tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/multichannel-2 Latest Multichannel content from Econsultancy 2016-09-27T11:39:10+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68329 2016-09-27T11:39:10+01:00 2016-09-27T11:39:10+01:00 Farfetch’s CMO: Why we’re more than just a shopping platform Nikki Gilliland <p>Here is what she had to say.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9547/stephanie_horton.JPG" alt="" width="464" height="299"></p> <h3>Farfetch describes itself as “for fashion lovers, not followers” – can you talk a bit about the general branding strategy of the company?</h3> <p>It’s interesting how the brand has actually evolved a lot since that statement.</p> <p>When we first started out we were definitely a fashion site for people who wanted to find that special item – but since then the brand itself has really expanded into more than just a shopping platform.</p> <p>We now have Black and White, which is a new division we launched last year, that lends our technology to retailers and brands.</p> <p>So where before we focused on putting boutiques on the site, we’re now looking at ourselves as more of a platform for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67731-think-affiliate-marketing-doesn-t-work-for-luxury-brands-think-again/" target="_blank">luxury</a>.</p> <h3>What is Farfetch’s USP in relation to other luxury retailers like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68219-four-things-brands-can-learn-about-content-marketing-from-net-a-porter" target="_blank">Net-a-Porter</a> and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68293-a-review-of-style-com-conde-nast-s-new-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">Style.com</a>?</h3> <p>It’s mainly breadth and selection, because we have over 500 boutiques around the world contributing to the site as well as over 200 brands.</p> <p>We have more product, sometimes even more than a brand’s own website, and we have more variety of product.</p> <p>For example, you’ll have a buyer in Toyko, a buyer in Paris and a buyer in New York – all from the same brand – so instead of having maybe six or seven selections, you might have 30 or 40.</p> <p>For a consumer it is amazing because they can actually shop and style a certain brand or designer, rather than having a limited number of pieces. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GLhdJoqSLdc?wmode=transparent" width="909" height="472"></iframe></p> <h3>What is the value for boutiques selling on Farfetch?</h3> <p>The site started because a lot of the smaller boutiques and brands didn’t have the ability to do ecommerce – for them it’s a very expensive and time-consuming proposition.</p> <p>They simply didn’t have the resources to do it.</p> <p>By using Farfetch, they are able to gain a global audience and gain all the infrastructure needed to become a real player in the ecommerce world.</p> <p>That includes things like customer service, payment... all those factors they would have had to figure out for themselves.</p> <h3>Last year, it was announced that Farfetch had acquired the Browns store in London – does this signal a move into physical branded stores?</h3> <p>I think Farfetch has always been really focused on the physical experience.</p> <p>One thing José, our founder, always says is that fashion is not downloadable. So it’ll never be the case that customers will only ever buy online – stores will always be an important part of the process.</p> <p>Browns allows us to have that incubator, a sort of lab to test new things and the technology to make the retail experience even better.</p> <p>For us it was just a way to really expand, do more things, and be able to roll more things out to our boutique and retail partners at large.</p> <h3>How do you ensure the experience of ‘luxury’ is replicated in digital?</h3> <p>I think every site has a point of view, and you just have to take that and really make sure that it is coming through in all aspects - from the quality of the editorial to the look and feel and how you’re presenting things.</p> <p>It’s important to read reviews, and make sure that the consumer experience is up to scratch.</p> <p>It’s also recognising that luxury requires certain things online that it might not in physical stores.</p> <p>Everything from the quality of customer service to the quality of delivery and how easy it is to return – making sure that all of those things stand up and that they are of a premium standard.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9546/farfetch_boutiques.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="242"></p> <h3>Lastly, what will you be speaking about at the Festival of Marketing?</h3> <p>I’ll be speaking about international marketing – so what we look for when going into a new market as well as what we know about our customers.</p> <p>There will be a focus on how Farfetch has been able to expand globally, the key leverages for us and the biggest challenges throughout the process.</p> <p><strong><em>The <a href="http://www.festivalofmarketing.com/welcome?utm_source=econsultancy&amp;utm_medium=blog&amp;utm_campaign=econ%20blog" target="_blank">Festival of Marketing</a> takes place in London on October 5-6.</em><br></strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4244 2016-09-22T10:00:00+01:00 2016-09-22T10:00:00+01:00 Digital Intelligence Briefing: Succeeding in the Omnichannel Age <p>The <strong>Succeeding in the Omnichannel Age</strong> report, produced by Econsultancy in association with <a href="http://www.adobe.com/marketing-cloud.html">Adobe</a>, looks at the extent to which organisations take an integrated approach to marketing across different channels and use cross-channel campaign management tools.</p> <p>The report is based on a global survey of 2,065 digital marketers and ecommerce professionals carried out in July and August 2016, and follows up on a similar waves of research from <a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Multichannel Reality" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-multichannel-reality/">2015</a> and <a title="Channels in Concert: Trends in Integrated Marketing" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-integrated-marketing/">2013</a>.</p> <p>The following sections are featured in the report:</p> <ul> <li>Mixed progress on the path to integration</li> <li>Solving the data challenge</li> <li>The omnichannel imperative</li> <li>Behind the mobile curve</li> <li>Operationalising the real-time experience</li> <li>Campaign management tools: the state of play</li> </ul> <h3> <strong>Findings</strong> include:</h3> <ul> <li>While companies are 29% more likely to take an integrated approach to all their campaigns across all channels compared to last year, the proportion of those saying that none of their marketing campaigns are integrated has more than doubled over the last three years.</li> <li>It’s clear that data deficiencies exist, with only 12% being able to join online and offline data and just a quarter claiming to have a single customer view.</li> <li>More than half of organisations have separate technologies for managing data across channels. These separate technologies are the most significant barrier to integration (51%), followed by the inherently linked problem of disparate data sources (40%).</li> <li>Only 5% of those surveyed say they have a single platform that manages data across multiple channels and these companies are twice as likely to take an integrated approach to all campaigns across all channels as those with separate technologies.</li> <li>Omnichannel marketing is well-supported at a senior level, with only 15% saying that buy-in is a top-three barrier, and 5% ranking it as the biggest obstacle.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> <h4> <strong>Econsultancy's Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings, sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/solutions/digital-marketing.html">Adobe</a>, look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape. </strong><strong>You can access the other reports in this series <a title="Econsultancy / Adobe Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefings" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefings">here</a>.</strong> </h4> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68282 2016-09-15T14:00:00+01:00 2016-09-15T14:00:00+01:00 Black Friday & Christmas: How to make the most of early seasonal shoppers Saima Alibhai <p>According to some recent research from shopping channel QVC, 1.5m Londoners have already started their Christmas shopping.</p> <p>That’s a substantial pre-season opportunity, but you must act now to engage with early bird shoppers or risk missing out to the competition.</p> <p>The traditional Christmas shopping season has seen upheaval in recent years, including ever-longer seasonal sales promotions and the growing popularity of online shopping. And most recently,<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67159-are-we-doing-black-friday-in-the-uk-or-not/"> the emergence of Black Friday </a>has thrown the cat amongst the pigeons.</p> <p>Black Friday was introduced to the UK by Amazon in 2010. Although fairly new, this sales event reaped £1.1bn last year in 2015, up 33% on the year before.</p> <p>With such lucrative revenues, you might have already launched your own Black Friday promotions in recent years, but now you must be prepared to serve seasonal shoppers even earlier in the year. </p> <p>So what are the main tactics you can use to make the most of this opportunity? </p> <h3>Gear up for ‘peak’ performance</h3> <p>The growth of the Christmas peak in spending now spans over two months of sales, so be prepared to deliver exceptional service and maximise profits throughout the entire time.</p> <p>In the UK, the Black Friday sales period isn’t punctuated at the end with the Thanksgiving public holiday as in the US, so your promotions can run all the way to Christmas and even through to January. </p> <p>In addition to sustaining promotions, reward the loyalty of your returning and longstanding customers.</p> <p>With the increased competition between online and physical retailers, you must create compelling reasons to keep them coming back for more.</p> <p>Unique offers and content for specific customer segments demonstrates that you appreciate their loyalty and helps deepen their emotional connection to your brand.</p> <p><em>Argos' extended sale.</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9164/blue_friday.png" alt="argos black friday promotion" width="615" height="357"></p> <h3>Cater to all shopping habits</h3> <p>On Black Friday, there will be many different kinds of shoppers hunting for bargains, some for altruistic reasons and others more selfish.</p> <p>Research from delivery firm Doddle showed that instead of purchasing gifts for those on their Christmas list, 40% of Brits make personal purchases on Black Friday.</p> <p>As well as creating promotions for gift ideas, analyze your customers’ past purchases and browsing preferences over the year so you can deliver the right offers for self-gifters in the lead up to Black Friday, and then for those buying gifts for others in the weeks that follow. </p> <p>Brexit and the resulting currency fluctuations have attracted more shoppers from overseas markets, such as China.</p> <p>Factor in this potentially increased demand, and make your website navigation and checkout process, including shipping details, as easy as possible for international shoppers. </p> <h3>Get ready for Black Friday 2.0</h3> <p>Consumers are becoming even more tech savvy. They use social media to research products and are browsing and buying products across multiple devices.</p> <p>In fact, some of our own research showed that 37% of shoppers use their smartphones to complete a purchase, while almost a third (30%) use their tablets.</p> <p>You need to be able to track these customers across the entire purchasing journey and provide the right encouragement to convert initial interest into sales, and avoid customers leaving items lingering idly in baskets.</p> <p>The Black Friday phenomenon has already delivered success for many retailers, but as with the retail market, it is constantly evolving.</p> <p>Understand your customers and their purchasing journeys to maximise revenue between now and the year’s end. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67061-seo-black-friday-how-are-brands-preparing-their-landing-pages">Black Friday is casting a longer shadow</a>, but by making the most of the entire seasonal shopping period, you can significantly increase your annual sales results.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68275 2016-09-07T15:10:00+01:00 2016-09-07T15:10:00+01:00 Ted Baker unveils shoppable video & Google voice search stunt for AW16 campaign David Moth <p>UK customers can also view the shoppable video on Selfridges’ site, while Nordstrom is the US partner for the ‘Mission Impeccable' campaign.</p> <p>The film portrays T.E.D. as the leader of a spy agency that is out to thwart a ‘couture catastrophe’. </p> <p>Here's the video, without the shoppable element.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8FrB663mBns?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <p>Ted Baker has also partnered with Google’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67213-google-voice-search-update-in-pictures/">voice search</a> to bring a further interactive element to the retail experience.</p> <p>If users ask Google one of the slogans written on Ted Baker’s shop windows around the UK they will be entered into a prize draw and can access extra information about the film’s characters.</p> <p>So, in the grand tradition of Econsultancy blog posts, we must ask... is it any good?</p> <h3>The shoppable video</h3> <p>I’ve never been entirely sold on the idea of shoppable video, and unfortunately this campaign hasn’t won me over.</p> <p>In my opinion the creative idea in the video is quickly lost as the viewer gets distracted trying to identify things they can click on. It becomes a bit like a game of whack-a-mole.</p> <p><a href="http://www.tedbaker.com/uk/Mens/c/category_mens">The Mission Impeccable video</a> begins with instructions on how to add items to your ‘vault’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8880/Ted_Baker_video.png" alt="" width="800" height="428"></p> <p>Initially I thought this meant I had to press the '+' button on my keyboard to add items to my basket, but in fact you just click the icon with your mouse.</p> <p>The total number of items you’ve clicked is totted up in the top right hand corner, and the products also appear lower down the screen below the video.</p> <p>It’s an interesting concept and the video is very slick, but I’m not convinced by the execution.</p> <p>Take this shot for example. It’s dimly lit, and there are too many options on screen. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8881/Ted_Baker_video_2.png" alt="" width="800" height="429"></p> <p>The viewer has to pause the video to get a decent look at the items, and it’s not entirely clear what I’m adding to my basket.</p> <p>Equally, by having to regularly pause the film to browse the items on screen, you lose track of the storyline.</p> <p>That said, Ted Baker previously tested shoppable video technology last Christmas and sales of the featured products increased by 30%.</p> <h3>Voice search</h3> <p>After spotting this tweet I skulked off into the office stairwell so nobody would hear me tell my Samsung that ‘The gatekeeper’s Paisley is loud and crude.’</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Head to Ted’s Regent St store and play with the interactive windows - there’s £1000 up for grabs <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MissionImpeccable?src=hash">#MissionImpeccable</a> <a href="https://t.co/yDYpaGfY13">pic.twitter.com/yDYpaGfY13</a></p> — Ted Baker (@ted_baker) <a href="https://twitter.com/ted_baker/status/773468356351520768">September 7, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>The secret website was then presented as a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-search-marketing-ppc-best-practice-guide/">paid search</a> result. In hindsight this delivery method is quite obvious, but I was pleasantly surprised and think it’s a good creative idea.</p> <p>I doubt there are many people bidding on that keyphrase either (see more <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62270-six-examples-of-effective-ppc-and-seo-campaigns/">creative uses of PPC</a>)</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8874/ted_baker_ppc.png" alt="" width="300">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8875/ted_baker_passcode.png" alt="" width="300"></p> <p>The landing page displays an animated Gif of my password being accepted, before giving me a code that can be shown in-store to claim a prize.</p> <p>My curiosity piqued, I wandered the short distance to Regents Street where the friendly staff were ready and waiting for customers to walk in demanding freebies.</p> <p>The process of claiming a prize will likely become a bit slicker once the staff have had some practice, but after the briefest of waits I was eventually given the choice of a shave at a Ted Baker salon or a branded backgammon set.</p> <p>I opted for the latter.</p> <p>Upon exiting the shop I noticed several people outside speaking the code words into their phones, so the campaign already seems to be attracting some interest.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>While I like the concept behind this multichannel campaign, I'm still not convinced by the shoppable video.</p> <p>Personally I like to take a bit of time when shopping rather than trying to quickly click on random products before they disappear off screen.</p> <p>That said, the previous shoppable video campaign yielded good results for Ted Baker and it provides some good PR value.</p> <p>The voice search element is also very clever and I really like the execution. It's quick, simple and will help to entice people in-store.</p> <p>Overall I like the Mission Impeccable creative, but I think shoppable video is a technology I'll never get on board with.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68189 2016-08-19T14:50:31+01:00 2016-08-19T14:50:31+01:00 There’s life in the old tablet dog yet: stats Saima Alibhai <blockquote> <p>I can’t see anybody who needs a laptop buying an iPad, and I can’t see people using it as a smartphone either.</p> </blockquote> <p>While the iPad was not the first tablet on the market, it turned out to be a trailblazer for an entire device category, successfully establishing tablets as the perfect mid-way device between a smartphone and a laptop.</p> <p>Our research recently found that 60% of UK adults now own a tablet – that’s as many as 22.8m of us.</p> <p>It’s impressive to think that, in just six years, we have disregarded any reluctance we may have initially had and embraced the tablet into our lives. </p> <p>The iPad is still the fastest selling Apple product of all times with more than 225m sold in the first five years –  that's quite something up against the iPhone and iPod.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8286/ipad_usage.jpg" alt="" width="848" height="565"></p> <p>But a new generation of alternative devices, namely larger smartphones and smartwatches, may herald its end.</p> <p>I have recently seen articles talking about <a href="http://www.ibtimes.com/tablet-dead-usage-declines-first-time-teenagers-stick-smartphones-2376684">the death of the tablet</a>.</p> <p>Is the tablet the modern day equivalent of Concorde - an amazing, ubiquitously famous innovation but whose time and place in the world was ultimately limited and pertinent to a particular era? </p> <p>In fact, tablet shipments are expected to <a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160602005370/en/Tablets-Set-Return-Growth-2018-Driven-Emergence">decline 9.6% year on year in 2016</a>. But we found that British consumers still use tablets to shop.</p> <p>The UK (60%) not only has a higher level of tablet ownership than Australia (54%) or the US (57%), but also British consumers use the device more frequently when making a purchase (34%), compared with the US (25%) and Australia (19%).</p> <p><a href="http://mkto.bronto.com/BrontoResources_Whitepapers_Guides.html">We also found that in the last 12 months</a>, the time UK consumers spend shopping on their tablets has increased by a healthy proportion (48%), topped only by smartphones (54%).</p> <p>Some sources suggest that younger age groups barely use tablets at all because of the huge appeal of smartphones, but our research shows the age group with the greatest propensity to purchase via tablet is 25-34 (39%).</p> <p>Tablets also prove popular in the Baby Boomer generation which embraces the device category’s unique combination of a mobile operating system on a large screen.</p> <p>Twice as many UK consumers aged over 55 (22%) use tablets for online purchasing than their US (11%) and Australian peers (11%).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8287/ipad.jpg" alt="" width="848" height="565"></p> <p>With a third of UK consumers shopping on tablets, the gadget is still a crucial part of the device puzzle.</p> <p>No matter whether customers are using a smartphone, smartwatch, laptop or indeed a tablet - it’s very important to cater to everyone.</p> <p>The shopping and purchasing experience with your brand needs to span all the devices used by your target audience.</p> <p>So track closely which devices your customers use to visit your website or open your emails. Monitor the differences in device usage over the day.</p> <p>For example, if your ecommerce store shows a peak in smartphone traffic in the morning when people browse on their way to work, target your email sends accordingly.</p> <p>Also analyse when, and on which device, customers make the actual purchase.</p> <p>Many people prefer to buy on a larger device, such as a tablet, laptop or desktop, when they’re at home in the evening. </p> <p>Understanding the specifics of your audience and adjusting strategies accordingly will ensure that the shopping experience, from browse to buy on whatever device, is seamless, tailored to your customers and drives results.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68040 2016-07-19T13:40:00+01:00 2016-07-19T13:40:00+01:00 Five digital strategy tips for mono-brands that wholesale and sell direct to consumer Ben Potter <p>For many businesses, the wholesale route allows the brand to build awareness via retail partners, such as department stores, but at the expense of margin and the ability to form a direct relationship with the end customer.</p> <p>At some stage, the brand will decide the time is nigh to create a direct proposition. However, this presents a number of challenges in the digital marketing space that are often not understood or properly considered from the outset.</p> <p>Having worked with a number of mono-brands over the years, here are a few things we’ve observed and helped them overcome:</p> <h3>1. You must give people a compelling reason to buy direct</h3> <p>By the time a typical mono-brand goes direct, they are likely to have a number of well-known, trusted stockists selling their wares online (normally with much deeper pockets).</p> <p>This means that the mono-brand is, in effect, competing against themselves online, via those stockists. The customer is therefore presented with choice as to where they buy that brand.</p> <p>Last year, we <a href="http://www.leapfrogg.co.uk/froggblog/2015/07/insight-edit-consumers-favour-multi-brand-retailers-over-single-brands/" target="_blank">questioned our consumer panel</a> on this very topic - <strong>89% of respondents stated they favoured buying from multi-brand retailers over single-brand sites.</strong></p> <p>When pressed a little further, of those that preferred buying from single brand sites, 71% stated it was because the brand makes them feel more valued as a customer.</p> <p>Added value is therefore the key to driving conversion on the brand site - the promise that if a customer buys direct, they are buying into more than just the product itself.</p> <p>This is where the brand has an advantage. Getting to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67526-how-retail-marketers-can-ensure-they-deliver-the-right-customer-experience/" target="_blank">know the customer intimately</a>, what it is they value and then delivering on this is something that a multi-brand retailer, such as John Lewis, <strong>cannot replicate, at scale, for each and every brand they stock. </strong>Some get the specialist treatment but even then the breadth of content is fairly limited.</p> <p>For example, despite Levi’s being a ‘featured brand’ on the John Lewis website, content is limited to a brief overview of the brand, a few images and a men’s fit guide (strangely, in the women’s section with a link that didn’t work at the time of writing).</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7209/Capture.jpg" alt="John Lewis Levi's category page" width="526" height="489"></p> <p><br> Ultimately, as THE brand, you need to be able to answer (and act upon) one, fundamental question;</p> <p><strong><em>‘Why would someone buy from our site as opposed to an established multi-brand retailer?’</em> </strong></p> <p>If you can’t, then you need to go back to the drawing board.</p> <h3>2. Make it your mission to ‘own’ organic search results for brand terms</h3> <p>The remit of an ecommerce manager is to grow the direct channel, which of course yields a number of benefits compared to the wholesale model (control, acquiring data, building a relationship with the end customer and so on).</p> <p>Search will be a key part of the strategy. <strong>Occupying as much of the search ‘real estate’ for brand terms, as possible, should be the aim.</strong></p> <p>To what extent you can do so will ultimately depend on how many retailers stock your products and how sophisticated their natural search strategies are. The more stockists you have, the more competitive the search results are likely to be for brand terms.</p> <p>Utilising site links, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64778-what-is-schema-markup-and-why-should-you-be-using-it/">schema mark-up</a>, My Business pages, reviews, social media profiles and optimising rich-media assets, such as images and video, are just some of the means by which you can occupy a greater share of the search results for brand terms, at the expense of stockists, as highlighted by Sony below:</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7211/Capture3.png" alt="Sony Google search result" width="532" height="597"></p> <p><br> Please note, there is often a balancing act between aggressively growing the direct channel and keeping stockists on side. Stealing share from stockists is inevitable so needs to be carefully managed.</p> <h3>3. You will almost certainly have to pay for brand PPC traffic</h3> <p>Assuming stockists are present in paid search and bidding on your brand name, you will have to do likewise. There are a million and one articles debating the pros and cons of bidding on your own brand terms so I won’t repeat those arguments.</p> <p>Instead, a slightly different take on the issue, born out of a recent client conversation. Despite the presence of some fairly small but aggressive stockists, the client in question was determined not to bid on their brand terms, due to two questionable assumptions.</p> <p>Firstly, they felt that searchers would, by default, seek out their organic listing. Some no doubt will.</p> <p>However, we demonstrated that other searchers were distracted by a compelling ad from one of their stockists and therefore didn’t even think about scrolling down to find the brands organic listing. Opportunity lost.</p> <p>Secondly, they assumed that if somebody searched for their brand, then that searcher would go onto purchase one of their products (whether direct or via a stockist). However, with some qualitative insight, this was proven not always to be the case.</p> <p>The presence of a multi-brand retailer meant that some were distracted by the greater choice on offer, going onto buy a different brand altogether. Again, opportunity lost.</p> <p><strong>By being present in the paid listings, ideally by being as aggressive as you can to own the number one position, you give yourself the greatest chance of getting the click.</strong></p> <p>This is especially important on mobile where it is common for only ads to appear ‘above the fold’.</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7210/capture2.png" alt="Search results on mobile" width="330" height="583"><br> </p> <p>Therefore, paid search is increasingly the only way in which you can guarantee a presence on the devices searchers are most likely to be using and where they are most likely to click. Don’t leave money on the table.</p> <h3>4. Getting the price right is more important than ever</h3> <p>We worked with a brand where you could consistently purchase many of their products from a well-known high street retailer for 30% less than the price on the brand site. But we were tasked with significantly growing direct revenue. Errr…</p> <p>Consumers are savvier than ever. <strong>With the prominence of Google Shopping listings, price information is thrust upon eager searchers without them even having to click.</strong></p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7212/Capture4.png" alt="Nike Internationalist shopping results" width="481" height="231"><br> <br>Whilst some consumers will of course buy from the brand site and be loyal in doing so again in the future, others won’t give two hoots where they purchase. In fact, if I can buy your product at the same time as all the other stuff on my John Lewis ‘wish list’, all the better.</p> <p>Whilst you cannot dictate the prices your stockists choose to sell at, you need to be aware of their pricing strategy and be agile enough to react should you choose to, particularly during sale periods.</p> <p>It was put to me by a brand in the past that “our stockists can have those ‘sale only’ customers”. Fair enough but I’d always prefer to acquire any customer direct, sale only or not, and nurture the relationship.</p> <p>This brings to light an interesting point regarding loyalty. It should not be measured only in monetary terms. We have discovered that some of our clients’ most loyal customers are not necessarily those that spend the most money.</p> <p>Perhaps these customers can only afford to shop with the brand once or twice a year. However, they are the ones that shout the most about their purchase, something that is often not measured or harnessed.</p> <p>You therefore need to look beyond financial data and models, such as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64481-finding-your-best-customers-with-the-rfm-matrix/" target="_blank">RFM</a> when it comes to understanding loyalty.</p> <h3>5. Make sure your direct and wholesale teams are talking to one another</h3> <p>I spoke to a premium menswear brand last year looking to grow their direct channel. ‘Super!’ I thought, we can help. However, as we dug a little deeper, we soon realised it was going to be a huge challenge.</p> <p>We discovered that the wholesale team had some pretty aggressive targets of their own, meaning they were selling into an ever-increasing number of retailers. Worse still, many of these retailers were at the lower end of the market, damaging brand perception.</p> <p>The direct team also had some rather juicy numbers to hit for the next financial year. But nobody internally had joined the dots, namely that the direct team would find themselves gradually hamstrung by increased competition in search as stockists optimised their sites and bid on brand terms.</p> <p>This highlights how <strong>the wholesale and direct strategy have to be working in unison.</strong></p> <p>Growing both channels simultaneously is possible but requires careful planning, great communication and an understanding of how the two will play out online, especially in search. </p><p><strong>Have you worked with or for a mono-brand? What challenges did you experience? Please feel free to share below.</strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68034 2016-07-07T09:58:23+01:00 2016-07-07T09:58:23+01:00 How Selfridges’s Body Studio blurs the lines between digital & in-store Nikki Gilliland <p><a href="http://www.selfridges.com/GB/en/content/article/body-studio" target="_blank">Body Studio</a>, the latest creative project from Selfridges, is hoping to turn this notion around. </p> <p>Capitalising on the wellness trend, it is an entirely new in-store and online department based around lingerie, hosiery, swimwear and sportswear.</p> <p>Here’s why Body Studio is a great example of creativity within the world of women’s retail.</p> <h3>Empowering content</h3> <p>Whether it’s a Victoria Secret model or David Beckham in his pants, lingerie advertising is often highly sexualised – far removed from the everyday reality of buying underwear.</p> <p>With ‘Incredible Machines’ – a short film designed to promote the campaign – Selfridges sets a very different tone.</p> <p>In the video, a number of inspirational women speak about the relationship they have with their own body.</p> <p>A deliberate move away from traditional advertising, Selfridges uses video as a way of creating conversation as well as promoting its core message. </p> <p>With its empowering tone and inspirational subject matter, it’s certainly a refreshing take on the world of lingerie advertising – and a great way of capturing consumer interest in the Body Studio.</p> <p>By promoting an ethos rather than a product, it is automatically much more memorable.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rmaNcRj-Wd4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Unique in-store space</h3> <p>Described as a ‘statement space’, the Body Studio is Selfridges’ attempt to take a neglected category and truly celebrate it.</p> <p>Instead of resigning lingerie to one corner, it has made it the focus of the largest department in its flagship store.</p> <p>Part of a five-year refurbishment project, it is designed to be a destination within a destination - a place where people will want to come to explore.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6763/Selfridges_Body_Studio_In-Store.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="540"></p> <p>What is unique about the Body Studio is that, despite selling a multitude of luxury brands, the studio itself is heavily promoted as a Selfridges-own service.</p> <p>Instead of focusing on the designers or even the clothes themselves, the store is much more focused on the overall experience it provides.</p> <p>Including a 'Fit Studio', two beauty rooms, a Daniel Galvin hair salon and a healthy eating café, it harks back to the days where shopping was an all-day activity and not just a lunch-time browse. </p> <p>The first department of its kind, it also signals a shift for retailers. Integrating the categories of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/a-marketer-s-guide-to-wearable-technology/">wearable technology</a>, activewear and underwear, it highlights the way clothes are now seen as an extension of our lifestyle choices.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6764/Fit_Studio.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="479"></p> <h3>Interactive digital experience</h3> <p>The Body Studio digital hub aims to complement the in-store experience, offering a wealth of content related to fashion, fitness and wellbeing.</p> <p>With its pared-down design, there is a clear focus on editorial, and this makes for an enjoyable and interesting user experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6765/selfridges_hemsley_and_hemsley.PNG" alt="" width="750" height="645"></p> <p>As well as features that cleverly advertise products, there are also recipes and interviews - making it feel like more of a lifestyle publication as opposed to just a retail website.</p> <p>As we've seen from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67909-selfridges-unveils-ios-app-with-shoppable-instagram-feed-is-it-any-good/">recent launch of its shoppable app</a>, Selfridges has been focusing on its digital efforts of late. With its 360 degree-video as well as integrated streaming of Body Talk debates, this section of its website is similarly digitally-savvy.</p> <p>However, what <em>is</em> different here is that the content always points the user’s attention back to the physical experience.</p> <p>Personally, I found myself far more intrigued by the events happening in-store rather than online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6766/selfridges_events.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="541"></p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>While the digital hub provides an interesting glimpse into the Body Studio, it mainly serves as an advert for the flagship department. And ultimately, this appears to be Selfridges’ aim.</p> <p>More of a creative concept designed to entice shoppers in-store (as well as provide a platform for the growing athleisure industry), it is a great example of how to execute an immersive shopping experience.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67731 2016-04-11T14:27:17+01:00 2016-04-11T14:27:17+01:00 Think affiliate marketing doesn’t work for luxury brands? Think again Chris Bishop <p>But no longer. Affiliate marketing has truly come of age.</p> <h3>Isn’t affiliate just voucher codes?</h3> <p>This is not just about voucher codes, cashback and last-click for advertisers, this is part of a holistic approach to digital advertising that promises real and sustained ROI for high-end brands.</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/whoaretheaffiliates.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>The modern managed affiliate programmes use sophisticated groups of content publishers, including mainstream “offline” publishing houses such as Condé Nast.  </p> <p>This is performance marketing through deep partnership, levered via tenancy, editorial, blogging, email and (yes) incentives like voucher codes or cashback. </p> <p>Partnerships with high volume and niche sites that can deliver the kind of primed-to-buy, long tailed traffic available nowhere else.</p> <h3>Are you at risk of losing control of your message?</h3> <p>No, but…</p> <p>For years affiliate networks and technology companies used the size and scale of the channel as a key selling point, promising brands access to tens of thousands of affiliates.  </p> <p>Given that they worked on tracking fees based upon revenue generated by activity, who can blame them? </p> <p>However, this wasn’t what luxury or designer retailers, already nervous about losing control of their brand’s messages, wanted to hear. </p> <p>Only now, with dedicated, digital agencies selling these solutions as part of a wider media strategy, are brands being given the whole picture.</p> <p>When properly managed, affiliate marketing allows brands to deliver relevant messages to highly-targeted customer segments.  </p> <p>But it’s the size and scale of the networks that makes this targeting possible in the first place.</p> <h3>But isn’t luxury all about exclusivity?  </h3> <p>Why would luxury brands want their valuable name bandied about on affiliate channels with everyone else’s?</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/chriscarcollection.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>Success in the digital age requires a change in mind-set for luxury brands as customers’ buying cycles accelerate and competition stiffens in every part of the market place.  </p> <p>No longer can scarcity be the strongest value in a luxury brand's armoury, as the array of choice and quality available elsewhere can fill any sales vacuum.  </p> <p>Instead, luxury today is defined by desirability, product excellence, exemplary service and, fundamentally, a brand promise.</p> <p>And affiliate channels are exactly where a brand’s promise, desirability, service and excellence are defined for its target audience.  </p> <p>They are key to the continued success of luxury brands in the digital age and are proven to send ready-to-convert customers direct to online stores.   </p> <h3>Luxury is talked about and bought online more than ever</h3> <p>Deloitte says that 58% of UK millennial luxury consumers buy their luxury goods online. What’s more, 85% of luxury consumers regularly use social media.</p> <p>According to Google one in five luxury purchases happens on the web.</p> <p>And participating in high profile online retail events like Black Friday and Cyber Monday clearly doesn’t dim the lustre of a luxury brand or cannibalize their full-price sales.</p> <p>In 2015 our client NET-A-PORTER saw Black Friday was its highest day for sales that year, with one item sold every second on its website. </p> <p>What’s more, offering deals and vouchering is not regarded as damaging to luxury brands’ reputation by consumers.  </p> <p>In fact, these luxury customers were four times more likely to be searching for deals on Black Friday 2015 than non-luxury customers (Experian).</p> <h3>Do affiliate tactics really deliver incremental sales to luxury brands?</h3> <p>Yes, they do.</p> <p>One of our retailers had always assumed cashback websites would only reach customers already on its files and has little effect on overall profit. We helped them prove otherwise.  </p> <p>A tactical trial conducted with Quidco for the brand found that 86% of consumers that bought their products via the publisher during the trial were “new to file” and their average order value was much higher than the norm.</p> <p><img src="https://openmerchantaccount.com/img2/shopstylesolacelondon.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>For another fashion retailer, working with affiliates achieved over 300 pieces of content coverage in a three-month period which, in turn, contributed to content websites driving 50%+ of the brand's affiliate revenue.</p> <p>Affiliate channels have proved, time and time again, to bring new customers and incremental sales to the table for every kind of brand, particularly those at the very top end of their sector.</p> <h3>Who else is using affiliates?</h3> <p>The roll call of brands that are using the affiliate channel as part of the marketing mix is impressive – Agent Provocateur, Barneys New York, Burberry, Liberty London, NET-A-PORTER to name a few.</p> <p>But if the affiliate channel was just about vouchers and cashback, they wouldn’t be using it.</p> <p>These brands know the value of curated conversation and content-led buzz to their brand; they are finding new and exciting ways to engage through affiliate marketing.  </p> <p>Crucially, they are realising that careful planning, targeted partnership and innovative execution ensures the biggest ROI alongside an extension of digital PR.</p> <h3>The lessons of affiliate marketing</h3> <ul> <li>Luxury affiliate marketing is happening... if you’re not doing it, you’re already losing out.</li> <li>Luxury consumers are savvy, switched on and impulsive – take advantage of that.</li> <li>Be led by the data and use experts to help you execute the highest quality campaigns.</li> <li>Choose who manages your affiliates carefully – your brand’s success will live or die by their experience both within wider digital marketing, the specific affiliate channel and naturally their knowledge of your brand / sector.</li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67681 2016-03-30T14:56:00+01:00 2016-03-30T14:56:00+01:00 Can cross-channel marketing save the Next catalogue? Matthew Kelleher <h3>Catalogues on the wane?</h3> <p>It’s not the shift from offline to digital that is the stand out issue here, which remains a constant now as it has done for many years (although the shift in buying patterns detailed by Next in their annual review, from offline to online to mobile, is very significant).</p> <p>What is momentus is that the Next catalogue, one of the pillars of Next’s long term success along with Directory and its credit services, as well as being one of the icons of the catalogue market, is on the wane.</p> <p>Of course it is not just Next who are questioning the role of the catalogue in the digital era, many retailers I speak to are struggling to understand both the strategic role of a catalogue in the evolving marketing mix and its value in a multi-channel world.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3440/Screen_Shot_2016-03-30_at_14.45.07.png" alt="next catalogue" width="615"></p> <h3>Is the catalogue's value to other channels truly known?</h3> <p>Customer behaviour continues to change and, critically, traditional measurement of channel performance no longer provides accurate understanding of channel performance.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66440-three-key-trends-from-our-marketing-attribution-briefing-digital-cream-2015/">Attribution modelling</a>, if it is being applied, is stymied by the inability to accurately view customers across the great divide between off and online marketing.</p> <p>The convergence of traditional and digital marketing and the rise of cross-channel marketing have been well predicted, for instance <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65990-three-digital-marketing-mega-trends-for-2015/">by Ashley Friedlein</a> here on Econsultancy. The travails of the Next catalogue are a salient reminder of this trend.</p> <p>Retailers operating without cross-channel tracking and genuinely-<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66316-how-are-organisations-integrating-the-single-customer-view">single customer views </a>cannot see what role the catalogue plays in generating, for instances, footfall in store or browsing activity online.</p> <p>The catalogue is therefore operating marooned in its own silo, judged only by its direct response results which, we all know, are declining across the board.</p> <h3>Enhancing attribution models</h3> <p>The solution for retailers facing these issues is to move onto the next generation of cross-channel single customer view database that use cross-channel tracking and customer identification software.</p> <p>Retailers need to know when they send a catalogue who browses, who is driven in store and who is price checking on a mobile device.</p> <p>In this fashion attribution models are enhanced, customer journeys effectively tracked and channel value properly understood. There is also the added benefit, probably the most valuable, of integrating the catalogue into the digital channels.</p> <p>Retailers practising cross-channel marketing in this fashion can serve relevant content to individuals launched on their journey by the catalogue as they arrive at the next stage on their journey, for instance when they arrive at the website or when they interact with an email, delivering an ‘omnichannel’ message and guiding them along the path to conversion.</p> <p><em>A mid-'90s Next Directory (<a href="http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Next-Directory-Catalogue-No-10-Autumn-Winter-1992-/281975932968">via eBay</a>)</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3441/Screen_Shot_2016-03-30_at_14.53.28.png" alt="early next directory" width="615"></p> <h3>Confidence in catalogues can only come from a single customer view</h3> <p>I’m also intrigued by the phraseology used by The Telegraph – “for customers who don’t want them”. This refers to the Next press release's ‘Catalogues and Marketing’ review.</p> <p>Next has been a leader in using segmentation and analytics to drive their catalogue and direct mail for many years, but reading between the lines, as the Telegraph is doing, the Next hierarchy is losing confidence and switching spend.</p> <p>Any retailer facing a similar challenge needs a cross-channel single customer view to open the door to a wealth of online generated data that would bolster a shift to Predictive Analytical approaches. The days of offline marketers dismissing and ignoring multi-channel behavioural data as ‘clickstream’ have to be nearing an end.</p> <p>The development of cross-channel tracking software and single customer views will lead retailers not only to greater understanding of the role of the catalogue but will also create additional customer value.</p> <p>Not only will retailers be able to more accurately tie online customers together with offline, showing the true value of a single customer, but it will drive increased value through better decision making at a customer level.</p> <p>That means more accurate personalisation and a greater probability to retain a customer in a world where brand loyalty is an increasingly rare commodity.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67680 2016-03-29T14:04:00+01:00 2016-03-29T14:04:00+01:00 Cross-device measurement: what to look for in a solution James Collins <h3>We have the technology</h3> <p>I am reminded of Steve Austin, the astronaut from the popular 1970s TV series, The Six Million Dollar Man. His team set out to “rebuild” him, using the latest technology to design the first bionic man.</p> <p>Similarly, the technology exists to connect user journeys across screens – desktop, mobile, tablet, connected TVs and others. Through a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67110-what-does-the-rollout-of-google-cross-device-conversions-mean-for-marketers">cross-device tracking</a> solution, we have the technology to fix broken user journeys and ultimately improve the conversation between brands and consumers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3390/six.jpeg" alt="six million dollar man" width="225" height="225"></p> <h3>Shopping for a Solution</h3> <p>To truly understand consumer behavior, you need to identify the role different devices play in the customer journey. I have compiled a “buyer’s guide” of five things you should consider when choosing a cross-device measurement solution.</p> <p><strong>1. Look for any joins you already have</strong></p> <p>Most businesses are sitting on piles of first party data; the first step to understanding the customer journey is to look inwards and see what you already have.</p> <p>It is likely that you will have lots of chances to join data within your organisation. Your customer database is a great source and a natural place to start. The solution you choose should be able to integrate this data and build from there. </p> <p><strong>2. Look for ways to enhance the data </strong></p> <p>Work with your measurement provider to add to your current data set.</p> <p>Your solution should allow for importing any <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67674-what-are-first-second-and-third-party-data">first party data </a>where a user provides information that is consistent across devices, like an email address, customer ID or login. Of course, PII data (personally identifiable information) must be hashed and encrypted to safeguard users’ privacy at all times. </p> <p>Your provider should be able to create deterministic joins based on first party data collected and joined. Keep in mind, you are not going to get every match right – no data is 100% accurate.</p> <p>Even with deterministic first party data, there are circumstances that make the data less accurate, such as when multiple people use the same machine or when households share an email address.  </p> <p><strong>3. If you can’t find them, buy them</strong></p> <p>Your data can only get you so far. What about those who are visiting your site on their mobile or tablet for the first time, who you have yet to identify?</p> <p>Whether your provider buys the data or creates it themselves, this is where probabilistic joining comes in. Probabilistic identification involves ‘fingerprinting’ devices using a variety of attributes, such as number of cookies stored, device IDs, public data such as IP addresses and behavioural data (geographic location and movement of devices geographically across time).</p> <p>All of these factors are combined to connect disparate devices to the same user.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3391/print.jpg" alt="fingerprint" width="250" height="234"> </p> <p><strong>4. Use deterministic joins to increase confidence in probabilistic data </strong></p> <p>Probabilistic device joining is often very accurate, but since the process employs algorithms, analysis and probabilities to match devices there will always be a degree of inaccuracy. The ‘accurate’ deterministic data can be used to validate the joins made by the probabilistic approach.</p> <p>For example, take a user who’s identified themselves on two devices – has the probabilistic data also matched the same devices, or is it saying something completely different; then repeat this process as required. A cross-device solution provider should be able to provide the degree of accuracy for the data they have joined.  </p> <p><strong>5. Use the data to take action </strong></p> <p>Similar to painting a room, the hard work is done before you actually put fresh paint on the walls. It is in the prep, the patching and the priming that makes a newly painted room shine.</p> <p>Now that you have done the work to create the joins, you can look at all of your marketing performance and use the insights to enhance your marketing. </p> <h3>A smarter abandoned basket campaign</h3> <p>Cross-device data can be used to improve marketing effectiveness and efficiency in many ways. One example is when managing <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67534-from-checkout-to-conversion-how-to-prevent-basket-abandonment">abandoned basket </a>campaigns – when a customer adds items to their online basket but does not place an order.</p> <p>A problem arises when customers are targeted with email reminders based on shopping cart abandonment on a single device. This strategy does not take into consideration real user behaviour – shopping and browsing on tablet or mobile, but making a purchase on desktop, or vice versa.</p> <p>Without a view across devices marketers are unable to see if people have actually converted, and ultimately this can result in a poor experience.   </p> <p>To be successful at targeting users who have left items in their online basket, you need a solution that captures and joins behaviour across all screens, enabling you to send relevant and timely emails to re-engage consumers. By using this insight, brands can make their emails more effective and ensure they don’t retarget customers with products they have already bought. </p> <h3>A Smart Solution for your Business</h3> <p>Marketers need to understand their customers’ cross-device journeys and through harnessing this information they can develop smarter marketing campaigns.</p> <p>When working with a cross-device solution provider, each business should strive to use their data in a pragmatic way, understanding the value that will be gained from creating this joined up view.</p>