tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/multichannel-marketing Latest Multichannel Marketing content from Econsultancy 2016-04-20T15:45:00+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2016-04-20T15:45:00+01:00 2016-04-20T15:45:00+01:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to a B2B report) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet, statistics and online market research with data, facts, charts and figures.The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need, to help make your pitch or internal report up to date.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Those looking for B2B-specific data should consult our <a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B Internet Statistics Compendium</a>.</strong></p> <p> <strong>Regions covered in each document (where available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67726 2016-04-12T14:43:45+01:00 2016-04-12T14:43:45+01:00 SEO is more than just organic traffic: Are you taking all the credit you deserve? Ian Harris <p>Many in the industry still cling to the growth of organic as the metric to measure success but, while it’s still very important, we’re not measuring like for like when comparing with years gone by.</p> <p>So how are SEOs missing out on credit, and what else should they be looking at?</p> <h3><strong>Organic search has changed</strong></h3> <p>Traditionally, the way we judge the success of an SEO campaign is by the growth of the organic channel. In essence, the more visits and sessions that come through this channel, the better.</p> <p>While search has become more expansive, encompassing everything from <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/social-media-and-online-pr/">online PR to social</a>, this metric of success has remained constant. </p> <p>Put simply, though, this isn’t as simple a metric as it once was to judge success.</p> <p>By making technical changes to improve a website and producing engaging content, you can make sure your web presence gives off all the best signals to Google and hope that has a positive effect on organic traffic.</p> <p>However, as Google’s algorithm becomes more precise and complex upon how it analyses sites, it’s not a sure thing.</p> <p>Organic search is primarily about SERP rankings but, with new additions to results pages such as the carousel and answer box, good rankings aren’t the sole route to success.</p> <p><em>Google carousel</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3878/Google_carousel.png" alt="" width="793" height="512"></p> <p>For example, there’s evidence that the answer box – which scrapes content from ranking results – quite often doesn’t choose the top ranking site.</p> <p>So, even if the authority of your site means you’re not ranking as well as you could, Google could still recognise quality information and place you in the answer box.</p> <p>Conversely, you may be ranking well but may not be receiving the clickthrough rate that you once did if a competitor gets their content in the answer box.</p> <p>The importance of quality on-site copy has, therefore, never been more pressing. </p> <h3><strong>The boundary between organic and direct has blurred</strong></h3> <p>As the industry has naturally evolved it’s become more difficult to definitively attribute traffic to one channel or another.</p> <p>A number of factors, including improvements in browser technology, have meant that traffic that would once have been attributed as organic traffic is now being attributed as direct.</p> <p>Although technology is advanced in these fields, SEOs are still selling themselves short by just looking at organic when, as part of optimising organic, we can drive more traffic than we are often credited for.</p> <p>Groupon ran an experiment in 2014 in which it deindexed itself for a full six hours (not something we’d recommend trying!) to try and understand how users were truly getting to their site.</p> <p>By deindexing its website, Groupon removed the possibility of users finding their site through search.</p> <p>Users could still get to the page by entering the website URL in the address bar, for example, or if they had it saved in their bookmarks, but it allowed Groupon to look at how both direct and organic search was affected by it.</p> <p>Measuring its longer URLs (e.g. www.groupon.com/local/san-francisco/restaurants), the company saw that as organic traffic dropped to near zero after the change, direct traffic also dropped by 60%.</p> <p>This big chunk of what Groupon thought was direct traffic dropped as soon as the site was de-indexed. </p> <p>Indexing is purely for search purposes so that Google can crawl your site and offer you up in its SERPs.</p> <p>If this traffic disappeared, it could indicate a couple of things. While the problem could be metric based, for example, an issue with the website’s Google Analytics tracking, it could also be as a result of misattribution.</p> <p>One study isn’t evidence of an industry-wide problem, but it does highlight the need for SEOs to better understand and measure the true source of their website’s traffic.</p> <h3><strong>Browsers have become more advanced</strong></h3> <p>The way we search has changed and that’s partly due to the advancement of browsers. Modern browsers have evolved to look and work differently to their ancestors.</p> <p>In the past, when we were searching for something online, we would enter the address of a search engine and then search for the query or just search directly from the address bar.</p> <p>The search engine then delivered SERPs based on our query and we would click through to the relevant website.</p> <p>While that is still a common method users use to search, today, browsers may even suggest a URL from your history when you start typing a query in its address bar.</p> <p>If you click on this suggested URL, that traffic bypasses a search engine and is attributed as direct. Browsers such as Chrome or Safari are clever enough to now know what brand you’re searching for even after an incomplete search is entered.</p> <p>In both instances, this means that some traffic you once took previously took credit for as organic could now be recorded as direct traffic and therefore not reported on. </p> <p><em>Fig 1. Safari suggests a website</em><em> </em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3869/google_serps_1.png" alt="" width="302" height="532"></p> <p><em>Fig 2. Desktop chrome suggests relevant URLs from a user’s history based on a generic query</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3870/google_serps_2.png" alt="" width="825" height="159"></p> <h3><strong>Impact of mobile</strong></h3> <p>Mobile browser usage varies quite a lot compared to desktop. While Chrome and Safari still take up most of the market, Android’s own internet browser is used by around 11% of mobile users, and Firefox barely features at all.</p> <p>This is important as, even since improvements in the referral data from mobile visits, there’s still a lack of consistency.</p> <p>Some mobile applications often do not send referral data, so traffic almost always comes through as direct.</p> <p>For example, if a user clicks through to your site from a Google Maps app – an app which pulls data from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64985-why-google-local-is-vital-for-offline-businesses/">Google My Business listings</a> you’ve optimised as part of your SEO strategy – then you’re probably not getting the credit for it.</p> <p><em>Fig 3. The Apple Maps app uses Yelp &amp; Apple Maps Connect to send traffic to a website, however, this is attributed as ‘direct’. </em></p> <p><em>Google Earth and the Google Maps app will also attribute this to ‘direct’.</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3871/google_serps_3.png" alt="" width="298" height="530">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3872/google_serps_4.png" alt="" width="298" height="532"></p> <h3><strong>Apps taking organic traffic</strong></h3> <p>Another reason why we may see less organic traffic hitting a website is if a user has an app for the relevant site that appears in the SERP.</p> <p>Clicking the SERP listing can now direct users straight to the content ‘in-app’, without hitting the website at all.</p> <p>If you are solely responsible for sending users to a website, this will reduce the amount of traffic you’re seeing.</p> <h3><strong>Local listings and Yelp</strong></h3> <p>Local listings are vital to businesses with physical premises, especially those who rely on local trade.</p> <p>The people nearest to you are most likely to use your services, so making sure you’re being exposed to this audience is vital.</p> <p>However, they can also be of great benefit to your SEO strategy.</p> <p>The <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66574-10-essentials-for-local-seo-success/">most important part of local listings</a> is that you have standardised, consistent details about your business across the web, particularly the name, address and phone number (NAP details) – specifically in your Google My Business account.</p> <p>The details you put in are dragged through to Google SERPs with local listings and Google Maps / Google Earth so they need to be correct.</p> <p>Your business listing will be more trusted, and rank better if Google can see that the NAP details are consistent across a number of aggregators.</p> <p>So, it’s for that reason that many SEOs undertake a task of adding consistent listings on platforms such as Yelp.</p> <p><em>Fig 4. Yelp, a local search engine or a social platform?</em> </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3873/Yelp_screenshot.png" alt="" width="887" height="265"></p> <p>This issue here is that by creating and optimising this listing (initially to boost their organic local presence), many SEOs neglect to take credit for the relevant traffic that these places can drive.</p> <p>Yelp, for example, has around 150m unique users per month. While it is technically classed as a social platform by Google Analytics (by default, this can be reconfigured), it has many of the same features as a ‘local search engine'. </p> <p>We also have various changes that Google has made in recent years to the layout in mobile SERPs.</p> <p>Currently, the ‘local pack’ doesn’t have an immediate website click-through option unless the listing is expanded.</p> <p>The main action you’re encouraged to do <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64395-google-click-to-call-used-by-more-than-40-of-mobile-searchers/">is click-to-call</a>, an action that will bypass the website (and any <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67206-why-call-tracking-is-vital-for-accurate-attribution-modelling/">call tracking</a>), thus SEOs may neglect to take credit for that call.</p> <p><em>Fig 5. A mobile SERP for the term ‘sheds’, showing click to call option in the ‘local pack’</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3875/local_listings.png" alt="" width="367" height="653"></p> <p>There currently isn’t any robust way of understanding what traffic the My Business listing brings via analytics, but you can regularly share the reports dashboard provided in the platform to highlight your work.</p> <h3><strong>Google isn’t the only map</strong></h3> <p>Google Maps is a great tool, but it’s also not the only tool out there. Apple Maps, while still lagging behind Google Maps, has the advantage of being pre-loaded on millions of new iPhones.</p> <p>The rival to Google Maps uses a number of sites to pull through its data, but you can be sure it will pull your Yelp business listing so you need to make sure they are optimised.</p> <p>You can also add/manage your listing via ‘Maps Connect’. As with Google Maps, traffic from Apple Maps generally is attributed as direct.</p> <p>This means that even if you’ve optimised your listings you’re not getting the credit through those precious organic search listings.   </p> <h3><strong>In summary...</strong></h3> <p>We can compartmentalise different aspects of search into organic and paid channels but the end goal is the same: impressions, clicks and, ultimately, conversions.</p> <p>Instead of splitting our departmental efforts into individual channels, we need to realise that search has changed.</p> <p>The organic channel is still an important metric to measure success, but there is so much more to showing the true value that your endeavours as an SEO brings.</p> <p>Taking a narrow view of ‘solely measuring success via improvements to the organic channel’ is neglecting the wider value of your digital marketing endeavours.</p> <p>The key to all of this is data is simple: make sure you know where to get all the information that shows the value you’re providing and take credit for it.</p> <p>Send your client or managers reports from your My Business account, Apple Maps Connect and try to understand the organic influence on direct, Yelp and others.</p> <p>Include referral traffic data from links and listings that you created and app analytics data with organic as the source.</p> <p>Look at all the work you do across your campaigns and provide examples and data to show the full effect your work is having.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67731 2016-04-11T14:27:17+01:00 2016-04-11T14:27:17+01:00 Think affiliate marketing doesn’t work for luxury brands? Think again Chris Bishop <p>But no longer. Affiliate marketing has truly come of age.</p> <h3>Isn’t affiliate just voucher codes?</h3> <p>This is not just about voucher codes, cashback and last-click for advertisers, this is part of a holistic approach to digital advertising that promises real and sustained ROI for high-end brands.</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/whoaretheaffiliates.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>The modern managed affiliate programmes use sophisticated groups of content publishers, including mainstream “offline” publishing houses such as Condé Nast.  </p> <p>This is performance marketing through deep partnership, levered via tenancy, editorial, blogging, email and (yes) incentives like voucher codes or cashback. </p> <p>Partnerships with high volume and niche sites that can deliver the kind of primed-to-buy, long tailed traffic available nowhere else.</p> <h3>Are you at risk of losing control of your message?</h3> <p>No, but…</p> <p>For years affiliate networks and technology companies used the size and scale of the channel as a key selling point, promising brands access to tens of thousands of affiliates.  </p> <p>Given that they worked on tracking fees based upon revenue generated by activity, who can blame them? </p> <p>However, this wasn’t what luxury or designer retailers, already nervous about losing control of their brand’s messages, wanted to hear. </p> <p>Only now, with dedicated, digital agencies selling these solutions as part of a wider media strategy, are brands being given the whole picture.</p> <p>When properly managed, affiliate marketing allows brands to deliver relevant messages to highly-targeted customer segments.  </p> <p>But it’s the size and scale of the networks that makes this targeting possible in the first place.</p> <h3>But isn’t luxury all about exclusivity?  </h3> <p>Why would luxury brands want their valuable name bandied about on affiliate channels with everyone else’s?</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/chriscarcollection.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>Success in the digital age requires a change in mind-set for luxury brands as customers’ buying cycles accelerate and competition stiffens in every part of the market place.  </p> <p>No longer can scarcity be the strongest value in a luxury brand's armoury, as the array of choice and quality available elsewhere can fill any sales vacuum.  </p> <p>Instead, luxury today is defined by desirability, product excellence, exemplary service and, fundamentally, a brand promise.</p> <p>And affiliate channels are exactly where a brand’s promise, desirability, service and excellence are defined for its target audience.  </p> <p>They are key to the continued success of luxury brands in the digital age and are proven to send ready-to-convert customers direct to online stores.   </p> <h3>Luxury is talked about and bought online more than ever</h3> <p>Deloitte says that 58% of UK millennial luxury consumers buy their luxury goods online. What’s more, 85% of luxury consumers regularly use social media.</p> <p>According to Google one in five luxury purchases happens on the web.</p> <p>And participating in high profile online retail events like Black Friday and Cyber Monday clearly doesn’t dim the lustre of a luxury brand or cannibalize their full-price sales.</p> <p>In 2015 our client NET-A-PORTER saw Black Friday was its highest day for sales that year, with one item sold every second on its website. </p> <p>What’s more, offering deals and vouchering is not regarded as damaging to luxury brands’ reputation by consumers.  </p> <p>In fact, these luxury customers were four times more likely to be searching for deals on Black Friday 2015 than non-luxury customers (Experian).</p> <h3>Do affiliate tactics really deliver incremental sales to luxury brands?</h3> <p>Yes, they do.</p> <p>One of our retailers had always assumed cashback websites would only reach customers already on its files and has little effect on overall profit. We helped them prove otherwise.  </p> <p>A tactical trial conducted with Quidco for the brand found that 86% of consumers that bought their products via the publisher during the trial were “new to file” and their average order value was much higher than the norm.</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/shopstylesolacelondon.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>For another fashion retailer, working with affiliates achieved over 300 pieces of content coverage in a three-month period which, in turn, contributed to content websites driving 50%+ of the brand's affiliate revenue.</p> <p>Affiliate channels have proved, time and time again, to bring new customers and incremental sales to the table for every kind of brand, particularly those at the very top end of their sector.</p> <h3>Who else is using affiliates?</h3> <p>The roll call of brands that are using the affiliate channel as part of the marketing mix is impressive – Agent Provocateur, Barneys New York, Burberry, Liberty London, NET-A-PORTER to name a few.</p> <p>But if the affiliate channel was just about vouchers and cashback, they wouldn’t be using it.</p> <p>These brands know the value of curated conversation and content-led buzz to their brand; they are finding new and exciting ways to engage through affiliate marketing.  </p> <p>Crucially, they are realising that careful planning, targeted partnership and innovative execution ensures the biggest ROI alongside an extension of digital PR.</p> <h3>The lessons of affiliate marketing</h3> <ul> <li>Luxury affiliate marketing is happening... if you’re not doing it, you’re already losing out.</li> <li>Luxury consumers are savvy, switched on and impulsive – take advantage of that.</li> <li>Be led by the data and use experts to help you execute the highest quality campaigns.</li> <li>Choose who manages your affiliates carefully – your brand’s success will live or die by their experience both within wider digital marketing, the specific affiliate channel and naturally their knowledge of your brand / sector.</li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67681 2016-03-30T14:56:00+01:00 2016-03-30T14:56:00+01:00 Can cross-channel marketing save the Next catalogue? Matthew Kelleher <h3>Catalogues on the wane?</h3> <p>It’s not the shift from offline to digital that is the stand out issue here, which remains a constant now as it has done for many years (although the shift in buying patterns detailed by Next in their annual review, from offline to online to mobile, is very significant).</p> <p>What is momentus is that the Next catalogue, one of the pillars of Next’s long term success along with Directory and its credit services, as well as being one of the icons of the catalogue market, is on the wane.</p> <p>Of course it is not just Next who are questioning the role of the catalogue in the digital era, many retailers I speak to are struggling to understand both the strategic role of a catalogue in the evolving marketing mix and its value in a multi-channel world.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3440/Screen_Shot_2016-03-30_at_14.45.07.png" alt="next catalogue" width="615"></p> <h3>Is the catalogue's value to other channels truly known?</h3> <p>Customer behaviour continues to change and, critically, traditional measurement of channel performance no longer provides accurate understanding of channel performance.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66440-three-key-trends-from-our-marketing-attribution-briefing-digital-cream-2015/">Attribution modelling</a>, if it is being applied, is stymied by the inability to accurately view customers across the great divide between off and online marketing.</p> <p>The convergence of traditional and digital marketing and the rise of cross-channel marketing have been well predicted, for instance <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65990-three-digital-marketing-mega-trends-for-2015/">by Ashley Friedlein</a> here on Econsultancy. The travails of the Next catalogue are a salient reminder of this trend.</p> <p>Retailers operating without cross-channel tracking and genuinely-<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66316-how-are-organisations-integrating-the-single-customer-view">single customer views </a>cannot see what role the catalogue plays in generating, for instances, footfall in store or browsing activity online.</p> <p>The catalogue is therefore operating marooned in its own silo, judged only by its direct response results which, we all know, are declining across the board.</p> <h3>Enhancing attribution models</h3> <p>The solution for retailers facing these issues is to move onto the next generation of cross-channel single customer view database that use cross-channel tracking and customer identification software.</p> <p>Retailers need to know when they send a catalogue who browses, who is driven in store and who is price checking on a mobile device.</p> <p>In this fashion attribution models are enhanced, customer journeys effectively tracked and channel value properly understood. There is also the added benefit, probably the most valuable, of integrating the catalogue into the digital channels.</p> <p>Retailers practising cross-channel marketing in this fashion can serve relevant content to individuals launched on their journey by the catalogue as they arrive at the next stage on their journey, for instance when they arrive at the website or when they interact with an email, delivering an ‘omnichannel’ message and guiding them along the path to conversion.</p> <p><em>A mid-'90s Next Directory (<a href="http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Next-Directory-Catalogue-No-10-Autumn-Winter-1992-/281975932968">via eBay</a>)</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3441/Screen_Shot_2016-03-30_at_14.53.28.png" alt="early next directory" width="615"></p> <h3>Confidence in catalogues can only come from a single customer view</h3> <p>I’m also intrigued by the phraseology used by The Telegraph – “for customers who don’t want them”. This refers to the Next press release's ‘Catalogues and Marketing’ review.</p> <p>Next has been a leader in using segmentation and analytics to drive their catalogue and direct mail for many years, but reading between the lines, as the Telegraph is doing, the Next hierarchy is losing confidence and switching spend.</p> <p>Any retailer facing a similar challenge needs a cross-channel single customer view to open the door to a wealth of online generated data that would bolster a shift to Predictive Analytical approaches. The days of offline marketers dismissing and ignoring multi-channel behavioural data as ‘clickstream’ have to be nearing an end.</p> <p>The development of cross-channel tracking software and single customer views will lead retailers not only to greater understanding of the role of the catalogue but will also create additional customer value.</p> <p>Not only will retailers be able to more accurately tie online customers together with offline, showing the true value of a single customer, but it will drive increased value through better decision making at a customer level.</p> <p>That means more accurate personalisation and a greater probability to retain a customer in a world where brand loyalty is an increasingly rare commodity.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67439 2016-01-26T14:07:00+00:00 2016-01-26T14:07:00+00:00 How creative SEO can deliver big wins for luxury fashion retailers Chris Bishop <p>Neither were they desperately researching which colour would dominate this season and updating their collections accordingly.</p> <p>They were mostly trying to work out how not to break their necks on a Saturday night.</p> <p>But even more surprisingly, this term was searched for equally by men and women.</p> <h3>Why you need to understand search behaviour</h3> <p>Both these strange insights from Google underline one important message.</p> <p>If you want to understand and take advantage of the retail opportunities presented by search, you really have to understand what search is all about.</p> <p>Because, despite the odd quirks of search behaviour – or maybe because of them – there is vast branding and commercial potential here for fashion brands.</p> <p>And now, more than ever, luxury brands that are ignoring search are missing huge revenue opportunities that others are capitalising on.</p> <h3>But what’s the opportunity in search for luxury brands?</h3> <p>With 1 trillion Google searches in 2015, luxury customers are just as likely to Google as everyone else.</p> <p>And luxury customers were <strong>4.7 times more likely to Google ‘Black Friday’</strong> than the average.</p> <p>Add to this the fact that <strong>39% of luxury clothes bought on the internet last year were bought on impulse</strong>, search really <em>does</em> look like the place where the smartest luxury brands would want to be.</p> <p>At a fashion digital conference last week we presented with our client Net-A-Porter on luxury consumer search behaviour and it really demonstrates how crucial ecommerce is for luxury brand health in the years ahead:</p> <h3>Black Friday: what a difference a day makes</h3> <p>Luxury brands really can benefit from the retail ‘holidays’ which have established themselves in recent years.</p> <p>Black Friday and Cyber Monday 2015 marked the highest and second highest sales days on record for Net-A-Porter.</p> <ul> <li>The retailer sold one item every second.</li> <li>Of these, the most expensive item sold online was priced at <strong>$27,307.</strong> </li> <li>While a single Saint Laurent mini-dress was sold for <strong>$14,943.</strong> </li> </ul> <p>This is not loss-leading discounting reluctantly undertaken for fear of losing brand profile.</p> <p>This is a strategic opportunity to engage with high-net-worth individuals and galvanise profitable sales activity at specific points in the calendar.</p> <p>And search plays a crucial part in this.</p> <h3>And what a difference a change makes</h3> <p>Data from fashion brands is pointing to a shift from slow, curated purchasing patterns to fast decision making tipped by arresting content. </p> <p>Once luxury brands understand that price is no longer the key driver behind online luxury brand buying decisions, it becomes much clearer what search barriers are really in the way of increased sales.</p> <p>McKinsey released research demonstrating that returns (75%) and delivery policy (73%) were key factors influencing luxury buying decisions, especially interesting when considering only<strong> 48% were interested in price</strong>.  </p> <h3>Adjusting to a multi-device world</h3> <p>It’s a cliché, but luxury brand customers are cash rich and time poor – the question is how does this translate into search and buying behaviour online?</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/multidevice.png" alt=""></p> <p>In online luxury retail there is no such thing as a single customer journey anymore, these customers with their demanding lifestyles, constantly switch between devices that are ‘always on’.</p> <p>What’s more, they have the best devices (high spec, tablets, laptops, smartphones) and they expect the experiences they have on them to be equally high spec.</p> <p>Therefore, as one absolute takeaway - don’t ever think in devices (desktop, mobile), think only of the consumer journey.</p> <h3>The beautiful customer experience</h3> <p>Ecommerce is now a multi-device world and brands need to understand the importance of a ‘beautiful customer experience’, meaning a series of seamless, all-encompassing, cross-platform customer journeys that often begin with search and are highly mobile.</p> <p>Every year marketers have been told that this year is the year of mobile and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67397-ashley-friedlein-s-10-digital-marketing-ecommerce-trends-for-2016/">2016 will be no exception</a>.</p> <p>For luxury mobile is becoming increasingly important to keep up with the demands of the luxury consumer.</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/catwalkmobilephone.png" alt=""></p> <p>Often we hear about the increase in mobile penetration in a market – however when you consider the affluence of a luxury shopper that becomes even more important.</p> <p>McKinsey suggests that across the world <strong>95% of luxury shoppers have a smartphone</strong>, with <strong>100% penetration in some markets</strong>.</p> <p>Forrester research last year stated most luxury consumers expect retailers to have mobile optimised website or app - however in January 2016 only half do.</p> <p>Luxury customers are everywhere in terms of device and location, and mobile has become key to closing sales.</p> <ul> <li>41% of Net-A-Porter’s customer orders over Thanksgiving were on a mobile device.</li> <li>Nearly half (48%) of its sales in Japan were on mobile.</li> </ul> <p>Customers are not only visiting Net-A-Porter's sites on mobile, but buying items as well.</p> <p>As such there are opportunities to optimise search in specific ways, in specific locations and for specific groups that could make all the difference to traffic and sales.</p> <h3>Gender targeting through Google search</h3> <p>Gender targeting is one of these opportunities. Male luxury customers still often seem to be impulsive and impatient in their purchases as they tend to shop for gifts on mobile devices at the last minute. </p> <p>Males tend to spend more time examining search engine results pages (SERPS) and are <strong>5.4 times more likely than females</strong> to inspect lower ranked results.</p> <p>Therefore, a key opportunity to maximize conversion from search is by reassuring customers on the SERPS that the mobile checkout process will be simple and painless.</p> <h3>Location, location, location?</h3> <p>Location is also significant when selling to these customers, but not necessarily in the ways that you think.</p> <p>The average luxury customers takes <strong>16 trips a year</strong>. So, where these customers are searching is not necessarily where they live.</p> <p>This means brands need to be careful about the kind of delivery offers they’re making based on location.</p> <p>Don’t go offering free delivery in Tokyo when the customer lives in New York.</p> <p>Therefore, when a consumer adds location-based search queries we have to listen to the signal - dig deeper into data, don’t make assumptions and tailor to location.</p> <h3>Social &amp; content converts</h3> <p>Even if they’re not buying, your customers want to talk to you and about you.</p> <p>Working out when to sell to them and when to talk to them is part of the challenge of dealing with customer search.</p> <p>But in reality every search is an opportunity for engagement that may lead to a sale.</p> <p>In fashion it is even more important to have a focus on social, with two-thirds of the target audience generating content on a regular basis and <strong>15% doing that on a daily basis</strong>.</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/customerswantcontent.png" alt="" width="660" height="390"></p> <p>Social and content is presenting more and more chances to capture the imagination of potential customers and shortening the gap between catwalk and shopping basket.</p> <p>Fashion is throwing open the doors to the public with live streaming and interactive digital tools.</p> <p>Lining up your social, content and search is presenting more and more chances to share amazing content and arrest the attention of a customer base primed and willing to buy into your brand.</p> <h3>Rising to the challenge of search for luxury brands</h3> <p>“<em><strong>How to Walk In Heels</strong></em>” is not a comment on the mundanity of search.</p> <p>Instead it’s an imaginative challenge to agencies and marketers to interpret needs and wants in ways that are thrilling to customers.</p> <p>I hear there’s a trick to walking in heels, but once learned it looks elegant and effortless.</p> <p>Learning the secrets of luxury search is learning to create beautiful experiences, optimised customer journeys that seamlessly capture, build your brand and convert sales in new and exciting ways.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66501-how-fashion-brands-are-setting-trends-in-digital/"><em>How fashion brands are setting trends in digital</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64543-20-beautiful-examples-of-web-design-from-high-fashion-brands/"><em>20 beautiful examples of web design from high fashion brands</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/fashion-ecommerce-and-content-marketing/"><em>Fashion Ecommerce and Content Marketing Report</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67339 2016-01-22T15:18:09+00:00 2016-01-22T15:18:09+00:00 Three marketing trends to watch in 2016 Georges Berzgal <p>All three have come a long way since they first emerged. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/10301-to-use-or-not-to-use-personalisation-in-email-marketing">When personalisation was in its infancy</a>, it stretched only as far as automating the use of the recipient’s name in a marketing email.</p> <p>In a similar vein, the shift <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/6415-smartphone-users-are-more-active-shoppers-survey">from marketing mechanics for ‘basic’ mobile phones to those for smartphones</a> offered new opportunities.</p> <p>Lastly, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/2715-will-facebook-s-engagement-advertisements-engage">the arrival of Facebook advertising</a> brought an innovative way to reach consumers. Each of these areas will continue to present new and interesting opportunities in 2016.</p> <h3>Personalisation</h3> <p>Batch and blast is finally falling by the wayside. It’s time to employ real personalisation and the automation that goes along with it to ultimately optimise customer interactions. </p> <p>Is your email welcome series a unique journey for each customer? With messages tailored to the actions the recipient has taken previously?</p> <p>Do you send a message to customers who have just bought to encourage them to review the product? Match their purchase with complementary items and send a 'thank you' and a suggestion? Or ask about their experience?</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/0750/Screen_Shot_2016-01-15_at_10.50.49.png" alt="" width="462" height="376"></p> <p>Shoppers tell you online what they are interested in, both explicitly in email preference information they’ve provided but also directly through their behaviour including purchase history and visited product pages.</p> <p>Be sure to use that information when communicating with them, be it about product ranges, price levels, or offers, in a relevant and engaging way.</p> <p>By continually testing the key aspects of your communication strategy – tone and content, level of communication, frequency – you’ll find the sweet spot for boosting your revenues while adding value to your customers.</p> <h3>Mobile</h3> <p>2016 is the year for getting mobile right, and it is no longer a matter of choice – your customers are there already.</p> <p>Recently, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66141-six-thoughts-on-google-s-mobile-friendly-search-announcement">Google announced</a> its decision to give a boost to mobile-friendly sites.</p> <p>And we all know that customers are increasingly using their phones to window shop, check prices from a store, or park items in a shopping basket for later.</p> <p>Mobile shopping experiences must be inviting, engaging and easy to transact through.</p> <p>Perhaps the biggest lesson for the new year: if you don’t sell a product people order daily or weekly (think pizza, coffee or groceries), don’t waste money developing an app.</p> <p>Your budget would be better spent optimising your website for mobile and mastering the latest in responsive design best practice to improve your customers’ overall user experience.</p> <h3>Social</h3> <p>Every year, we hear something new about social. So what will it be this year?</p> <p>With Facebook selling fewer ads at higher prices, a big advertising spend with the social network <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66346-is-there-a-facebook-ad-bubble">buys only a fraction of what it did a year ago</a>.</p> <p>That’s not to say social shouldn’t be part of your marketing strategy; just be sure it adds value. Your social media investment should build interest in your brand, attract shoppers to your site, and most importantly, retain them as customers. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/0751/Screen_Shot_2016-01-15_at_11.01.39.png" alt="" width="363" height="357"></p> <p>Use your email subscription lists to better understand where and how to advertise on social media.</p> <p>Many social networks offer very powerful segmentation. If you see that a particular demographic is responding to a particular offer, target your social spend on that group of consumers.</p> <p>Then use that information to help refine your ecommerce messaging and segmentation. This will help you stretch your social media advertising budget much further.</p> <p>In 2016, we will see how well <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66989-twitter-s-buy-now-button-will-it-work/">social media buy buttons</a> on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram perform.</p> <p>Recent research indicates that <a href="http://digitalmarketingmagazine.co.uk/social-media-marketing/is-the-social-buy-button-poised-to-take-off/2766">one-third of UK shoppers (32%) are ready to make a purchase via social media</a>, so retailers should start to think about if and how to use it as part of a broader commerce strategy.</p> <p><em>There are many reasons to be excited and many strategies to consider for 2016, but the common thread should be consistency. </em></p> <p><em>Above all, deliver a great, consistent marketing experience that shows you really know your customers and what they want.</em> </p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/1980 2016-01-21T16:30:00+00:00 2016-01-21T16:30:00+00:00 Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings Econsultancy <h3>Download the latest Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing (The Pursuit of Data-Driven Maturity) <a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Pursuit of Data-Driven Maturity" href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-pursuit-of-data-driven-maturity/">here</a>.</h3> <p>Econsultancy's <strong>Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings </strong>look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape.</p> <p>Marketers around the world are surveyed on a regular basis to give an accurate bellwether of trends that matter to marketers. Each year kicks off with a broader view on where marketers are focusing their attention. For the rest of the year, Econsultancy’s Research Team dig into some of the key trends to add depth and insight.</p> <p>These reports will benefit senior marketers with budget and planning responsibility who wish to benchmark themselves against their industry peers. They provide many stats and data points to assist with business cases, presentations and client pitches.</p> <p>The Digital Intelligence Briefings are sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/solutions/digital-marketing.html">Adobe</a>.</p> <p><strong>2016</strong></p> <ul> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2016 Digital Trends" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2016-digital-trends/">Q1: 2016 Digital Trends</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Pursuit of Data-Driven Maturity" href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-pursuit-of-data-driven-maturity/">Q2: The Pursuit of Data-Driven Maturity</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2015</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2015-digital-trends/">Q1: 2015 Digital Trends</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Quest for Mobile Excellence" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-quest-for-mobile-excellence">Q2: The Quest for Mobile Excellence</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Multichannel Reality" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-multichannel-reality/">Q3: The Multichannel Reality</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-cx-challenge/">Q4: The CX Challenge</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2014</strong></p> <ul> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2014 Digital Trends" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2014-digital-trends">Q1: Digital Trends for 2014</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Finding the Path to Mobile Maturity" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-finding-the-path-to-mobile-maturity">Q2: Finding the Path to Mobile Maturity</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Delivering Digital Experiences" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-delivering-digital-experiences">Q3: Delivering Digital Experiences</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-why-marketing-should-be-personal/">Q4: Why Marketing Should Be Personal</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2013</strong></p> <ul> <li> <a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Digital Trends for 2013" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-digital-trends-for-2013">Q1: Digital Trends for 2013</a> </li> <li> <a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: From Content Management to Customer Experience Management" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-from-content-management-to-customer-experience-management">Q2: From Content Management to Customer Experience Management</a> </li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Optimising Paid Media" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-optimising-paid-media">Q3: Optimising Paid Media</a></li> <li><a title="Channels in Concert: Trends in Integrated Marketing" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-integrated-marketing">Q4: Trends in Integrated Marketing</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2012</strong></p> <ul> <li><a title="Digital Trends for 2012" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-digital-trends-for-2012/">Q1: Digital Trends for 2012</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Personalisation, Trust and Return on Investment" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-personalisation-trust-and-roi">Q2: Personalisation, Trust and Return on Investment</a></li> <li><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-managing-and-measuring-social">Q3: Managing and Measuring Social</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Making Sense of Marketing Attribution" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-making-sense-of-marketing-attribution">Q4: Making Sense of Marketing Attribution</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2011</strong></p> <ul> <li><a title="Digital Trends for 2011" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-q2-2011">Q2: Digital Trends for 2011</a></li> <li><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-q3-2011">Q3: Impact of Marketing Technology on Business</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Social Data" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-social-data">Q4: Social Data</a></li> </ul> <p><em>All reports are free to download as part of an Econsultancy subscription.</em></p> <h3><strong>More trends analysis from Econsultancy</strong></h3> <p>Enterprise subscribers also have access to <a title="Econsultancy Digital Shift" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-shift">Digital Shift</a>, a quarterly service which curates and interprets the most important developments, trends and innovation. Our aim? To make it simple for you to keep track of the key developments in digital technology and marketing. </p> <h4>Find out more about Econsultancy subscriptions</h4> <p>Email us on <a href="mailto:subscriptions@econsultancy.com">subscriptions@econsultancy.com</a>.</p> <p>Or call your local team:</p> <ul> <li>EMEA: Paul Simmons, +44 (0)203 142 8162</li> <li>Americas: Mark Thompson, +1 212 971 0636</li> <li>Asia Pacific: Jefrey Gomez, +65 6809 2088</li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/2896 2016-01-19T12:23:17+00:00 2016-01-19T12:23:17+00:00 Multichannel Marketing and the Customer Journey <p>Consumers don’t see “channels”. They only see brands to facilitate their needs in the moment. Yet despite this, businesses are often structured, resourced and budgeted around individual marketing channels, which can lead to a disconnect between consumers and brands….or even within businesses themselves.</p> <p><a name="h.c2ixnqwvr8bh"></a>This is no chalk and talk session. Using a case study throughout the day, this practical one-day course provides you with the strategic planning tools to take a compelling campaign proposition to market, with a multichannel marketing strategy that ensures you can deliver the right content, to the right person, through the blend of channels they prefer.</p> <p>Having mapped out the multichannel activation plan for your brand, you will then gain an understanding of the key measures and how to bring these together in a meaningful context.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/2843 2016-01-14T14:48:21+00:00 2016-01-14T14:48:21+00:00 Multichannel Marketing and the Customer Journey <p>Consumers don’t see “channels”. They only see brands to facilitate their needs in the moment. Yet despite this, businesses are often structured, resourced and budgeted around individual marketing channels, which can lead to a disconnect between consumers and brands….or even within businesses themselves.</p> <p><a name="h.c2ixnqwvr8bh"></a>This is no chalk and talk session. Using a case study throughout the day, this practical one-day course provides you with the strategic planning tools to take a compelling campaign proposition to market, with a multichannel marketing strategy that ensures you can deliver the right content, to the right person, through the blend of channels they prefer.</p> <p>Having mapped out the multichannel activation plan for your brand, you will then gain an understanding of the key measures and how to bring these together in a meaningful context.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67332 2015-12-17T12:15:00+00:00 2015-12-17T12:15:00+00:00 11 quotes from brands on multichannel data capture Ben Davis <h3>Omnichannel vs. multichannel</h3> <p><strong>Steve Sweeney, General Manager Marketing Operations at MoneySuperMarket.com</strong></p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64697-six-omnichannel-trends-in-ecommerce">Omnichannel</a> or multichannel, it’s all just language to us. Someone recently told me we should say omnichannel but if you put the customer at the heart of the sentence – they don’t care if it’s multichannel or omnichannel, they just want it to work. </p> <h3>Multichannel culture</h3> <p><strong>Adam Joseph, Director of Digital Casinos, Grosvenor Casinos</strong></p> <p>It’s a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67315-eight-tips-for-getting-corporate-buy-in-for-data-analytics">big cultural shift</a> to stop general managers thinking it’s cannibalisation, but if you can convert [our casino customers] to playing digitally with us, it’s increasing our share of wallet and stopping them playing with competitors.</p> <p>We are in a unique position to stop migration to our competition.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/0014/Screen_Shot_2015-12-15_at_16.00.20.png" alt="grosvenor casinos website" width="615"></p> <h3>Choosing the right KPIs</h3> <p><strong>Paul Say, Director of Marketing, UK&amp;I, Sage</strong></p> <p>You’ve got to be <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67296-how-to-create-a-clear-data-strategy-for-your-business">crystal clear in terms of your KPIs</a> driving the marketing process towards optimisation. At <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65368-why-i-love-sage-and-its-content-marketing">Sage</a>, as more and more of our customers go onto the cloud, we are finding lots of transactional data being generated.</p> <p>When you look at the sales journey on the website, we keep our KPIs to a minimum here even though the web generates so much information. It’s about being really clear what metric is important to the organisation.</p> <p><strong>Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce, Schuh </strong></p> <p>Typically with the transactional style of data we’ve got access to more information than we’re really doing enough with. While there are theoretical things I’d like to know more about, they’re wants – not needs.</p> <p>We should be focusing on our needs, that’s how we get our best return on data.</p> <p><strong>Andrew Warner, VP Marketing at Monster.co.uk</strong></p> <p>We've boiled things down into three levels of data:</p> <ul> <li>The key performance indicators that have been shown to have the biggest impact on our commercial performance – the dashboard of the car if you like.</li> <li>The diagnostic data, a greater level of granularity, which each function needs to inform them the ‘engine is running smoothly’ and to adjust where necessary.</li> <li>Insight data which allows us to better identify, test and quantify future opportunities.</li> </ul> <p>The insight data is the hardest as you don’t always know what you are looking for. Consequently, you have to use your business objectives and strategic approach as a filter and focus in areas where you have identified gaps and opportunities.</p> <p>The KPI data and diagnostic data will often provide signals as to where you need to look for insights. Sometimes you identify quite small, incremental things you can change that have a positive business impact.</p> <p>Find a few of those and your analytics quickly pays for itself.</p> <p><strong>Ed Kamm, Chief Customer Officer, First Utility</strong></p> <p>Our objective has been to capture as much data as possible. I’d rather cast a wide net and find out what could be useful.</p> <p>Even seemingly disparate bits of data are useful when brought together. Once someone becomes a customer, it’s different.</p> <p>We want to know how they are using the app or the website and also combine this with third party data sources in terms of the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) and home sale data.</p> <p>The challenge is to bring it all together to provide commercial insights.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/0012/Screen_Shot_2015-12-15_at_15.56.47.png" alt="first utility website" width="615"></p> <h3>Education in store</h3> <p><strong>Celia Pronto, Marketing and Ecommerce Director, TrustFord</strong></p> <p>Where we have an advantage is because of the nature of our business we have the permission to capture a lot of information because of the nature of the purchase customers are making with us. We can capture address details, date of birth and financial information, as well as email and mobile.</p> <p>We are also finding that some of our colleagues at the frontline are starting to fill in some of the additional colour for us, capturing customers’ interests as an example.</p> <p>We’re not using this information from a communications perspective – an interest in sailing is tough to use in segmentation – but it’s feeding it back to the customer when you speak to them that reaps the benefits in nurturing and growing the relationship.</p> <p>The biggest stumbling block is probably making sure we do capture the most valuable data – in our case, email and mobile because it’s a more cost-effective route to market.</p> <p>There’s a big piece around education and behaviour change . If frontline colleagues don’t understand that it’s important to capture this information they don’t necessarily try to in the day-to-day melee.</p> <h3>Customer incentives</h3> <p><strong>Stuart McMillan, Schuh</strong></p> <p>We have a 365-day return policy, we wanted it in ecommerce but the retail side of the business wanted to have more interactions with the business, especially with the lifecycle in kids stores, such as inviting customers in to have their children’s feet re-measured.</p> <p>We wanted to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67163-six-examples-of-data-value-exchange-between-brands-customers">add value to customer interactions</a> with us. Check and reserve has given a convenient service. Any data capture gets more attention if it’s attractive to the customer.</p> <h3>The limitations of social</h3> <p><strong>David Paice, Group Ecommerce and Admissions Director, Merlin Entertainments</strong></p> <p>Social media also provides another listening post, although aggregating that data to deliver meaningful insights at a global scale is difficult.</p> <p><strong>Stuart McMillan, Schuh</strong></p> <p>We don’t try to aggregate social media insights; we just look at it in isolation. Simply because of the complexity of doing so and we’re far from convinced about the ROI we can get from integrating it.</p> <p>But we can get a lot of value from looking at it on its own. Time and money is required and we’re open to being convinced.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/0016/screen_shot_2015-12-15_at_16.10.09-blog-flyer.png" alt="schuh on twitter" width="470" height="484"> </p> <h3>Data skills</h3> <p><strong>Stuart McMillan, Schuh</strong></p> <p>We deal with things at quite a low level, with a skill set that allows us to query databases.</p> <p>Because it’s all our own system, it all talks back to a single back-end database and the transactional database runs the warehouse. SQL isn’t to everyone’s taste but it was designed to be human.</p> <p><strong>David Langridge, Group Marketing Director at Fitness First</strong></p> <p>We are only just getting around to employing <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67203-data-analysts-vs-data-scientists-what-s-the-difference">data scientists </a>– not data analysts – because we need to be able to understand the question properly before we can even begin to ask it.</p> <h3>Third-party solutions</h3> <p><strong>Tanya Cordrey, Chief Digital Officer of The Guardian</strong></p> <p>Every day my inbox is inundated by people trying to sell me data solutions.</p> <p>I suspect many have the same experience, but we took the decision at The Guardian to build our own data platform because we believe nobody can understand our readers better than we can and we want to be leading the thinking, not following the crowd.</p> <h3>Team structures</h3> <p><strong>Mark Evans, Marketing Director, Direct Line</strong></p> <p>For us there’s a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-marketing-organisational-structures-and-resourcing-best-practice-guide">hub-and-spoke model</a> emerging. More specialised analytics will remain within each function, whereas overall data ownership and management will sit centrally.</p> <p>We’ve got our first data scientist on board and they will play a key role in coordination.</p> <p>Functions will need to access centrally held data but often the work itself needs to be undertaken within the context and specifics of the function. There is a folly in overcentralising.</p>