tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/facebook Latest Facebook content from Econsultancy 2018-06-12T08:17:03+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/70076 2018-06-12T08:17:03+01:00 2018-06-12T08:17:03+01:00 What happened to social communities? Do brands and businesses still care? Michelle Goodall <p>NB. Subscribers can access the reports here:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-strategy-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-platforms-overview-2018">Social Media Platforms Overview Best Practice Guide</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-social-media-advertising-2018">Paid Social Media Best Practice Guide</a></li> </ul> <p>The question of communities, and whether companies are giving them due attention, was met with thoughtful reflection: </p> <p>“You’re absolutely right to ask this question. Every organisation should be clear on their answer,” BBC’s head of social news, Mark Frankel responded.</p> <h3>Why do we need to address the ‘community’ question?</h3> <p>Recent <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69721-why-the-facebook-news-feed-update-might-be-the-wake-up-call-that-marketers-need">Facebook algorithm changes</a> to favour friend, family and local posts followed Facebook’s adapted mission statement to "Give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together." </p> <p>Facebook’s definition of ‘community’, and the impact of the changes, are being felt by many brands and businesses. The cynical suggest that a ‘demotion’ of brand social media content and communities is a thinly-disguised ploy to ensure an insurance budget against the decreased visibility of Facebook Page organic posts. </p> <p>I’ve spoken to a number of marketers from small businesses who have felt the effects. Many said that their Facebook focus is now on reaching audiences through paid media only for upper awareness and lower-funnel conversion activity. They are allowing their Pages to ‘drift’, spending less time on crafting organic posts, and dealing only with issues rather than proactively managing their Page. </p> <p>With that said, many marketers from all sectors feel that the ‘Facebook Zero’ algorithm changes are welcome, and that they have forced organisations to rethink their relationship with audiences - redressing the broadcast content vs meaningful engagement imbalance.</p> <p>Those of us who have been social media strategists since the turn of the century (wow, that makes me feel old) have always guided organisations using community strategy principles in social media - after all, a social media presence = the creation of a community.</p> <p>Stephen Waddington, Chief Engagement Officer, Ketchum has been working with organisations for long enough in social spaces to feel that the word ‘community’ in both digital and social media needs clarity. It’s a term that has been misused by many. </p> <p>He makes the case that core PR skills, as well as a clear community strategy are key to developing and maintaining active and effective communities. </p> <blockquote> <p>'Community' is a much abused and maligned word in this social media era. Create a Twitter hashtag, or build a Facebook or LinkedIn group, and people will come. Except they don’t. The internet is littered with failed community building efforts.</p> <p>Successful communities, online and offline, are co-created around a shared purpose. They coalesce around people with shared interests and value, and those in these communities rely on information from those they trust.</p> <p>The skills of public relations in listening, storytelling and content, can make communities vibrant.</p> </blockquote> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/5253/community.jpg" alt="community word above crowd" width="615" height="410"></p> <h3>What happened to ‘social communities’?</h3> <p>Social networks were simply an extension of the early community spaces of the internet, such as forums and Usenet. Creating communities required an understanding of audience motivations, group dynamics, communication theory, transactional analysis, crisis communications, effective moderation practices - essentially a solid community strategy and community management skills. </p> <p>As social platforms grew and features changed in the mid 2000s, many marketers threw funds at delighting their audiences with apps, competitions, content and experiences. The core principles of developing and nurturing a community, however loosely that community was connected, were often forgotten in the pursuit of fans, followers and likes.</p> <p>Social media became a space for many to spew out interruptive clickbait - low friction ‘which type are you’ ‘hot or not’ ‘tag yourself’ posts, competitions and memes - rather than focusing on providing a community space to nurture a group of thinkers, makers, shakers, doers, fixers and fans.</p> <p>This, of course, is a highly reductive and simplistic view. Let’s not forget that this approach to low-value social content was also rewarded by the social networks, until they publicly announced that the days of rewarding low level brand/audience engagement were well and truly over. </p> <p>There are also many amazing communities out there using social networks as their platforms. Communities of purpose, principle, action, local communities and even branded communities connected by little else than a love of a particular brand, tv series or celebrity, for example. Do use the comments below to highlight yours.</p> <p>So what did some of our expert report contributors have to say when asked the question: </p> <h3><strong>"Do brands and businesses really care about creating communities in social media?"</strong></h3> <p>First up, Kerry Taylor – EVP, MTV International &amp; Chief Marketing Officer Viacom UK at Viacom. Given that Viacom’s brands include MTV, Comedy Central and Nickelodeon with programmes that have large active fan bases on social media, her response to the question was perhaps unsurprisingly emphatically positive:</p> <blockquote> <p>We do! It is our biggest connection to our audience, and helps us get the most immediate sense of how we are doing and where we need to go. </p> <p>We don't have tonnes of data points and so our community is everything – our fan base, our immediate source of insight, where we test new ideas and get inspired.</p> </blockquote> <p>Ros Lawler, Digital Director at Tate, agrees:</p> <blockquote> <p>It is essential in the museum sector as a means of reaching and growing new audiences. Particularly when trying to engage young audiences.</p> </blockquote> <p>Focusing on business objectives, understanding the interplay between organic and paid media in social and working to the strength of each is the secret to building and gaining value from communities, states Jeff Semones, Managing Partner, Head of Social Media, Mediacom.</p> <p>"For brands that enjoy a strong, active relationship with their customers who choose to engage on social, great value can be realized through loyalty and advocacy. For these brands, the answer is yes.  </p> <p>"However, a marketer’s appetite for long-term commitment to creating communities very much depends on the individual brand, the business they’re in, and most importantly, the brand’s relationship with their customers. </p> <p>“With that, 'customer-centric marketing' has emerged as a term that often applies to brands that prioritise communities in their social strategies.  </p> <p>“It’s important to recognise the skillsets and resources required to garner maximum value of social media through the interplay of organic and paid disciplines in support of a brand’s social media strategy.  </p> <p>“Customer-centric marketers understand the limitations of organic reach but still see great value for their brands through community-inspired tactics.  They also understand that paid media is a must-have to deliver meaningful reach. Additionally, the latest ad products from the primary platforms enable marketers to leverage impressive targetability of specific audience segments that can drive more measurable outcomes.</p> <p>“However, brands still need to deliver on the day-to-day expectations of their social media audiences, which is the primary role of the organic discipline. This is where the potential power of community can be leveraged.  </p> <p>“Brands that fully commit to fostering collaboration, integrating paid/owned/earned strategies and maintaining their communities, can inspire naturally occurring advocacy that drives word of mouth and earned media value.  </p> <p>“The best brand marketers in social media understand how to synthesise the strengths of both organic and paid tactics that create great experiences for audiences, while delivering strong results against business objectives.”  </p> <p>So, there is clearly an appetite to continue to invest in social media communities. </p> <h3>The rise of Facebook Groups for communities?</h3> <p>Some organisations, like the BBC, are testing out the efficacy of Facebook Groups, arguably a better place to develop genuine communities of interest and purpose on the world's largest social network. Groups are one of the most active and loved community elements of Facebook with over 1 billion users. </p> <p>The BBC are experimenting by supporting specific programming which encourage high levels of community engagement. An example of this is the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/deathinicevalley/">Death in Ice Valley Facebook Group</a> from BBC World Service and Norwegian broadcaster NRK.</p> <p>But others are not so keen to put their eggs in the Facebook Groups basket. One anonymous contributor said, </p> <blockquote> <p>It feels like if we jump to Facebook’s tune and develop Facebook Groups, then the algorithm will change again. We’ll go back to reduced visibility, and have to spend significant sums on advertising.</p> </blockquote> <p>Another big question for strategists is: will Facebook monetise Groups? Will they extend ad placements or create a new ad formats specifically for these community hubs that Facebook publicly cherishes?</p> <p>Facebook will certainly have to proceed with caution as they develop new ad inventory. </p> <p>It’s a time of uncertainty, but it’s certainly a a good time to reflect on the question: “Do you really care about creating communities on social media?” </p> <p>What’s your answer?</p> <p><strong><em>For more context, guidance, opinions and data on social media best practice, download the updated <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-strategy-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide</a> and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-platforms-overview-2018/">Social Media Platforms Overview Best Practice Guide</a>.</em></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><a style="color: #2976b2; text-decoration: none;" href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/social-media-and-online-pr" target="_self"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/4984/Social_Media___Online_PR_training.png" alt="social media and online pr training" width="600" height="209"></a></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4144 2018-06-11T12:26:00+01:00 2018-06-11T12:26:00+01:00 Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide <p>Part of our <a title="Social Media Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Best Practice Guide bundle</a>, this report aims to identify <strong>best practice approaches, techniques, measurement considerations, challenges and opportunities for creating your social media strategy.</strong></p> <p>It contains actionable, real-world insight with detailed explanations to help you start and improve your performance on social media platforms.</p> <p>Throughout the report, we bring you examples of how companies are using social media in different ways, as well as insights from companies interviewed specifically for this guide.</p> <p>For more details on the main features of social media platforms and the most pressing considerations for marketers looking to generate the most value from social media, read the complementary <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-platforms-overview">Social Media Platforms Overview</a> and the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-social-media-advertisinghttps://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-social-media-advertising">Paid Social Media Advertising</a> report.</p> <h2>Methodology</h2> <p>The methodology involved two main phases:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Phase 1:</strong> Desk research to identify relevant issues, examples and models.</li> <li> <strong>Phase 2:</strong> A series of in-depth interviews with a range of senior digital and non-digital marketers, communications leads and social media strategists.</li> </ul> <h2>Lead author</h2> <p>The lead author for our social media best practice guides is <strong>Michelle Goodall</strong>, an experienced consultant. She has more than 17 years’ B2C and B2B experience client and agency-side, providing digital transformation and social media strategy advice and support.</p> <p>She has worked with a wide range of clients, including London2012, BBC, Direct Line Group, Multiple Sclerosis Society, Barclays Bank, Coca Cola, Unilever, US Embassy, and many others.</p> <p>Michelle is a trainer and consultant for Econsultancy and can generally be found curating things that smart people write / make / do and getting to grips with Peach and other peripheral / transformative / game-changing technologies for her clients.</p> <h2>Contributors</h2> <p>The author and Econsultancy wish to extend sincere thanks to the following respected professionals who have contributed to the report:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Richard Bagnall</strong> – CEO, PRIME Research UK &amp; SVP PRIME Research Europe</li> <li> <strong>Alison Traboulsi</strong> - Social Media Editor, Direct Line Group</li> <li> <strong>Kerry Taylor</strong> – EVP, MTV International. Chief Marketing Officer, Viacom UK at Viacom </li> <li> <strong>Guy Stephens</strong> – Social Customer Care Consultant, IBM</li> <li> <strong>Stephen Waddington</strong> – Partner and Chief Engagement Officer, Ketchum</li> <li> <strong>Ros Lawler</strong> – Digital Director, Tate</li> <li> <strong>Mark Frankel</strong> – Social Media Editor, BBC News</li> <li> <strong>Helen Wood</strong> – Planning Director, H&amp;K Strategies</li> <li> <strong>Sophie Mindell </strong>– Content &amp; Publishing Strategist, H&amp;K Strategies</li> <li> <strong>Matt Owen</strong> – Founder, Atomise Marketing</li> <li> <strong>Alison Spray</strong> – Director of Data and Insights, H&amp;K Strategies (AMEC Board Member)</li> <li> <strong>Jeff Semones</strong> – Managing Partner, Head of Social Media, MediaCom</li> </ul> <p><strong>Stay tuned - Econsultuancy will host a Social Media webinar, further exploring the most important issues and takeaways in this report on 20th September 2018.  </strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4147 2018-06-11T12:00:00+01:00 2018-06-11T12:00:00+01:00 Social Media Bundle <p>According to research by GlobalWebindex, <strong>93% of internet users have at least one social media account</strong>. With social media touching so many areas of an organisation, the process of getting social media right has never been more important.</p> <p>This <strong>Social Media Best Practice Guide</strong> contains actionable, real-world insight with detailed explanations to help you start and improve your performance on social media platforms.</p> <p>In order to enable you to quickly access the information you need to start improving your marketing efforts, the guide is available as two individual reports:</p> <h3><strong>1. <a title="Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-strategy-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide</a></strong></h3> <p>The aim of this research is to identify <strong>best practice approaches, techniques, measurement considerations, challenges and opportunities for creating your social media strategy.</strong></p> <p>As social media platforms continue to evolve at a rapid rate we also cover some of the exciting developments taking place in social media.</p> <h3><strong>2. <a title="Social Media Platforms Overview" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-platforms-overview/">Social Media Platforms Overview</a></strong></h3> <p><strong>We've updated our social media platforms overview guide in 2018</strong> to account for the rapid developments occurring in this space. This report's purpose is to provide <strong>a snapshot of the major social media platforms and the most pressing considerations for marketers looking to generate the most value from social media</strong>.</p> <p>It provides a summary of the main features of these platforms, and outlines some of the options available to marketers when developing a paid, owned and earned strategic approach to social media marketing and communications.</p> <p>From Snapchat Lenses and Geofilters and Facebook's latest innovations to Live Video, Augmented Reality and Chatbots, our 2018 edition will ensure that you're up to date with the latest platform trends.</p> <p>Throughout both reports, we bring you <strong>examples of how companies are using social media in different ways, as well as insights from companies interviewed</strong> specifically for these guides.</p> <h2>Methodology</h2> <p>The methodology involved two main phases:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Phase 1:</strong> Desk research to identify relevant issues, examples and models.</li> <li> <strong>Phase 2:</strong> A series of in-depth interviews with a range of senior digital and non-digital marketers, communications leads and social media strategists. </li> </ul> <h2>Lead author</h2> <p>The lead author for our social media best practice guides is <strong>Michelle Goodall</strong>, an experienced consultant. She has more than 17 years’ B2C and B2B experience client and agency-side, providing digital transformation and social media strategy advice and support.</p> <p>She has worked with a wide range of clients, including London2012, BBC, Direct Line Group, Multiple Sclerosis Society, Barclays Bank, Coca Cola, Unilever, US Embassy, and many others.</p> <p>Michelle is a trainer and consultant for Econsultancy and can generally be found curating things that smart people write / make / do and getting to grips with Peach and other peripheral / transformative / game-changing technologies for her clients.</p> <p><strong>Stay tuned - Econsultuancy will host a Social Media webinar, further exploring the most important issues and takeaways in these reports on 20th September 2018.  </strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/70072 2018-06-08T14:44:24+01:00 2018-06-08T14:44:24+01:00 How brands can use social media polling Nikki Gilliland <p>So, what are the benefits for brands on social media? Here’s a look at how some are using polls, and the reasons why they can be an effective part of an overall social media strategy.</p> <h3>1. Feedback and insight</h3> <p>According to a survey by Wunderman, <a href="https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/wunderman-study-reveals-79-of-consumers-only-buy-from-brands-that-prove-they-care-about-earning-their-business-300386618.html" target="_blank">79% of consumers</a> say they want brands to actively demonstrate that they ‘understand and care’ about them before they make a purchase. </p> <p>Polls are a great way to demonstrate this, allowing brands to ask for direct feedback on products or general customer experience, and in turn, letting users know that their opinion is valued. </p> <p>People are perhaps more likely to respond on social media, too, especially in comparison to email surveys or requests that create more disruption to the user experience. Responding to a poll takes little thought or consideration, making it an easy and seamless way for brands to gain insight. </p> <p>This is particularly true for Instagram Stories (which added the option for polls last October) – whereby users are already actively engaged in content. </p> <p>Starbucks is one brand that has made use of this, creating polls to gain quick insight into customer preferences. In the story shown below, the poll simply asks users whether they would be more inclined to choose a pink or violet drink. There’s not much difference in the product to begin with, but with a quick poll, the brand is able to gain insight into these minute customer preferences. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/5008/Starbucks.JPG" alt="starbucks instagram poll" width="400" height="690"></p> <h3>2. Driving decisions</h3> <p>As well as gaining insight into how products or marketing is faring with customers, polls can also be used to drive future decisions. Again, for example, Starbucks might choose to put its pink or violet drink on the menu (and disregard the other) based on poll results.</p> <p>In a similar way, polls can also be used to help brands make more immediate decisions, with users aware that they have the power to create a specific outcome.</p> <p>eBay has used this tactic in the past, using polls to determine what special offers to roll out. As well as increasing engagement, this is a particularly good way to create positive sentiment towards the brand, with users feeling satisfied if they end up getting the offer they want.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/eBayChoice?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#eBayChoice</a>: Do you want to unlock an awesome deal on an Apple Watch or Fitbit Charge HR?</p> — eBay (@eBay) <a href="https://twitter.com/eBay/status/764812956982992897?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 14, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>Meanwhile, Benefit Cosmetics uses a cross-channel approach to determine social content, using an Instagram poll to determine what to include in its next Facebook video. This gives users greater control, as well as promotes the video and prompts them to check it out.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/5007/Benefit_Cosmetics.JPG" alt="benefit instagram poll" width="400" height="679"></p> <h3>3. Entertainment and fun</h3> <p>While polls can generate purposeful insight, they can also be viewed as just another form of social content, with the sole aim of entertaining or informing an audience.</p> <p>Due to their interactive nature, brands can also use gamification elements, using the question-based format to create a quiz rather than a simple survey.</p> <p>HelloFresh uses polls in this way, asking users food and cooking-related questions before allowing them to swipe up to find out the answers. This is a particularly clever use of the format, as not only does it provide a bit of fun for followers, but it also ensures they stay invested enough to watch the whole story to the end.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/5009/Hello_Fresh.JPG" alt="hello fresh instagram poll" width="400" height="687"></p> <p>GIFs are another tool that can effectively grab the user's attention. Last year, Facebook added the option to add in GIFs into polls, creating yet another hook to engage users. One of the first brands to test the feature was 20th Century Fox, using it on its page for new movie, Kingsman: The Golden Circle. </p> <p>As well as generating conversation about the movie, the use of GIFs helped it to stand out in user’s news feeds. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FKingsmanUK%2Fposts%2F866425713509552&amp;width=500" width="500" height="476"></iframe></p> <h3>4. Engaging during real-time events</h3> <p>Polls have a real-time element attached to them, meaning they’re a great way for brands to enhance existing experiences. For example, when It comes to sporting matches, polls can be used to generate excitement and anticipation around the event.</p> <p>Football clubs including Man City have previously integrated polls into Facebook content, prompting users to interact close to big games.</p> <p>Similarly, polls can also be used to engage people who can’t attend events in person. Bayern Munich is another football club to do this - this time on Instagram Stories - to get fans involved on match day. The club asks users to vote using emojis to indicate their response at behind-the-scenes action. What’s more, it also lets fans vote to determine the direction of content, further immersing them into the experience (from afar). </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Props to my colleagues in Munich for this awesome Instagram Stories idea! Letting fans direct it via voting. Great execution! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/sportsbiz?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#sportsbiz</a> <a href="https://t.co/jAkwSVAwaF">pic.twitter.com/jAkwSVAwaF</a></p> — Cristian Nyari (@Cnyari) <a href="https://twitter.com/Cnyari/status/924654155230318593?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 29, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>5. Strengthening connections (to influencers)</h3> <p>Finally, while the arrival of Instagram polls spells good news for brands, it's arguably even better for influencers. This is because influencers rely on engagement as a tangible measure of success (and indeed revenue), with polls providing another and arguably better way for followers to interact. </p> <p>Polls are likely to generate higher engagement as they provide the opportunity for a two-way interaction between fans and influencers, with the latter asking direct questions to make people feel more involved. This is different to fans merely liking or leaving a comment on a photo, which feels far more passive and impersonal.  </p> <p>At the same time, the integration of polls will benefit influencers, as it means they can gauge general opinion without having to deal with individual responses via DMs or comments. This might be opinion on what kind of content their audience wants to see, or feedback on previous work. In turn, brands are also likely to take note of these results, potentially helping when it comes to forging partnerships and creating campaigns.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/5006/Victoria_Van_Ness.JPG" alt="influencer poll" width="400" height="738"></p> <p><strong>Related articles:</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69505-eight-effective-examples-of-quizzes-in-content-marketing" target="_blank">Eight effective examples of quizzes in content marketing</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69094-five-examples-of-brands-using-interactive-video" target="_blank">Five examples of brands using interactive video</a></li> </ul> <p><a style="color: #2976b2; text-decoration: none;" href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/social-media-and-online-pr" target="_self"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/4984/Social_Media___Online_PR_training.png" alt="social media and online pr training" width="600" height="209"></a></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4148 2018-06-01T12:45:00+01:00 2018-06-01T12:45:00+01:00 Social Media Platforms Overview <p>Part of our <a title="Social Media Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Best Practice Guide bundle</a>,<strong> we've updated and refreshed this report for 2018</strong> to reflect on the latest trends and to provide <strong>a snapshot of the major social media platforms and the most pressing considerations for marketers looking to generate the most value from social media</strong>, as well as what to consider when making the business case for social media platforms.</p> <p>The report provides a summary of the main features of social media platforms, and outlines some of the options available to marketers when developing a paid, owned and earned strategic approach to social media marketing and communications.</p> <p>Throughout the report, we bring you <strong>examples of how companies are using social media in different ways, as well as insights from companies interviewed</strong> specifically for this guide.</p> <p>For more details on <strong>best practice approaches, techniques, challenges and opportunities for creating your social media strategy</strong>, read the complementary <strong><a title="Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-strategy-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide</a></strong>.</p> <h2>Methodology</h2> <p>The methodology involved two main phases:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Phase 1:</strong> Desk research to identify relevant issues, examples and models.</li> <li> <strong>Phase 2:</strong> A series of in-depth interviews with a range of senior digital and non-digital marketers, communications leads and social media strategists. </li> </ul> <h2>Lead author</h2> <p>The lead author for our social media best practice guides is <strong>Michelle Goodall</strong>, an experienced consultant. She has more than 17 years’ B2C and B2B experience client and agency-side, providing digital transformation and social media strategy advice and support.</p> <p>She has worked with a wide range of clients, including London2012, BBC, Direct Line Group, Multiple Sclerosis Society, Barclays Bank, Coca Cola, Unilever, US Embassy, and many others.</p> <p>Michelle is a trainer and consultant for Econsultancy and can generally be found curating things that smart people write / make / do and getting to grips with Peach and other peripheral / transformative / game-changing technologies for her clients.</p> <h2>Contributors</h2> <p>The author and Econsultancy wish to extend sincere thanks to the following respected professionals who have contributed to the report:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Kerry Taylor</strong> – EVP, MTV International &amp; Chief Marketing Officer, Viacom UK at Viacom</li> <li> <strong>Mark Frankel</strong> – Social Media Editor, BBC News</li> <li> <strong>Will McInnes</strong> - Chief Marketing Officer, Brandwatch</li> <li> <strong>Stephen Waddington</strong> – Chief Engagement Officer, Ketchum</li> <li> <strong>Georgina Forster</strong> – Managing Director, Mirum, San Diego</li> <li> <strong>Helen Wood</strong> – Planning Director, H&amp;K Strategies</li> <li> <strong>Sophie Mindell and Micaela Maciel</strong> – Content &amp; Publishing Strategists, H&amp;K Strategies</li> <li> <strong>Alison Traboulsi</strong> – Social Media Editor, Direct Line Group</li> <li> <strong>Matt Owen</strong> – Founder, Atomise Marketing</li> <li> <strong>Rafi Nizam</strong>, VP Creative, NBC Universal International</li> <li> <strong>Jeff Semones</strong>, Managing Partner, Head of Social Media, MediaCom</li> </ul> <p><strong>Stay tuned - Econsultuancy will host a Social Media webinar, further exploring the most important issues and takeaways in this report on 20th September 2018.  </strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/70057 2018-05-30T09:23:00+01:00 2018-05-30T09:23:00+01:00 GDPR Day 1: complaints filed against Google and Facebook Patricio Robles <p>The complaints allege that these two tech giants have violated the GDPR's prohibitions against forced constent by using popups prompting users to give consent if they want to continue using their services. NOYB claims that Facebook has already blocked the accounts of users who have refused to provide consent.</p> <p>In <a href="https://noyb.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/pa_forcedconsent_en.pdf">a statement</a>, NOYB explains, “The GDPR prohibits such forced consent and any form of bundling a service with the requirement to consent (see Article 7(4) GDPR). Consequently access to services can no longer depend on whether a user gives consent to the use of data. On this issue a very clear guideline of the European data protection authorities has already been published in November 2017.”</p> <p>According to Max Schrems, the Austrian lawyer behind NOYB, “Many users do not know yet that this annoying way of  pushing people to consent is actually forbidden under GDPR in most cases.”</p> <p>Schrems is a well-known privacy advocate who has the distinction of having taken on Facebook in court and won. </p> <p>Noting that companies do not need to gather consent for “anything strictly necessary for a service”, Schrems called consent popups a plague and suggested that “if companies realize that annoying pop-ups usually don't lead to valid consent, we should also be free from this digital plague soon. GDPR is very pragmatic on this point: Whatever is really necessary for an app is legal without consent, the rest needs a free 'yes' or 'no' option.”</p> <h3>Huge stakes</h3> <p>NOYB claims that Google and Facebook could face fines of up to €7bn for their alleged violations of the GDPR. That's big money and will surely mean that a big fight is inevitable.</p> <p>But the stakes aren't just high because of the amount of money involved. They're high because the NOYB actions are promptly putting the GDPR to the test. “Will GDPR show teeth?” the NOYB statement asks.</p> <p>Obviously, the GDPR is a complex piece of legislation and has many provisions. If the enforcement authorities decide that Facebook and Google haven't violated the GDPR in this instance, it doesn't mean that there won't be other alleged violations, some of which could lead to significant penalties.</p> <p>But NOYB's test of the GDPR seems to be a particularly meaningful one because the issue of forced consent speaks directly to the spirit of the GDPR. If the authorities effectively decide that users can be strong-armed into providing consent under the threat of being unable to continue using popular services, it would call into question whether the primary aim of the GDPR – empowering users to control their data – can ever be achieved.</p> <p>Of course, there's an important counter-argument to NOYB's position: if companies like Google and Facebook are told that they have to provide service to users who don't consent to the use of their data for advertising purposes, there's a real question as to whether or not their services will remain economically viable.</p> <p>From this perspective, it might not be an exaggeration to suggest that what's at stake here is nothing less than the future of the digital economy.</p> <p><a href="https://hello.econsultancy.com/gdpr-workshops/"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/4828/GDPRworkshop_leaderboard.jpg" alt="gdpr workshop" width="615"></a></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/70039 2018-05-22T12:00:00+01:00 2018-05-22T12:00:00+01:00 Why data will win the dating game, now Facebook is in the market Fiona Salmon <p>Dating companies have always recognised Facebook as a competitor of sorts. Arguably, it has been in the dating industry since Marc Zuckerberg added "Relationship Status" to the profile settings. There is also a great deal of anecdotal and empirical evidence of people who developed or rekindled a romantic relationship on Facebook. (Somehow, those stories are actually less surprising than those of people meeting on online dating platforms.)</p> <p>48 Percent of single women admit to researching their prospective online date on Facebook before meeting for the first time according to a Match Singles in America Survey. But perhaps more fundamentally, digital dating services already use Facebook: Tinder, Bumble and Happn use Facebook Connect and data to provide their services. Match.com's AI dating coach <a href="https://www.meetic-group.com/press/uk/match-launches-toolkit-make-modern-dating-easier/">Lara</a>, integrates with Facebook Messenger and has delivered a 30% increase in registrations across Europe since its launch.</p> <p>Integrations like those have shown Facebook more than a thing or two about the dating industry. That's why the announcement of <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69991-will-facebook-feel-the-love-again-with-new-dating-service">a dedicated Facebook dating service</a> is justifiably unnerving the dating industry. </p> <p>Although commentators are pointing to the 22% fall in Match Group's share price, Match is <a href="https://globaldatinginsights.com/2018/05/04/facebook-dating-online-dating-industry-reacts/">by no means</a> the only brand that could suffer. Match also operates Tinder, OK Cupid, and Plenty of Fish. As well as the other dating giant eHarmony there’s also the raft of mainstream publishers operating dating services. The Guardian's Soulmates is probably the most successful of the mainstream UK publishers, but the Evening Standard, the Times, The Telegraph, The Independent, The Mirror all provide dating services through white label dating providers.</p> <p>There's also all the smaller sites supporting particular communities, characteristics and niche interests. Facebook joins many people together via their niche interests – their hobbies, interests and charactertistics. Their market entry poses a threat to all of these players.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/4595/fb_dating.jpeg" alt="dating apps" width="615"></p> <h3>But "Senator, we sell ads"...?</h3> <p>Considering Mark Zuckerburg's "Senator, we sell ads," explanation for Facebook's ability to provide services for free, it is surprising that a Facebook spokesperson told Re:Code that <a href="https://www.recode.net/2018/5/6/17321108/facebook-online-dating-service-explained-no-ads">ads won't appear</a> next to profiles and users' dating data won't be used to target them with ads on other Facebook properties.</p> <p>The Motley Fool suggests that the dating service <a href="https://www.fool.com/investing/2018/05/07/facebook-wont-monetize-its-forthcoming-dating-serv.aspx">doesn't need to generate revenue independently</a>. It’s enough that it will strengthen user engagement with Facebook's core service. It will support the advertising business, albeit indirectly. (I’m open to be proven wrong, but I'm still expecting advertising will play a role in Facebook's dating service. It may not be planned now, but that's not to say it won't appear later.)</p> <p>Another great advantage for Facebook is that it won't have to spend as much money as competitors in <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69390-brand-marketing-chief-at-elitesingles-on-metrics-channel-mix-and-the-future-of-dating">trying to attract users to its dating services</a>. Facebook Dating already has its users' subscription data, profile data, interest and behavioural data – and importantly their everyday photos. What's more, since dating will be an anciliary service to the main Facebook service, it won't face anywhere near the same level of subscriber churn that pure play dating services suffer. </p> <p>That advantage comes from the real strength of Facebook's dating service: it possesses a single unified data profile for its users across all the services it provides. (Perhaps that's one way that they'll be able to avoid exchanges of naked photos, as the images used for the dating profile pictures will be the same as the mainstream profile pictures. People don't generally display naked pictures to their friends, parents, aunts and uncles, nieces and nephews who make up their Facebook social network nowadays.)</p> <p>The additional dating data will make Facebook’s database even more valuable. </p> <h3>How to be a player</h3> <p>Facebook's market entry will change the rules of the digital dating game. To be a player, requires the following: </p> <h4>1) Diversify into complementary services </h4> <p>Facebook's additional services don't just add new revenue streams, they promote engagement with the core offering. It's notable that the large dating sites have already started diversifying into complementary services. Match offers advertising, events and short breaks holidays. The Match.com group also owns tutoring service The Princeton Review.</p> <p>eHarmony certainly recognised the affinity between offering dating services and recruitment with the launch of Elevated Careers, albeit they put it up for sale 10 months later. There is an opportunity to deliver premium content, <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68068-four-ways-brands-are-marketing-through-dating-services">advertising</a>, education, events, travel, retail services and more in a complementary manner that will keep consumers returning to the business.</p> <h4>2) Consolidate all current audience profile data into a single data platform</h4> <p>Numerous digital publishers offering dating services are neglecting to make maximum use of their data, not just to match singletons with more relevant people, but to support other commercial ventures. National news brands are offering dating services, recruitment services, education and training courses, bookshops, events, holidays and even financial services. All of this data could be used to provide better services to subscribers as well as to support each area of the business.</p> <p>The vast majority of both dating and mainstream digital publishers offering these complementary services keep their incredibly valuable data in separate silos. That's a huge missed opportunity. What's more they're often wasting money buying audience data from third parties to enable them to offer certain services, most notably for targeting advertising, even though they already have incredibly rich and relevant user data in another part of their business.</p> <p>If all that data is effectively consolidated into a single data platform, they could build unified data profiles in much the same way as Facebook. What's more, using this data as seed data for machine learning technologies, they can build incredibly detailed and accurate profiles of users that haven't even subscribed to a single service.</p> <h4>3) Form data alliances</h4> <p>Entering data alliances – whereby complementary data controllers work together to derive value from combined data sets – is one way to compete with Facebook, and can add huge scale to publishers' data sets. The mass of guys with tigers, photos at music festivals, and profiles which list ‘laughing’, ‘travelling’ and ‘going out and staying in’ as defining characteristics don’t do justice to the incredibly insightful data that online dating services possess.</p> <p>Subscribers share their passions, favourite locations, work, education, appearance, family status, salary bracket as well as their age, gender and more. The right data partnerships enhance brand positions and develop a strong niche market which is extremely appealing to consumers and brands seeking to communicate with the resultant audiences.</p> <p>However, data alliances pose numerous technical and compliance challenges. Publishers need to collect and share data in <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/a-marketer-s-guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr">a GDPR compliant fashion</a>, ensuring appropriate consents. They also need good technology to make the data consolidation process simple, ensuring the traceablity of the data source, and processing it in a GDPR compliant fashion. They also need raw access to the data to be able to gain meaningful insight from the data and put it to use.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/gdprsurvivalpack"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/4596/GDPRsurvival-pack-leaderboard.jpg" alt="gdpr survival pack" width="728" height="90"></a></p> <h4>4) Improve the consumer experience </h4> <p>Since Facebook's dating system hasn't been launched yet, there's no evidence of the success of its compatibility matching. However, numerous independent data studies show the accuracy of predictions of personality traits, political affiliation and ethnicity based on <a href="https://theconversation.com/facebook-gets-into-dating-but-theres-little-scientific-evidence-online-personality-matching-works-95935">Facebook's collection and processing of data</a>.</p> <p>The success of dating companies' numerous matching systems have come into question numerous times. In January 2018, the UK's Advertising Standards Authority even <a href="https://www.asa.org.uk/rulings/eharmony-uk-ltd-a17-392456.html">ruled</a> that eHarmony's matching system didn't offer users a significantly greater chance of finding lasting love.</p> <p>Dating providers need to assess whether their current tech stack is up to the competition Facebook now poses. They need to investigate new data platforms that are up to the challenge. If they use effective AI they can add the equivalent of millions of data scientist man hours to their data team. Machine learning technologies can match, even predict, the level of interest that one person will have in another person, an article, a service or an ad. Dating services need to adopt these technologies now, as Facebook is far ahead of them in this area.</p> <p>It took just five years for Facebook to go from college dorm room project to overtaking its main social media competitors. The competition mainstream publishers have been facing from FAANG (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Google) is coming to the dating industry.</p> <p>Publishers of personals advertising and dedicated dating services need to up their game immediately. This can’t wait.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/70036 2018-05-18T10:16:54+01:00 2018-05-18T10:16:54+01:00 Facebook's interest-based ad targeting highlights GDPR uncertainty Patricio Robles <p>For evidence of this, one need only look at Facebook and its ad targeting options.</p> <p>In advance of May 25, Facebook asked its users to tell it whether any “political, religious, and relationship information” they had shared with the social network should continue to be stored or displayed. This was clearly done to ensure compliance with special GDPR rules around sensitive information, including information that has human rights implications. </p> <p>As the ICO explained, "This type of data could create more significant risks to a person’s fundamental rights and freedoms, for example, by putting them at risk of unlawful discrimination."</p> <p>But <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/may/16/facebook-lets-advertisers-target-users-based-on-sensitive-interests">an investigation</a> conducted by The Guardian and the Danish Broadcasting Corporation found that while Facebook gave users the ability to control what would happen to the political, religious or relationship information they had explicitly shared with Facebook, the world's largest social network is still allowing advertisers to target users based on interests it infers based on users' behavioral data, such as Facebook Pages they like.</p> <p>In some cases, these inferred interests could allow Facebook and advertisers to target users based on information they opted not to have the company retain or display.</p> <p>According to Facebook, however, the ad interests it generates are different than explicit associations users provide. </p> <p>"Like other internet companies, Facebook shows ads based on topics we think people might be interested in, but without using sensitive personal data," the company told The Guardian. "This means that someone could have an ad interest listed as gay pride because they have liked a Pride-associated page or clicked a Pride ad, but it does not reflect any personal characteristics such as gender or sexuality."</p> <p>As Facebook sees it, "Our advertising complies with relevant EU law and, like other companies, we are preparing for the GDPR to ensure we are compliant when it comes into force." </p> <p>The company does offer users the ability to remove some of their ad interests but not only is it not clear how many users know about this, it's not clear how many users are really aware of the fact the Facebook is using actions such as Likes to generate these inferred interests in the first place.</p> <p>From this perspective, there's a debate to be had about Facebook's position and whether it truly represents GDPR compliance. Specifically, Facebook's position seems to implicate Article 22 of the GDPR, which forbids any "decision based solely on automated processing, including profiling, which produces legal effects concerning [a data subject] or similarly significantly affects [the data subject]."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">This is going to be a big battleground. We talk about inferred special category data in the context of the Article 29 Working Party guidelines on profiling here &gt; <a href="https://t.co/TjCHqOvcBA">https://t.co/TjCHqOvcBA</a> (open access) <a href="https://t.co/XZB5ypjELs">https://t.co/XZB5ypjELs</a></p> — Michael Veale (@mikarv) <a href="https://twitter.com/mikarv/status/996635865442078720?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 16, 2018</a> </blockquote> <h3>The letter of the law versus the spirit of the law</h3> <p>The Guardian's Alex Hern notes that the targeting it identified is "reminiscent of Facebook’s previous attempts to skirt the line between profiling users and profiling their interests. In 2016 it was revealed that the company had created a tool for 'racial affinity targeting'." </p> <p>The operative phrase here is "skirt the line." Facebook and other large companies that rely on targeted advertising to drive the bulk of their revenue have literally tens of billions of incentives (in the form of dollars) to adhere to the letter of the law but avoid adhering to the spirit of the law if it benefits them financially.</p> <p>The big question is where the proverbial line is. The answer: nobody knows. And for that reason, it's likely that it probably won't take too long for early battles to emerge over what the GDPR actually requires.</p> <p>For ad-supported companies like Facebook, the outcome of those battles could very well determine the fate of their businesses as they currently exist.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/70006 2018-05-15T14:00:00+01:00 2018-05-15T14:00:00+01:00 How Amazon retailers can use search & social ads to improve customer engagement Oren Stern <p>Ads on Amazon are native – fit in naturally with the content and information present on the pages where they appear – and are intent driven, making them very effective. From a simple product search, for example, an ad appears that looks exactly like a regular product listing - unobtrusive, native, and engaging for the shopper.  </p> <p>These native ecommerce ads have higher conversion rates than banners or contextual ads on other sites. Which is why brands are increasingly investing in them, especially on Amazon.</p> <p>Today’s online purchase journey, however, is increasingly non-linear, with people hopping between traditional search engines, ecommerce sites such as Amazon, and Facebook, Pinterest and the other social networks as they twist and turn through many phases: inspiration, product discovery, focused product research and comparison, and active online shopping.     </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/4404/Path_to_purchase_May_2018_Kenshoo.png" alt="path to purchase visualisation" width="615"></p> <p><em>Visualisation of a typical path to purchase</em></p> <p>The chart above shows how consumers use Amazon, Facebook and traditional search engines on their journey - seeing audience-targeted Facebook posts, search ads, display ads on Amazon and other exposure related content. As the customer moves toward the conversion to the right of the chart, the shopping phase, they are exposed to keyword targeted, final purchase ads on Google, Amazon, Bing etc.</p> <p>So if you are an ecommerce advertiser who has invested in maximizing your, keyword-targeted native ads programme, how do you begin to build an integrated strategy to enrich that program? It makes sense to want to find ways to combine and sync an Amazon marketing strategy with search and social campaigns, for example.</p> <p>Such additional investment in the Amazon purchase path can help expand the audience for your brand’s products and reach customers at multiple points in their purchase journey in order to drive more conversions. </p> <p>Things are evolving rapidly in this area. Here are a couple of practical things you can do now to get started.</p> <h3>Optimise spend holistically across all publishers</h3> <p>As new commerce budgets start coming in to performance advertising, you need a holistic approach to understand your customer engagement strategy in order to help you find the most effective channel for these investments.</p> <p>Depending on where in the customer journey your target customers are, you may choose to place these new budgets directly on Amazon search advertising as well as evaluating other channels. It is important to analyse how certain keywords are performing on Amazon as well as on Google and Bing, for example. </p> <p>At Kenshoo, we have seen clients optimising spend on specific phrases or terms based on CPCs or conversion rates from different channels and publishers. You need to keep tabs on performance and optimise the budget as a whole.</p> <p>And ideally, in order to move quickly on opportunities you need to have access to up-to-date performance data from the various publishers  – and to ensure the teams that are managing them (if they’re separate) are working together.</p> <p>It’s not just the traditional search engines you should be looking at of course. Pinterest is an increasingly important destination, where consumers go for inspiration and ideas. In fact, in a study of consumer journeys related to buying Halloween costumes, searches for related terms peaked on Pinterest in mid-September – nearly six weeks ahead of the holiday itself. </p> <p>So as an Amazon advertiser – especially if you sell products based on visual appeal – you should also be considering allocating performance advertising budget to Pinterest using broader head terms to help you prospect for customers who are in the product discovery and research phase.</p> <h3>Use Facebook ads to attract traffic and conversions on Amazon </h3> <p>eMarketer recently published <a href="https://www.emarketer.com/Chart/ChannelsLocations-Where-US-Internet-Users-Complete-Purchases-Brands-Discovered-on-Facebook-Dec-2017-of-respondents/217015">research</a> suggesting 42% of consumers who discover brands on Facebook are likely to go on and complete their purchases on Amazon. This is actually a higher proportion than those who decide to complete the transaction on the brands’ own websites (36%). </p> <p>The truth is that brands are already aware that a lot of traffic to their Amazon product detail pages comes from Facebook. They may not have been able to track it, but they know there is value there and it is having an impact. And they have a huge appetite to capitalise on this. </p> <p>Many brands are starting to take up the opportunity to use Amazon Stores for this purpose. What is an Amazon Store? It’s a landing page on Amazon that is dedicated to your products and brand - ultimately your own custom brand destination with a custom URL on Amazon. The landing page will have your brand’s look and feel and showcase as many products from your company as you like. Importantly, no competitors can advertise within the confines of your store which makes it an ideal landing page if you want to drive traffic from Amazon Marketing Services ads as well from external sources such as Facebook.</p> <p>You can use part of your ecommerce marketing spend on Facebook ads such Dynamic Product Ads to promote specific products or product groups and drive visitors to your Amazon Stores page. And you can monitor performance, tracking metrics such as daily visitors, page views, and attributed sales.</p> <p>Ecommerce advertising on Amazon is becoming an important part of the digital marketing ecosystem. And if you are already advertising on Amazon, you should be looking for ways to maximise its effectiveness by integrating it into your overall digital marketing strategy and tactics.</p> <p><em><strong>More on Amazon:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/70003-four-amazon-weaknesses-retailers-can-exploit">Four Amazon weaknesses retailers can exploit</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69517-is-amazon-s-ad-business-the-new-slotting-fee">Is Amazon's ad business the new slotting fee?</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69571-amazon-starts-discounting-products-sold-by-third-party-sellers">Amazon starts discounting products sold by third-party sellers</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69636-is-the-calvin-klein-amazon-deal-a-step-change-for-multichannel-fashion-retail">Is the Calvin Klein &amp; Amazon deal a step-change for multichannel fashion retail?</a></li> </ul> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/4406/Programmatic_training.png" alt="learn about econsultancy's programmatic training" width="600" height="208"></a></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/70012 2018-05-11T15:15:00+01:00 2018-05-11T15:15:00+01:00 China is a "massively untapped market" for US media sellers Patricio Robles <p>Take, for instance, Facebook. Despite the efforts of its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, who has learned to speak Mandarin and even reportedly asked Chinese President Xi for baby name suggestions, the world's biggest social network is blocked by China's so-called Great Firewall.</p> <p>But according to one Wall Street analyst, there's a "massively untapped market" for American digital businesses in China.</p> <p>During an IAB webinar, Pivotal Research Group's Brian Wieser <a href="https://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/319062/what-blows-brian-wiesers-mind-stumbling-upon-bil.html">revealed</a> that there are billions of dollars in digital ad spend now being directed by Chinese brands at American consumers.</p> <p>Wieser says this spend has gone unnoticed to date.</p> <p>Based on Wieser's analysis, Chinese brands are spending $5 billion on Facebook to reach consumers outside of China, primarily in the US. In total, he estimates that this spend from Chinese brands now accounts for nearly 10% of Facebook's ad revenue. And he suspects that Chinese ad spend is also benefiting other large players like Google and Twitter.</p> <p>So who are the Chinese advertisers spending all this money to reach US consumers?</p> <p>Based on his analysis of Facebook's filings with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, Wieser says that the advertisers primarily fall into two camps: Chinese businesses that are now operating as global brands and organizations that are endemic to China, such as tourism agencies.</p> <h3>The rise of Chinese brands</h3> <p>As Wieser sees it, the interest of Chinese advertisers in reaching consumers outside of China could create significant opportunities for lots of American companies.</p> <p>"It may be an opportunity for all sorts of media owners to find new money to bring into the United States," he stated. </p> <p>The good news for digital media firms in the US is that this trend appears to be in its infancy. Chinese manufacturers, for instance, are increasingly cutting out the middleman and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/70003-four-amazon-weaknesses-retailers-can-exploit/">selling direct to consumers through Amazon</a>, which, while not mentioned specifically by Wieser, has built a billion dollar advertising business and would seemingly be among the best positioned to take advantage of growing Chinese ad spend.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/4374/Chinese_Markets.png" alt="chinese brands targeting american consumers" width="615"></p> <p>Amazon's marketplace provides perhaps the best evidence of the rise of Chinese brands. Take TCL, for instance. Hardly a household name, this Chinese brand manufactures televisions that <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/sethporges/2016/11/14/how-a-no-name-chinese-tv-brand-came-to-dominate-the-amazon-charts/">consistently rank</a> among Amazon's best sellers.</p> <p>Such success stories are increasingly common and as more and more Chinese brands seek to woo directly to consumers in large export markets, the number of opportunities for businesses that can help them reach consumers will only grow.</p> <p>For that reason, media sellers in countries like the US would be wise to start exploring how they can position themselves to take advantage of these opportunities.</p> <p><em><strong>Further reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69578-what-western-brands-need-to-know-before-joining-china-s-massive-ecommerce-economy">What Western brands need to know before joining China's massive ecommerce economy</a></li> </ul>