tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/multichannel-marketing Latest Multichannel Marketing content from Econsultancy 2016-11-28T14:24:49+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68567 2016-11-28T14:24:49+00:00 2016-11-28T14:24:49+00:00 Five things to appreciate about Missguided’s first ever physical store Nikki Gilliland <p>On the back of its brash tone of voice and innovate social strategy, the ecommerce retailer has seen rapid growth over the past few years.</p> <p>Now, it has launched its first ever standalone physical store in London’s Westfield Stratford. </p> <p>But, is it any good?</p> <p>I recently paid it a visit to find out more – here are five things to appreciate.</p> <h3>High concept, high impact</h3> <p>Walking into Missguided is a bit of an overload on the senses, but in a good way. </p> <p>Created by agency Dalziel and Pow, it is designed to mimic a television studio, with the ‘On-Air’ concept reflecting the experience of shopping 'live' as opposed to online.</p> <p>If you’re familiar with the brand’s online branding, you’ll recognise many of the same hallmarks in-store.</p> <p>There are slogans everywhere, and even its mannequins are typically ‘Missguided’, striking poses and taking selfies around a giant pink monster truck that dominates the bottom floor entrance.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1800/Missguided_store_7.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="585"></p> <p>Together with the store’s screen-heavy design and dramatic lighting – it certainly makes for a striking atmosphere.</p> <p>It's pretty unlike any other fashion store in Westfield, which is bound to attract Missguided’s target teen-to-20s female audience.</p> <p>You can probably expect to see many dads and boyfriends waiting patiently outside.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1801/Missguided_store_8.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="799"></p> <h3>Encourages social sharing IRL</h3> <p>From its <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67600-missguided-launches-tinder-inspired-app-experience-review">Tinder-inspired app</a> to its Instagram feed, everything Missguided does online is inspired by a social-media-obsessed generation.</p> <p>The physical store is an extension of this, clearly designed to be ‘Instagrammable’ in its own right. </p> <p>With signs prompting customers to download the app and follow the brand on Snapchat, it cleverly fuses the online and offline experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1802/Missguided_store_3.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="720"></p> <p>In terms of design, there are cool features everywhere. Even the stairs are mirrored so that customers can see themselves (and take photos) while walking up.</p> <p>But more than just encouraging sharing on social, it also champions social interaction in-store – in the literal sense that is. </p> <p>Instead of hiding its fitting rooms in the back, this area is front and centre, complete with a pool party-themed lounge space so that people can hang out while trying on clothes. </p> <h3>Reinforces brand tone of voice</h3> <p>Missguided is quite clever in how it speaks to its target audience, using slang and pop culture references to create a tongue-in-cheek <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67268-how-to-achieve-the-right-tone-of-voice-for-your-brand" target="_blank">brand voice</a>.</p> <p>With slogan lightboxes dotted about everywhere, this is another aspect that stands out in-store.</p> <p>It is used to great effect, with slogans like ‘mermaid party this way’ replacing the expected ‘more clothing upstairs’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1803/Missguided_store_2.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="767"></p> <p>There is the odd eyebrow-raising example, such as the ‘send me nudes please’ sign by the lingerie and the ‘asspirational’ hashtag.</p> <p>Perhaps these would be less jarring to read online, but it does feel a little different to physically see these types of slogans in massive neon letters. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1804/Missguided_store_9.jpg" alt="" width="662" height="422"></p> <p>That being said, it certainly contributes to the brand’s playful and recognisable tone of voice.</p> <p>And luckily, the tone does err on the side of empowerment rather than coming off as merely outrageous.</p> <p>What’s more, by pushing the boundaries in this way, the retailer successfully sets itself apart from the comparatively bland-sounding Topshop and River Island.</p> <h3>Creates immersive shopping experience</h3> <p>While Missguided has met the demand for a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68387-how-missguided-uses-personalisation-to-create-an-addictive-shopping-experience" target="_blank">certain type of digital experience</a>, its new store reflects the increasing desire for immersive shopping.</p> <p>As well as enabling customers to try before they buy, it also turns the act of shopping into more of an event.</p> <p>This effect is mainly created in the way everything is set out, with sections separated into distinct and divided ‘sets’. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1805/Missguided_store_1.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="706"></p> <p>Similar to the maze-like layout of Ikea and high street store Tiger, this means customers are required to navigate it in a certain way, ultimately creating a much more immersive and explorative experience. </p> <p>Instead of just popping in for a quick browse, customers are likely to stay and discover new sections as they move around.</p> <h3>Offers exclusive perks</h3> <p>There are a few extra surprises to be found in-store.</p> <p>One of the most unique features is an own-brand vending machine that sells ‘unicorn dreams’ in place of bog-standard Coke or Fanta.</p> <p>I later found out that it's actually bottled water... which now seems rather disappointing.</p> <p>But while undeniably gimmicky, it is still a great example of how Missguided generates excitement on the back of its own branding. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1806/Missguided_store_11.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="798"></p> <p>What other retailer has its own 'spirit animal'? More to the point, how many times have you seen customers queuing up to buy water in a fashion store? It's undeniably quirky.</p> <p>Lastly, the store includes some additional features that are impossible to get online.</p> <p>From exclusive collaborations with upcoming brands to an in-store pop-up by Wah Nails - it builds on the sense that shopping in-store is more special than online.</p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>I was quite impressed with Missguided's debut retail outlet. </p> <p>While I wouldn’t usually shop from the brand online, the fun and quirky nature of its physical store would tempt me to take a look in person. Regular customers are likely to jump at the chance.</p> <p>By combining an innovative design with clever branding, Missguided has created something quite memorable.</p> <p>While it’s not quite ‘destination shopping’, it’s certainly given its young demographic another incentive to visit Westfield.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1807/Missguided_store_12.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="765"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2016-11-23T09:45:00+00:00 2016-11-23T09:45:00+00:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to a B2B report) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet, statistics and online market research with data, facts, charts and figures.The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need, to help make your pitch or internal report up to date.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Those looking for B2B-specific data should consult our <a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B Internet Statistics Compendium</a>.</strong></p> <p> <strong>Regions covered in each document (where available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:WebinarEvent/837 2016-10-07T10:27:18+01:00 2016-10-07T10:27:18+01:00 State of Cross-Channel Marketing in Australia and New Zealand <p>This webinar will highlight results from Econsultancy's State of Cross-Channel Marketing in Australia and New Zealand report, produced in association with <a href="https://www.ibm.com/watson/marketing/" target="_blank">IBM Watson Marketing</a>. The report looks at how marketers in the region progress in their cross-channel marketing strategies.</p> <p>The live session will be hosted by <strong>Jeff Rajeck, Research Analyst, APAC at Econsultancy </strong>and co-hosted by <strong>Antonia Edmunds, Business Leader, APAC at IBM Watson Marketing</strong>. There will be a 15 minute Q&amp;A session after the presentation.</p> <h4>FAQ:</h4> <p><strong>I'm not an Econsultancy subscriber, can I join?<br></strong>Ans: You sure can. The sessions are complimentary for existing customers and new friends.</p> <p><strong>Will the session be recorded?<br></strong>Ans: Yes! We record all of our webinars, and we'll send out a link to the recording the following week.</p> <p><strong>What if I register but can't make it?<br></strong>Ans: It's all good. We'll send a follow-up with key takeaways and a link to the recording.</p> <p><strong>Can I ask questions?<br></strong>Ans: Absolutely! This session is for you. Bring your questions and participate during Q&amp;A.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4244 2016-09-22T10:00:00+01:00 2016-09-22T10:00:00+01:00 Digital Intelligence Briefing: Succeeding in the Omnichannel Age <p>The <strong>Succeeding in the Omnichannel Age</strong> report, produced by Econsultancy in association with <a href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, looks at the extent to which organisations take an integrated approach to marketing across different channels and use cross-channel campaign management tools.</p> <p>The report is based on a global survey of 2,065 digital marketers and ecommerce professionals carried out in July and August 2016, and follows up on a similar waves of research from <a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Multichannel Reality" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-multichannel-reality/">2015</a> and <a title="Channels in Concert: Trends in Integrated Marketing" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-integrated-marketing/">2013</a>.</p> <p>The following sections are featured in the report:</p> <ul> <li>Mixed progress on the path to integration</li> <li>Solving the data challenge</li> <li>The omnichannel imperative</li> <li>Behind the mobile curve</li> <li>Operationalising the real-time experience</li> <li>Campaign management tools: the state of play</li> </ul> <h3> <strong>Findings</strong> include:</h3> <ul> <li>While companies are 29% more likely to take an integrated approach to all their campaigns across all channels compared to last year, the proportion of those saying that none of their marketing campaigns are integrated has more than doubled over the last three years.</li> <li>It’s clear that data deficiencies exist, with only 12% being able to join online and offline data and just a quarter claiming to have a single customer view.</li> <li>More than half of organisations have separate technologies for managing data across channels. These separate technologies are the most significant barrier to integration (51%), followed by the inherently linked problem of disparate data sources (40%).</li> <li>Only 5% of those surveyed say they have a single platform that manages data across multiple channels and these companies are twice as likely to take an integrated approach to all campaigns across all channels as those with separate technologies.</li> <li>Omnichannel marketing is well-supported at a senior level, with only 15% saying that buy-in is a top-three barrier, and 5% ranking it as the biggest obstacle.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> <h4> <strong>Econsultancy's Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings, sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/solutions/digital-marketing.html">Adobe</a>, look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape. </strong><strong>You can access the other reports in this series <a title="Econsultancy / Adobe Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefings">here</a>.</strong> </h4> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68302 2016-09-20T15:20:00+01:00 2016-09-20T15:20:00+01:00 Three ways U.S. brands can sell more effectively in Asia Bart Mroz <p>What many brands fail to see is that the Asian markets are very different from their Western counterparts, so fail to adapt their strategies for the specific nuances of each.</p> <p>How then should companies better prepare to enter Asia’s burgeoning ecommerce market? </p> <h3>1. Learn how consumers differ across each country</h3> <p>Consumers in Asia are very nuanced; each respective country has it own set of particular attributes and shopping habits.</p> <p>By simply taking a look at the GDP per capita in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67594-digital-marketing-in-singapore-101/">Singapore</a> (<a href="http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.CD">$52,000</a>) compared to that in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67707-digital-marketing-in-asia-spotlight-on-malaysia/">Malaysia</a> (<a href="http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.CD">$9,000</a>), one can see the vast imbalance.</p> <p>These two countries are separated by a body of water less than a mile long and yet they are very different from a discretionary income perspective.  </p> <p>Unfortunately, many U.S. brands use blanket pricing for customers all across Asia. This is an unfortunate misstep, as price sensitivity across the region varies dramatically.</p> <p>What may be considered cheap in a developed country such as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64956-navigating-the-complex-but-valuable-south-korean-search-market/">South Korea</a> can be considered expensive in a neighboring country such as Vietnam. </p> <p>Therefore, it’s important for brands to segment their customers by country and if possible, even cities, since income differences between small and large cities can often be as great as those between developed and emerging nations.</p> <h3>2. Leverage the local platform of choice</h3> <p>Each and every country in Asia has a distinct ecommerce platform through which the majority of its online transactions occur.</p> <p>In the same way that Amazon is the dominant ecommerce platform in the U.S., Flipkart is the platform of choice in India, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67771-a-beginners-guide-to-alibaba-s-tmall/">Tmall</a> in China and Coupang in Malaysia.  </p> <p>Setting up an individual ecommerce site and translating it to adapt to a local country is not enough for brands to enter individual markets in Asia.</p> <p>Many have done so relying on their slightly-targeted digital marketing campaigns to attract consumers but it is absolutely critical that U.S. brands establish a presence on local platforms, which often serve as the entry point for foreign brands. </p> <p><em>Tmall</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4225/product_tmall.jpg" alt="tmall" width="655" height="460"></p> <h3>3. Look to local brands for inspiration and insight</h3> <p>It’s important that brands do not assume that their American roots will help drive sales in Asia, regardless of the product fit or quality.</p> <p>Some brands will always be successful regardless of their geographic location because of their brand equity and legacy (such as Nike or Apple) but for the mass majority of brands, simply being “American” is not enough.</p> <p>Though privileged, they cannot expect to immediately succeed unless they spend considerable effort in expanding their global reach through local marketing and brand building.</p> <p>In most developed countries, there’s already a number of successful local brands that do quite well and pose formidable threats to any new entrants.</p> <p>In South Korea, famous beauty brands such as <a href="http://www.tonymolyus.com/">Tony Moly</a> or Nature Republic – which are considered leaders in the industry – dominate the playing field, making it very difficult for international brands to enter the market.</p> <p>Instead of getting discouraged, brands must look at dominant competitors to help gain a better understanding of which products sell well in each country, what marketing tactics work best and even which ecommerce design styles/layouts local consumers prefer.</p> <h3>In summary</h3> <p>Breaking into the Asian ecommerce market is a highly attractive prospect for any brand, due to its immense growth. But brands need to be aware of all the detailed nuances that are present in each and every country.</p> <p>A simple blanket strategy to conserve resources or personnel will not suffice to successfully enter the Asian market</p> <p>Instead, building a well thought-out plan that takes into consideration the differences that exist within markets is crucial.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3033 2016-08-12T12:07:55+01:00 2016-08-12T12:07:55+01:00 Multichannel Marketing and the Customer Journey <p>Consumers don’t see “channels”. They only see brands to facilitate their needs in the moment. Yet despite this, businesses are often structured, resourced and budgeted around individual marketing channels, which can lead to a disconnect between consumers and brands….or even within businesses themselves.</p> <p><a name="h.c2ixnqwvr8bh"></a>This is no chalk and talk session. Using a case study throughout the day, this practical one-day course provides you with the strategic planning tools to take a compelling campaign proposition to market, with a multichannel marketing strategy that ensures you can deliver the right content, to the right person, through the blend of channels they prefer.</p> <p>Having mapped out the multichannel activation plan for your brand, you will then gain an understanding of the key measures and how to bring these together in a meaningful context.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68040 2016-07-19T13:40:00+01:00 2016-07-19T13:40:00+01:00 Five digital strategy tips for mono-brands that wholesale and sell direct to consumer Ben Potter <p>For many businesses, the wholesale route allows the brand to build awareness via retail partners, such as department stores, but at the expense of margin and the ability to form a direct relationship with the end customer.</p> <p>At some stage, the brand will decide the time is nigh to create a direct proposition. However, this presents a number of challenges in the digital marketing space that are often not understood or properly considered from the outset.</p> <p>Having worked with a number of mono-brands over the years, here are a few things we’ve observed and helped them overcome:</p> <h3>1. You must give people a compelling reason to buy direct</h3> <p>By the time a typical mono-brand goes direct, they are likely to have a number of well-known, trusted stockists selling their wares online (normally with much deeper pockets).</p> <p>This means that the mono-brand is, in effect, competing against themselves online, via those stockists. The customer is therefore presented with choice as to where they buy that brand.</p> <p>Last year, we <a href="http://www.leapfrogg.co.uk/froggblog/2015/07/insight-edit-consumers-favour-multi-brand-retailers-over-single-brands/" target="_blank">questioned our consumer panel</a> on this very topic - <strong>89% of respondents stated they favoured buying from multi-brand retailers over single-brand sites.</strong></p> <p>When pressed a little further, of those that preferred buying from single brand sites, 71% stated it was because the brand makes them feel more valued as a customer.</p> <p>Added value is therefore the key to driving conversion on the brand site - the promise that if a customer buys direct, they are buying into more than just the product itself.</p> <p>This is where the brand has an advantage. Getting to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67526-how-retail-marketers-can-ensure-they-deliver-the-right-customer-experience/" target="_blank">know the customer intimately</a>, what it is they value and then delivering on this is something that a multi-brand retailer, such as John Lewis, <strong>cannot replicate, at scale, for each and every brand they stock. </strong>Some get the specialist treatment but even then the breadth of content is fairly limited.</p> <p>For example, despite Levi’s being a ‘featured brand’ on the John Lewis website, content is limited to a brief overview of the brand, a few images and a men’s fit guide (strangely, in the women’s section with a link that didn’t work at the time of writing).</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7209/Capture.jpg" alt="John Lewis Levi's category page" width="526" height="489"></p> <p><br> Ultimately, as THE brand, you need to be able to answer (and act upon) one, fundamental question;</p> <p><strong><em>‘Why would someone buy from our site as opposed to an established multi-brand retailer?’</em> </strong></p> <p>If you can’t, then you need to go back to the drawing board.</p> <h3>2. Make it your mission to ‘own’ organic search results for brand terms</h3> <p>The remit of an ecommerce manager is to grow the direct channel, which of course yields a number of benefits compared to the wholesale model (control, acquiring data, building a relationship with the end customer and so on).</p> <p>Search will be a key part of the strategy. <strong>Occupying as much of the search ‘real estate’ for brand terms, as possible, should be the aim.</strong></p> <p>To what extent you can do so will ultimately depend on how many retailers stock your products and how sophisticated their natural search strategies are. The more stockists you have, the more competitive the search results are likely to be for brand terms.</p> <p>Utilising site links, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64778-what-is-schema-markup-and-why-should-you-be-using-it/">schema mark-up</a>, My Business pages, reviews, social media profiles and optimising rich-media assets, such as images and video, are just some of the means by which you can occupy a greater share of the search results for brand terms, at the expense of stockists, as highlighted by Sony below:</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7211/Capture3.png" alt="Sony Google search result" width="532" height="597"></p> <p><br> Please note, there is often a balancing act between aggressively growing the direct channel and keeping stockists on side. Stealing share from stockists is inevitable so needs to be carefully managed.</p> <h3>3. You will almost certainly have to pay for brand PPC traffic</h3> <p>Assuming stockists are present in paid search and bidding on your brand name, you will have to do likewise. There are a million and one articles debating the pros and cons of bidding on your own brand terms so I won’t repeat those arguments.</p> <p>Instead, a slightly different take on the issue, born out of a recent client conversation. Despite the presence of some fairly small but aggressive stockists, the client in question was determined not to bid on their brand terms, due to two questionable assumptions.</p> <p>Firstly, they felt that searchers would, by default, seek out their organic listing. Some no doubt will.</p> <p>However, we demonstrated that other searchers were distracted by a compelling ad from one of their stockists and therefore didn’t even think about scrolling down to find the brands organic listing. Opportunity lost.</p> <p>Secondly, they assumed that if somebody searched for their brand, then that searcher would go onto purchase one of their products (whether direct or via a stockist). However, with some qualitative insight, this was proven not always to be the case.</p> <p>The presence of a multi-brand retailer meant that some were distracted by the greater choice on offer, going onto buy a different brand altogether. Again, opportunity lost.</p> <p><strong>By being present in the paid listings, ideally by being as aggressive as you can to own the number one position, you give yourself the greatest chance of getting the click.</strong></p> <p>This is especially important on mobile where it is common for only ads to appear ‘above the fold’.</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7210/capture2.png" alt="Search results on mobile" width="330" height="583"><br> </p> <p>Therefore, paid search is increasingly the only way in which you can guarantee a presence on the devices searchers are most likely to be using and where they are most likely to click. Don’t leave money on the table.</p> <h3>4. Getting the price right is more important than ever</h3> <p>We worked with a brand where you could consistently purchase many of their products from a well-known high street retailer for 30% less than the price on the brand site. But we were tasked with significantly growing direct revenue. Errr…</p> <p>Consumers are savvier than ever. <strong>With the prominence of Google Shopping listings, price information is thrust upon eager searchers without them even having to click.</strong></p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7212/Capture4.png" alt="Nike Internationalist shopping results" width="481" height="231"><br> <br>Whilst some consumers will of course buy from the brand site and be loyal in doing so again in the future, others won’t give two hoots where they purchase. In fact, if I can buy your product at the same time as all the other stuff on my John Lewis ‘wish list’, all the better.</p> <p>Whilst you cannot dictate the prices your stockists choose to sell at, you need to be aware of their pricing strategy and be agile enough to react should you choose to, particularly during sale periods.</p> <p>It was put to me by a brand in the past that “our stockists can have those ‘sale only’ customers”. Fair enough but I’d always prefer to acquire any customer direct, sale only or not, and nurture the relationship.</p> <p>This brings to light an interesting point regarding loyalty. It should not be measured only in monetary terms. We have discovered that some of our clients’ most loyal customers are not necessarily those that spend the most money.</p> <p>Perhaps these customers can only afford to shop with the brand once or twice a year. However, they are the ones that shout the most about their purchase, something that is often not measured or harnessed.</p> <p>You therefore need to look beyond financial data and models, such as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64481-finding-your-best-customers-with-the-rfm-matrix/" target="_blank">RFM</a> when it comes to understanding loyalty.</p> <h3>5. Make sure your direct and wholesale teams are talking to one another</h3> <p>I spoke to a premium menswear brand last year looking to grow their direct channel. ‘Super!’ I thought, we can help. However, as we dug a little deeper, we soon realised it was going to be a huge challenge.</p> <p>We discovered that the wholesale team had some pretty aggressive targets of their own, meaning they were selling into an ever-increasing number of retailers. Worse still, many of these retailers were at the lower end of the market, damaging brand perception.</p> <p>The direct team also had some rather juicy numbers to hit for the next financial year. But nobody internally had joined the dots, namely that the direct team would find themselves gradually hamstrung by increased competition in search as stockists optimised their sites and bid on brand terms.</p> <p>This highlights how <strong>the wholesale and direct strategy have to be working in unison.</strong></p> <p>Growing both channels simultaneously is possible but requires careful planning, great communication and an understanding of how the two will play out online, especially in search. </p><p><strong>Have you worked with or for a mono-brand? What challenges did you experience? Please feel free to share below.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67943 2016-06-14T09:57:00+01:00 2016-06-14T09:57:00+01:00 Why are we still talking omni-bollocks? Chris Bishop <p>We all know by now that digital thinking can’t be siloed.  </p> <p>That it works best as an active and integrated part of the retail mix, supporting and complementing the whole shopping experience.</p> <h3>So, why are we still going on about it?</h3> <p>Well, amazingly, at the retail and digital conferences I attend and speak at, these same old debates do seem to rumble on.   </p> <p>There is an old guard who are still in denial, who need convincing that digital is not simply eating away at bricks and mortar profitability.  </p> <p>Marketing teams are still asking us for help to sell in joined up digital thinking to their senior management.</p> <p><img src="https://httpsimage.com/img/online-stealing.png" alt=""></p> <p>So if we’re still banging on about "omni-channel" and "digital transformation" maybe it’s because the focus remains within silos and those lessons don’t seem to haven’t been universally adopted.</p> <h3>Are we making digital sound too complicated?</h3> <p>But maybe we’re so bound up in the omni-channel rhetoric and jargon that the digital world is simply not making the case well enough.  </p> <p>Maybe the problem is the new media age punks chasing or being given the latest cool-sounding job titles and spouting the latest omni-bingo terms.  </p> <p>Maybe we aren’t telling the story clearly enough. Ironically, maybe it’s the focus on digital itself that’s misleading.</p> <p>We need to remember that BHS, Austin Reed and the rest did not collapse because they failed at digital, they collapsed because they failed at retail.</p> <h3>It’s just retail</h3> <p>Digital is not replacing real world sales but lifting performance and building profitability across the board.</p> <p>It is simply helping retailers to sell more product in more ways than ever before.</p> <p><img src="https://httpsimage.com/img/online-not-for-luxury.png" alt=""></p> <p>From <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66389-what-does-the-ideal-click-and-collect-service-look-like/">click and collect</a>, to location-based services and mobile, in 2016 we are seeing digital more and more bridging the gap between the physical and virtual world.</p> <p>It is breathing life into the whole retail sector and making it a formidable force in the economy.</p> <h3>Where’s the proof?</h3> <p>Online retail is continuing to expand; experts are forecasting more than 18% growth in 2016 alone.  </p> <p>But total retail spend is also on the increase from £13.3trn last year to a projected £13.7trn in 2016. </p> <p>Smart brands are realising that all of their real estate (digital and physical) are assets that can work together to drive customer satisfaction and profitability.</p> <h3>So, bricks and mortar retail is not dead?</h3> <p>No, but digital has killed off the idea of the convenience store because physical retail is no longer a ‘convenience’.  </p> <p>We’re no longer popping to the shops because it’s the simplest thing to do. Online is now by far the easiest way for consumers to transact.  </p> <p>Digital is what we turn to first in the buying cycle and remains their to assist in every aspect of a real world purchase, too,</p> <p>Digital retail is not eating the lunch of their bricks and mortar operations, it is redefining what those operations are for and how they work.</p> <h3>The mobile revolution changed the world</h3> <p>In the story of mobile we can see the way a single digital channel has reconfigured the entire shopping experience.  </p> <p>Of course, it’s become a powerful retail platform in its own right, it now accounts for one-third of the retail sales in the US (source: Internet Retailer).  </p> <p>But mobile has become the ultimate shopping assistant in real world sales, too. Mobile is the operating system that navigates your customers to your physical store. </p> <p>Today there are 34 times more ‘find my nearest’ requests made on mobile than there were in 2011, according to Google. </p> <p>Mobile is the operating system that makes the consumer more knowledgeable about the product they are about to buy.</p> <p>Already this year consumers have spent 100m hours watching ‘how to’ videos on their handsets, while 82% of consumers have turned to their smartphone for advice before making an in-store purchase.</p> <p>This isn’t a channel that’s driving customers away from shops!</p> <h3>Destination Retail</h3> <p>But one thing digital is doing is placing a new emphasis on retail premises as ‘destinations’ in their own right. </p> <p>With luxury brands leading the way, stores are becoming <em>more</em> attractive as places to spend time and money. </p> <p>They offer location-specific experiences, they build loyal communities and relationships, precisely because they do so in the real world.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BE4dzuZeFkk?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>And it’s easy to see how digital experiences can be built around those communities, through apps, notifications, concierge services and the like, to help evangelise brands and create further real world and online sales.</p> <h3>Death to the buzzword!</h3> <p>As digital marketers let’s tell our stories without resorting to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66631-20-banned-words-from-the-econsultancy-blog-and-their-alternatives/">buzzwords, jargon and other omni-bollocks</a>.  </p> <p>It’s getting us a bad reputation and switching people off.</p> <p>Consumers don’t see themselves as ‘multi’ or ‘omni’ anything, they simply want to choose the most convenient way to shop at any particular moment.  </p> <p>They are becoming less patient and more demanding. They expect retailers to provide a connected and on-demand shopping experience - anytime, anywhere.</p> <p>Digital channels are key to these new <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/creating-superior-customer-experiences/">customer experiences</a>, but they are part of an organic whole.</p> <p>Forget about the digital fairy stories, what’s important is what makes consumers tick and what makes them buy - wherever and whenever. </p> <p>If we focus on those things we’ll really help the total retail sector continue to grow.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67726 2016-04-12T14:43:45+01:00 2016-04-12T14:43:45+01:00 SEO is more than just organic traffic: Are you taking all the credit you deserve? Ian Harris <p>Many in the industry still cling to the growth of organic as the metric to measure success but, while it’s still very important, we’re not measuring like for like when comparing with years gone by.</p> <p>So how are SEOs missing out on credit, and what else should they be looking at?</p> <h3><strong>Organic search has changed</strong></h3> <p>Traditionally, the way we judge the success of an SEO campaign is by the growth of the organic channel. In essence, the more visits and sessions that come through this channel, the better.</p> <p>While search has become more expansive, encompassing everything from <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/social-media-and-online-pr/">online PR to social</a>, this metric of success has remained constant. </p> <p>Put simply, though, this isn’t as simple a metric as it once was to judge success.</p> <p>By making technical changes to improve a website and producing engaging content, you can make sure your web presence gives off all the best signals to Google and hope that has a positive effect on organic traffic.</p> <p>However, as Google’s algorithm becomes more precise and complex upon how it analyses sites, it’s not a sure thing.</p> <p>Organic search is primarily about SERP rankings but, with new additions to results pages such as the carousel and answer box, good rankings aren’t the sole route to success.</p> <p><em>Google carousel</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3878/Google_carousel.png" alt="" width="793" height="512"></p> <p>For example, there’s evidence that the answer box – which scrapes content from ranking results – quite often doesn’t choose the top ranking site.</p> <p>So, even if the authority of your site means you’re not ranking as well as you could, Google could still recognise quality information and place you in the answer box.</p> <p>Conversely, you may be ranking well but may not be receiving the clickthrough rate that you once did if a competitor gets their content in the answer box.</p> <p>The importance of quality on-site copy has, therefore, never been more pressing. </p> <h3><strong>The boundary between organic and direct has blurred</strong></h3> <p>As the industry has naturally evolved it’s become more difficult to definitively attribute traffic to one channel or another.</p> <p>A number of factors, including improvements in browser technology, have meant that traffic that would once have been attributed as organic traffic is now being attributed as direct.</p> <p>Although technology is advanced in these fields, SEOs are still selling themselves short by just looking at organic when, as part of optimising organic, we can drive more traffic than we are often credited for.</p> <p>Groupon ran an experiment in 2014 in which it deindexed itself for a full six hours (not something we’d recommend trying!) to try and understand how users were truly getting to their site.</p> <p>By deindexing its website, Groupon removed the possibility of users finding their site through search.</p> <p>Users could still get to the page by entering the website URL in the address bar, for example, or if they had it saved in their bookmarks, but it allowed Groupon to look at how both direct and organic search was affected by it.</p> <p>Measuring its longer URLs (e.g. www.groupon.com/local/san-francisco/restaurants), the company saw that as organic traffic dropped to near zero after the change, direct traffic also dropped by 60%.</p> <p>This big chunk of what Groupon thought was direct traffic dropped as soon as the site was de-indexed. </p> <p>Indexing is purely for search purposes so that Google can crawl your site and offer you up in its SERPs.</p> <p>If this traffic disappeared, it could indicate a couple of things. While the problem could be metric based, for example, an issue with the website’s Google Analytics tracking, it could also be as a result of misattribution.</p> <p>One study isn’t evidence of an industry-wide problem, but it does highlight the need for SEOs to better understand and measure the true source of their website’s traffic.</p> <h3><strong>Browsers have become more advanced</strong></h3> <p>The way we search has changed and that’s partly due to the advancement of browsers. Modern browsers have evolved to look and work differently to their ancestors.</p> <p>In the past, when we were searching for something online, we would enter the address of a search engine and then search for the query or just search directly from the address bar.</p> <p>The search engine then delivered SERPs based on our query and we would click through to the relevant website.</p> <p>While that is still a common method users use to search, today, browsers may even suggest a URL from your history when you start typing a query in its address bar.</p> <p>If you click on this suggested URL, that traffic bypasses a search engine and is attributed as direct. Browsers such as Chrome or Safari are clever enough to now know what brand you’re searching for even after an incomplete search is entered.</p> <p>In both instances, this means that some traffic you once took previously took credit for as organic could now be recorded as direct traffic and therefore not reported on. </p> <p><em>Fig 1. Safari suggests a website</em><em> </em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3869/google_serps_1.png" alt="" width="302" height="532"></p> <p><em>Fig 2. Desktop chrome suggests relevant URLs from a user’s history based on a generic query</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3870/google_serps_2.png" alt="" width="825" height="159"></p> <h3><strong>Impact of mobile</strong></h3> <p>Mobile browser usage varies quite a lot compared to desktop. While Chrome and Safari still take up most of the market, Android’s own internet browser is used by around 11% of mobile users, and Firefox barely features at all.</p> <p>This is important as, even since improvements in the referral data from mobile visits, there’s still a lack of consistency.</p> <p>Some mobile applications often do not send referral data, so traffic almost always comes through as direct.</p> <p>For example, if a user clicks through to your site from a Google Maps app – an app which pulls data from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64985-why-google-local-is-vital-for-offline-businesses/">Google My Business listings</a> you’ve optimised as part of your SEO strategy – then you’re probably not getting the credit for it.</p> <p><em>Fig 3. The Apple Maps app uses Yelp &amp; Apple Maps Connect to send traffic to a website, however, this is attributed as ‘direct’. </em></p> <p><em>Google Earth and the Google Maps app will also attribute this to ‘direct’.</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3871/google_serps_3.png" alt="" width="298" height="530">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3872/google_serps_4.png" alt="" width="298" height="532"></p> <h3><strong>Apps taking organic traffic</strong></h3> <p>Another reason why we may see less organic traffic hitting a website is if a user has an app for the relevant site that appears in the SERP.</p> <p>Clicking the SERP listing can now direct users straight to the content ‘in-app’, without hitting the website at all.</p> <p>If you are solely responsible for sending users to a website, this will reduce the amount of traffic you’re seeing.</p> <h3><strong>Local listings and Yelp</strong></h3> <p>Local listings are vital to businesses with physical premises, especially those who rely on local trade.</p> <p>The people nearest to you are most likely to use your services, so making sure you’re being exposed to this audience is vital.</p> <p>However, they can also be of great benefit to your SEO strategy.</p> <p>The <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66574-10-essentials-for-local-seo-success/">most important part of local listings</a> is that you have standardised, consistent details about your business across the web, particularly the name, address and phone number (NAP details) – specifically in your Google My Business account.</p> <p>The details you put in are dragged through to Google SERPs with local listings and Google Maps / Google Earth so they need to be correct.</p> <p>Your business listing will be more trusted, and rank better if Google can see that the NAP details are consistent across a number of aggregators.</p> <p>So, it’s for that reason that many SEOs undertake a task of adding consistent listings on platforms such as Yelp.</p> <p><em>Fig 4. Yelp, a local search engine or a social platform?</em> </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3873/Yelp_screenshot.png" alt="" width="887" height="265"></p> <p>This issue here is that by creating and optimising this listing (initially to boost their organic local presence), many SEOs neglect to take credit for the relevant traffic that these places can drive.</p> <p>Yelp, for example, has around 150m unique users per month. While it is technically classed as a social platform by Google Analytics (by default, this can be reconfigured), it has many of the same features as a ‘local search engine'. </p> <p>We also have various changes that Google has made in recent years to the layout in mobile SERPs.</p> <p>Currently, the ‘local pack’ doesn’t have an immediate website click-through option unless the listing is expanded.</p> <p>The main action you’re encouraged to do <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64395-google-click-to-call-used-by-more-than-40-of-mobile-searchers/">is click-to-call</a>, an action that will bypass the website (and any <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67206-why-call-tracking-is-vital-for-accurate-attribution-modelling/">call tracking</a>), thus SEOs may neglect to take credit for that call.</p> <p><em>Fig 5. A mobile SERP for the term ‘sheds’, showing click to call option in the ‘local pack’</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3875/local_listings.png" alt="" width="367" height="653"></p> <p>There currently isn’t any robust way of understanding what traffic the My Business listing brings via analytics, but you can regularly share the reports dashboard provided in the platform to highlight your work.</p> <h3><strong>Google isn’t the only map</strong></h3> <p>Google Maps is a great tool, but it’s also not the only tool out there. Apple Maps, while still lagging behind Google Maps, has the advantage of being pre-loaded on millions of new iPhones.</p> <p>The rival to Google Maps uses a number of sites to pull through its data, but you can be sure it will pull your Yelp business listing so you need to make sure they are optimised.</p> <p>You can also add/manage your listing via ‘Maps Connect’. As with Google Maps, traffic from Apple Maps generally is attributed as direct.</p> <p>This means that even if you’ve optimised your listings you’re not getting the credit through those precious organic search listings.   </p> <h3><strong>In summary...</strong></h3> <p>We can compartmentalise different aspects of search into organic and paid channels but the end goal is the same: impressions, clicks and, ultimately, conversions.</p> <p>Instead of splitting our departmental efforts into individual channels, we need to realise that search has changed.</p> <p>The organic channel is still an important metric to measure success, but there is so much more to showing the true value that your endeavours as an SEO brings.</p> <p>Taking a narrow view of ‘solely measuring success via improvements to the organic channel’ is neglecting the wider value of your digital marketing endeavours.</p> <p>The key to all of this is data is simple: make sure you know where to get all the information that shows the value you’re providing and take credit for it.</p> <p>Send your client or managers reports from your My Business account, Apple Maps Connect and try to understand the organic influence on direct, Yelp and others.</p> <p>Include referral traffic data from links and listings that you created and app analytics data with organic as the source.</p> <p>Look at all the work you do across your campaigns and provide examples and data to show the full effect your work is having.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67731 2016-04-11T14:27:17+01:00 2016-04-11T14:27:17+01:00 Think affiliate marketing doesn’t work for luxury brands? Think again Chris Bishop <p>But no longer. Affiliate marketing has truly come of age.</p> <h3>Isn’t affiliate just voucher codes?</h3> <p>This is not just about voucher codes, cashback and last-click for advertisers, this is part of a holistic approach to digital advertising that promises real and sustained ROI for high-end brands.</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/whoaretheaffiliates.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>The modern managed affiliate programmes use sophisticated groups of content publishers, including mainstream “offline” publishing houses such as Condé Nast.  </p> <p>This is performance marketing through deep partnership, levered via tenancy, editorial, blogging, email and (yes) incentives like voucher codes or cashback. </p> <p>Partnerships with high volume and niche sites that can deliver the kind of primed-to-buy, long tailed traffic available nowhere else.</p> <h3>Are you at risk of losing control of your message?</h3> <p>No, but…</p> <p>For years affiliate networks and technology companies used the size and scale of the channel as a key selling point, promising brands access to tens of thousands of affiliates.  </p> <p>Given that they worked on tracking fees based upon revenue generated by activity, who can blame them? </p> <p>However, this wasn’t what luxury or designer retailers, already nervous about losing control of their brand’s messages, wanted to hear. </p> <p>Only now, with dedicated, digital agencies selling these solutions as part of a wider media strategy, are brands being given the whole picture.</p> <p>When properly managed, affiliate marketing allows brands to deliver relevant messages to highly-targeted customer segments.  </p> <p>But it’s the size and scale of the networks that makes this targeting possible in the first place.</p> <h3>But isn’t luxury all about exclusivity?  </h3> <p>Why would luxury brands want their valuable name bandied about on affiliate channels with everyone else’s?</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/chriscarcollection.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>Success in the digital age requires a change in mind-set for luxury brands as customers’ buying cycles accelerate and competition stiffens in every part of the market place.  </p> <p>No longer can scarcity be the strongest value in a luxury brand's armoury, as the array of choice and quality available elsewhere can fill any sales vacuum.  </p> <p>Instead, luxury today is defined by desirability, product excellence, exemplary service and, fundamentally, a brand promise.</p> <p>And affiliate channels are exactly where a brand’s promise, desirability, service and excellence are defined for its target audience.  </p> <p>They are key to the continued success of luxury brands in the digital age and are proven to send ready-to-convert customers direct to online stores.   </p> <h3>Luxury is talked about and bought online more than ever</h3> <p>Deloitte says that 58% of UK millennial luxury consumers buy their luxury goods online. What’s more, 85% of luxury consumers regularly use social media.</p> <p>According to Google one in five luxury purchases happens on the web.</p> <p>And participating in high profile online retail events like Black Friday and Cyber Monday clearly doesn’t dim the lustre of a luxury brand or cannibalize their full-price sales.</p> <p>In 2015 our client NET-A-PORTER saw Black Friday was its highest day for sales that year, with one item sold every second on its website. </p> <p>What’s more, offering deals and vouchering is not regarded as damaging to luxury brands’ reputation by consumers.  </p> <p>In fact, these luxury customers were four times more likely to be searching for deals on Black Friday 2015 than non-luxury customers (Experian).</p> <h3>Do affiliate tactics really deliver incremental sales to luxury brands?</h3> <p>Yes, they do.</p> <p>One of our retailers had always assumed cashback websites would only reach customers already on its files and has little effect on overall profit. We helped them prove otherwise.  </p> <p>A tactical trial conducted with Quidco for the brand found that 86% of consumers that bought their products via the publisher during the trial were “new to file” and their average order value was much higher than the norm.</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/shopstylesolacelondon.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>For another fashion retailer, working with affiliates achieved over 300 pieces of content coverage in a three-month period which, in turn, contributed to content websites driving 50%+ of the brand's affiliate revenue.</p> <p>Affiliate channels have proved, time and time again, to bring new customers and incremental sales to the table for every kind of brand, particularly those at the very top end of their sector.</p> <h3>Who else is using affiliates?</h3> <p>The roll call of brands that are using the affiliate channel as part of the marketing mix is impressive – Agent Provocateur, Barneys New York, Burberry, Liberty London, NET-A-PORTER to name a few.</p> <p>But if the affiliate channel was just about vouchers and cashback, they wouldn’t be using it.</p> <p>These brands know the value of curated conversation and content-led buzz to their brand; they are finding new and exciting ways to engage through affiliate marketing.  </p> <p>Crucially, they are realising that careful planning, targeted partnership and innovative execution ensures the biggest ROI alongside an extension of digital PR.</p> <h3>The lessons of affiliate marketing</h3> <ul> <li>Luxury affiliate marketing is happening... if you’re not doing it, you’re already losing out.</li> <li>Luxury consumers are savvy, switched on and impulsive – take advantage of that.</li> <li>Be led by the data and use experts to help you execute the highest quality campaigns.</li> <li>Choose who manages your affiliates carefully – your brand’s success will live or die by their experience both within wider digital marketing, the specific affiliate channel and naturally their knowledge of your brand / sector.</li> </ul>