tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/influence-measurement Latest Influence measurement content from Econsultancy 2017-03-21T12:43:33+00:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3224 2017-03-21T12:43:33+00:00 2017-03-21T12:43:33+00:00 Web Measurement and Analytics <p>If you are to get the best results from your website, leveraging digital insight is essential. This course focuses on using web analytics and other data sources to improve results from your website through analysis of site visitor characteristics and behaviour.</p> <p>You'll learn how to produce a plan to develop the most appropriate metrics, tools and digital marketing improvement process for your organisation.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3174 2017-03-21T11:33:08+00:00 2017-03-21T11:33:08+00:00 Intensive: Mastering Analytics <p>Develop your analytics strategy and gain practical skills in measurement, interpretation, optimisation and prediction.</p> <p>The volume of data, analytics tools and different sources relevant to digital is ever-increasing and getting value from that data requires a focused and structured approach.</p> <p>This three day course will arm you with the practical knowledge and skills you need to transform this wealth of data into increased performance and better strategic decisions. </p> <p>The Mastering Analytics Intensive covers the full analytics journey from planning measurement and data collection through to the practicalities of analysing, optimising and predicting behaviour.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Econsultancy’s intensives are three-day programmes offering you a deep dive into specific digital disciplines. The intensives offer the practical training without the need for long term commitment.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Intensives</strong>: </p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Are led by practitioner trainers</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Include access to resources to support the training</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Allow delegates to implement and evaluate what they’ve learnt through ‘homework’ and trainer feedback after training</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3171 2017-03-21T11:29:32+00:00 2017-03-21T11:29:32+00:00 Google Analytics <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently once the tool is in place there seems to be a "what next" moment.</p> <p>This practical, small group workshop will help you to get started with Google Analytics, offering you plenty of practical tips and shortcuts.</p> <p>You'll learn how to get useful information from the tool so you can begin optimising your site, online marketing and content.</p> <p>Your website will also be viewed by an industry expert, who will make recommendations as to the best starting points for your own analysis.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3170 2017-03-21T11:28:33+00:00 2017-03-21T11:28:33+00:00 Google Analytics <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently once the tool is in place there seems to be a "what next" moment.</p> <p>This practical, small group workshop will help you to get started with Google Analytics, offering you plenty of practical tips and shortcuts.</p> <p>You'll learn how to get useful information from the tool so you can begin optimising your site, online marketing and content.</p> <p>Your website will also be viewed by an industry expert, who will make recommendations as to the best starting points for your own analysis.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68782 2017-02-10T11:36:23+00:00 2017-02-10T11:36:23+00:00 Three ways brands are using emotional analytics to connect with customers Tamara Littleton <p>But now it’s time for the next step.</p> <p>Emotional analytics allows brands to connect with people on a deeper, more personal, level. Unlike sentiment analytics, which simply allocates responses into broad positive, neutral or negative categories, emotional analytics tells brands what people are feeling and why. This, I think, makes all the difference.</p> <p>I might take to Twitter after a bad experience with customer service, and while the post could be defined as negative in a sentiment analysis report, how useful is that “negative” tag to the brand? My post will be lumped in with tons of other “negative” posts, depleted of all context which could make it actionable for the brand.</p> <p>Without deeper context, the brand can’t solve any problems. It can’t see that certain business practices make me frustrated, or that many other customers are experiencing a similar frustration for the same reason.</p> <p>Brands that don’t know why a customer feels the way they do can’t tailor their products and services to meet specific needs and wants.</p> <h3>How emotional analytics delivers results</h3> <p>By using emotional analytics, brands can see if there’s a disconnect between the emotions that we want the brand to create, and those that real customers are experiencing.</p> <p>A brand’s marketing team may want to promote the brand as inspirational and exciting, but how can it tell if it’s really delivering on this? Emotional analytics looks at how people are feeling, examines what topics they are having feelings about, and allows marketers the chance to change the narrative. </p> <h3>Three ways brands use emotional analytics</h3> <h4>1. Personalisation </h4> <p>As part of its 20th anniversary celebrations, <a title="campaignlive.co.uk" href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/easyjet-transformed-customer-data-emotional-anniversary-stories/1414488">EasyJet</a> used emotional analytics to discover what its customers felt about previous journeys they had taken.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3819/easyjet_20_years.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="450"></p> <p>It then used these insights to send customers personalised emails featuring their own history with the airline.</p> <p>These emails were opened 100% more than regular email campaigns, with the word “love” being the most common word used by recipients to describe how they felt about it.</p> <h4>2. Compliance</h4> <p>Bloomberg allows its clients to track the emotion in text and voice communications, helping them <a title="informationweek.com" href="http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/businesses-harness-emotional-analytics-for-gains/d/d-id/1324970">prevent market abuse</a> and remain compliant.</p> <p>Think of all the times that we don’t say what we mean. When we say we’re fine, when really were angry. By analysing our emotional responses, brands have a better chance of spotting any hidden meaning behind our messages.</p> <p>Businesses can apply this technology to their own internal communications and identify irregularities before they become problems.</p> <h4>3. Improved experience </h4> <p>We’re starting to see more <a title="insider-trends.com" href="http://www.insider-trends.com/is-emotion-tracking-the-next-big-retail-trend/">wearables</a> that track our emotional responses. For retailers, these offer a way to improve and tailor their in-store customer service – from sending assistance to frustrated shoppers to knowing which customers would be more open to special offers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3820/feel_wristband.png" alt="" width="700" height="349"></p> <p>When <a title="wgsn.com" href="https://www.wgsn.com/blogs/ebays-pop-up-tracks-shoppers-emotions/">eBay</a> launched its pop-up store in late 2016, it wanted to track how people felt when they shopped for Christmas gifts. The answer? Stressed. 88% saw their heart rate jump by 32% during their shopping experience.</p> <p>Ebay wanted to use this data to take the stress out of shopping, and use the emotional insights to show shoppers what products they had connected with. The ecommerce giant tracked this data using wearables and in-store experiences, but it could gather the same sort of data online using emotional analytics.</p> <h3>Emotional analytics: using humans to turn emotion into action</h3> <p>From managing a crisis to refining a customer’s retail experience - if you understand the emotion that your brand elicits from a customer, you can take positive action.</p> <p>Using human insight to get under the skin of the data means you can turn analytics into action, transforming your marketing, customer service and experience to resonate with customers. You can win not just their heads, but their hearts. </p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68747 2017-01-30T11:47:08+00:00 2017-01-30T11:47:08+00:00 From buzzword to bullsh*t: celebrating 144 years of ‘influencer marketing’ Ian McKee <p>Yeah, you read that right — 1873. Jules Verne, a hugely influential author, was known to be writing another adventure novel <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Product_placement#Origins">when he was lobbied by transport companies for mentions</a>.</p> <p>Perhaps if Jules had been a millennial, then ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ would have been an Instagram Story featuring definitely-not-awkward contract-fulfilling selfies taken on the Orient Express. </p> <p>I’m sure the world would have been a richer place. </p> <h3>New tricks for old dogs</h3> <p>You can see my point, through the dripping sarcasm — <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">influencer marketing</a> is not a new thing. </p> <p>In the decade I’ve been in PR, I’ve been involved in activity that today you might term ‘influencer marketing’ from day one. And I’m a relative whippersnapper compared to the transport industry lobbyists of the 1870s. </p> <p>It goes like this — this person holds sway over our audience. Give them free stuff, or some other compensation, to talk about our brand. Bingo, consider that audience influenced. </p> <p>Coining new terms for old tactics is something we love doing in the internet age. Look at fake news (or, propaganda), <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63722-what-is-native-advertising-and-do-you-need-it/">native advertising</a> (what we used to call advertorial) and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy">content marketing</a> (all marketing involves content, people). </p> <p>Just because the media has changed immeasurably doesn’t mean the ways we use it have. And influencer marketing is another buzzword coined more for tech companies to sell software than it is to describe anything new. </p> <h3>Rule of diminished returns</h3> <p>Which isn’t to say it’s not of value. There’s a reason marketers have been using this tactic for over a century. </p> <p>However, gaining buzzword status has inevitable negative effects. Just as in B2B content marketing when it started getting harder and harder to attract attention to your latest white paper, if everyone’s employing the same tactic then the rule of diminishing returns comes into play. </p> <p>In the case of influencer marketing, if it continues to grow there are only two routes we’ll plausibly go down.</p> <p>The first is a world where literally everyone’s an influencer to some degree. Like in the Black Mirror episode <a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5497778/">Nosedive</a>, whether you can live in a certain place, buy your coffee from a certain café or do a certain job will all depend on your influencer score. Social media armageddon, basically.</p> <p>The second (and far more likely) outcome is a backlash. Consumer cynicism reaches the point where your average Instagram user can spot a plug from a mile off, and the returns of influencer marketing are significantly diminished. </p> <p>I think it’s fairly obvious that we’re approaching the second outcome right now. Stories like <a href="http://digiday.com/agencies/confessions-social-media-exec-no-idea-pay-influencers/">confessions of a social media exec on influencer marketing</a>, or from the other side, Bloomberg’s <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2016-11-30/confessions-of-an-instagram-influencer">confessions of an Instagram influencer</a> show the cracks are forming. </p> <h3>Gaming the system</h3> <p>Of course, I’m aware of the long tail argument — don’t pay over the odds for a superstar ‘influencer’, go with the person that has 10,000 genuinely engaged followers, or even 1,000 but they’re all actual friends and acquaintances. </p> <p>There’s Brian Solis's ‘<a href="http://www.briansolis.com/2012/03/the-pillars-of-influence-and-how-to-activate-them-in-business/">Pillars of Influence</a>’ — reach, relevance and resonance. Make sure your strategy is balanced. </p> <p>The problem is that at the moment, consumers are becoming more cynical, destroying the trust that these pillars are founded on. And this is not helped by the fast-growing phenomenon of the self-made influencer — those that are gaming the system. </p> <p>As any social media guru knows, you can game followers, likes and shares, and plenty of self-proclaimed ‘influencers’ are doing just that. All this makes it harder for any software tool to tell true influence.</p> <h3>Human intuition</h3> <p>Cue influx of software vendors protesting that their tool is super intelligent and can weed out the bogus influencers. </p> <p>I’m sure some of them do, to some degree. But just as in the earlier days of influencer marketing when it was just choosing which media outlets to send a product to, human intuition and experience come into play. </p> <p>I would always tell clients that when choosing media targets that circulation (reach) was one metric, audience (relevance) was another, but so was our own intuition and knowledge. And not just in ‘resonance’ — that should come from the story, the message, or the content. </p> <p>I’m talking about understanding who really knows what they’re talking about and commands attention on a topic. </p> <p>For this there’s no substitute for reading, interacting with and working with the media full time. And the same applies whether you’re talking about a steel industry trade mag or a health and fitness Instagrammer. </p> <h3>‘Influencer marketing’ won’t die</h3> <p>As much as I wish the buzzword would disappear, at the very least the practice will continue. But hopefully it will be <a href="https://www.marketingweek.com/2016/05/26/more-must-be-done-to-educate-brands-on-online-ad-rules-says-asa/">under better-observed regulations</a>, and with growing consumer cynicism the market will bottom out to a more measured approach. </p> <p>If you’re planning an influencer outreach programme anytime soon, obviously you won’t just cream off the top 10 Instagrammers using a relevant hashtag. But hopefully, you also won’t just use what your fancy software’s proprietary algorithm tells you are the top 10 either. </p> <p>By all means take those factors into account, but also spend time reading and reviewing content, understand the audience you want to reach and work transparently with people you know they’ll trust. </p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3073 2016-08-16T09:05:38+01:00 2016-08-16T09:05:38+01:00 Web Measurement and Analytics <p>If you are to get the best results from your website, leveraging digital insight is essential. This course focuses on using web analytics and other data sources to improve results from your website through analysis of site visitor characteristics and behaviour.</p> <p>You'll learn how to produce a plan to develop the most appropriate metrics, tools and digital marketing improvement process for your organisation.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3012 2016-08-11T11:13:27+01:00 2016-08-11T11:13:27+01:00 Intensive: Mastering Analytics <p>Develop your analytics strategy and gain practical skills in measurement, interpretation, optimisation and prediction.</p> <p>The volume of data, analytics tools and different sources relevant to digital is ever-increasing and getting value from that data requires a focused and structured approach.</p> <p>This three day course will arm you with the practical knowledge and skills you need to transform this wealth of data into increased performance and better strategic decisions. </p> <p>The Mastering Analytics Intensive covers the full analytics journey from planning measurement and data collection through to the practicalities of analysing, optimising and predicting behaviour.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Econsultancy’s intensives are three-day programmes offering you a deep dive into specific digital disciplines. The intensives offer the practical training without the need for long term commitment.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Intensives</strong>: </p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Are led by practitioner trainers</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Include access to resources to support the training</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Allow delegates to implement and evaluate what they’ve learnt through ‘homework’ and trainer feedback after training</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3011 2016-08-11T11:12:16+01:00 2016-08-11T11:12:16+01:00 Intensive: Mastering Analytics <p>Develop your analytics strategy and gain practical skills in measurement, interpretation, optimisation and prediction.</p> <p>The volume of data, analytics tools and different sources relevant to digital is ever-increasing and getting value from that data requires a focused and structured approach.</p> <p>This three day course will arm you with the practical knowledge and skills you need to transform this wealth of data into increased performance and better strategic decisions. </p> <p>The Mastering Analytics Intensive covers the full analytics journey from planning measurement and data collection through to the practicalities of analysing, optimising and predicting behaviour.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Econsultancy’s intensives are three-day programmes offering you a deep dive into specific digital disciplines. The intensives offer the practical training without the need for long term commitment.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Intensives</strong>: </p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Are led by practitioner trainers</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Include access to resources to support the training</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Allow delegates to implement and evaluate what they’ve learnt through ‘homework’ and trainer feedback after training</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3006 2016-08-10T17:37:46+01:00 2016-08-10T17:37:46+01:00 Google Analytics <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently once the tool is in place there seems to be a "what next" moment.</p> <p>This practical, small group workshop will help you to get started with Google Analytics, offering you plenty of practical tips and shortcuts.</p> <p>You'll learn how to get useful information from the tool so you can begin optimising your site, online marketing and content.</p> <p>Your website will also be viewed by an industry expert, who will make recommendations as to the best starting points for your own analysis.</p>