tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/media-planning-buying Latest Media planning & buying content from Econsultancy 2017-06-08T09:45:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69150 2017-06-08T09:45:00+01:00 2017-06-08T09:45:00+01:00 Google Contributor: What you need to know Patricio Robles <p>But that is just the start of Google's efforts to ensure that it doesn't lose out big time as ad blocking continues to grow. Last week, the Mountain View-based company launched <a href="https://contributor.google.com">Google Contributor</a>, a new offering that allows users to pay to remove ads from the sites they visit.</p> <p>Here's what you need to know about it..</p> <h3>It's an "ad removal pass for the web" </h3> <p>Google Contributor allows users with a Google account to load $5 onto a virtual "pass" and opt into paying a per-page fee on sites that they don't want to see ads displayed on.</p> <p>The per-page fee is set by the publisher. Users manage their pass from their Google accounts, eliminating the need to establish and manage accounts with each publisher. With a few clicks, users can opt out of paying for content and revert to seeing ads.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6662/pass.png" alt="google pass" width="615" height="311"></p> <p><em>A range of publishers have signed up in beta</em></p> <h3>Google is going to help publishers deal with ad block users</h3> <p>Google is also launching a publisher solution called Funding Choices that works in conjunction with Contributor. When enabled, Funding Choices will give publishers the ability to identify users who are using an ad blocker and prompt them to either disable their ad blocker or opt-in to supporting the publisher through Contributor.</p> <h3>Google is beta testing Contributor</h3> <p>At launch, a dozen sites are part of the Google Contributor beta. These include Popular Mechanics, Business Insider (UK) and Townhall.</p> <p>Google is, however, inviting interested publishers to apply to join the Contributor beta as it expands.</p> <h3>Google isn't the first to try micropayments</h3> <p>Google isn't the first company to try building a way for individuals to support sites through micropayments. Major companies <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/5598-paypal-plans-better-micropayment-solution/">like PayPal</a> as well as startups like Flattr have tried to make micropayments a bigger part of the way consumers pay for content and services on the web, but <a href="https://www.editorandpublisher.com/news/nickel-and-dimed-micropayments-wont-solve-ad-blocking/">none have cracked the code</a>. Even so, entrepreneurs continue to launch micropayment schemes.</p> <p>Google, of course, has some natural advantages that could help it succeed where others have failed, and coupled with publisher urgency to deal with ad blocking, the timing could be right.</p> <h3>Some see a conflict of interest</h3> <p>Some observers, however, are concerned that Google's decision to include an ad blocker in Chrome <a href="https://news.vice.com/story/google-ad-blocker-could-make-it-the-prosecutor-judge-and-jury-of-online-ads">could turn it into the "judge and jury" of online ads</a>, raising anti-trust concerns.</p> <p>Google Contributor could eventually factor into the debate. After all, the inclusion of the ad blocker in Chrome will logically exacerbate the ad blocking problem for publishers at the same time Google is pushing a solution to deal with ad blocking that it stands to profit from if it works.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">This looks like instant antitrust to me. Restriction of competition through dominant position in browser. <a href="https://t.co/5tlPhLX0QE">https://t.co/5tlPhLX0QE</a></p> — Charles Arthur (@charlesarthur) <a href="https://twitter.com/charlesarthur/status/870544751120011264">June 2, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>It could still be a tough sell</h3> <p>Google's size and position combined with publisher interest in micropayments as a solution to ad blocking won't necessarily help the search giant finally solve the micropayments puzzle.</p> <p>In fact, Google Contributor isn't even Google's first foray into the world of micropayments. In 2011, <a href="https://news.googleblog.com/2011/02/simple-way-for-publishers-to-manage.html">it launched</a> Google One Pass, "a service that lets publishers set their own prices and terms for their digital content." One Pass was shuttered in 2012.</p> <p>While Contributor is not a carbon copy of One Pass, the harsh reality is that a large percentage of consumers are opposed to paying for content and don't feel an obligation to view ads. Therefore, convincing them that paying pennies (or fractions of a penny) at a time for viewing content without ads is probably going to remain a tough sell, especially as ad blocking technology becomes harder and harder to detect.</p> <p>Notwithstanding consumers' appetite for micropayments, Google Contributor might not be so appealing to publishers, a number of which have <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67130-seven-ways-publishers-are-addressing-ad-blocking/">turned to subscriptions</a> to offset declines in ad revenue.</p> <p>Unlike subscriptions, micropayments won't necessarily offer a predictible revenue stream and with Google sitting between them and their users, they won't have the opportunity to build direct relationships with the people who matter most to their business. What's more, consumers <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/4657-subscriptions-preferred-over-micropayments-in-the-uk-report/">have for years demonstrated a preference for subscriptions</a> over micropayments.</p> <p><em><strong>More on ad blocking:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68502-three-creative-ways-publishers-and-advertisers-are-combating-ad-blockers/">Three creative ways publishers and advertisers are combating ad blockers</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68996 2017-04-13T15:22:31+01:00 2017-04-13T15:22:31+01:00 10 cracking digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>28% of marketers still feeling unprepared for the GDPR</h3> <p>With just over a year until the GDPR comes into force, a <a href="https://dma.org.uk/infographic/infographic-b2b-marketing-and-the-gdpr" target="_blank">new infographic</a> from the DMA shows that many marketers are failing to prepare.</p> <p>While general awareness of the GDPR is up, 28% of B2B marketers still feeling unprepared – down just 2% from previous figures. Only two-thirds of survey respondents said their business would be GDPR compliant in time for 2018.</p> <p>In terms of the causes of concern, 37% of marketers said profiling, while 50% said it was legacy data. The biggest was by far consent, with 70% agreeing that it would change under the GDPR.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5442/DMA_infographic.JPG" alt="" width="618" height="324"></p> <h3>Three fifths of marketing graduates have no knowledge of affiliate strategies</h3> <p>Affilinet has been researching how well marketing students are prepared for a career in the industry, with results showing that many are graduating with little or no knowledge of affiliate or performance-based marketing.</p> <p>In a survey, 41% of graduates said that they have studied modules related to affiliate marketing. Out of these, however, 67% stated that the information taught was ‘outdated and unhelpful’.</p> <p>52% admitted that they’d needed to teach themselves to progress in their career, with 22% learning through courses later on. The remaining 26% of marketing graduates said that they still had no knowledge of affiliate practices whatsoever.</p> <h3>Mobile drives digital ad spend past £10bn</h3> <p>According to a new report from <a href="https://iabuk.net/about/press/archive/mobile-drives-digital-ad-spend-past-10-billion-threshold" target="_blank">IAB and PwC,</a> digital advertising grew at its fastest rate for nine years in 2016, increasing 17.3% to £10.3bn.</p> <p>Mobile video is now the fastest-growing ad format, with spend on mobile video ads doubling to £693m. Consequently, it now accounts for 29% of the total growth in ad spend.</p> <p>Insight suggests that the rise reflects the increasing amount of users watching video clips on their smartphones, with two in five people reportedly saying they now watch mobile video more than they did a year ago.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5440/PwC_IAB.png" alt="" width="780" height="480"></p> <h3>Just 13% of employees able to name their company CMO</h3> <p>New research by eShare suggests that chief marketing officers are one of the least recognised board members, with just 13% of employees able to identify the CMO of their organisation.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 UK employees, just 8% were able to identify the chairperson and 14% were able to identify the chief information officer and chief financial officer. In contrast, 36% were able to name the CEO, making this the most visible board member to UK employees.</p> <h3>66% of beauty shoppers use Instagram for inspiration</h3> <p>Facebook and Instagram has revealed how beauty shoppers are increasingly turning to social media to help inform their purchases.</p> <p>The Mobile Makeover Report states that 66% of beauty shoppers look to social media for inspiration on how to achieve their perfect look, 70% for learning make-up techniques and 62% for advice on products. </p> <p>Tutorials are among the most popular types of video, with 74% of beauty viewers watching ‘how-to’ content. You can read more about how mobile is impacting the beauty industry <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68992-three-ways-mobile-is-impacting-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">in this article</a>. </p> <h3>41% of UK shoppers will spend more to make Easter special</h3> <p>Savvy has been exploring how consumers will spend their money over Easter, with 62% of UK shoppers planning to celebrate over the bank holiday weekend.</p> <p>In a survey, 41% of respondents said they don’t mind spending more in order to make their Easter celebrations special. That being said, shoppers will still be on the hunt for a discount, with 60% saying they already know where they’ll can find the best value Easter eggs.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, eggs will be the most popular item to buy, followed by chocolate in general, and the ingredients for a roast dinner. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5441/Savvy.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="452"></p> <h3>62% of ecommerce brands don’t personalise digital experiences</h3> <p>Episerver’s <a href="http://www.episerver.com/learn/resources/research--reports/seven-digital-commerce-trends-for-retail-2017/" target="_blank">State of Digital Commerce</a> report suggests that just 38% of ecommerce brands are incorporating personalisation into their current marketing strategies. Despite 70% of companies using email marketing, only 28% are using triggered emails to re-engage non-converting customers.</p> <p>What’s more, despite the abundance of data available, 46% of marketers admit they wouldn’t be able to create an omnichannel campaign due to a lack of insight into the customer journey.</p> <h3>Paddy Power generates the most social engagements during Grand National</h3> <p>4C has analysed the level of social engagement generated from TV ads during the Grand National. Results show that Paddy Paddy stole the show, with its two ads generating 59,527 engagements from public mentions, retweets, comments and likes on social channels – double the engagement of competitors.</p> <p>SkyBet saw 16,840 engagements and Coral saw 18,733. Meanwhile, despite its close association with horse racing, William Hill saw just 2,812 over the course of the event.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Looking for some guidance on how to pick the winner of the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GrandNational?src=hash">#GrandNational</a>? Watch this video to find out how the experts do it. <a href="https://t.co/27q9DPQJP0">pic.twitter.com/27q9DPQJP0</a></p> — Paddy Power (@paddypower) <a href="https://twitter.com/paddypower/status/850644686096281600">April 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Consumers see Snapchat as a passing trend for brand communication</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://uk.mailjet.com/blog/guide/email-innovations-research-report/" target="_blank">Mailjet</a> has revealed that consumers are displaying a lack of faith in new platforms like Pinterest and Snapchat and their role in brand communication.</p> <p>41% of consumers believe that email is the platform most people will be using in 10 years’ time, followed by 26% of consumers saying the same for Facebook and WhatsApp. In contrast, just 11% of people are certain that Pinterest and LinkedIn will be used in a decade and only 14% are confident that Snapchat will still exist. </p> <p>Despite many brands getting involved, major updates to platforms are also going unnoticed by consumers, with just 6% of people noting Instagram’s ‘buy button’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5443/Instagram_shop_now.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="452"></p> <h3>Supermarket promotions fall to lowest level in 11 years</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/uk/en/press-room/2017/supermarket-promotions-at-lowest-level-for-11-years.html" target="_blank">Nielsen</a>, supermarket promotions have fallen to their lowest level in 11 years in the UK, with just 26% of consumer spend going towards temporary discounts or multi-buy offers in the four weeks up until 25th March 2017.</p> <p>Nielsen suggests that this is due to supermarkets becoming increasingly price competitive, turning temporary price reductions into permanent cuts as a result.</p> <p>Year-on-year supermarket sales have also fallen, with the late Easter period said to have contributed to a 2.6% decrease in the four-week period to March 25th.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68937 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 Stories from SXSW 2017: ad blocking, content distribution, and Joe Biden Nick Hammond <p>These looked at the areas of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">ad blocking</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">influencer marketing</a>, social video, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66752-10-steps-to-better-content-distribution/">content distribution</a>, and the thoughts of Joe Biden, former Vice-President of the USA.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP67501">Ending The Ad Blocking Wars</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included representatives from Brave Software, The New York Times, Digital Context Next and The Christian Science Monitor. They considered whether publishers can improve the ad experience to persuade readers to turn off blockers? Or will add blockers bring about the end of the free web?</p> <p>As you may imagine there was no simple solution to this conundrum. The two biggest players in the digital space (you know who they are) are not affected by ad blocking and therefore are not bothered by its effects. </p> <p>Although ad blocking is plateauing (<a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/uk-ad-blocking-levels-stabilise-22/1425085?bulletin=campaign_breakfast_briefing&amp;utm_medium=EMAIL&amp;utm_campaign=eNews%20Bulletin&amp;utm_source=20170223&amp;utm_content=www_campaignlive_co_uk_ar_6">at least in the UK</a>), the real squeeze is on smaller publishers, the little guys getting caught in the middle. These organisations are caught in an imperfect storm, made up of greater reliance on ad revenues and lacking the engineering investment levels and knowledge to respond to the threat.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/5034/adblock-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="163"></p> <p>As a result of this, there is a real possibility of local, smaller publishers, starting to disappear. This could create a regional ‘news desert’ as even more people seek their news from social media. Currently 44% of Americans use Facebook as a news source and the number is rising. </p> <p>There was also a discussion around different types of ad blockers. Much of the debate tends to be around the big players, such as AdBlock which has 200m downloads; but there are other providers with different business models. <a href="https://brave.com">Brave Software</a> (represented on the panel) doesn’t just remove ads – it replaces them with new ads and splits the revenue between publishers, users, network partners and the company itself.</p> <p>Brendan Eich from Brave suggested that this software is the first ‘post-bad’ ad blocking solution. Still early days for this, 'softer' ad blocking model and it will be interesting to see how it plays out.</p> <p>Predictably, content was identified as a way to get around this challenge. The NYT emphasized the importance of engaging content – ‘pull instead of push’ – and advised strongly against using technology to push advertising onto consumers.</p> <p>Sponsored ‘native’ content is not necessarily the panacea to solve this problem, as publishers often tag creative to acquire more data; these are then identified as ads and therefore blocked. </p> <p>Ad fraud was a serious related issue discussed, with an estimated 23% of global video traffic being served to robots. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65228">The Hundred Thousand Dollar Snap(chat)</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this one was ShopStyle and Neiman Marcus, who considered the opportunities and challenges arising from social commerce, as well as the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">growing importance of influencers</a>, particularly within retail.</p> <p>The background to this is the change in consumers’ consumption of media and the importance of the mobile channel. 30% of all time online is spent on social and 60% of that is on mobile.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5033/snapchat_logo.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="243"></p> <p>As is often not the case, influencer activity should be approached in the same manner as any other communications campaign. It is not safe to assume that a single endorsement – ‘one and done’ – will do the trick. An effective frequency of ‘seven’, was mentioned as appropriate to the fashion retail sector. As with other channels, planning should be considered over an extended activity period, not as a series of one-offs. </p> <p>In addition, activity should not undermine influencers connections with their followers, and these retail influencers can be initially incentivised through special deals to offer to their followers. </p> <p>An interesting analogy compared the purchasing process for expensive items, such as for a Chanel bag, to the dating process; where buyers return to the store to view and interact with the product over time. In instances like these, iterative influencer messages can be effective in moving an individual closer to purchase.</p> <p>Strategies need to be different across separate social channels. Facebook is all about advertising, whilst Instagram benefits from a more organic approach. Snapchat is the new kid on the block and the hardest to measure. </p> <p>Above all, brands need to work out when to act as themselves, or through influencers in the social space. What are the key KPIs, how to measure these and how to ensure valuable content lives effectively beyond social channels? </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP97038">Social Video and The Future of Consumption</a></strong></p> <p>Representatives from Vox Media, Vice Media and the New York Times joined this panel to discuss how social media is impacting video journalism. This session made very clear that Facebook is now the platform for video consumption. </p> <p>The NYT identified Facebook as ‘the stage’, and the essential channel for engagement and getting time with its audience. A major focus for NYT is around <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">Facebook Live</a>, which is being used to provide real-time coverage of news events. They are even looking at using this channel to create crowd-sourced investigations, a kind of mass citizen journalism.</p> <p>The upside of the live video phenomenon is that brands have an opportunity to powerfully engage with a massive audience, using current, exciting and rapidly changing content. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnytimes%2Fvideos%2F10151119750979999%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="476"></iframe></p> <p>The downside of live unedited content, is a concern around quality and the loss of editorial perspective. As a result, insightful user comments can be important to create context; but recognising this may not always be the case, Vice has indicated that all user comments are monitored in real-time.</p> <p>More controversially, the <a href="https://tytnetwork.com">The Young Turks</a> news channel is allowing users to pay to have their comments listed. Although the rise in importance of user comments can be seen as a democratic trend, allowing a financial bias on inputs would seem rather less altruistic. </p> <p>Another concern is that a publisher brand cannot easily prevent incorrect stories or unsuitable content being viewed. They can provide a retraction or an alternative perspective later on; but this may be seen by many fewer people. A good example of this would be the <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/10/technology/hillary-clinton-google-search-results/">SourceFed Hilary Clinton conspiracy theory</a>. </p> <p>For me, this progression towards an ‘always-on’ society is worryingly redolent of Dave Eggers' book, and now film, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCOXARv6J9k">The Circle.</a></p> <p>In any event, the benchmark for how quality video is defined is changing rapidly as we transition from a ‘TV-centric’ to ‘mobile video-centric’ world. In the digital space, where everyone with a phone is a director, quality is now less about production values and more about the story, speed and authenticity. </p> <p>Separate approaches to video content are needed across different channels. For example on Facebook a ‘raw’ approach is more appropriate and authentic. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy/">Episodic content</a> on Snapchat is popular, with bitesize ‘episodes’ being used to tell a story in a manner entirely fitting to the medium. </p> <p>With live video, there is also a greater ethical onus on brands to decide what they will show and what they will not. A good example of content that could be considered to be on this demarcation line is <a href="http://mashable.com/2016/10/21/snapchat-breaking-news/#i0SLEFuJPsql">Snapchat’s coverage of the conflict in Mosul</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65066">Content Distribution Platforms – Friends or Foes?</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included The Economist, Conde Nast International, The Young Turks and ABC News. They looked at how<em> </em>publishers are becoming more reliant than ever on content distribution platforms such as Facebook and Snapchat to reach new audiences. </p> <p>A good starting point for this session was mention of Emily Bell’s 2016 article <a href="http://www.cjr.org/analysis/facebook_and_media.php">Facebook Is Eating The World</a>.</p> <p>Facebook is the key platform under consideration here, as it increasingly becomes the place where online content is consumed. It’s importance and control over brand content has increased with the rise of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67544-facebook-to-open-up-instant-articles-what-publishers-need-to-know/">Instant Articles</a>, as opposed to publisher feeds, keeping traffic within the Facebook ecosystem. As an aside, Snapchat was seen to be on the rise but not currently a viable global option. </p> <p>With this is in mind, the panel considered that Facebook was both a friend and a foe. It was seen to be a friend in terms of providing a broad distribution platform and a foe with regards to its control over advertising revenues. </p> <p>According to Steve Oh of The Young Turks, the key to content success with Facebook is threefold:</p> <ul> <li>Creating regular, relevant content</li> <li>Swift use of new product features released</li> <li>Focus on building an audience </li> </ul> <p>The Economist’s approach is to focus on bite size content that lures customers towards subscription, with news topics including ‘on this day’ and ‘famous quotes’. A specific approach is with ‘Vimages’, using Facebook <a href="http://www.niemanlab.org/2016/09/with-vimages-the-economist-is-using-facebook-to-make-low-budget-video-versions-of-its-stories/">to re-package magazine stories into video form</a>.</p> <p>One of the questions in the session, was how to keep up with the rapid changes at Facebook and the best ways to share content. There was no clear answer, but suggestions included looking for Newsroom tips, and Google Alerts pertaining to Facebook algorithms. </p> <p><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP61899"><strong>Art + Science: Videos That Inform, Inspire &amp; Scale</strong></a></p> <p>Finally, PopSugar's David Grant discussed what brand marketers need to know about creating video that engages their target audience at scale while delivering on brand KPIs. The session sought to explain the success of PopSugar in targeting millennial women.</p> <p>The starting point for the brand's success is to understand, as does Snapchat, the increasing cultural relevance of the camera (<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html?_r=0">as identified in this NYT article</a>) and that humans naturally gravitate towards content that is made up of <a href="http://www.kvibe.com/2015/03/17/why-we-as-humans-gravitate-towards-video/">sight, sound and motion.</a></p> <p>PopSugar creates videos that inform, and are created from a combined perspective drawn from its brand, brand partners and their data. PopSugar has created its own tool, <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/how-popsugars-new-tool-will-help-you-stay-ahead-social-media-trends-174640/">Trend Rank</a>, to help it identify areas of content focus, supply ‘velocity data predicting’ and find trends ahead of time.</p> <p>Grant observed that, with video, companies typically have only one second to make an impact, so selected content has only that time to have an effect. </p> <p>Some examples of PopSugar's recent successful native content campaigns are: </p> <ul> <li>Doubletree by Hilton: ‘Find Your Happy’ campaign. Building on the fact that Hilton always leaves a cookie for its guests, PopSugar a campaign focusing on wider acts <a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Random-Acts-Kindness-You-Can-Do-Every-Day-40742607">of kindness and generosity</a>.</li> <li>Garner Shampoo: ‘Photo Ready Mums’. Based on the insight that mums often take pictures of the family, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzaKYqPYKyo">but regret that they are not in the pictures themselves;</a> this campaign shows how mums can be in the photos, and look great, with the help of Garner. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Joe Biden</strong></p> <p>And finally, some lessons from the keynote speech of SXSW 2017 (and a totally inspiring moment) from Joe Biden, former Vice-President of The United States. </p> <p>Perhaps more recently famous for his (unwitting) appearance in <a href="http://www.boredpanda.com/funny-barack-obama-joe-biden-tweets/">a sequence of memes with Barack Obama</a>, Joe Biden appeared on stage in Austin to raise awareness and seek support for his <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/09/biden-outlines-steps-to-pursue-post-obama-cancer-moonshot.html">cancer Moon-shot agenda</a>.</p> <p>He discussed the progress made during Obama's presidency by the call for innovative solutions to tackle the barriers that prevent faster gains in ending cancer; and described how he plans to remain in the fight. </p> <p>This talk has a wider relevance for business because, as Joe Biden put it, organisations involved in the cancer treatment process had become ‘siloed by design’ and their ability to face the growing threat of this disease was limited by this lack of co-operation.</p> <p>One of these silo-related issues was the low number of patients involved in clinical trials (only 4/100) as there was no system for companies to match the correct trial drugs to the correct patients and vice versa. In addition a database of patient learnings was not being effectively shared between hospitals.</p> <p>Biden’s efforts to break down the barriers in the cancer treatment process are a lesson to organisations who may have similar silo problems. </p> <p>Organisations in this process have started to collaborate and other bodies have become involved in the fight. NASA is adding information regarding the impact of radiation on astronauts, and Amazon has provided free cloud data storage for the project.  </p> <p>There is also focus on clear KPIs and where the biggest return on investment can be derived. As Biden said, of any process "where everything is treated as equally important, then nothing is considered important."</p> <p>The key to the project’s increasing success (apart from the obvious profile of the promoter) is the open sharing of information, offering clear encouragement and, of course, giving hope.</p> <p>Inspiring stuff and a lesson to all businesses interested in breaking down silos and identifying priorities.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68901 2017-03-24T12:10:34+00:00 2017-03-24T12:10:34+00:00 Top tips to drive more engagement with data-driven native ads Ray Jenkin <p>This quote nicely sums up the reason for this forecast: “Native advertising looks like a rare win-win for the industry: more effective for advertisers, more valuable for publishers, and more acceptable for users”, says Joseph Evans, digital media analyst at Enders Analysis.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5022/native_spend.png" alt="" width="470" height="470"></p> <p>To deliver this sort of scale and growth over the years, the programmatic buying protocol will be key; and with this in play, a whole plethora of opportunities emerge; from the use of data to dynamically adjusting the creative elements in native.</p> <h4><strong>Why native ads? </strong></h4> <p>Consumer consumption is changing and so is our attitude to “traditional” digital advertising. Display click-through rates are decreasing year on year, while engagement with native ads is up to six times higher than traditional display.  </p> <p>The native ad experience is personalised to the specific site and context where the ads appears, providing a more integrated experience for the ads and content. Furthermore, the format extends meaningfully across all major devices.</p> <p>Not only is native preferable for the users; the creative execution of native ads is quick and easy to deploy with most native supply being very similar to the specs of Facebook’s native ads, so little additional work is required and creative approvals should be significantly faster.</p> <h4><strong>Strengthening native: a data-driven tactic</strong></h4> <p>TripleLift, a programmatic native vendor, saw the number of ad impressions traded through its platform grow more than sevenfold in <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/programmatic-native-ads-are-growingbut-banner-habit-is-hard-to-break-1484737200">2016 to 23bn</a>. This increase in supply in the programmatic environment means marketers can start to focus on a user centric approach to native. Applying both contextual and behavioural data to native buys means there can be even more relevance and value applied to the native experience. </p> <p>It is an exciting time to match this trusted ad format with the blend of data, but you should be aware of several key considerations to really take full advantage of data driven native:</p> <h4><strong>1. Not all native supply is created equal </strong></h4> <p>Consider what native supply you are tapping into for your campaigns. Look for supply partners that give a meaningful or exclusive share of voice within website content; sharing your space with other native placement only dilutes the potency of your content.</p> <p>Alignment alongside questionable ads and click bait news stories also does not engender trust in your brand. Understand how the supplier’s ads typically render on sites. Also make sure they comply with best practice on ad disclosure, failure to do so means a great opportunity to engage consumers turns into perceived trickery.  </p> <h4><strong>2. Native supply and audience reach: a balancing act</strong></h4> <p>Balance inventory access with audience reach. If you want to use behavioural or contextual data to help further enhance your segmentation and improve engagement, make sure you tap into native supply that provides the audience reach you need to benefit from data based targeting.</p> <p>If you are only interested in cherry picking a few properties for your native ads then you are better off not mixing data tactics into the buy as your audience and inventory overlaps will be too small. However, some promising programmatic native integrations with large portals and popular vertical publishers over the last few months mean there is increasingly good scale to blend audience and inventory tactics. </p> <h4><strong>3. What data and when?</strong></h4> <p>In using data-driven native, data recency is key to engagement. If you are not serving ads to consumers based on recent behavioural actions, all the benefit of native placement is lost on those consumers.</p> <p>Behaviourally targeting a consumer with automotive ad content will seem misplaced if the data of that user browsing auto-related content is two-weeks-old. Work with data partners who can demonstrate the ability to build and refresh audiences quickly or ideally in real-time.  </p> <p>Consider the use of both contextual and behavioural data to provide both scale and improve relevance. Site buys may be good for a demographic segmentation but drilling down into the content of that page or URL can be a great way to enhance your data-driven native campaign. </p> <h4><strong>4. Creative Relevance</strong></h4> <p>If you utilise audience data for your native ads, headlines, images and copy need to be more relevant than ever before. Make sure you are matching your audiences and relevant data points with the most compelling creative. Being native and therefore in content means you need to be truly relevant to be noticed. You can’t fall back on the standard ad slot and call to action to gain attention.</p> <p>Dynamically served native ads: this is still in its infancy but as this becomes more prevalent, it will provide exciting opportunities for brands to have a more scaled approach to matching out the context of the page and/or the behaviours of the consumer with the most relevant content or product in real time.</p> <p>Native ads are much more than headline, copy and static image, with video and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67507-30-stunning-cinemagraphs-that-will-blow-your-mind/">cinemagraph formats</a> now becoming more prevalent in native placements. Improve relevancy and engagement by learning about and experimenting with these formats and how they might interplay with data-driven native opportunities.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/4705/data_driven_native_ops-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="271"></p> <h4><strong>In conclusion...</strong></h4> <p>Those that move quickly and begin to experiment and learn more about combining data to drive their native activity stand to benefit; not just from short term gains in engagement but also by preparing themselves for the long term changes in the digital ad market.   </p> <h4><em>Related resources:</em></h4> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/">Programmatic Training</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/">The CMO's Guide to Programmatic</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/">A super accessible beginner’s guide to programmatic buying and RTB</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68776 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 10 astounding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>As always, the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> is ready and waiting if you’re in the mood for something a little extra.</p> <h3>34% of brands admit internal silos</h3> <p>New research from Oracle highlights how closer collaboration between sales and marketing teams is required to better target audiences and increase sales.</p> <p>However, despite also recognising the need, many organisations are failing to put it into practice. </p> <p>The Oracle survey found that 34% of brands admit their sales, marketing and customer service teams work completely independently of each other, leading to a lack of customer insight.</p> <p>In terms of the reasons why, 33% blame it on their current systems and technologies, while 30% say their corporate culture makes it tricky for sales and marketing teams to align priorities.</p> <h3>Millennials increasingly influencing tech-buying decisions</h3> <p>With millennials predicted to make up 50% of the US workforce by 2020, <a href="https://business.linkedin.com/marketing-solutions/blog/marketing-for-tech-companies/2017/millennials-and-gen-x-decision-makers-achieving-more--together">Linkedin has been exploring how younger generations</a> are influencing technology buying decisions in the workplace.</p> <p>In a survey of 5,470 global professionals, it found that 61% of younger millennials (age 19-25) contribute to their companies’ technology purchases, with one in three already being decision-makers. Older millennials (those aged 25-35) are said to have even more influence, with 68% contributing to decisions.</p> <p>Lastly, Generation X still holds the power, with 85% of employees aged 36-50 deciding technology purchases or managing the budget.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3667/Linkedin.JPG" alt="" width="428" height="519"></p> <h3>Searches for US visas surge following travel ban</h3> <p>Following Trump’s travel ban, Hitwise data has revealed that searches for American visas have since increased by 34%. More specifically, searches for “visa for USA from UK” and “US visa waiver” have been among the highest.</p> <p>This is similar to what happened after Brexit, when Hitwise witnessed a 300% increase in searches related to moving to the EU. </p> <p>Following the week’s news coverage, approximately one in every 10,000 searches over three days related to the “travel ban”, which is an increase of 2,045% since January 28.</p> <h3> </h3> <h3>One in 10 Gmail users say emails are miscategorised</h3> <p>Gmail’s automatic sorting feature is proving less than effective, with one in 10 users reporting incorrectly categorised messages.</p> <p>This is according to new research from Return Path, leading to warnings that marketers should be more vigilant about how and where their messages are being delivered.</p> <p>The study found that 45% of tabbed inbox users check the ‘Promotions’ tab - used to aggregate marketing promotions and other offers - at least once per day. As a result, if marketing email is delivered to another tab, it could be missed entirely.     </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3665/gmail.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK consumers spent the most via mobile last Christmas </h3> <p>According to Adobe’s latest Digital Index, UK shoppers spent more via mobile last Christmas than the US or any other European nation. </p> <p>Data shows that 60% of online visits to UK retailers over Christmas were made on mobile, and of every £10 spent online in the UK, £4.10 came from a mobile device. </p> <p>Insight suggests that this could be due to a rise in last-minute buying, with the amount spent on the last Monday before Christmas increasing by 50% in 2016.</p> <h3>Live chat leads to greater customer loyalty</h3> <p>A new <a href="https://skilled.co/resources/live-chat-best-customer-service-right-now/" target="_blank">infographic</a> by Skilled highlights how live chat on ecommerce sites can lead to increased levels of customer satisfaction and loyalty.</p> <p>Studies show that 63% of live chat users said they are more likely to return to the site as a result. Interestingly, Mexico is said to be the leader of live chat, with the highest customer satisfaction rate of 94.11%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3663/Skilled.JPG" alt="" width="674" height="342"></p> <h3>Nearly two in five shoppers have used their phone to pay in-store</h3> <p>MEF’s <a href="http://mobileecosystemforum.com/mobile-money-report/" target="_blank">Mobile Money Report</a> has revealed that mobile payments are on the rise, with nearly two in five shoppers using their smartphone to make a purchase in-store.</p> <p>From analysis of 6,000 consumers in nine countries, it also found that 78% of people have made a purchase using an app or mobile site.</p> <p>Mobile banking looks to be on a similar path, with 61% of respondents saying they now use their mobile phone to bank, and 44% using an app to check their balance.</p> <h3>Consumers see over half of brand content as ‘clutter’</h3> <p>The <a href="http://www.meaningful-brands.com/en" target="_blank">Meaningful Brands</a> report by Havas has revealed that over half of consumers view brand content as poor or irrelevant.</p> <p>In a study of 375,000 people across 33 countries, Havas found that while 84% of respondents expect brands to produce content of some kind, 60% of it fails to deliver any personal benefit.</p> <p>Consequently, we can see that the greater the impact on a person’s well-being, the more likely content is to be perceived as meaningful or effective.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3664/Havas.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="426"></p> <h3>80% of marketers describe data as ‘critical’ to success</h3> <p>A new GDMA survey has highlighted how customer data has become an indispensable asset, with 80% of global respondents citing it as critical to their marketing efforts.</p> <p>UK marketers are increasingly relying on data, coming top of all countries when asked about its importance.</p> <p>As a result, investment in data-driven marketing and advertising is still on the rise, with over half of global respondents saying they increased their spending in this area in 2016.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68742 2017-01-27T11:16:58+00:00 2017-01-27T11:16:58+00:00 Three common pitfalls in programmatic buying Lori Goldberg <p>Without an eye for the nuance, or a thorough understanding of a few key components of programmatic buying, advertisers run the risk of making pitfalls that create negative experiences while wasting ad dollars. </p> <p>Here's a summary of three common pitfalls.</p> <h3><strong>Not understanding the nuance behind the data</strong></h3> <p>One thing that is incumbent on media planners and buyers is to choose the right data for each campaign. We’ve all had moments where we realize we’re being served an ad for something that is completely irrelevant — in fact, just last week I was getting ads for puppy food, even though I don't own a dog. </p> <p>In order to avoid this kind of misstep, it’s critical to understand where data providers are sourcing their inventory. At the most basic level, advertisers need to know if their data provider is a reseller or if they are working with first-party proprietary data and if that data is verified. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3442/dog_food.jpg" alt="" width="724" height="483"></p> <p>While most data providers believe that their data set is superior, it’s important to dig deeper to consider the nuances of the data set. Knowing what kind of data will make a great source for their campaigns can help marketers have a more sophisticated view of how their data can impact campaign performance. </p> <p>For example, when working with registration data, having an understanding of the consumers’ motivations for being on that list can shed insights into whether or not that data set is the right set for the campaign.</p> <p>If the end user has particular motivation to answer questions inaccurately (e.g. data from a dating website), campaign impressions might not yield the targeted user experience advertisers were hoping for. </p> <p>Yet when we align data sources with the targets of the campaign, we can create powerful fuel for relevant ad experiences. For example, one of Silverlight Digital’s travel clients, a tourism department for a Caribbean island, has been able to source data from travel networks that partner with two of the most popular airlines that fly to the island.</p> <p>Understanding not only what kind of data, but also the end consumers’ motivation for being part of this data set, tells us that they are likely to shop with these airlines and are likely to want to travel. Ultimately this is the ideal experience for both the marketer (targeting accurate impressions) and the consumer (great user experience).</p> <h3><strong>Not understanding where consumers are in the buying cycle</strong></h3> <p>Another area where we see advertisers missing opportunities in programmatic is not properly understanding how frequently consumers need to be targeted within the context of the product.</p> <p>A great example of this is a recent trip I took to Santa Monica. At the time of this writing, only eight weeks have passed and now I’m being retargeted by hotels and travel deal sites that are offering packages on a return trip to Santa Monica. While I had a great time, I’m not likely to go back across the country eight weeks after I just visited.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3440/Santa_Monica.png" alt="" width="650" height="368"></p> <p>If these advertisers understood the buying cycles of their consumers, they might hold off and re-target again in 6-12 months when I’m more likely to be considering a new trip.</p> <p>Continuing with this example of my recent trip, I noticed one of the advertisers that was re-targeting me was the hotel that I stayed in during my trip, offering a discount if I “complete my purchase” and book with their hotel.</p> <p>If they were to cross-reference their data with recent customers, they would know that I’ve already stayed at the hotel and would be able to serve me an ad that feels more customized (i.e. come back to Santa Monica!). Advertisers should take the time to cross-reference their data so that they save ad dollars and don’t waste impressions. </p> <h3><strong>Not capping the frequency </strong></h3> <p>Understanding the optimum number of impressions can not only boost campaign performance, but also prevent waste. According <a href="http://digiday.com/agencies/ad-techs-frequency-cap-problem/">to DigiDay</a>, “bad frequency management is costing digital marketers billions of dollars a year.”</p> <p>Research published in DigiDay showed that "64% of impressions were out of frequency, and no advertiser had fewer than 60% of its impressions delivered beyond their cap." What this means is that marketers are annoying consumers, and wasting lots of ad dollars while doing it. </p> <p>Often caps are neglected and never tested because they’re not straightforward, but not knowing what optimal frequency cap to use can give poor results. Running A/B tests to understand ideal frequency isn’t necessarily easy, but it is an imperative part of the process. </p> <p>Properly evaluating data sources, tailoring the campaign to the product lifecycle, and targeting consumer buying behavior is the key to creating successful and powerful programmatic campaigns. </p> <p><em>For more on programmatic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/"><em>Programmatic Training Course</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/"><em>The CMO's Guide to Programmatic</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/"><em>A super accessible beginner’s guide to programmatic buying and RTB</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68615 2016-12-20T16:15:00+00:00 2016-12-20T16:15:00+00:00 'The Critical Question' to ask when planning a digital campaign Lori Goldberg <h3>'The Critical Question' to ask</h3> <p>“At the end of this campaign (or month, quarter, year) we are all going to be sitting around this same table, giving each other high-fives."</p> <p>"What exactly are we celebrating? What metrics or goals have we hit to make this campaign a huge success?”</p> <p>This question is critical for three reasons:</p> <ol> <li>the answer to the question will inform every single decision you’ll make across the rest of the campaign together (for both your team and extended teams)</li> <li>this allows a moment to assess whether or not expectations for this campaign  are in line with the brand’s goals</li> <li>you can uncover any places where the client’s goals are conflicting, unclear, vague or competing (which happens more often than not)</li> </ol> <p>This may sound basic, but we find that our agencies, media partners, and brands are often eager to get into the meat of the campaign, and it is extremely easy to skip this step and move forward without defining success or ensuring cross-team consensus.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/2542/question-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="the critical question" width="470" height="219"></p> <h3>Weeding out conflicting goals </h3> <p>For example, we’ll often get clients saying things like this:</p> <p>“We want to reach moms with kids because we don’t have enough brand awareness with this group, but we need to make sure we are efficiently driving sales.” </p> <p>How often have we heard that? “We want it all!” This is a conflict. Do you want to increase your brand awareness or do you want to drive sales efficiently? Or diving in deeper, which goal is more important to you?</p> <p>Knowing conflicting goals in the beginning gives an opportunity to address them and find a path forward.</p> <p>This is the moment that you can offer alternative solutions, educate the client on best practices, or allocate a primary and secondary importance to goals.</p> <p>For example, with our 'moms with kids,' we might offer the idea of splitting their budget, with one variation focusing on brand awareness (say 40% of budget) and the other 60% aligned to a sales goal, focused on driving consumers through the funnel.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2545/weed.jpg" alt="weeding" width="450"></p> <h3>Other important things to nail down </h3> <p>After asking 'The Critical Question', this can be a great segue into other factors that need to be addressed.</p> <p>Some great questions that we start with are:  </p> <ul> <li>Is this a new product?</li> <li>Is there a specific attribute to the product you want to highlight?</li> <li>What do you want people to know about?</li> <li>Who do you want to know about it? (Patient? Caregiver? Moms? Increased awareness among dads?)</li> <li>What messaging are we thinking of using to resonate with this decision maker?</li> <li>What are the primary and secondary goals or KPIs to support 'The Critical Question'? </li> </ul> <h3>Nimble and effective partners</h3> <p>By clearly stating goals, the entire team associated with the campaign can now be nimble and effective.</p> <p>Understanding what success is going to look like allows teams to make decisions without having to go back to the client for approval, because they already understand how to make adjustments in their best interest.</p> <p>Week over week, and often daily, these goals will allow all stakeholders to optimize towards the stated KPI and create the very best campaign possible at every step along the process: </p> <ul> <li>Creative messaging</li> <li>Tagging portions of the site that tie back to the stated KPI</li> <li>The media buy and the channel partner selection</li> <li>Optimizations along the way and how to focus reporting to give meaningful insights </li> </ul> <h3>Reporting should align with goals </h3> <p>The answer to 'The Critical Question' should often drive your weekly meetings and check-ins.</p> <p>This can stand as your team’s central guidepost for weekly insights, learnings, and recommendations as the campaign runs. </p> <p>For example, we pull reports daily, make optimization decisions and then the following week we see the results of our decisions. We’re constantly tweaking to back into those goals.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/2546/report-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="report" width="470" height="313"></p> <h3>Change is okay. Just get it in writing. </h3> <p>Along the way of any campaign, there sometimes can be confusion.</p> <p>Clients may like the “new shiny object” and feel compelled to try new tactics based on what they see competitors doing, or suddenly feel their missing out by not jumping on new trends (“Should we be on Snapchat!?”).</p> <p>This may not fall in line with what everyone agreed to as the success metric.</p> <p>This is the time to have harder conversations to remind everyone what we are gaining and what we are losing by changing course. “OK, we can try that tactic, but we will not all be high fiving each other at the end of this campaign based on the goals of driving sales.”</p> <p>If possible, this can also be the time to reiterate goals based on new learnings or the lifecycle of the product.</p> <p>Typically, this is met with appreciation that the client and agency partners keep their eye on the original, long term, or ultimately beneficial goals. </p> <p>If along the way, the answer to 'The Critical Question' changes, that is ok. Just get changes to goals in writing, so you can adjust your creative, optimizations and reporting to be in line with the new goals.</p> <p>Then we can all enjoy the high five.</p> <p><strong><em>Now read:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/planning-effective-digital-media-campaigns/">Planning Effective Digital Media Campaigns training</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65380-how-to-get-marketing-campaign-timing-right/">How to get marketing campaign timing right</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67033-nine-free-content-planning-tools-to-kickstart-your-campaign/">Nine free content planning tools to kickstart your campaign</a> </li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68435 2016-10-20T15:13:00+01:00 2016-10-20T15:13:00+01:00 Q&A: Publicis’s Rishad Tobaccowala on digital transformation & agency double dealing Olivia Solon <h3>You have said that customers are now Davids while marketers are Goliaths. What do you mean by that?</h3> <p>Traditionally marketers have spoken about how they would enable people, empower people.</p> <p>But now you and I have smartphones with the same amount of processing power that was in the Space Shuttle.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0574/rishad.jpg" alt="" width="226" height="226"></p> <p>So what happens is we already are enabled by our phone and our social networks connected to the internet. This technology allows us to bring down Goliath. </p> <h3>How well are marketers coping with digital transformation, on the whole?</h3> <p>They are in the stage somewhere between grief and anger. They no longer have denial.</p> <p>The problem with grief and anger is that they are taking it out not on themselves but on anybody else. It’s one of the reasons why you are seeing so many agency reviews.</p> <p>They are slowly moving to acceptance but that doesn’t mean there’s a solution there. </p> <h3>Which companies are thriving in this environment? </h3> <p>Look at Dollar Shave Club.</p> <p>They realized they could market using Facebook and YouTube effectively by giving people value by selling blades made in the same factories as Gillette, without the overheads of Gillette’s advertising.</p> <p>This means they give you the same blade for half the price and send it to you directly.</p> <p>In return they went from no market share to 15% of the market and they got bought by Unilever for $1bn.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZUG9qYTJMsI?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <p>P&amp;G is now going to have to write down the value of Gillette. </p> <p>Similarly cab drivers used to give us problems and now they are very nice to us.</p> <p>In the old days our bosses would tell us ‘you are well paid’. Now, with Glassdoor we can see when that’s wrong.</p> <p>Entire industries are being revitalized. </p> <h3>Which companies aren’t coping well?</h3> <p>Most newspaper brands with the exception of the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post and New York Times. They failed to adapt.</p> <p>And TV networks. The basic concept has died but they still don’t realize. People care about shows rather than networks. Or modern networks like Netflix. </p> <h3>Why hasn’t the TV industry realized that the model is broken?</h3> <p>Primarily because it’s been highly lucrative and successful until about now. They have to recognize that the spectrum is no longer valuable.</p> <p>They have to think about the storytelling business. TV is the next big thing that will be restructured in a big way.</p> <p>Magazines? Too late. Newspapers? Too late. TV had the opportunity but did nothing because they were succeeding because it was the last mass medium left.</p> <p>They didn’t do any deals with the devil like Apple like the music industry did, but consumer behavior has moved. They no longer align with the consumer like Amazon and Netflix do. </p> <h3>What do marketers need to do to adapt to the new digital landscape?</h3> <p>The future does not fit into the mindsets of the containers of the past.</p> <p>If you are trying to get into a different business using the same people, incentive system and structures you aren’t going to get there.</p> <p>A bus does not fly however much the bus people want it to fly. You need pilots. And this applies to every company, not just agencies. </p> <h3>Are there any skills that still apply in this new digital world?</h3> <p>Insights and ideas matter. The ability to align with customers matters. Marketing still matters. Understanding and meeting people’s requirements.</p> <p>Marketing works otherwise we would all be using Blackberrys and driving Yugos.</p> <p>Marketing works when it has this combination of respect, trust, value and design as well as empathy and storytelling.</p> <p>It’s not like throwing the baby out with the bathwater. </p> <h3>What does this mean for agencies?</h3> <p>The agency business is one of the few businesses that will survive very well. The rationale is not because I work in it, it’s because the only thing we have is people.</p> <p>As the world changes we can change the people. We don’t have things like factories and assembly lines, TV spectrum and any sunk costs.</p> <p>Our holding company went from 7% digital to 50% digital in seven years. We’re light. We are stupid but we’re light.</p> <p>Our business is about some combination of automation and creativity. Storytelling for big brands and connecting machines requires people. </p> <h3>What does this mean for the CMO?</h3> <p>The future is about allowing people to access companies, to market to themselves.</p> <p>When I’m looking for a product or service I’ll ask my friends, check out stuff on Facebook and Google.</p> <p>We have to facilitate this self-marketing, so I suggested the Chief Marketing Officer becomes the Chief Facilitating Officer. </p> <h3>How will marketing evolve over the next five to ten years?</h3> <p>People increasingly want access rather than ownership. That changes the way you speak to people. It’s not one sale, you have to keep them happy.</p> <p>You need a continued good experience. As a result of that you need more investment in utility services and a superior product and less in advertising.</p> <p>If you have a superior product and service and fantastic content and storytelling you can get it distributed.</p> <p>So spend more money on content, utility and services and less in messaging and media. </p> <p>You are also going to have less arbitrage. You are going to have to work in a world of perfect information.</p> <p>That’s going to impact a lot of companies. For our company, our clients wonder, ‘can we trust you to shepherd our money properly or are you double dealing?’. Most of us aren’t.</p> <p>The reason there was any double dealing is because clients were saying ‘we won’t give you any fees so make it your own way’. So we worked out how to get paid.</p> <p>We have to grow up and learn how to connect. Our industry may become smaller, but it will be more profitable and with better people. </p> <h3>How can agencies rebuild trust lost?</h3> <p>Most clients believe we are the sewage of the Nile. You have to convince them we are the jewel in the Nile.</p> <p>If you do that with any arrogance you’ll get kicked out in 15 seconds. You cannot take people into the future if you are scared or arrogant.</p> <p>You also have to address the ‘turd on the table’.</p> <h3>What do you mean by addressing the ‘turd on the table’?</h3> <p>A big part of leadership is addressing reality. There are too many meetings where nobody discusses the real issue. People do these dances. Accept reality!</p> <p>Then there’s credibility and you can spend time arguing about the real problem: the shitty brown thing on the table, rather than ignoring it or pretending it’s chocolate cake. </p> <p>At the moment clients have questions over whether they can trust us to allocate their money and whether we are double dealing.</p> <p>After they get past that, clients are deeply insecure about their own future. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/new/">Digital transformation</a> is an issue that’s challenging everybody. </p> <h3>Everybody?</h3> <p>Well apart from Google and Facebook. Every other company that was unstoppable – AOL, even Apple – has problems.</p> <p>Microsoft was unstoppable, Yahoo was unstoppable and both got into trouble. </p> <h3>What’s your advice to anyone starting out in marketing now?</h3> <p>Try to spend one hour a day learning new things. People always ask me how I stay fresh when I’ve worked in the same company for 30-40 years.</p> <p>Every day I spend between 4.30am and 6am learning new things. Today I was reading a book called Magic and Loss by Virginia Heffernan.</p> <p>Sometimes I play around with new tech like Samsung Gear VR. Sometimes I’m reading blogs or learning about new technology.</p> <p>Or read poetry. I spend 90 minutes doing stuff that helps me grow but is not about work or email. That’s how we remain relevant in a changing world. You have to educate yourself. </p> <h3>Every day?! What time do you go to sleep?</h3> <p>10pm. I get up at 4.30am when I’m in Chicago, which is 50% of my time. 5.30am in New York, which is 15% of my time.</p> <p>The rest of the time I do not get up. </p> <h3>So you travel a lot, how do you cope with jetlag?</h3> <p>I have three tricks. The first is luck. I know how to sleep on planes and I am relatively senior so I travel business class, which makes it easier to sleep.</p> <p>Then I work out every morning, so my system recognizes that if I am working out I must be awake. It’s a Pavlovian sign.</p> <p>Then I have coffee take-offs and alcoholic landings. Three espressos, exercise, sleep on planes, two beers at night. That’s what I do. </p> <p><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://digitalagencies.econsultancy.com/"><em>Top 100 Digital Agencies Report 2016</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68066-top-100-digital-agencies-2016-the-state-of-the-industry/"><em>Top 100 Digital Agencies 2016: The state of the industry</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68393 2016-10-10T14:36:00+01:00 2016-10-10T14:36:00+01:00 A day in the life of... a dancer turned head of paid media Ben Davis <p>Remember, if you're looking for a new challenge in digital <a href="https://jobs.econsultancy.com/">our jobs board</a> lists hundreds of open positions, and you can benchmark your own digital knowledge using our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-skills-index-lite/">Digital Skills Index</a>.</p> <h3>Please describe your job: What do you do? </h3> <p>As head of paid media I’m responsible for the teams that manage our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/">programmatic display</a>, paid search and paid social activity.</p> <p>I make sure we have the right people, tools, technology and workflows in place to be successful.</p> <p>One of the most important aspects of my role is to remove barriers or roadblocks so that my team can do their job as effectively as possible. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0035/Dan-4.jpg" alt="dan @ jellyfish" width="500"></p> <h3>Whereabouts do you sit within the organisation? Who do you report to? </h3> <p>I’ve been with <a href="http://www.jellyfish.co.uk/">Jellyfish</a> for over 11 years, starting out as a PPC manager and working my way up to head of paid media. Today, as one of the department heads, I report directly to the CEO, Rob Pierre. </p> <h3>What kind of skills do you need to be effective in your role? </h3> <p>You have to be open to new ideas and be able to solve problems quickly and effectively. The industry moves incredibly fast, so flexibility and adaptability are a must.</p> <p>I know this is important in any job but listening is vital. Listening to what clients and employees are telling you helps you make the right decisions.</p> <h3>Tell us about a typical working day.</h3> <p>Mornings and early afternoons are normally taken up by the UK team, with afternoons and early evenings dedicated to the US.</p> <p>I work across some of our key clients, get involved with lots of new business opportunities and spend the rest of the time working with the team to find new and interesting ways of running paid media campaigns.</p> <p>There are always new methodologies, tools, networks or new features on existing tools that need to be explored and tested. </p> <h3>What do you love about your job? What sucks? </h3> <p>Coming up with new ways of tackling client challenges has always motivated me. It’s exciting to see how new innovations and technologies can help clients gain a competitive advantage.</p> <p>I’ve been really lucky to have a lot of autonomy within my role at Jellyfish. This has enabled me to do things that may not be typical for a head of paid media.</p> <p>As an example, I introduced a peer-to-peer reward and recognition scheme into the company and developed the Jellyfish Academy, a three-month graduate training program that teaches new recruits how to manage paid search campaigns.</p> <p>It’s great to see the students learn new skills and progress through the program to become effective digital marketers. </p> <p>The thing that sucks is trying to be disciplined and prioritising the things that will have the greatest impact on our business. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0036/Screen_Shot_2016-10-07_at_12.37.08.png" alt="jellyfish website" width="615" height="330"></p> <h3>What kind of goals do you have? What are the most useful metrics and KPIs for measuring success?</h3> <p>We have goals at both client and division level. For the paid media division we’re looking at client retention and growth as well as new business growth.</p> <p>At a client level<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67646-ppc-a-beginners-guide-to-kpis-budgets-agencies/"> the KPI’s </a>are always aligned with the clients’ commercial goals. As a performance agency we’re always interested in conversion and return on advertising spend. </p> <h3>What are your favourite tools to help you to get the job done?</h3> <p>I love the Google technology stack from DoubleClick (DS, DCM, DBM) through to Audience Centre, Analytics and Attribution 360.</p> <p>We’ve spent a lot of time understanding how the tech all works together and how we can create a unique approach through the standard tools.</p> <h3>How did you get started in the digital industry, and where might you go from here? </h3> <p>This is a long story. I used to compete in Latin American and ballroom dancing and went on to dance professionally for 10 years in an Irish dance show called Spirit of the Dance.</p> <p>I went to a recruitment agent and after she stopped laughing at my CV, she advised that everyone was looking for PPC people. I went home, looked up PPC and researched obsessively for weeks.</p> <p>Once I’d started interviewing, I received three job offers in the space of one week, one of which was at Jellyfish. More than 11 years later, I’m head of paid media at the UK’s largest independent performance marketing agency.  </p> <h3>Which brands do you think are doing digital well? </h3> <p>There are so many brands doing a great job in digital. I think one of my favourites is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67745-15-examples-of-artificial-intelligence-in-marketing/">Netflix</a>.</p> <p>They’ve really embraced the use of data across their business, especially to inform creative execution and delivery.</p> <h3>Do you have any advice for people who want to work in the digital industry?  </h3> <p>Jump in. There are so many different roles that require diverse skill sets and attributes. I truly believe there is something that will appeal to everyone within digital.</p> <p>In such a fast moving industry, those who keep up to date with the latest digital news and trends can do really well.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68228 2016-08-31T11:04:34+01:00 2016-08-31T11:04:34+01:00 How The Financial Times is dealing with the problem of ad blocking Nikki Gilliland <p>You can watch the interview in full here, and I've also summarised her answers below.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MUoHJ-y0GcI?list=PL1-kPkZBw50FexVdl4i94-lQdSVnsN7A1&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>The FT's innovative approach</h3> <p>While some sites have started to completely block access to anyone using the software, The FT is taking a different approach.</p> <p>One of multiple strategies, it has recently started to serve a partial view of the site to anyone using ad-blocking software, by blurring or missing out portions of text.</p> <p>Essentially, this serves as a visual-representation of what ad blocking does to the business revenue overall. </p> <h3>Getting users to understand the impact</h3> <p>Instead of merely shutting out readers, The FT’s strategy aims to get consumers interested and engaged in what is an industry-wide problem.</p> <p><a href="https://pagefair.com/blog/2015/ad-blocking-report/" target="_blank">Adobe estimated</a> that ad-blockers cost publishers nearly $22bn in 2015, and according to Sacha, consumers can often be unaware of the large-scale impact.</p> <h3>A consumer-focused solution</h3> <p>There is no single solution to the problem of ad-blocking, however The Financial Times is striving to bring back the focus onto the consumer.</p> <p>In doing so, it aims to create a two-way conversation – recognising the pitfalls for both publishers and their audiences – to ultimately find a solution for all.</p> <p><em>Sacha is among the expert speakers at Econsultancy's <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get With The Programmatic</a> event in London on September 21.</em></p>