behaviour of people who buy from you but also those people who come to your site and do not purchase.</p> <p>Armed with this information, you can identify the marketing channels that aren’t helping attract or convert your chosen customer segments well enough.</p> <p>You can then experiment with cutting back spend in those areas and reallocating budget to other more effective channels.</p> <h3>Discover what activities attract new customers</h3> <p>One of the most common uses of segmentation is to provide a <strong>distinction between new and existing customers.</strong></p> <p>Segmentation allows you to distinguish between these two types of customers, while attributed reporting and user journey analysis helps you understand their typical behaviours.</p> <p>This combination then gives you the power to experiment and discover which channels are most effective at attracting each type of customer.</p> <p>How might user behaviour differ between these two segments? You might expect that new customers are exposed to your brand through channels like display and non-navigational search.</p> <p>On the other hand, existing customers might visit your website more often directly, through <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census/">email marketing</a>, or a branded, more specific, search.</p> <p>Once you have the data to prove (or disprove) these assumptions, you’ll have an idea of where to focus your marketing efforts.</p> <p>For example, if you want to attract more new customers, you’ll know which channels, and which combination of channels, to test first.</p> <h3>Reach your different customer groups in the most effective ways</h3> <p>Effective segmentation should also allow you to <strong>determine between different groups of customers based on their demographic or behavioural characteristics.</strong></p> <p>Analysing your attributed reporting data by customer segment allows you to formulate and test marketing campaigns specific to your different customer groups, rather than put out an ineffective ‘one-size-fits-all’ campaign and hope for the best.</p> <p>To give a simple example to put this into context, say you’re a travel company and you’ve identified two of your common customer types:</p> <p><strong>Active Retirees</strong></p> <ul> <li> <strong>Description:</strong> older holidaymakers who have the free time and money to enjoy travel.</li> <li> <strong>Relevant products:</strong> cruises, package holidays, tours.</li> <li> <strong>User journey:</strong> don’t regularly use social media, conduct a lot of online research before making final choice, often complete purchase offline.</li> <li> <strong>Effective marketing campaigns: </strong> display advertising, affiliate partnerships, email marketing campaigns well in advance of peak booking time offering in-store discount.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Affluent Singles</strong></p> <ul> <li> <strong>Description: </strong> spontaneous decision makers with money to burn.</li> <li> <strong>Relevant products: </strong> last minute group holiday deals.</li> <li> <strong>User journey: </strong> impulse purchasers with short lead time, engage with social media regularly.</li> <li> <strong>Effective marketing campaigns: </strong> targeted social media advertising offering limited-time group discount.</li> </ul> <p>In this example, ‘Active Retirees’ tend to have more touchpoints in their path to purchase than ‘Affluent Singles’.</p> <p>Given this data, you can then try targeting your Active Retirees well in advance with an in-store discount across the various platforms that work for them.</p> <p>At the same time, you can test cutting back on the number of different touchpoints used to engage with Affluent Singles, who convert last-minute regardless, to see if you get better results.</p> <h3>Learn how to market to customers with high lifetime value</h3> <p>Segmentation can also allow you to <strong>group customers based on their purchasing habits.</strong></p> <p>For example, one-time purchasers, occasional purchasers, and regular purchasers with a high lifetime value.</p> <p>Using the Active Retirees example again, let’s say that your attributed reporting shows that a retargeting campaign had only a minor impact on these customers’ decisions to purchase their first holiday.</p> <p>In this way, it doesn’t appear to be a profitable a campaign.</p> <p>However, when you analyse the attributed data over an extended period of time, you may find that these same customers come back to make additional purchases further down the line, making them fall into your high lifetime value segment.</p> <p>You may also find that they return using what we might call ‘free’ channels (<a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/search-marketing/">SEO</a>, email, or direct), interacting with fewer touchpoints each time.</p> <p>When judging the value of the initial retargeting campaign across the entire lifetime value of these customers, the associated ROI becomes much greater.</p> <p>Only by using segmentation and attribution in combination can you gain this insight and judge the performance of your campaigns effectively.</p> <p>This then gives you the power to experiment and get better at targeting the right people in the right ways.</p> <h3>Use attribution to unlock the value that’s right under your nose</h3> <p>By <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66996-the-three-stages-of-attribution-that-are-crucial-to-success/" target="_blank">harnessing the power of attributed reporting data</a>, marketers can better understand the intricacies of the true value of their efforts.</p> <p>By segmenting that data in astute ways, marketers are given the opportunity to test, evaluate, and ultimately get better at targeting their most valuable customers.</p> <p>When talking about attribution, the conversation is immediately drawn into the algorithm, with little regard as to the additional benefits it can bring to all of your marketing channels.</p> <p>The advice I’ve provided here hopefully demonstrates that using the data to enhance insight presents a huge opportunity for marketers.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68440 2016-10-25T10:27:02+01:00 2016-10-25T10:27:02+01:00 Jaguar Land Rover launches digital store in London: Is it any good? Nikki Gilliland <p>I recently paid it a visit to find out more.</p> <h3>Fashion-inspired design</h3> <p>Jaguar Land Rover is not the first automotive brand to experiment with a digital retail store.</p> <p>Last year, Hyundai opened a similar showroom in Kent’s Bluewater.</p> <p>Aiming to create better brand engagement rather than straightforward sales – it had some surprising results.</p> <p>The Hyundai store saw 60% of visiting customers completing their purchase online and 54% of buyers were women. </p> <p>Jaguar Land Rover is aiming to replicate this success – ramping up efforts to engage Westfield’s typically younger consumers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0619/jaguar_land_rover.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="585"></p> <p>With its sleek and airy design, the store fits in well with neighbouring luxury brands like Mulberry and Hugo Boss.</p> <p>The deliberately open-plan nature of the entrance is designed to entice passers-by, and is a good reflection of the general changing habits of car consumers. </p> <p>Now, it’s no longer about visiting a car dealership or poring over brochures for hours on end.</p> <p>Automotive brands like Jaguar Land Rover want to create an experience akin to shopping for luxury fashion or an item of technology, hence the store's location near the likes of Apple and Armani.</p> <p>The exposed store-front is certainly enticing.</p> <p>I’m not the type of person who is particularly interested in cars (disclaimer: I can’t actually drive) – but even I could be tempted to stroll in for a look round.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0618/IMG_3419.JPG" alt="" width="767" height="576"></p> <h3>Click-to-buy technology</h3> <p>The store itself is designed to complement the brand’s new click-to-buy website.  </p> <p>The idea is that consumers can visit in person to browse and view the display models, before either choosing to complete the purchase in-store (via one of the many tablet screens dotted around) or at home online.</p> <p>I spoke to one of the store’s so-called ‘Angels’ who guided me through the online process.</p> <p>Apparently, the rather grandiose title reflects their intent to help and offer information – not sell.</p> <p>The site itself is impressive, though my initial feeling was that it could potentially prove a little overwhelming.</p> <p>Allowing consumers to do everything from arrange a test drive to customise and arrange a trade-in – there’s a hell of a lot to take in. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0620/Jaguar_Land_Rover_online.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="437"></p> <p>I questioned whether people will actually have the confidence to complete such a large purchase online, however my ‘Angel’ assured me that the process is incredibly intuitive and straightforward.</p> <p>That also appears to be the main aim of the store, whereby a relaxed and laid back environment encourages consumers to learn about the cars at their own pace.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0622/store_interior.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="585"></p> <p>I certainly felt relaxed during my visit.</p> <p>There’s no pressure to show any intent to purchase - employees are more than happy to take a hands-off approach, leaving you to look around before asking whether or not you need any help.</p> <p>Again, this is reflective of the accessible nature of the store, created so that consumers don’t feel coerced into actually buying.</p> <h3>High-end experience</h3> <p>Alongside the tech, there are some nice additional touches in-store.</p> <p>As well as allowing users to choose car specifications online, the samples are showcased on the walls.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0621/store_screens.JPG" alt="" width="723" height="542"></p> <p>Likewise, visitors can be taken through various examples of interiors and colour choices, and large screens showcase the cars' features throughout.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0624/IMG_3427.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="666"></p> <p>It is a shame there aren’t more tangible features like this.</p> <p>Granted, the whole point of Jaguar's store is to complement the website.</p> <p>However, with many consumers desiring a physical experience - <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68073-how-marketers-can-use-new-tech-to-deliver-meaningful-brand-experiences/" target="_blank">as well as a meaningful one</a> – it's a little disappointing that the digital elements are still built around the sale.</p> <p>We’ve already seen the likes of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67877-how-automotive-brands-are-blurring-the-lines-between-digital-reality/" target="_blank">Audi and Toyota experiment with immersive technology</a> like VR and AR. </p> <p>With such a large and prominent retail space, it seems a shame that Jaguar Land Rover hasn't grabbed the opportunity to do so too.</p> <p>While it's a great example of how to make car buying more accessible, a few additional touches could make it a more memorable experience - one of the most vital factors for increasing brand engagement.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68423 2016-10-21T11:45:54+01:00 2016-10-21T11:45:54+01:00 How fashion and travel are leading the way in m-commerce Gregory Gazagne <p><a href="http://www.deloitte.co.uk/mobileuk/">Deloitte’s Mobile Consumer Survey</a> found that UK citizens look at their smartphones over a billion times a day, declaring that “no other personal device has had the same commercial and societal impact as the smartphone, and no other device seems likely to.”</p> <p>Around the same time in late September the IAB released its ‘<a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160927005394/en/Three-Quarters-Mobile-Users-World-Purchases-Smartphones-Tablets">Mobile Commerce: A Global Perspective</a>’ survey, which found that three-quarters (75%) of smartphone and tablet users say they have purchased a product or service on their smartphone or tablet in the past six months, and nearly a quarter (23%) buy on mobile devices on a weekly basis.</p> <p>As the retail industry rapidly adapts to mobile usage, at Criteo we’re able to analyse millions of online sales in real time, on all devices and from thousands of brands across all industries.</p> <p>With this front-row seat to the very latest in mobile commerce, we’re especially interested in looking at the way different retail industries are keeping pace with the rate of change.</p> <p>Because of the specific challenges facing them, we’ve seen that the fashion industry in particular is blazing a trail in smartphone targeting, including cross-channel strategies, and travel is making its mark by providing superior customer experience/ better conversions via apps.</p> <p>What’s driving these industries to lead in these areas – and what can others learn from them?</p> <h3><strong>The rise of the ‘Smartphonista’</strong></h3> <p>Last month’s New York-London-Milan-Paris Fashion Weeks saw the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/sep/30/us-vogue-editors-ridiculous-fashion-shows-changed-bloggers">old guard of print fashion journalism clash with the fashion world’s new digital influencers</a>, who rely on blogging platforms and Instagram to communicate with their thousands of followers.</p> <p>Their argument is symptomatic of a wider trend: that smartphones are revolutionising the way the fashion industry markets and sells its wares, and this is causing headaches for traditional media – but driving strong results on digital channels.</p> <p>According to Criteo <a href="http://www.criteo.com/resources/fashion-flash-report-2016/">data</a>, clothes have quickly become the premier mobile purchase in the UK, with 55% of online fashion purchases now being made through mobile (smartphones or tablets), and four out of 10 of all fashion purchases in the UK being made through smartphones.</p> <p>This makes fashion shoppers that purchase on smartphones (who we’ve coined ‘Smartphonistas’) a particularly valuable audience for fashion retailers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0592/criteo_slide.png" alt="" width="800"></p> <p>Mobile is perfect for this kind of off-the-cuff purchase, allowing consumers to browse flash sales on their phone, shop while watching TV, or buy an article of clothing on a whim.</p> <p>In addition to impulse, these purchases can also be driven by social connections and social influence (as evidenced by the rise of the fashion bloggers so vilified by Vogue).</p> <p>Social media – particularly Snapchat, Instagram and Pinterest – appears to strongly influence clothing purchases on mobile.</p> <p>Heavy Snapchat users are 139% more likely to buy clothes on mobile than the average Brit, while heavy Instagram (113%) and Pinterest (83%) users are also much more likely than average to buy clothing on mobile, according to <a href="http://www.criteo.com/resources/a-portrait-of-mobile-performance/">Criteo’s Portrait of Performance report</a>.</p> <p>Despite all this, acquiring new fashion customers is notoriously hard.</p> <p>What’s more, it can take several purchases before a customer earns you a profit, and turning new customers into loyal buyers takes finesse.</p> <p>In response to these challenges, fashion retailers are starting to recognise what products drive the best response on what device.</p> <p>For example, fashion shoppers favour small screens for low-risk items (T-shirts etc.) and products they don't need to try on (e.g. accessories).</p> <p>In addition, the new breed of Smartphonistas often use multiple devices on the path to purchase, so retailers are starting to track more effectively across devices in order to send the right message to the right person, at the right time.</p> <p>Nadya Birca, Senior Digital Marketing Manager at New Look told us that the key to successfully engaging with the Smarphonista is to recognise that he or she expects a truly cross-channel experience:</p> <p>“With mobile usage soaring in the UK, the experience we’re aiming to deliver on mobile is significant for our interactions with customers both on- and off-line.</p> <p>"When browsing on mobile we shouldn’t expect users to purchase straight away - allowing them a seamless navigational exploration, and later consideration experience, is what should drive any mobile commerce business focus.”</p> <h3><strong>Destination App</strong></h3> <p>As the 36th annual <a href="http://wtd.unwto.org/en">World Tourism Day</a> reminded us at the end of last month, the tourism industry continues to drive positive social, cultural, political and economic impacts worldwide.</p> <p>In many countries, including the UK, the travel industry is feeling the positive impact of the rise of smartphone use.</p> <p>Criteo’s latest Travel Flash Report shows that one in five Brits now browse for travel options on their mobile phones, and close to one-third of online travel bookings worldwide took place on mobile devices in Q2 2016 (up 24% from the year before).</p> <p>During the same period, smartphones captured nearly one in five online travel bookings.</p> <p>But that’s not all – the travel industry, more than most other verticals, is seeing particular success when it comes to mobile apps.</p> <p>According to our data, with investment in in-app tracking and advertising, committed travel advertisers are seeing a surge of bookings made from apps.</p> <p>Apps generated 57% of mobile bookings in Q1 2016, up from 40% in Q3 2015.</p> <p>Over the past two years, travel brands that invested in their apps saw constant growth in app bookings from 12% to now over half of all mobile bookings. </p> <p>For one-night stays, apps have a clear lead over other devices or platforms, with nearly three in four app bookings made for one-night stays.</p> <p>The most effective travel mobile strategies encourage app installs with services that really make a difference:</p> <ul> <li>Personalising recommendations based on searches, selection criteria, past travels and wish lists</li> <li>Sending up-to-date, useful and non-intrusive notifications (e.g., check-in reminders, traffic, delays, alternatives, cancellation, nearby offers)</li> <li>Offering better deals on your app to temporarily capture downloads and bookings, but be consistent to sustain them</li> <li>Enabling one-click bookings with intelligent auto-fill of personal details (while highlighting payment security)</li> </ul> <p>App bookings are on a roll, and we can see that merchants who invested in and promoted apps early are now reaping the benefits. </p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68326 2016-10-17T14:54:56+01:00 2016-10-17T14:54:56+01:00 Three brands succeeding in connecting online and offline experiences Ben Davis <h3>Topshop</h3> <p>Topshop's recent '<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68305-runway-to-retail-how-fashion-brands-are-introducing-see-now-buy-now/">Retail to Runway</a>' initiative integrated London Fashion Week (LFW) with the retailer's stores and digital properties.</p> <p>For its young audience, Topshop is truly a multichannel experience (with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66389-what-does-the-ideal-click-and-collect-service-look-like/">click and collect</a>, free WiFi in store, a social-enabled ecommerce app with barcode scanner), but Retail to Runway took this a step further.</p> <p>The launch played out as follows: </p> <ul> <li>Consumers could watch the Topshop catwalk show livestreamed on Topshop.com and on playback thereafter.</li> <li>Pieces from the show were available to buy immediately in selected stores, online and a pop-up showspace.</li> <li>The Topshop website ran plenty of editorial about LFW and allowed consumers to sign up for updates via email.</li> <li>The Topshop app provided notifications to users of all the LFW news.</li> </ul> <p>The merging of online and offline continues apace at Topshop, with the identity of the website (with its quick turnover of content and integrated social) matching the feel of the Topshop stores.</p> <p>Topshop plans to debut a 100% shoppable range at the next Fashion Week in February 2017, as it makes fashion ever more accessible, both online and offline.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9496/Screen_Shot_2016-09-23_at_16.54.29.png" alt="topshop unique" width="615" height="304"></p> <h3>Hilton</h3> <p>Whilst <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68375-airbnb-how-its-customer-experience-is-revolutionising-the-travel-industry/">Airbnb gets the plaudits in travel</a> for a unique UX including its peer review system, Hilton is fighting back.</p> <p>By adding functionality to the Hilton HHonors app, the hotelier is removing some of the more frustrating elements of using hotels.</p> <p>Users can choose a room in selected hotels and check in via the app, unlock rooms with their app's digital key, and book a cab via Uber.</p> <p>Customer service with a smile at the front desk can always be compromised in a busy period, but these app improvements help to empower customers to customise and control their own experiences, beyond the online booking journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9526/Screen_Shot_2016-09-23_at_17.33.24.png" alt="hilton app" width="615" height="622"> </p> <h3>Starbucks</h3> <p>It's easy to dismiss Starbucks as just another big brand example of great CX - don't they just have plenty of money to throw at digital technology?</p> <p>Such an attitude would do an immense disservice to a brand that has been at the forefront of online/offline experiences for a number of years.</p> <p>Starbucks was the first store to widely offer free Wi-Fi and is, of course, known for letting customers dwell (which has become the default for all coffee shops).</p> <p>The coffee giant nailed mobile payment &amp; loyalty early, with its app that uses a barcode system launching in 2009.</p> <p>A staggering 21% of US transactions take place via the app and in 2015 the brand launched <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66997-starbucks-new-click-collect-app-is-it-any-good/">click-and-collect coffee</a> for those that don't want to wait in line.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-30/starbucks-takes-its-pioneering-mobile-phone-app-to-grande-level">Chart via Bloomberg</a></em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9527/Screen_Shot_2016-09-23_at_18.31.18.png" alt="starbucks mobile sales at 21%" width="615" height="414"></p> <p>Starbucks' digital marketing reaches into stores, too. Just a few initiatives include: </p> <ul> <li>The brand has used location-based app notifications (seen below),</li> <li>Starbucks' famous music playlists are available exclusively to rewards members on Spotify, where users can suggest their own tracks for in-store.</li> <li>An active <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/email-ecrm/">email marketing</a> and social media programme pushes seasonal specialities and offers to rewards members.</li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/0789/Location-Based-Mobile-Marketing-Example.jpg" alt="starbucks notification" width="350"></p> <p>Overall, Starbucks' investment in stores (<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67085-starbucks-new-london-digital-concept-store-puts-focus-on-customer-experience/">including concept stores</a>) is just as impressive as its investment in its digital capabilities, making it a truly multichannel brand.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68329 2016-09-27T11:39:10+01:00 2016-09-27T11:39:10+01:00 Farfetch’s CMO: Why we’re more than just a shopping platform Nikki Gilliland <p>Here is what she had to say.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9547/stephanie_horton.JPG" alt="" width="464" height="299"></p> <h3>Farfetch describes itself as “for fashion lovers, not followers” – can you talk a bit about the general branding strategy of the company?</h3> <p>It’s interesting how the brand has actually evolved a lot since that statement.</p> <p>When we first started out we were definitely a fashion site for people who wanted to find that special item – but since then the brand itself has really expanded into more than just a shopping platform.</p> <p>We now have Black and White, which is a new division we launched last year, that lends our technology to retailers and brands.</p> <p>So where before we focused on putting boutiques on the site, we’re now looking at ourselves as more of a platform for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67731-think-affiliate-marketing-doesn-t-work-for-luxury-brands-think-again/" target="_blank">luxury</a>.</p> <h3>What is Farfetch’s USP in relation to other luxury retailers like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68219-four-things-brands-can-learn-about-content-marketing-from-net-a-porter" target="_blank">Net-a-Porter</a> and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68293-a-review-of-style-com-conde-nast-s-new-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">Style.com</a>?</h3> <p>It’s mainly breadth and selection, because we have over 500 boutiques around the world contributing to the site as well as over 200 brands.</p> <p>We have more product, sometimes even more than a brand’s own website, and we have more variety of product.</p> <p>For example, you’ll have a buyer in Toyko, a buyer in Paris and a buyer in New York – all from the same brand – so instead of having maybe six or seven selections, you might have 30 or 40.</p> <p>For a consumer it is amazing because they can actually shop and style a certain brand or designer, rather than having a limited number of pieces. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GLhdJoqSLdc?wmode=transparent" width="909" height="472"></iframe></p> <h3>What is the value for boutiques selling on Farfetch?</h3> <p>The site started because a lot of the smaller boutiques and brands didn’t have the ability to do ecommerce – for them it’s a very expensive and time-consuming proposition.</p> <p>They simply didn’t have the resources to do it.</p> <p>By using Farfetch, they are able to gain a global audience and gain all the infrastructure needed to become a real player in the ecommerce world.</p> <p>That includes things like customer service, payment... all those factors they would have had to figure out for themselves.</p> <h3>Last year, it was announced that Farfetch had acquired the Browns store in London – does this signal a move into physical branded stores?</h3> <p>I think Farfetch has always been really focused on the physical experience.</p> <p>One thing José, our founder, always says is that fashion is not downloadable. So it’ll never be the case that customers will only ever buy online – stores will always be an important part of the process.</p> <p>Browns allows us to have that incubator, a sort of lab to test new things and the technology to make the retail experience even better.</p> <p>For us it was just a way to really expand, do more things, and be able to roll more things out to our boutique and retail partners at large.</p> <h3>How do you ensure the experience of ‘luxury’ is replicated in digital?</h3> <p>I think every site has a point of view, and you just have to take that and really make sure that it is coming through in all aspects - from the quality of the editorial to the look and feel and how you’re presenting things.</p> <p>It’s important to read reviews, and make sure that the consumer experience is up to scratch.</p> <p>It’s also recognising that luxury requires certain things online that it might not in physical stores.</p> <p>Everything from the quality of customer service to the quality of delivery and how easy it is to return – making sure that all of those things stand up and that they are of a premium standard.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9546/farfetch_boutiques.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="242"></p> <h3>Lastly, what will you be speaking about at the Festival of Marketing?</h3> <p>I’ll be speaking about international marketing – so what we look for when going into a new market as well as what we know about our customers.</p> <p>There will be a focus on how Farfetch has been able to expand globally, the key leverages for us and the biggest challenges throughout the process.</p> <p><strong><em>The <a href="http://www.festivalofmarketing.com/welcome?utm_source=econsultancy&amp;utm_medium=blog&amp;utm_campaign=econ%20blog" target="_blank">Festival of Marketing</a> takes place in London on October 5-6.</em><br></strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4244 2016-09-22T10:00:00+01:00 2016-09-22T10:00:00+01:00 Digital Intelligence Briefing: Succeeding in the Omnichannel Age <p>The <strong>Succeeding in the Omnichannel Age</strong> report, produced by Econsultancy in association with <a href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, looks at the extent to which organisations take an integrated approach to marketing across different channels and use cross-channel campaign management tools.</p> <p>The report is based on a global survey of 2,065 digital marketers and ecommerce professionals carried out in July and August 2016, and follows up on a similar waves of research from <a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Multichannel Reality" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-multichannel-reality/">2015</a> and <a title="Channels in Concert: Trends in Integrated Marketing" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-integrated-marketing/">2013</a>.</p> <p>The following sections are featured in the report:</p> <ul> <li>Mixed progress on the path to integration</li> <li>Solving the data challenge</li> <li>The omnichannel imperative</li> <li>Behind the mobile curve</li> <li>Operationalising the real-time experience</li> <li>Campaign management tools: the state of play</li> </ul> <h3> <strong>Findings</strong> include:</h3> <ul> <li>While companies are 29% more likely to take an integrated approach to all their campaigns across all channels compared to last year, the proportion of those saying that none of their marketing campaigns are integrated has more than doubled over the last three years.</li> <li>It’s clear that data deficiencies exist, with only 12% being able to join online and offline data and just a quarter claiming to have a single customer view.</li> <li>More than half of organisations have separate technologies for managing data across channels. These separate technologies are the most significant barrier to integration (51%), followed by the inherently linked problem of disparate data sources (40%).</li> <li>Only 5% of those surveyed say they have a single platform that manages data across multiple channels and these companies are twice as likely to take an integrated approach to all campaigns across all channels as those with separate technologies.</li> <li>Omnichannel marketing is well-supported at a senior level, with only 15% saying that buy-in is a top-three barrier, and 5% ranking it as the biggest obstacle.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> <h4> <strong>Econsultancy's Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings, sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/solutions/digital-marketing.html">Adobe</a>, look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape. </strong><strong>You can access the other reports in this series <a title="Econsultancy / Adobe Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefings">here</a>.</strong> </h4> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68235 2016-08-31T11:39:44+01:00 2016-08-31T11:39:44+01:00 A closer look at the National Trust's content strategy Nikki Gilliland <p>But how exactly did the organisation manage such a big overhaul of its content? </p> <p>We recently sat down with Tom Barker, Head of Digital for the National Trust, to hear how his team planned and executed <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/digital-content-strategy/">a winning content strategy</a>.</p> <p>You can read a summary of what he said below, or watch these videos to see what he said in full.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fiN494itqa0?list=PL1-kPkZBw50G5af50RWyZQktGWjOkGxLI&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/IAz4146xkO4?list=PL1-kPkZBw50G5af50RWyZQktGWjOkGxLI&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Out with the old</h3> <p>The National Trust’s new website launched in November of 2015, but involved months of planning and preparation prior to this.</p> <p>With an old and clunky website consisting of around 50,000 pages, the challenge was finding a way to condense such a large volume of information into a concise and user-friendly amount. </p> <p>Even after stripping out a large portion of the old site, it re-launched with the hefty sum of 9,000 pages. </p> <blockquote> <p>If you think not just about our national cause and the various elements of membership and fundraising, but the sheer number of places we have.</p> <p>So, that’s over 350 properties, 200 more major pieces of outdoor landscape and coastline... it becomes a huge website with lots of content.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Updating the new site</h3> <p>As well as the amount that needed to be included, Tom highlights how the seasonal nature of the Trust requires content to be continuously updated and refreshed. </p> <p>For the launch of its new site, 500 National Trust employees were trained on the content management system to ensure that content would be ready by launch day, as well as updated according to seasonal calendars. </p> <blockquote> <p>We have a distributed marketing model, so for each of the seven regions that the National Trust covers we have a regional digital lead, but also web editors at each of the properties and places.</p> </blockquote> <p>With news featuring heavily on the site, it is imperative that staff are able to update at a property-level as quickly and seamlessly as possible.</p> <h3>How success is measured</h3> <p>With a brand new site, the National Trust now has a far superior analytics set-up. However, despite knowing how it is being used, it is yet to discover who is using it. </p> <p>A new sign-in capability will be added later in the year, and is going to be a big focus in future.</p> <blockquote> <p>Success for me, yes it could be the traditional metrics such as visits to the site and bounce rate etc.</p> <p>But when we are able to see who is using it, we can determine whether the touchpoints match up, which means no longer means having a website or mobile app that exists in silo.</p> </blockquote> <p>For the National Trust, a seamless user experience across all channels is the ultimate sign of success. </p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68115 2016-08-05T12:41:03+01:00 2016-08-05T12:41:03+01:00 How can we meet the needs of the multi-device consumer? Saima Alibhai <p>The UK has also seen evolution in the way consumers are browsing, researching and purchasing products, which has opened up new opportunities for retailers looking for additional revenue opportunities.</p> <p>Whilst the daily commute was once a time to read the newspaper, listen to your Walkman or take a nap, the rise of online devices has transformed what we do on the bus or train.</p> <p>The introduction of Wi-Fi into a number of lines on the London Underground has led to <a href="http://www.computerweekly.com/news/450298050/Londoners-go-mobile-shopping-on-the-Tube">39% of passengers making purchases on the tube</a>.</p> <p>A recent study estimates that the <a href="http://www.cityam.com/219305/were-spending-billions-shopping-online-while-commuting">UK is now spending £9.3bn a year online shopping while on public transport</a>, making it one of the most valuable times of the day for ecommerce.</p> <p>Clearly there is no shortage of opportunities to engage customers, but the challenge for brands comes in understanding how they should be adapting to meet the needs of the multi-device consumer to ensure they are in the best position to secure sales.</p> <h3>Recognise the role of smartphones</h3> <p>While smartphone ownership continues to be on the rise, its usage is changing. <a href="http://www.shopsafe.co.uk/news/traditional-pcs-preferred-for-online-shopping/11572">54% of consumers are using the device more frequently</a> to make purchases in comparison to last year.</p> <p>Perhaps unsurprisingly, this is most prevalent amongst the younger generation, with 65% of 16-24 year olds shopping more via their phone.</p> <p>For retailers, having <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67174-five-best-practice-tips-to-boost-mobile-conversions/">mobile optimised sites</a> is absolutely crucial. Consumers have access to so much choice that a poor mobile experience could lead shoppers to abandon their browsing and shop with a competitor that meets their multichannel expectations.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7785/iphone.jpeg" alt="iphone" width="275" height="183"></p> <h3>Don’t discount traditional devices</h3> <p>Whilst we are becoming ever more mobile, traditional devices still hold a role for customers, particularly when it comes to making a purchase.</p> <p>In fact, more sales are still being completed via laptop (58%) than smartphone (37%), so be mindful to reflect this in your ecommerce strategy. In addition to laptops, <a href="http://mkto.bronto.com/BrontoResources_Whitepapers_Guides.html?campaignid=WS_WP-MultiDeviceOwnership_UK&amp;source=Whitepapers&amp;asset=MultiDeviceOwnership_UK&amp;leadsource=Website&amp;Whitepaper%20Interest=MultiDeviceOwnership_UK">desktops are still used for shopping by 41% of consumers over 55</a>; a valuable source of revenue given that this age group tends to have a higher disposable household income.</p> <p>Staying close to customers and using data insights to understand how they are using their devices will help signpost how and when you should be communicating with them. This will enable you to create the simplest path to purchase.</p> <h3>Make the experience seamless </h3> <p>UK shoppers are using multiple devices for browsing but when it comes to making the actual purchase, they rely on a smaller number of gadgets.</p> <p>On average, consumers are using 2.7 devices to get online, <a href="http://www.directcommercemagazine.com/news/web-mobile/smartphone-ownership-buying-online">but only 1.6 devices to make a purchase</a>, highlighting the importance in delivering a consistent and seamless experience that allows them to move between devices.</p> <p>Remarketing strategies such as cart and browse abandonment reminder emails play a critical role, allowing you to re-engage customers who leave your website with the potential intention to complete the purchase later on a different device. </p> <p>Of course, brands must remain mindful of integrating the online- with the in-store experience. Research shows that <a href="http://directcommercemagazine.com/news/web-mobile/smartphone-ownership-buying-online">whilst 22% of UK consumers have shopped less in physical stores</a> in the last year, 26% have shopped more frequently.</p> <p>Location-based email tactics can be particularly valuable in connecting online and offline. For example, when you recommend products based on the customer’s browse behaviour, include information on item availability in the closest local store. Perhaps even include a special offer to encourage them to visit that shop. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7786/store.jpg" alt="store" width="500"></p> <h3>Keep tracking evolving behaviours</h3> <p>As technology continues to evolve, so will consumer shopping behaviour. Ensure you are in sync with how your customers are browsing and purchasing.</p> <p>For example, research has shown that wearables are currently owned by just 5% of the population, but that <a href="http://mkto.bronto.com/BrontoResources_Whitepapers_Guides.html?campaignid=WS_WP-MultiDeviceOwnership_UK&amp;source=Whitepapers&amp;asset=MultiDeviceOwnership_UK&amp;leadsource=Website&amp;Whitepaper%20Interest=MultiDeviceOwnership_UK">30% of owners have shopped via their wearable more frequently</a> in the last year. So be flexible to adapt to your customers and continually identify innovative ways to meet their shopping needs. </p> <p>Consumers today are spoilt for choice when it comes to how, when and where they shop. With the multi-device consumer come multiple opportunities for you to engage them and drive revenue growth.</p> <p>However, the benefit of this expanding device universe will only be realised if you have a clear understanding of individual shopping behaviour and can adapt accordingly.</p> <p>It comes down to making effective use of customer data to deliver the seamless experience that customers have now come to expect. </p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68102 2016-07-27T14:02:00+01:00 2016-07-27T14:02:00+01:00 Why there should be more plaudits for digital audits Chris Bishop <p>Those at the top of organisations don’t feel they have the strategic sweep to justify the time and effort required to commission them.</p> <p>Audits are viewed at times as a little “too tactical” or only done once every blue moon by agencies aiming to impress for your business, only to then collect dust on top of Econsultancy buyers guides print outs or even your old New Media Age magazines (<strong>Ed</strong>: We let this lie, but only to show we have a sense of humour).</p> <p>For the in-house Head of Ecommerce, requesting a digital audit might sound dangerously like a turkey voting for Christmas. </p> <h3>Are we selling audits wrongly?</h3> <p>Or is it the slightly cheesy marketing of website or marketing auditors themselves that is putting people off?</p> <p>All that tired ‘digital health check’ stuff might be the kind of foot in the door tactic that make brands feel suspicious of then giving access to their precious AdWords account, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67171-what-is-affiliate-marketing-why-do-you-need-it/">affiliate network</a> or analytics suite.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7503/healthcheck.jpeg" alt="health check" width="275" height="183"></p> <h3>How important are digital audits anyway?</h3> <p>In reality, though, digital audits are absolutely vital. And third party objective auditing ensures that you’re not marking your own home work or ignoring long term problems.</p> <p>Proper auditing, UX testing and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67473-seven-conversion-rate-optimization-trends-to-take-advantage-of-in-2016/">CRO analysis</a> means you can elongate the lifetime and effectiveness of your website and digital media activity, in a way that can be done on any budget.</p> <p>Your digital real estate is often an expensive investment - you’ve got to maintain it properly to get results.</p> <h3>Regular servicing is vital</h3> <p>Think of that shiny new website you’ve just spent months developing as a new car you’ve just acquired.</p> <p>To start off with, it’s the envy of everyone who sees it. After-sales support is pretty good and you can see years of trouble free motoring ahead of you. Before you know it, though, your warranty is up and you’re on your own.</p> <p>As the car ages, small problems become big problems. It performs less effectively. You’re paying for petrol, but it’s becoming less and less economical to run. There are so many things going wrong with it you don’t know where to start. Eventually the car's value is so diminished you might as well scrap it and buy a new one.</p> <p>It’s the same with websites and digital marketing campaigns. They can’t be left to look after themselves – and even the mechanic themselves might need some fine tuning or training themselves.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7504/service-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="car service" width="380"></p> <h3>What a digital audit can do for you </h3> <p>Audits can show you how to balance your budget more effectively through action and prioritisation. They can identify common issues like plateaus in activity and drop offs in acquisition; all the elements that reduce profitability. </p> <h3>The Lessons of the Audit</h3> <p>Constantly learn, constantly improve, constantly trade! A timely and constructive audit will help you:</p> <ul> <li>Keep up to date with the latest channel trends - Google changes, new publishers in affiliate, new platform or techniques for social. </li> <li>Use competitor analysis to keep your enemies close! It’s crucial to analyse and understand market share/spend and its consequences for your brand. </li> <li>Help you (re)define your goals.</li> <li>Confirm your objectives or KPIs so you can measure success.</li> <li>Understand new opportunities.</li> <li>Benchmark improvements or conversely measure areas of decline.</li> <li>Ensure corporate compliance – its best practice to have someone external “rubber stamp” your activity.</li> <li>Encourage serendipity – the uncovering of that nugget of information that transforms your understanding and makes the commercial difference.</li> </ul> <h3>Should you take the plunge?</h3> <p>Regular and skilled digital auditing is a detailed and never ending task.  It can transform the effectiveness of your digital advertising, website and budget.  </p> <p>Is it sexy? It’s showing your website a lot of love and attention. It’s optimizing and maximizing your marketing profitability and performance. Sounds pretty sexy to me.</p> <p><em>More on auditing:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68031-answering-the-key-question-of-content-auditing-where-do-i-start/">Answering the key question of content auditing - where do I start?</a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68075 2016-07-14T15:17:07+01:00 2016-07-14T15:17:07+01:00 Who will win the live-streaming battle: Facebook Live or Periscope? Blake Cahill <p>With an injection of social along with the time-sensitive nature of breaking broadcast, live-streaming is simply an age-old device repurposed for the present times. </p> <h3><strong>What does it mean for all of us?</strong></h3> <p>As traditional social channels are coming close to saturation, tech companies need to build new channels to invigorate their consumers.</p> <p>For brand marketers, this offers a tremendous opportunity to access tech-native early-adopter millennials and post-millennials – the customers of today and tomorrow.</p> <p>Most of whom have foregone broadcast, print, and 1.0 social networks for next-gen platforms.</p> <p>When it comes to advertising value, according to <a href="http://totalaccess.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1014105&amp;dsNav=Ro:-1,N:789,Nr:NOT(Type%3aComparative+Estimate)">eMarketer</a>, digital video advertising spending grew 46% to $7.7bn in the US last year alone.</p> <p>Meaning marketers are increasingly betting on the success of these live platforms. </p> <h3><strong>#SendMeToSleep – the world’s most sleep-inducing social campaign</strong></h3> <p>A good example is the <a href="http://www.philips.co.uk/healthcare/resources/landing/world-sleep-day">#SendMeToSleep</a> social media campaign we rolled out in time for the World Sleep Day.</p> <p>As part of this campaign – during which we actively tried to create content so boring it was capable of sending our audiences straight to sleep – Philips broadcasted what Twitter tells us is the world’s longest Periscope stream.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZzOFWhtxEUw?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>For 41 hours straight, we showed splashes of paint being added to a canvas.</p> <p>And because the whole campaign was engaging and worked as a holistic experience, more than 6,000 people tuned in to watch paint dry.</p> <p>Besides being strangely soothing and entertaining, the campaign has achieved significant commercial success which should be the cornerstone of any good marketing strategy.</p> <h3><strong>Periscope &amp; Facebook Live: A modern day David &amp; Goliath?</strong></h3> <p>At first glance, it might look like Facebook is the obvious winner – it has the size, money, user base and brand trust as a popular advertising platform.</p> <p>Despite all this, however, I wouldn’t count out Twitter just yet.</p> <h4>Four reasons for choosing Facebook Live:</h4> <ol> <li> <strong>Audience:</strong> Facebook has a user base of 1.2bn people.</li> <li> <strong>Brand presence:</strong> Live broadcast can bring life back to Facebook brand pages that have been lagging behind Instagram and Twitter in terms of engagement.</li> <li> <strong>Spending power:</strong> Facebook has been on a spending spree signing over 140 contracts worth more than $50m with the likes of CNN, the New York Times and BuzzFeed.</li> <li> <strong>Pioneers:</strong> Airbnb and Disney teamed up for the Jungle Book premiere, Chevrolet used it to launch its new electric car, and Patron taught viewers how to master the perfect drink. </li> </ol> <h4>Four reasons for choosing Periscope:</h4> <ol> <li> <strong>The “cool” factor:</strong> Twitter’s <a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2016-02-12/social-studies-comparing-twitter-with-facebook-in-charts">user base</a> skew younger, more diverse, wealthier, more educated and more likely to live in urban areas. This will drive usage as the two platforms integrate.</li> <li> <strong>Additional features:</strong> The native app offers a dedicated space with broadcast tabs, account tracking and sketch &amp; reaction options that just make it a bit more fun and user-oriented.</li> <li> <strong>Content:</strong> Periscope recently secured partnerships with <a href="https://gopro.com/help/articles/Block/Periscope-Live-Streaming-with-your-GoPro">GoPro</a> and <a href="http://uk.businessinsider.com/twitter-to-stream-nfl-thursday-night-games-2016-4">Thursday Night Football</a> (NFL) to ensure a lineup of engaging content.</li> <li> <strong>Innovation:</strong> Periscope just recently announced a series of new functions such as drone feed integration, search functions, and auto-save through app and Twitter comments.</li> </ol> <h3><strong>What are the downsides? </strong></h3> <p>Live on camera, some products, and even some people, may not work well.</p> <p>It’s difficult to be smartly scripted while still coming across as authentic, and a constant stream of comments from viewers can be hard to manage and moderate.</p> <p>It’s also important that you own what you’re streaming. No brand wants to end up tied in legal battles because they streamed content where ownership and rights haven’t been made clear.</p> <p>As with all new tools, it’s not easy to measure a return on investment. How you measure success – do you look at viewer numbers or drop-offs, likes or the comments?</p> <p>Lastly, live-streaming without a clear strategy and a clear focus on quality and relevance will ultimately disappoint the audience.</p> <h3><strong>Who is the winner?  </strong></h3> <p>At this point, it’s still too early to call.</p> <p>However, the competition is heating up, with YouTube and Tumblr unveiling their competitive offering along with lesser known players such as Live.ly, Livestream, and Hang all releasing their own live broadcast services.   </p> <p>If you’ve already placed your bets then make sure your content fits with the medium and you’re totally clear on ownership, quality, and measurement.</p> <p>Everything after that is just a stream away. </p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67603-what-marketers-need-to-know-about-facebook-s-livestreaming-push/"><em>What marketers need to know about Facebook's livestreaming push</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67712-seven-helpful-tips-for-livestreaming-success/"><em>Seven helpful tips for livestreaming success</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67967-six-things-we-learned-from-using-periscope-to-live-stream-from-fodm16/"><em>Six things we learned from using Periscope to live stream from #FODM16</em></a></li> </ul>