tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/mobile Latest Mobile content from Econsultancy 2017-04-26T01:00:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69033 2017-04-26T01:00:00+01:00 2017-04-26T01:00:00+01:00 Five essential mobile moments and how brands can take part in them Jeff Rajeck <h4>Engineering mobile moments</h4> <p>As part of a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/understanding-the-customer-journey-in-apac">recent report about the customer journey in Asia-Pacific</a>, Econsultancy asked nearly 1,000 marketers about their ability to insert their brands into 'mobile moments'.</p> <p>The results indicate that around half of respondents felt that they did, in fact, engineer these 'mobile moments' which showed their brand in a positive light. But what exactly does that mean?</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5674/1.png" alt="" width="777" height="298"></p> <p>According to <a href="http://blogs.forrester.com/ted_schadler/17-01-25-reinvent_the_web_to_win_the_mobile_moment">Forrester</a>, a 'mobile moment' is a point in time and space when someone pulls out a mobile device to get what he or she wants immediately, in context.</p> <p>And, it follows, that if brands want to engage the increasingly mobile consumer then marketers are going to have to position themselves into that moment and provide the value that consumers are looking for.</p> <p>Below are a list of five mobile moments and what brands can do to be a part of them, and win their customer's love and attention.</p> <h4>Before we start</h4> <p>Econsultancy Asia-Pacific has two events currently which may interest you:</p> <ol> <li> <strong>Webinar</strong> - <a href="https://econsultancy.com/events/mobile-trends-data-and-best-practice-apac-time-zone/">Mobile: Trends, Data and Best Practice</a> - on Thursday April 27th in the Asia-Pacific timezone.  Sign up here.</li> <li> <strong>Survey</strong> - We are looking for marketers in Australia and New Zealand to take part in a survey about marketing automation.  <a href="http://econsultancy.linkedin-state-of-marketing-automation-in-anz.sgizmo.com/s3/">Click here to participate</a> - and get a free copy of the report when it is published.</li> </ol> <h3>1) I want to know</h3> <p>The first mobile moment is when a consumer suddenly needs some information, either out of interest or perhaps as a first step on the customer journey.</p> <p>According to<a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/collections/micromoments.html"> research conducted by Google</a>, two out of three (66%) consumers use their mobile to look something up that they have seen in a TV advert.</p> <p>Additionally, <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/content/dam/nielsenglobal/kr/docs/global-report/2016/nielsen_global_mobile_money_report_final.pdf">according to Nielsen</a>, more than half (56%) of consumers in Asia-Pacific use their mobile to look up product information when shopping and a similar amount use their smartphone in many other similar ways as well.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5673/nielsen.png" alt="" width="800" height="407"></p> <p>How can brands win this moment? As nearly all searches for information on mobile start with Google, brands should ensure that their sites are high in search results for the things consumers are likely to search for on mobile.</p> <p>While this can be accomplished through good SEO, marketers should also review their AdWords keyword strategies to ensure that they are not losing the top of the page to competitors.</p> <h3>2) I want to go</h3> <p>Another mobile moment occurs when consumers are thinking of going somewhere, or even on the way, and they need to know more about their destination.</p> <p>Google's <a href="https://www.consumerbarometer.com/en/">Consumer Barometer</a> data indicates that 82% of consumers, globally, look for local information on mobile. While numbers are quite as high as that in Asia Pacific, in most Asia Pacific countries at least half of all consumers use their mobile devices to find local information.</p> <p> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5676/2.png" alt="" width="800" height="432"></p> <p>For brands to be a part of this mobile moment, they should ensure that: </p> <ul> <li>They are on Google Maps (if they have a physical presence)</li> <li>Their website is mobile-optimized</li> <li>Their site has easily-accessible locations and opening hours </li> </ul> <h3>3) I want to buy</h3> <p>Perhaps the most obvious, and most-coveted by brands, mobile moment is when consumers are ready to buy something.</p> <p>Google reports that 82% use their smartphone in-store when deciding what to buy and Nielsen indicates that 60% use their mobiles to compare prices when shopping.</p> <p>According to the Consumer Barometer, many consumers also use smartphones to actually make a purchase in Asia-Pacific. The percentage varies considerably by country, but all brands in Indonesia should know that more than two in three consumers buy using their mobile device.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5677/3.png" alt="" width="800" height="475"></p> <p>There are countless suggestions for how marketers can improve mobile ecommerce, but perhaps the most important suggestion is that brands should avoid forcing their mobile customers to create accounts or do any typing of any significance. Point and click is the way to go on mobile.</p> <h3>4) I want to do</h3> <p>Smartphones are not, however, only used out-of-home. Many consumers also use their mobiles as the most convenient way to get information while they are working on projects in their homes.</p> <p>These moments are classified as 'I want to do' and brands which offer products or services which help people with cooking, DIY, homework, or other in-house tasks need to be present at these times.</p> <p>Google's data indicates that more than 9 in 10 (91%) of consumers use their smartphone to find ideas when 'doing a task' and so marketers can consider this mobile moment as pertaining to just about everyone.</p> <p>To be a part of the 'doing' moment, brands should consider search terms which consumers use when trying to accomplish something - "How can I...", "fix ...", "best way to make ..." - and produce appropriate content to satisfy the consumer's requirements.</p> <h3>5) I want to show</h3> <p>And finally, another emerging mobile behaviour which brands should be a part of is the moment where consumers want to share something with their friends or followers.</p> <p>According to <a href="http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/smartphones-the-new-must-have-when-travelling">research by travel site Kayak</a>, more than half (54%) of travelers from Singapore use their smartphones on holiday (70% for those aged between 18 and 24), and the most popular reason is to share photos showing what they are doing while vacationing.</p> <p>For brands to be part of these mobile moments, marketers should consider doing experiential marketing in areas where people are on holiday or in crowded city centres.</p> <p>One excellent example of this is a recent experiential campaign <a href="https://www.whycatalyst.com/the-economist-future-forces/">dreamed up by Catalyst for The Economist</a>. To encourage subscriptions, the agency set up stands in urban areas which offered insect-flavoured ice cream.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5678/4.png" alt="" width="800" height="412"></p> <p>Intended to be a thought-provoking exercise about using bugs as a source for protein for a growing global population, the event also provided many memorable images which were surely shared extensively on social media.</p> <h4>So...</h4> <p>In order to stay relevant on mobile, marketers need to break out of the habit of looking at the customer journey as steps along the buying funnel and instead consider the consumers' new, mobile behaviours.</p> <p>These mobile moments offer brands an opportunity to move beyond interruption-based advertising and become relevant to the tasks which matter most in the lives of their customers.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69016 2017-04-25T13:00:00+01:00 2017-04-25T13:00:00+01:00 Why beauty brands are betting on augmented reality Nikki Gilliland <p>How exactly? Well it’s all down to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/5637-can-augmented-reality-be-a-commercial-success-for-e-commerce/" target="_blank">augmented reality</a>. </p> <p>Sephora is the latest brand to introduce AR into its app, with its ‘Virtual Artist’ feature allowing users to ‘try on’ different looks by overlaying make-up onto photos. A tutorials feature also demonstrates exactly how to achieve specific looks.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5543/Sephora_app.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="439"></p> <p>With brands like L’Oréal and OPI also offering users the chance to virtually experiment with beauty products, it’s becoming par for the course for big brands. Here’s just three reasons why.</p> <h4>Personalising beauty content</h4> <p>There’s certainly no shortage of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68087-six-brilliant-blogs-from-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">beauty-related content</a> online, with brands and influencers posting a constant stream of blogs, tutorials, hauls and ‘how-to’s. </p> <p>This means that consumers can find information about pretty much any product out there. However, what they <em>can’t</em> do is determine how it will look on their own face. </p> <p>Augmented reality introduces this concept, and along with it - real personalisation. Instead of watching an influencer demonstrate how to apply eyeliner, an AR feature like Sephora’s ‘Virtual Tutorial’ will tailor it to the user’s unique and individual features. </p> <p>Not only does this fulfil the learning aspect, but it makes the experience far more personal, which in turn, is also more memorable. </p> <h4>Adding an interactive element</h4> <p>While beauty content serves a functional purpose, it is mostly passive, with consumers merely watching videos or reading blogs to learn and discover. </p> <p>In contrast, there’s a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68059-should-pokemon-go-give-marketers-hope-for-augmented-reality/" target="_blank">gaming element to AR</a> which elevates it to something that can be purely entertaining. It also means that users can experiment with it in their own time, whether they want to use it to discover new products, learn techniques or just have fun. </p> <p>After all, there’s an experimental and nostalgic aspect to beauty that is really rather relatable. From trying your mum’s lipstick as a child to outlandish trends as teenagers – AR brings back the opportunity for self-expression and creativity, allowing make-up to become something fun and artistic again rather than a daily chore.</p> <p>It’s also time saving, of course, with technology allowing users to experiment without physically lifting a finger. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5544/L_oreal_make_up_genius.jpg" alt="" width="660" height="365"></p> <h4>Bridging the online and offline gap</h4> <p>According to Sephora, women buy the wrong colour foundation around seven times before finding the right shade. Of course, this tends to be the problem with buying anything online, with the absence of in-store help and advice resulting in poorly-judged purchases. </p> <p>AR solves this issue, allowing users to make smarter and better-informed decisions without the need to physically visit a store. </p> <p>Even better, AR also allows consumers to find products they would otherwise ignore or fail to notice.</p> <p>For instance, Iman Cosmetics has developed an app that helps users find their ‘colour signature’. As well as helping to find the right shade of foundation, this also means that it will recommend products to help match and complement unique skin tones and complexion types.</p> <p>So, will augmented reality lead to fewer beauty retail stores as a result? </p> <p>Not necessarily, because while AR certainly takes away the need for a physical shopping experience, it doesn’t remove the consumer’s desire for it. Yet with a multitude of brands demonstrating that AR technology can complement both online and offline shopping – we’re likely to see even more examples in future. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68689-how-the-beauty-industry-is-embracing-the-internet-of-things/" target="_blank">How the beauty industry is embracing the Internet of Things</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68371-why-travel-retail-is-big-business-for-beauty-brands/" target="_blank">Why travel retail is big business for beauty brands</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67884-seven-ways-social-media-is-shaping-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">Seven ways social media is shaping the beauty industry</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2017-04-21T12:55:00+01:00 2017-04-21T12:55:00+01:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to two sector-specific reports, B2B and Healthcare &amp; Pharma) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet statistics and digital market research with data, facts, charts and figures. The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need - a huge time-saver for presentations and reports.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Sector-specific data and reports are available under the following areas:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-and-pharmaceuticals-internet-statistics-compendium/">Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Financial Services and Insurance Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/financial-services-and-insurance-internet-statistics-compendium/">Financial Services and Insurance</a> </strong></li> </ul> <p><strong>Regions covered in each document (where data is available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4457 2017-04-19T09:00:00+01:00 2017-04-19T09:00:00+01:00 Email Marketing Industry Census 2017 <p>The 11th annual <strong>Email Marketing Industry Census</strong>, published in partnership with <a href="http://www.adestra.com">Adestra</a>, is based on the largest UK survey of email marketers.</p> <p>The census takes an in-depth look at email practices being adopted, the resources being dedicated to email and the channel's effectiveness compared to other types of marketing.</p> <p>Personalisation, marketing automation, optimisation for different devices and the future of email are all themes that are revisited in this year's Census, and there are also new questions about the <strong>use of metrics</strong>, the <strong>application of artificial intelligence</strong> and the <strong>impact of Brexit</strong> on how companies are approaching the <strong>EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)</strong>.</p> <p>With <strong>11 years' worth of data to assess</strong>, this provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the state of the industry and find out how those at the coalface of email marketing are operating.</p> <p>Over 1,000 respondents took part in the 2017 Census, which took the form of an online survey in February and March 2017.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>Find out how a variety of trends around email practices, budgets and opinions have changed over 11 years.</li> <li>Discover other marketers' opinions on what the future of email will look like.</li> <li>Benchmark your own practices with the activities of marketers maximising their email efforts.</li> <li>Understand the challenges organisations are facing in improving their email capabilities.</li> </ul> <h2>Key findings from the report</h2> <ul> <li>Marketers get to grips with automation, helped by improved technology</li> <li>Email reigns supreme when it comes to delivering ROI, though companies must do more to measure success</li> <li>Companies are still under-investing in a channel which drove an estimated £29bn in UK online retail sales in 2016</li> <li>Companies continue to adapt to consumer use of different devices</li> <li>True personalisation at scale remains elusive for many businesses, though more companies are starting to reap the benefits</li> <li>Census shows signs of inertia and lack of understanding around EU data law changes</li> <li>Segmentation continues to deliver</li> <li>Responsibility for email shifts from the individual to the team</li> <li>Artificial intelligence can improve email marketing performance</li> </ul> <h2>Expert insight</h2> <p>The <strong>80-page</strong> 2017 report contains insight and comment from leading experts in the email marketing world and associated digital sectors, including:</p> <ul> <li>Andrew Campbell, Martech Director, First 10</li> <li>Chris Combemale, Group CEO, DMA</li> <li>Riaz Kanani, Joint MD and Co-Founder, Radiate b2b</li> <li>Dave Littlechild, Email, Ecommerce and Sales &amp; Marketing Consultant</li> <li>Kath Pay, Founder and Senior Consultant, Holistic Email Marketing</li> <li>Jordie van Rijn, eCRM and Email Marketing Consultant, eMailMonday</li> <li>Philip Storey, Email Marketing and CRM Strategy Consultant, CEO at Enchant Agency</li> <li>Tim Watson, Email Marketing Consultant, Zettasphere</li> </ul> <h2>Features of the report</h2> <ul> <li>Approach to email</li> <li>Email effectiveness</li> <li>Place in the organisation</li> <li>Optimising for different devices</li> <li>Personalisation</li> <li>Marketing automation</li> <li>Improving email marketing for the future</li> </ul> <p><strong>You can download a free sample of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68996 2017-04-13T15:22:31+01:00 2017-04-13T15:22:31+01:00 10 cracking digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>28% of marketers still feeling unprepared for the GDPR</h3> <p>With just over a year until the GDPR comes into force, a <a href="https://dma.org.uk/infographic/infographic-b2b-marketing-and-the-gdpr" target="_blank">new infographic</a> from the DMA shows that many marketers are failing to prepare.</p> <p>While general awareness of the GDPR is up, 28% of B2B marketers still feeling unprepared – down just 2% from previous figures. Only two-thirds of survey respondents said their business would be GDPR compliant in time for 2018.</p> <p>In terms of the causes of concern, 37% of marketers said profiling, while 50% said it was legacy data. The biggest was by far consent, with 70% agreeing that it would change under the GDPR.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5442/DMA_infographic.JPG" alt="" width="618" height="324"></p> <h3>Three fifths of marketing graduates have no knowledge of affiliate strategies</h3> <p>Affilinet has been researching how well marketing students are prepared for a career in the industry, with results showing that many are graduating with little or no knowledge of affiliate or performance-based marketing.</p> <p>In a survey, 41% of graduates said that they have studied modules related to affiliate marketing. Out of these, however, 67% stated that the information taught was ‘outdated and unhelpful’.</p> <p>52% admitted that they’d needed to teach themselves to progress in their career, with 22% learning through courses later on. The remaining 26% of marketing graduates said that they still had no knowledge of affiliate practices whatsoever.</p> <h3>Mobile drives digital ad spend past £10bn</h3> <p>According to a new report from <a href="https://iabuk.net/about/press/archive/mobile-drives-digital-ad-spend-past-10-billion-threshold" target="_blank">IAB and PwC,</a> digital advertising grew at its fastest rate for nine years in 2016, increasing 17.3% to £10.3bn.</p> <p>Mobile video is now the fastest-growing ad format, with spend on mobile video ads doubling to £693m. Consequently, it now accounts for 29% of the total growth in ad spend.</p> <p>Insight suggests that the rise reflects the increasing amount of users watching video clips on their smartphones, with two in five people reportedly saying they now watch mobile video more than they did a year ago.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5440/PwC_IAB.png" alt="" width="780" height="480"></p> <h3>Just 13% of employees able to name their company CMO</h3> <p>New research by eShare suggests that chief marketing officers are one of the least recognised board members, with just 13% of employees able to identify the CMO of their organisation.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 UK employees, just 8% were able to identify the chairperson and 14% were able to identify the chief information officer and chief financial officer. In contrast, 36% were able to name the CEO, making this the most visible board member to UK employees.</p> <h3>66% of beauty shoppers use Instagram for inspiration</h3> <p>Facebook and Instagram has revealed how beauty shoppers are increasingly turning to social media to help inform their purchases.</p> <p>The Mobile Makeover Report states that 66% of beauty shoppers look to social media for inspiration on how to achieve their perfect look, 70% for learning make-up techniques and 62% for advice on products. </p> <p>Tutorials are among the most popular types of video, with 74% of beauty viewers watching ‘how-to’ content. You can read more about how mobile is impacting the beauty industry <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68992-three-ways-mobile-is-impacting-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">in this article</a>. </p> <h3>41% of UK shoppers will spend more to make Easter special</h3> <p>Savvy has been exploring how consumers will spend their money over Easter, with 62% of UK shoppers planning to celebrate over the bank holiday weekend.</p> <p>In a survey, 41% of respondents said they don’t mind spending more in order to make their Easter celebrations special. That being said, shoppers will still be on the hunt for a discount, with 60% saying they already know where they’ll can find the best value Easter eggs.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, eggs will be the most popular item to buy, followed by chocolate in general, and the ingredients for a roast dinner. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5441/Savvy.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="452"></p> <h3>62% of ecommerce brands don’t personalise digital experiences</h3> <p>Episerver’s <a href="http://www.episerver.com/learn/resources/research--reports/seven-digital-commerce-trends-for-retail-2017/" target="_blank">State of Digital Commerce</a> report suggests that just 38% of ecommerce brands are incorporating personalisation into their current marketing strategies. Despite 70% of companies using email marketing, only 28% are using triggered emails to re-engage non-converting customers.</p> <p>What’s more, despite the abundance of data available, 46% of marketers admit they wouldn’t be able to create an omnichannel campaign due to a lack of insight into the customer journey.</p> <h3>Paddy Power generates the most social engagements during Grand National</h3> <p>4C has analysed the level of social engagement generated from TV ads during the Grand National. Results show that Paddy Paddy stole the show, with its two ads generating 59,527 engagements from public mentions, retweets, comments and likes on social channels – double the engagement of competitors.</p> <p>SkyBet saw 16,840 engagements and Coral saw 18,733. Meanwhile, despite its close association with horse racing, William Hill saw just 2,812 over the course of the event.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Looking for some guidance on how to pick the winner of the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GrandNational?src=hash">#GrandNational</a>? Watch this video to find out how the experts do it. <a href="https://t.co/27q9DPQJP0">pic.twitter.com/27q9DPQJP0</a></p> — Paddy Power (@paddypower) <a href="https://twitter.com/paddypower/status/850644686096281600">April 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Consumers see Snapchat as a passing trend for brand communication</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://uk.mailjet.com/blog/guide/email-innovations-research-report/" target="_blank">Mailjet</a> has revealed that consumers are displaying a lack of faith in new platforms like Pinterest and Snapchat and their role in brand communication.</p> <p>41% of consumers believe that email is the platform most people will be using in 10 years’ time, followed by 26% of consumers saying the same for Facebook and WhatsApp. In contrast, just 11% of people are certain that Pinterest and LinkedIn will be used in a decade and only 14% are confident that Snapchat will still exist. </p> <p>Despite many brands getting involved, major updates to platforms are also going unnoticed by consumers, with just 6% of people noting Instagram’s ‘buy button’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5443/Instagram_shop_now.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="452"></p> <h3>Supermarket promotions fall to lowest level in 11 years</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/uk/en/press-room/2017/supermarket-promotions-at-lowest-level-for-11-years.html" target="_blank">Nielsen</a>, supermarket promotions have fallen to their lowest level in 11 years in the UK, with just 26% of consumer spend going towards temporary discounts or multi-buy offers in the four weeks up until 25th March 2017.</p> <p>Nielsen suggests that this is due to supermarkets becoming increasingly price competitive, turning temporary price reductions into permanent cuts as a result.</p> <p>Year-on-year supermarket sales have also fallen, with the late Easter period said to have contributed to a 2.6% decrease in the four-week period to March 25th.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68992 2017-04-13T11:13:00+01:00 2017-04-13T11:13:00+01:00 Three ways mobile is impacting the beauty industry Nikki Gilliland <p>With stats taken from Facebook’s <a href="https://www.facebook.com/business/m/mobile-makeover" target="_blank">Mobile Makeover</a> report, here are a few reasons why.</p> <h3>Building personal connections</h3> <p>Mobile has now officially overtaken desktop, with 61% of time online in the UK being spent on a smartphone device. This means that there is now little distinction between the web and the ‘mobile’ web – they are seen as one and the same for many people.</p> <p>But why is mobile the preferred option? Facebook suggests that it's because our connection to mobile is much more personal and intimate than it is to television screens or even desktop computers. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5415/mobile_is.JPG" alt="" width="340" height="498"></p> <p>We can switch from interacting with real life friends to our favourite brands, meaning there’s also very little difference in how we engage with them. </p> <p>For beauty brands, mobile enables them to build a much more direct and intimate connection the consumer. Or essentially, to become their friend too.</p> <p>Just like someone might 'like' a shared photo on Facebook, the same person wouldn’t think twice about doing so on a brand’s Instagram account. Brands such as Glossier capitalise on this seamless browsing behaviour, continuously putting relatable and shareable content into followers' news feeds.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5416/Glossier.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="484"></p> <h3>Sharing in real-time</h3> <p>Facebook states that 46% of beauty consumers use social media to share the results of something they’ve bought. It seems more so than any other industry, users are willing to offer their own feedback or share their opinion way past the point of purchase.</p> <p>This reflects the changing nature of the beauty industry in general, which is veering away from the unattainable to something much more authentic and real. Instead of looking to glossy fashion magazines for inspiration, consumers can check out an influencer online or read reviews from a fellow consumer – all directly from mobile.</p> <p>Meanwhile, since anyone can take and upload a selfie, beauty brands now have millions of advocates at their disposal.</p> <p>User-generated content is widely used by everyone from Kylie Cosmetics to Sephora, allowing brands to promote a sense of authenticity as well as foster a community online. Beauty fans apparently have 2.5 times the average number of followers on Instagram and follow four times the average number of accounts – it also enables brands to continue the cycle of advocacy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5417/Kylie.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="375"></p> <h3>Shopping on mobile</h3> <p>So, we’ve established just how important mobile is for capturing consumer engagement – but what about sales? Europe’s leading online beauty retailers reportedly get 50% of their <a href="https://www.raconteur.net/lifestyle/digital-is-key-to-beauty-industry" target="_blank">business from mobile devices</a>. </p> <p>This demonstrates the importance of a multichannel shopping experience, with brands being able to prompt consumers to purchase in the very moments they are researching, browsing or merely consuming content. </p> <p>Lastly, with Instagram recently allowing brands to test taggable or buyable products in photos, we could soon be moving into a whole new world of social commerce. Where, undoubtedly, mobile will be key.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68689-how-the-beauty-industry-is-embracing-the-internet-of-things/">How the beauty industry is embracing the Internet of Things</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68205-how-three-beauty-ecommerce-sites-integrate-editorial-content/">How three beauty ecommerce sites integrate editorial content</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68954 2017-03-31T13:25:00+01:00 2017-03-31T13:25:00+01:00 10 mesmerising digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for more.</p> <h3>Video advertising outperforms desktop display</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">A report released by Integral Ad Science has revealed that video advertising outperformed desktop display for the first time. </p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Compared to the first half of 2016, video viewability showed significant improvement in the second half of the year, increasing from 40% to 58.2%. Meanwhile, the completion rate in view increased from 26.7% to 35.1%.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Video brand risk also improved, decreasing from 11.2% to 8.9%. That being said, with the advent of fake news, brand safety remains a critical issue for advertisers, highlighting the need for a solution to protect brand reputations.</p> <h3>One in nine online visits were made to news and media sites in 2016</h3> <p>Hitwise suggests that there’s been a shift in the British public’s media consumption, predicted to be due to the impact of today’s political landscape. </p> <p>Data shows that, as well as consuming more news across broader sources, people are now beginning to question the validity of news providers and changing their preferences of media titles as a result. One in nine visits online were made to news and media sites in 2016 compared to 1 in 10 visits in 2015.</p> <p>Articles focusing on Trump and Brexit accounted for five out of the top 10 read articles in January and February 2017. Meanwhile, in the month before and after Trump’s inauguration, left-leaning newspapers such as the Guardian and The Independent gained readers from traditional tabloids, such as The Sun, Express and Daily Mail.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5157/Hitwise_1.png" alt="" width="510" height="464"></p> <h3>Consumers increasingly favouring mobile loyalty programs</h3> <p>The 2017 <a href="http://www.vibes.com/resources/2017-uk-mobile-consumer-report/" target="_blank">Mobile Consumer Report</a> from Vibes highlights a link between digital loyalty programs and greater consumer loyalty.</p> <p>Research shows that 70% of consumers would have a more positive opinion of a brand if it allowed them to save a loyalty card in their smartphone. Over one-third of people are said to store information from brands in a mobile wallet such as Apple Wallet and Android Pay.</p> <p>83% of smartphone users also say that receiving surprise rewards, exclusive content and special birthday or anniversary messaging would have a positive impact on their brand loyalty overall.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5161/Mobile_Consumer_report.jpg" alt="" width="763" height="756"></p> <h3>Mobile consumers in emerging markets are more intolerant of bad user experiences</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="http://wearefetch.com/cms/content/media/2015/12/Fetch-Global-Mobile-Consumer-Survey.pdf" target="_blank">Fetch</a> suggests that brands should consider shifting their mobile advertising focus to emerging markets, as levels of engagement rapidly increase.</p> <p>According to research, 31% of users in emerging markets define themselves as mobile-first, compared to 15% in Europe and 18% in North America.</p> <p>Similarly, where 66% of European consumers claim to access social media every hour, this rises to 72% amongst emerging markets.</p> <p>Lastly, mobile-first consumers in emerging markets are more intolerant of bad <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/user-experience-and-interaction-design-for-mobile-and-web/">mobile web experiences</a>, with 84% saying they would leave a mobile website if it loaded slowly, compared to 69% in Europe and 75% in North America.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5160/Fetch_mobile_consumer.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="280"></p> <h3>62% of consumers will stick to premium if prices rise post-Brexit</h3> <p>New findings from Centre for Retail Research and Rakuten Marketing suggest that consumers have differing views of how the referendum result will affect prices in the UK.</p> <p>A survey of 1000 consumers across the UK found that, over the next six months, 37% of people are sure they will be better off, while 40% think they will be worse off.</p> <p>Regardless, the survey also found that shoppers will not stop purchasing premium products if prices have to rise as a result of Brexit. If faced with a price increase of up to 10%, only 6% of Brits claim they would refuse to buy the item, while 62% would buy the premium brand anyway.</p> <p>There does seem to be a tipping point, however, with a 15% price increase expected to make 21% of shoppers switch to a cheaper brand.</p> <h3>UK companies unprepared for business pitching</h3> <p>Research from <a href="http://buffalo7.co.uk/uk-companies-are-not-prepared-for-pitching/" target="_blank">Buffalo7</a> has found that the majority of UK companies are not properly prepared to win new business pitches.</p> <p>From a survey of industry professionals, 61% of respondents said their companies did not employ any staff with slide-deck design expertise. In contrast, 60% wished their companies did have such expertise in-house, with 62% believing it would help their companies to win more pitches. </p> <p>Despite this recognition, a whopping 75% of respondents said that that their companies do not provide any formal training for delivering pitches.</p> <p>Perhaps unsurprisingly, the survey also found that 76% of companies have pitched for business in the last 12 months, but that 54% are losing half or more of the pitches they contest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5159/Buffalo7.jpg" alt="" width="721" height="458"></p> <h3>YouTube is number one for consumer positivity</h3> <p>According to a new study from Trinity McQueen, YouTube tops the list of media brands that people feel the most positively about.</p> <p>In a survey of ‘unbound consumers’ - people who reject scheduled media for on-demand services -  21% cited that they feel positively about YouTube, followed by 20% feeling positive towards the BBC and 16% about Netflix. </p> <p>New content appears to be a key factor in a media brand’s popularity, with 46% of unbound audiences most likely to believe YouTube always has new content, while 35% saying the same about the BBC.</p> <p>Lastly, 41% of unbound audiences feel that Facebook offers the most personalised experience, while 41% thinks YouTube offers the best overall online experience.</p> <h3>Car brands see Instagram follower growth of 20% in two months</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://www.quintly.com/blog/2017/03/the-10-most-liked-uk-brands-on-instagram/" target="_blank">Quintly</a> has revealed that five out of the top ten most-liked UK brands on Instagram are car manufacturers. </p> <p>What’s more, they all had a follower growth of at least 20% in the period of October to December 2016.</p> <p>Other analysis shows that Jaguar had the most successful post in terms of the number of likes, with a post showing the model F-Type garnering over 110,000 likes. </p> <p>This is just one example of the popularity of luxury brands on Instagram, which is also reflected by the success of other big brands like Burberry and Rolls Royce.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5154/Jaguar.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="489"></p> <h3>Mobile accounts for more than 60% of digital minutes in global markets</h3> <p>According comScore’s <a href="http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Presentations-and-Whitepapers/2017/Mobiles-Hierarchy-of-Needs?cs_edgescape_cc=GB" target="_blank">Mobile Hierarchy of Needs</a> report, mobile devices now account for a majority of consumers' digital minutes, with most of that time spent in apps.</p> <p>The growing share of consumer time claimed by mobile devices accounted for more than 60% of all digital minutes in nine major markets, rising to 91% in the case of Indonesia.</p> <p>Apps represented more than 80% of mobile minutes in all markets studied, rising to 99% in the case of China.</p> <p>The top apps are no surprise, with WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67490-10-things-you-didn-t-know-about-wechat/">WeChat</a>, QQ Instant Messenger and Line showing the popularity of messaging apps</p> <h3>63% of consumers believe the media needs more regulation</h3> <p>A new report by Network Research shows that public trust in the reliability of media information has declined significantly in the last 12 months, with 63% of people now believing that media outlets need more regulation.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,000 UK adults, the study also found that 39.5% of people feel the government has significant influence on the media agenda, while 32% feel that businesses do.</p> <p>Almost half of the public are suspicious they may have seen or read fake news recently, with 75% subsequently trusting publications to a lesser extent. 83% of people also believe there should be greater penalties for reporting fabricated news.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68938 2017-03-28T14:47:26+01:00 2017-03-28T14:47:26+01:00 How smartphone apps & personal data might reduce the cost of healthcare products Charles Wade <p>Sports brands, like <a href="http://www.nike.com/us/en_us/c/nike-plus/running-app-gps">Nike</a>, moved into the ‘wellness’ tech space early, as they quickly recognized the opportunity inherent within smartphones, utilising native functionality – such as GPS – to provide (often free) apps that offer users exercise regimes or maps to track their morning runs. </p> <p>Alongside goal-setting, fitness apps looked to enhance the experience by partnering with their home screen neighbors, such as Spotify, to combine their features, for example adding ‘Power Songs’ that play when performance dips. </p> <p>Only this month <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/12/adidas-new-open-digital-fitness-products/">adidas announced</a> that it plans to make its ‘Runtastic’ app an open platform, allowing third-parties to utilize its capabilities in their own apps to further personalize the user’s experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5083/adidas_runtastic.png" alt="" width="587" height="294"></p> <p>The reason for investing in technology is clear for the aforementioned sports apparel and footwear manufacturers – they hope to remain front of mind for their target market, namely ‘athleisure’ buyers, a segment <a href="http://digiday.com/uk/stretching-global-athleisure-boom-5-charts/">thought to be worth</a> $270bn globally last year. </p> <p>Not only is it a lucrative space, it is an increasingly competitive one where the ‘traditional’ players are under pressure from relative newcomers like Under Armour and lululemon, as well as Topshop (Ivy Park), H&amp;M, and American Eagle Outfitters, all of whom have developed ranges in an attempt to muscle in.</p> <p>At the same time the healthcare industry is spending heavily on apps as it looks to maximise the relationship that people have with their phone (<a href="https://insights.samsung.com/2016/02/24/do-patients-rely-on-mobile-healthcare-apps-more-than-their-doctors/">32% of US consumers</a> had at least one healthcare app on their phone in 2016). As an example: <a href="https://carezone.com/features">CareZone</a> acts as a journal, reminding you when to take medication; <a href="http://www.uptodate.com/home">UpToDate</a> helps students stay informed with medical developments; and the <a href="http://www.redcross.org/get-help/prepare-for-emergencies/mobile-apps">Red Cross</a> offers first aid advice.</p> <p>Incredibly, <a href="https://suite.face2gene.com/technology-facial-recognition-feature-detection-phenotype-analysis/">Face2Gene</a> allows the user to take a photo of their face (via their phone’s camera) and then uses an algorithm to scan it to identify any genetic syndromes.</p> <p>Aside from selling clothes or taking a fee for download or ‘Premium’ services, what <em>is</em> slightly unclear is what developers are doing with the most important aspect, namely the data that they collect. Looking further afield, Uber recently released ‘<a href="https://newsroom.uber.com/introducing-uber-movement/">Movements</a>’, a service which aggregates the information that the company has learnt about riders and their journeys, which it then offers to cities for better town planning. (Was that in the privacy settings?)</p> <p>It does not take a huge leap of the imagination to hypothesize that app developers might pass on the information that has been clocked up by users to insurers or pharmaceutical companies. If so, not only should consumers be alerted to this fact, but there might be an opportunity for them to demand more from this value exchange, above and beyond receiving information without having to wait at the Emergency Room.</p> <p>There are myriad apps that <a href="http://www.apppicker.com/applists/3414/the-best-health-insurance-apps-for-iphone">store insurance personal data</a>, and subsequently let users ‘compare the market’: why not take this a stage further? For example, a 40-year-old woman might share her Nike Run+ app data with her life insurance provider to show that she runs on average 25-miles a week, possibly along with her associated heart rate (and average time). This could be combined with the step counter on their iPhone, used to further detail the level of her fitness by assessing her mobility.</p> <p>Interestingly, <a href="https://www.healthiq.com/affinity/runspeed8minmile">Health IQ</a>, an insurer, has spent heavily recently on programmatic ads, stating: “Special rate life insurance for runners. Runners who can complete an 8-minute mile have a 35% lower risk of all-cause mortality and a 41% lower risk of death from heart disease.” </p> <p>Furthermore, <a href="http://www.runnersworld.com/general-interest/can-runners-save-on-life-insurance">in an article</a> from July 2016 (which also cites HealthIQ) Runner’s World explains how the US insurance provider <a href="http://www.johnhancock.com/">John Hancock</a> introduced a plan with discounts “of up to 15%” to those customers who meet exercise targets “measured by fitness trackers”. This is a good start for those people who workout.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5084/lifeinsurancead.jpg" alt="" width="578" height="368"></p> <p>Alongside the data above, could our runner submit her weekly online grocery order – that contains fruit and vegetables and low sugar items – evidence of a healthy diet that could also be used as a bargaining chip to reduce insurance costs. </p> <p>Again, John Hancock has implemented this, to a degree, through its ‘<a href="https://www.jhrewardslife.com/">Vitality Program</a>’, which rewards policy holders with points, redeemable at Whole Foods, Hyatt, and others if they can show a history of prudent eating. </p> <p>This is certainly commendable, but it does require the individual to have a relationship with that provider and the perks are only available at pre-determined vendors; those who remain fit and healthy might <em>possibly </em>prefer to use the information to reduce their premiums and buy whatever they like (such as new sneakers). </p> <p>Tech alone cannot determine the exact state of someone’s health. Indeed, people would need to continue to have medicals and routine check-ups to assess their overall state (until, that is, there’s an app for that too): however everyday activities should be seen as a tool for consumers to obtain services that are befitting of the condition they keep themselves in.</p> <p>This is timely for US consumers, given the long-term uncertainty around the <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/glossary/affordable-care-act/">Affordable Care Act</a> (recent climb-down notwithstanding). Millions of Americans pay significant sums for insurance coverage; above and beyond the impact on their health, the invaluable mine of data that apps contain should be used to positively influence their wallets too.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68851-six-ways-digital-is-changing-the-pharma-healthcare-industry/"><em>Six ways digital is changing the pharma &amp; healthcare industry</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68346-new-data-shows-why-digital-is-now-critical-to-pharma/"><em>New data shows why digital is now critical to pharma</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/863 2017-03-26T15:24:36+01:00 2017-03-26T15:24:36+01:00 Digital Outlook 2017 Part 2 - The Sequel <p>We hear you, and we understand that there are still many digital marketing topics that were not covered at <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154296603034327" target="_blank">Digital Outlook 2017</a>.</p> <p>We have selected the next six trending digital marketing topics to be presented at this event. Join us in this half day session to find out the trends and digital marketing best practices for the year.</p> <p>There will be 6 keynotes - all aiming to provide the audience with a outlook for the year.</p> <p>&gt;&gt;&gt; <strong>Overview of the 2017's trending digital marketing topics</strong></p> <p>&gt;&gt;&gt; <strong>Trends, best practices and c</strong><strong>ase studies</strong></p> <p>Hear from leading practitioners and network with industry players to learn what digital marketers should focus today to plan for tomorrow and succeed later.</p> <h4>Special Announcement</h4> <p>In partnership with NTUC, e2i and WSG, Econsultancy is carring out a research on <strong>digital marketing training and development needs in Singapore for 2017</strong>. Please help us improve our training courses by completing the short survey <a href="http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3421857/b9062f550750" target="_blank">here</a>. In return for your time, you can redeem a discount on Econsultancy training courses in Singapore. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68937 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 Stories from SXSW 2017: ad blocking, content distribution, and Joe Biden Nick Hammond <p>These looked at the areas of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">ad blocking</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">influencer marketing</a>, social video, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66752-10-steps-to-better-content-distribution/">content distribution</a>, and the thoughts of Joe Biden, former Vice-President of the USA.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP67501">Ending The Ad Blocking Wars</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included representatives from Brave Software, The New York Times, Digital Context Next and The Christian Science Monitor. They considered whether publishers can improve the ad experience to persuade readers to turn off blockers? Or will add blockers bring about the end of the free web?</p> <p>As you may imagine there was no simple solution to this conundrum. The two biggest players in the digital space (you know who they are) are not affected by ad blocking and therefore are not bothered by its effects. </p> <p>Although ad blocking is plateauing (<a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/uk-ad-blocking-levels-stabilise-22/1425085?bulletin=campaign_breakfast_briefing&amp;utm_medium=EMAIL&amp;utm_campaign=eNews%20Bulletin&amp;utm_source=20170223&amp;utm_content=www_campaignlive_co_uk_ar_6">at least in the UK</a>), the real squeeze is on smaller publishers, the little guys getting caught in the middle. These organisations are caught in an imperfect storm, made up of greater reliance on ad revenues and lacking the engineering investment levels and knowledge to respond to the threat.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/5034/adblock-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="163"></p> <p>As a result of this, there is a real possibility of local, smaller publishers, starting to disappear. This could create a regional ‘news desert’ as even more people seek their news from social media. Currently 44% of Americans use Facebook as a news source and the number is rising. </p> <p>There was also a discussion around different types of ad blockers. Much of the debate tends to be around the big players, such as AdBlock which has 200m downloads; but there are other providers with different business models. <a href="https://brave.com">Brave Software</a> (represented on the panel) doesn’t just remove ads – it replaces them with new ads and splits the revenue between publishers, users, network partners and the company itself.</p> <p>Brendan Eich from Brave suggested that this software is the first ‘post-bad’ ad blocking solution. Still early days for this, 'softer' ad blocking model and it will be interesting to see how it plays out.</p> <p>Predictably, content was identified as a way to get around this challenge. The NYT emphasized the importance of engaging content – ‘pull instead of push’ – and advised strongly against using technology to push advertising onto consumers.</p> <p>Sponsored ‘native’ content is not necessarily the panacea to solve this problem, as publishers often tag creative to acquire more data; these are then identified as ads and therefore blocked. </p> <p>Ad fraud was a serious related issue discussed, with an estimated 23% of global video traffic being served to robots. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65228">The Hundred Thousand Dollar Snap(chat)</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this one was ShopStyle and Neiman Marcus, who considered the opportunities and challenges arising from social commerce, as well as the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">growing importance of influencers</a>, particularly within retail.</p> <p>The background to this is the change in consumers’ consumption of media and the importance of the mobile channel. 30% of all time online is spent on social and 60% of that is on mobile.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5033/snapchat_logo.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="243"></p> <p>As is often not the case, influencer activity should be approached in the same manner as any other communications campaign. It is not safe to assume that a single endorsement – ‘one and done’ – will do the trick. An effective frequency of ‘seven’, was mentioned as appropriate to the fashion retail sector. As with other channels, planning should be considered over an extended activity period, not as a series of one-offs. </p> <p>In addition, activity should not undermine influencers connections with their followers, and these retail influencers can be initially incentivised through special deals to offer to their followers. </p> <p>An interesting analogy compared the purchasing process for expensive items, such as for a Chanel bag, to the dating process; where buyers return to the store to view and interact with the product over time. In instances like these, iterative influencer messages can be effective in moving an individual closer to purchase.</p> <p>Strategies need to be different across separate social channels. Facebook is all about advertising, whilst Instagram benefits from a more organic approach. Snapchat is the new kid on the block and the hardest to measure. </p> <p>Above all, brands need to work out when to act as themselves, or through influencers in the social space. What are the key KPIs, how to measure these and how to ensure valuable content lives effectively beyond social channels? </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP97038">Social Video and The Future of Consumption</a></strong></p> <p>Representatives from Vox Media, Vice Media and the New York Times joined this panel to discuss how social media is impacting video journalism. This session made very clear that Facebook is now the platform for video consumption. </p> <p>The NYT identified Facebook as ‘the stage’, and the essential channel for engagement and getting time with its audience. A major focus for NYT is around <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">Facebook Live</a>, which is being used to provide real-time coverage of news events. They are even looking at using this channel to create crowd-sourced investigations, a kind of mass citizen journalism.</p> <p>The upside of the live video phenomenon is that brands have an opportunity to powerfully engage with a massive audience, using current, exciting and rapidly changing content. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnytimes%2Fvideos%2F10151119750979999%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="476"></iframe></p> <p>The downside of live unedited content, is a concern around quality and the loss of editorial perspective. As a result, insightful user comments can be important to create context; but recognising this may not always be the case, Vice has indicated that all user comments are monitored in real-time.</p> <p>More controversially, the <a href="https://tytnetwork.com">The Young Turks</a> news channel is allowing users to pay to have their comments listed. Although the rise in importance of user comments can be seen as a democratic trend, allowing a financial bias on inputs would seem rather less altruistic. </p> <p>Another concern is that a publisher brand cannot easily prevent incorrect stories or unsuitable content being viewed. They can provide a retraction or an alternative perspective later on; but this may be seen by many fewer people. A good example of this would be the <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/10/technology/hillary-clinton-google-search-results/">SourceFed Hilary Clinton conspiracy theory</a>. </p> <p>For me, this progression towards an ‘always-on’ society is worryingly redolent of Dave Eggers' book, and now film, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCOXARv6J9k">The Circle.</a></p> <p>In any event, the benchmark for how quality video is defined is changing rapidly as we transition from a ‘TV-centric’ to ‘mobile video-centric’ world. In the digital space, where everyone with a phone is a director, quality is now less about production values and more about the story, speed and authenticity. </p> <p>Separate approaches to video content are needed across different channels. For example on Facebook a ‘raw’ approach is more appropriate and authentic. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy/">Episodic content</a> on Snapchat is popular, with bitesize ‘episodes’ being used to tell a story in a manner entirely fitting to the medium. </p> <p>With live video, there is also a greater ethical onus on brands to decide what they will show and what they will not. A good example of content that could be considered to be on this demarcation line is <a href="http://mashable.com/2016/10/21/snapchat-breaking-news/#i0SLEFuJPsql">Snapchat’s coverage of the conflict in Mosul</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65066">Content Distribution Platforms – Friends or Foes?</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included The Economist, Conde Nast International, The Young Turks and ABC News. They looked at how<em> </em>publishers are becoming more reliant than ever on content distribution platforms such as Facebook and Snapchat to reach new audiences. </p> <p>A good starting point for this session was mention of Emily Bell’s 2016 article <a href="http://www.cjr.org/analysis/facebook_and_media.php">Facebook Is Eating The World</a>.</p> <p>Facebook is the key platform under consideration here, as it increasingly becomes the place where online content is consumed. It’s importance and control over brand content has increased with the rise of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67544-facebook-to-open-up-instant-articles-what-publishers-need-to-know/">Instant Articles</a>, as opposed to publisher feeds, keeping traffic within the Facebook ecosystem. As an aside, Snapchat was seen to be on the rise but not currently a viable global option. </p> <p>With this is in mind, the panel considered that Facebook was both a friend and a foe. It was seen to be a friend in terms of providing a broad distribution platform and a foe with regards to its control over advertising revenues. </p> <p>According to Steve Oh of The Young Turks, the key to content success with Facebook is threefold:</p> <ul> <li>Creating regular, relevant content</li> <li>Swift use of new product features released</li> <li>Focus on building an audience </li> </ul> <p>The Economist’s approach is to focus on bite size content that lures customers towards subscription, with news topics including ‘on this day’ and ‘famous quotes’. A specific approach is with ‘Vimages’, using Facebook <a href="http://www.niemanlab.org/2016/09/with-vimages-the-economist-is-using-facebook-to-make-low-budget-video-versions-of-its-stories/">to re-package magazine stories into video form</a>.</p> <p>One of the questions in the session, was how to keep up with the rapid changes at Facebook and the best ways to share content. There was no clear answer, but suggestions included looking for Newsroom tips, and Google Alerts pertaining to Facebook algorithms. </p> <p><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP61899"><strong>Art + Science: Videos That Inform, Inspire &amp; Scale</strong></a></p> <p>Finally, PopSugar's David Grant discussed what brand marketers need to know about creating video that engages their target audience at scale while delivering on brand KPIs. The session sought to explain the success of PopSugar in targeting millennial women.</p> <p>The starting point for the brand's success is to understand, as does Snapchat, the increasing cultural relevance of the camera (<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html?_r=0">as identified in this NYT article</a>) and that humans naturally gravitate towards content that is made up of <a href="http://www.kvibe.com/2015/03/17/why-we-as-humans-gravitate-towards-video/">sight, sound and motion.</a></p> <p>PopSugar creates videos that inform, and are created from a combined perspective drawn from its brand, brand partners and their data. PopSugar has created its own tool, <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/how-popsugars-new-tool-will-help-you-stay-ahead-social-media-trends-174640/">Trend Rank</a>, to help it identify areas of content focus, supply ‘velocity data predicting’ and find trends ahead of time.</p> <p>Grant observed that, with video, companies typically have only one second to make an impact, so selected content has only that time to have an effect. </p> <p>Some examples of PopSugar's recent successful native content campaigns are: </p> <ul> <li>Doubletree by Hilton: ‘Find Your Happy’ campaign. Building on the fact that Hilton always leaves a cookie for its guests, PopSugar a campaign focusing on wider acts <a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Random-Acts-Kindness-You-Can-Do-Every-Day-40742607">of kindness and generosity</a>.</li> <li>Garner Shampoo: ‘Photo Ready Mums’. Based on the insight that mums often take pictures of the family, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzaKYqPYKyo">but regret that they are not in the pictures themselves;</a> this campaign shows how mums can be in the photos, and look great, with the help of Garner. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Joe Biden</strong></p> <p>And finally, some lessons from the keynote speech of SXSW 2017 (and a totally inspiring moment) from Joe Biden, former Vice-President of The United States. </p> <p>Perhaps more recently famous for his (unwitting) appearance in <a href="http://www.boredpanda.com/funny-barack-obama-joe-biden-tweets/">a sequence of memes with Barack Obama</a>, Joe Biden appeared on stage in Austin to raise awareness and seek support for his <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/09/biden-outlines-steps-to-pursue-post-obama-cancer-moonshot.html">cancer Moon-shot agenda</a>.</p> <p>He discussed the progress made during Obama's presidency by the call for innovative solutions to tackle the barriers that prevent faster gains in ending cancer; and described how he plans to remain in the fight. </p> <p>This talk has a wider relevance for business because, as Joe Biden put it, organisations involved in the cancer treatment process had become ‘siloed by design’ and their ability to face the growing threat of this disease was limited by this lack of co-operation.</p> <p>One of these silo-related issues was the low number of patients involved in clinical trials (only 4/100) as there was no system for companies to match the correct trial drugs to the correct patients and vice versa. In addition a database of patient learnings was not being effectively shared between hospitals.</p> <p>Biden’s efforts to break down the barriers in the cancer treatment process are a lesson to organisations who may have similar silo problems. </p> <p>Organisations in this process have started to collaborate and other bodies have become involved in the fight. NASA is adding information regarding the impact of radiation on astronauts, and Amazon has provided free cloud data storage for the project.  </p> <p>There is also focus on clear KPIs and where the biggest return on investment can be derived. As Biden said, of any process "where everything is treated as equally important, then nothing is considered important."</p> <p>The key to the project’s increasing success (apart from the obvious profile of the promoter) is the open sharing of information, offering clear encouragement and, of course, giving hope.</p> <p>Inspiring stuff and a lesson to all businesses interested in breaking down silos and identifying priorities.</p>