tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/facebook Latest Facebook content from Econsultancy 2017-05-24T08:19:00+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69111 2017-05-24T08:19:00+01:00 2017-05-24T08:19:00+01:00 If you want to improve your marketing ROI, stop spending on social media James Hammersley <p>My agency did this because our experience with our clients suggested that social media traffic, specifically that from Facebook and Twitter, performed significantly worse in comparison to any other source. Indeed many of our clients found that stopping investment in such traffic improved conversion significantly and improved ROI for acquisition investment as a whole.</p> <p>[<strong>Editor's note:</strong> This post is written by a guest blogger and doesn't necessarily reflect Econsultancy's views, nor does it refer to Econsultancy's research team.]</p> <p>We publish a six-monthly update that covers <a href="http://goodgrowth.co.uk/publications-and-articles/?cat=6">the research published</a> over the period and despite our continuing search there is still no empirical link between money spent and commercial outcome gained that suggests performance levels to compete with other digital channels. </p> <p>In fact, the reports that have been published in the last nine months have if anything started to suggest that, rather like Hans Christian Andersen’s Emperor, we may well be spending on a carefully woven story stitched together by social media platforms looking to justify their valuations and agencies looking to retain their fees. Is it time we challenged ourselves to stop drinking the Kool-Aid?</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6329/emperors_new_clothes.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="525"></p> <p><em>Emperor's new clothes</em></p> <p>Why do we think it’s time to stop and reflect? Just look at these outcomes from recent third party reports: </p> <ul> <li>76% of retailers are <a href="https://www.internetretailer.com/2016/09/29/why-76-retailers-are-boosting-their-social-media-budgets">spending more on social media marketing this year</a>, yet the same survey suggests that whilst they do this, the most cost effective channel is email marketing.</li> <li>89% of marketers <a href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/SocialMediaMarketingIndustryReport2016.pdf">believe social media marketing increases exposure</a> and drives traffic but only 51% believe investing in social media improves sales.</li> <li>48% of marketers <a href="https://komarketing.com/industry-news/seo-social-media-effective-difficult-execute-3238/">say social media is the most difficult channel to get right</a>.</li> <li>90% of marketers believe <a href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/SocialMediaMarketingIndustryReport2016.pdf">social media is important</a> but 92% do not know <a href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/top-dos-donts-effective-social-media-management/169626/">which social media management tactics are effective</a>.</li> <li>60% of consumers have <a href="http://internetretailing.net/2017/02/omni-channel-sales-throttled-shoppers-wont-buy-sms-social-chat-despite-loving-mobile-apps-email/">concerns over social media channels</a> being at risk of phishing attempts or fraudulent profiles.</li> <li>43% of marketers <a href="https://www.marketingweek.com/2017/03/16/social-media-spend-failing-live-expectations/">questioned on their experience of investment in social media marketing</a> said they “haven’t been able to show impact yet”. 38% claim to have a “good qualitative sense of the impact, but not a quantitative impact” while just 18.4% have proved the impact quantitatively.</li> </ul> <p>That’s not to say that there haven’t been reports of a commercial impact:</p> <ul> <li>68% of respondents to one survey said <a href="https://www.internetretailer.com/2016/09/29/why-76-retailers-are-boosting-their-social-media-budgets">Facebook ads increased sales</a>. </li> <li>Sony <a href="http://www.josic.com/using-social-media-to-increase-sales-and-brand-awareness">announced in February</a> that through Twitter it had earned an extra £1m in sales and Dell announced in June last year that its presence on Twitter accounted for $3m dollars increase in sales.</li> <li>And <a href="http://www.thedrum.com/news/2017/04/07/more-half-b2b-marketers-struggle-measure-value-social-media-0">one survey suggested</a> that investment in social by B2B marketers can drive sales upwards of £50,000 per month.</li> </ul> <p>The reports on B2C success are far fewer in number and both those quoted above fail to meet a core test about reliability in that they don’t benchmark this performance in terms of ROI. They also do not give a sense of scale. For example, the uplifts quoted for Sony and Dell would be lost in the rounding compared to their monthly sales, let alone their annual totals. </p> <p>Of all the B2C channels, Pinterest looks the most promising but <a href="https://www.clickz.com/how-pinterest-boosts-its-ecommerce-potential/102950/">the latest report</a> isn’t independently verified and there is no value data as opposed to activity data. So the jury is out, but the more direct link available between product and purchase suggests Pinterest could have a better ROI.</p> <p>B2B is much more interesting. There is an emerging argument for <a href="https://hbr.org/2016/11/84-of-b2b-sales-start-with-a-referral-not-a-salesperson">a commercial link in B2B activity</a> on LinkedIn and an opinion poll reported here <a href="http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/166003/file-25222284-pdf/docs/social_media_sales_quota.pdf">reinforces that story</a>, although doesn’t add to the evidence base. In my agency's own experience however, social advertising has a poor ROI and even sponsored posts, whilst garnering Likes, fail to deliver an acceptable ROI compared to other sales channels.  </p> <p>However using LinkedIn as a relationship sales channel (sometimes called linked selling) has proven a successful way to build an ‘opted in’ marketing database and generate leads. We have met a number of professional service firms who use this channel to drive their outbound new business activity but to date we can find no published research to quantify effectiveness. </p> <h3>Lies and stats</h3> <p>It was Disraeli who said there are lies, damned lies and statistics. In reality, both sets of numbers we have quoted here are unverifiable. They are either opinion or an incomplete ‘fact’ put into the public domain.  </p> <p>Many are placed into the market by an interested party (the channel or an agency) and for those of us who are driven by data this suggests that they all need to be covered by a health warning.  </p> <p>One of the consequences of this lack of transparency is that some in our industry are developing a narrative that undermines the claim of digital to be the ‘measurable’ marketing channel and introducing the concept of ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67529-the-rise-of-dark-social-everything-you-need-to-know/">dark social</a>’. We’ve come across some choice pieces of digital jargon over the years but this one should make us all worry – it's best defined as the digital equivalent of the ‘missing link’, providing a justification for continuing investment in social media on the basis of belief rather than transparently valid data.</p> <h3>In summary...</h3> <p>I admit it, we are obsessed by commercial value and there may well be ‘above the line’ marketing benefits of brand and product awareness that this type of investment generates. There is very little evidence however that can justify investment on the basis of an ROI that can compete with AdWords, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census/">email</a>, digital display or re-marketing.</p> <p>If your concern is ROI and optimising performance of your marketing funds then my advice is to put value over inputs. After all, more poor quality traffic reduces overall effectiveness and wastes scarce resources, no matter how many other marketers are walking around with no clothes on!</p> <p>[<strong>Editor's note:</strong> Just to reiterate, this post is written by a guest blogger and doesn't necessarily reflect Econsultancy's views, nor does it refer to Econsultancy's research team.]</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/social/"><em>Social Media Training Courses</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-best-practice-guide/"><em>Social Media Best Practice Guide</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4489 2017-05-22T11:14:00+01:00 2017-05-22T11:14:00+01:00 Social Quarterly: Q2 2017 <p>The <strong>Social Quarterly</strong> is a series of presentations by Econsultancy, which curate the latest trends, developments and statistics in social media. The reports focus on distilling the most recent data and trends, aiming to provide a guide to what's happening now in social media and what you should be keeping an eye on.</p> <p>Social media evolves rapidly, and the <strong>Social Quarterly</strong> provides an overview of the latest trends in the industry. It contains information which can be translated into your own documents, allowing you to prepare a pitch or use internally at a moment's notice.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly examines the current social media landscape, trends and updates on various social platforms and considers what will happen next. Updated four times per year, it will help to quickly surface statistics and trends you can use and react to immediately.</p> <p><strong>This edition of Social Quarterly includes</strong> Facebook’s introduction of ‘Stories’, the introduction of ‘Cabana’ from Tumblr, additional AR filters on Instagram and new ‘Trending Stories’ from LinkedIn, amongst other innovations.</p> <p>Bringing to life data from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> and the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/">Econsultancy blog</a>, the Social Quarterly is the best of social in an easy-to-digest format.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly will allow you to:</p> <ul> <li>Stay up to date with regular developments across multiple social media platforms.</li> <li>Present and pitch at short notice with clear and effective data.</li> <li>Pinpoint areas in which you want to find out more and use the linked Econsultancy resources and blog posts to do this.</li> <li>Spot potential ways your company could be using social media but is not currently.</li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68929 2017-05-16T10:00:00+01:00 2017-05-16T10:00:00+01:00 Digital crisis comms: How TfL's social media team copes with Tube strikes Nikki Gilliland <p>So spare a thought for Transport for London’s social media team, who see their daily tally of 2,500 Twitter mentions increase by a whopping 2,000% on a strike day.</p> <p>I recently spoke with TfL’s social media and content lead, Steven Gutierrez, to find out about the network’s approach to crisis communications, specifically when it comes to dealing with strikes. Here’s a summary of what he said, as well as a bit of further insight into the topic in general.</p> <h3>Multiple lines of communication</h3> <p>The <a href="http://managementhelp.org/blogs/crisis-management/2015/02/07/crisis-stats-you-should-remember/" target="_blank">OMD Group suggests</a> that just 54% of companies have a crisis plan in place. Unsurprisingly, it’s a necessity rather than an option for transport networks, with TfL taking steps to ensure there are multiple lines of communication open in the event of any planned or unplanned events.</p> <p>In total, TfL has 21 Twitter accounts, including individual accounts for Tube lines, rail lines, as well as dedicated channels for customer service such as <a href="https://twitter.com/TfLTravelAlerts" target="_blank">@TfLTravelAlerts</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/TfLBusAlerts" target="_blank">@TfLBusAlerts</a>. </p> <p>Despite offering multiple ways for users to check the status of the network, however, Steven suggests that manpower is still pretty limited. </p> <p>TfL’s First Contact team is made up of just a few members of staff – an amount that stays roughly the same during strike days. Similarly, each bus or rail line is manned by one or two people, meaning that there are usually around half a dozen people dealing with a huge volume of queries. </p> <h3>Broadcasting info and prioritising mentions</h3> <p>So, just how does TfL cope with the 2,000% increase in mentions when there’s a strike?</p> <p>With such a massive influx, it’s impossible for the team to reply to questions individually. In order to cover all bases, TfL broadcasts an overview of information to followers via its social channels and links to the website with is kepy up to date with live information, with the aim of reaching customers before they feel the need to reach out to the network.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4966/TFL_mentions.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="244"></p> <p><em>TfL's brand mentions on Twitter</em></p> <p>While TfL might not answer every question, impressively every single mention is still checked by an agent. To streamline the process TfL’s social team uses a tool called CX Social, which is also used by O2 and McDonald’s.</p> <p>According to Steven: “It makes it possible to handle many accounts, collaborate and triage messages to the most relevant team. I don’t think we’re limited by any tech our teams are well equipped.”</p> <p>Of course, not only does this give the team insight into what kind of information customers are actively seeking out, but it also means TfL is privy to people’s anger and frustration, too.</p> <p>That being said, Steven suggests that the majority of feedback is based on customers needing information, meaning a relatively small amount is actually abusive. “Increasingly customers thank the social media team because I think some realise how hard it is to work through a strike!”</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4967/Sentiment.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="304"></p> <p><em>Sentiment analysis of TfL brand mentions on Twitter</em></p> <p>Perhaps TfL’s commitment to communication is part of the reason why. In contrast, you’ve only got to look at an example like Southern Rail, which has come under fire for an inconsistent and incompetent approach to crisis communications.</p> <p>Even after it received complaints for a lack of visible compassion, Southern Rail angered commuters even further with its misjudged call to ‘strike back’ at RMT.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">.<a href="https://twitter.com/SouthernRailUK">@SouthernRailUK</a> When people waited three hours at Brighton last night, was that because of strikes?</p> — Cr O'Grizimov (@Mr_Ogrizovic) <a href="https://twitter.com/Mr_Ogrizovic/status/782841247706873856">October 3, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Reversing the message</h3> <p>As well as using broadcasts to pre-empt and stem the flow of incoming customer queries, TfL’s strategy for strike days is to reverse its working message. In other words, instead of telling customers what Tube lines are not working, it tries to tell them what ones are still running instead.</p> <p>Alongside this, it typically stops or reschedules any promotional campaigns in order to allow more pressing news to cut through.</p> <p>Together, this approach is effective for instilling trust and encouraging a positive mood, with TfL promoting the fact that it is working hard to help the customer – not pushing its own agenda.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">A possible Tube strike will significantly affect services from Sun eve to Wed morning. Stay up to date here: <a href="https://t.co/9bQz35k9Xa">https://t.co/9bQz35k9Xa</a> <a href="https://t.co/DOKNlcdR0B">pic.twitter.com/DOKNlcdR0B</a></p> — TfL Travel Alerts (@TfLTravelAlerts) <a href="https://twitter.com/TfLTravelAlerts/status/827486881415839744">3 February 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>According to Steven, a strike isn’t necessarily the most stressful event that a transport network like TfL can encounter. With storms, flooding or snow having a massive impact on the running of Tube lines, winter is typically the most demanding season.</p> <p>Meanwhile, with unforeseen accidents often harder to deal with than planned strikes (such as the helicopter that crashed in Vauxhall a few years ago), the team is essentially on constant standby throughout the entire year.</p> <p>In order to deal with an unplanned event, TfL has a defined process in place:</p> <ul> <li>One of the first steps is usually an acknowledgement of the issue.</li> <li>The next step is to coordinate a response based on verified information.</li> <li>At the same time all unnecessary activity (promotions, advertising, etc) is stopped</li> <li>TfL’s main accounts including @TfL and the TfL Facebook will lead on news and customer service accounts like individual Tube lines will broadcast service updates.</li> <li>TfL’s website will usually carry a dedicated webpage with more detailed travel advice and the Press Office will provide updates to the media.</li> <li>TfL continues providing updates from all relevant accounts and update the website regularly until things go back to normal.</li> </ul> <h3>Maintaining a genuine tone of voice</h3> <p>During busy or stressful times, rushed responses could potentially mean <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67268-how-to-achieve-the-right-tone-of-voice-for-your-brand/" target="_blank">brand tone of voice</a> goes out of the window.</p> <p>However, Steven emphasises that the network strives to maintain a genuine and friendly tone no matter what, with staff encouraged to be genuine and express themselves.</p> <p>He says that it helps that the majority of social media agents are part of the company's wider contact centre, meaning they also deal with calls, emails and letters as well as social media platforms. In turn, this encourages them to maintain a natural-sounding and friendly tone regardless of the channel.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Good afternoon all, Mark and Tariq are here to help. <a href="https://t.co/JfJ3ETqwIX">pic.twitter.com/JfJ3ETqwIX</a></p> — TfL Travel Alerts (@TfLTravelAlerts) <a href="https://twitter.com/TfLTravelAlerts/status/833702140300378117">20 February 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>While TfL clearly prioritises one-to-one human interaction, that doesn't mean it dismisses automation in all senses. Alongside automated ‘welcome’ messages on both Twitter and Facebook, TfL recently partnered with Twitter to offer a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68636-pizza-express-channel-4-and-tfl-three-examples-of-brand-chatbots/" target="_blank">chatbot ‘status checker</a>' that users can interact with via direct messages.</p> <p>Interestingly, Steven hints that it's not the only bot in the works. “We are developing chatbot experiences on other platforms... and our editors are working on the script to ensure it has a friendly tone of voice throughout.”</p> <p>However, TfL is likely to rely on its distinctly human approach a fair few more times in the future at least.</p> <p><strong><em>Now read:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68876-how-tfl-s-community-managers-engage-with-london-s-cyclists/" target="_blank">How TfL’s community managers engage with London’s cyclists</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69074 2017-05-10T12:30:00+01:00 2017-05-10T12:30:00+01:00 Will Instagram's mobile web app help Facebook slay Snapchat? Patricio Robles <p>And the rapid growth that makes Instagram look like Facebook circa 2009 to 2013 could accelerate even more now that Instagram has updated its mobile website, giving it a number of features that were previously only available in its iOS and Android mobile apps. The most important new feature added, photo sharing, will let users of the mobile web app post photos to Instagram.</p> <p>As TechCrunch's Josh Constine <a href="https://techcrunch.com/2017/05/08/instagram-mobile-web/">explained</a>, "Until now, users could could only browse, Like, follow, search, and see notifications on the stripped-down mobile web site and desktop site." But now they'll be able to post photos and browse a lightweight version of the Instagram Explore tab.</p> <p>The new functionality could be especially important in international markets where high-speed mobile internet is not widely available, making it more difficult for users to download and use the full Instagram app. Roughly 80% of Instagram's users are based outside of the U.S. and the company is clearly making an effort to better serve its international user base.</p> <h3>The latest shot at Snapchat?</h3> <p>Facebook's embrace of Instagram's international users, including those in developing markets, stands in stark contrast to the stance of Instagram's chief competitor, Snapchat.</p> <p>Snapchat recently came under fire after <a href="http://variety.com/2017/biz/news/snapchat-evan-spiegel-only-for-rich-people-anthony-pompliano-1202028526/">it was reported</a> that the company's twenty-something CEO, Evan Spiegel, had stated in 2015 that "This app is only for rich people...I don't want to expand into poor countries like India and Spain." The claim was made in a lawsuit involving a former Snapchat executive, who had apparently offered suggestions to improve the company's performance outside countries like the U.S.</p> <p>Snapchat has denied the report, but it's worth noting that while Instagram has a web app that is now growing its functional footprint, Snapchat still doesn't have a mobile website, so even if Snapchat CEO Spiegel isn't anti-"poor countries" as claimed, it doesn't appear that Snapchat is willing to go to the same lengths as Instagram is to court new users in places where a mobile web app would help its adoption.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7738/Screen_Shot_2016-08-04_at_14.42.36.png" alt="insta stories" width="591" height="347"></p> <p>Meanwhile, even though Facebook has been criticised by some observers for copying features from Snapchat, the tactic doesn't seem to be bothering users. For example, since launching its Snapchat Stories clone, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68142-instagram-stories-what-do-marketers-need-to-know/">Instagram Stories</a> has now surpassed 200m daily users, well above the 160m daily users Snapchat Stories reported in Q4 2016.</p> <p>For brands active on Instagram and Snapchat, the divergent strategies are worth noting for a couple of reasons.</p> <p>First, Instagram's willingness to offer a mobile web app and bring it closer to parity with the features of its native mobile apps could increasingly have an impact on the companies' respective growth rates. In the past year, Snapchat <a href="https://www.recode.net/2017/2/2/14492182/snapchat-user-growth-slowing-ipo">appears to have hit a growth plateau</a> and if it doesn't find a way to get its growth engine fired up again in a big way, it could find that it has permanently lost ground to Instagram, which has gained 100m users in the past four months alone.</p> <p>Second, for brands looking for a platform through which they can reach a global audience, it increasingly appears that Instagram is eating Snapchat's lunch. While Snapchat could argue that its smaller, first-world-dominated userbase is more valuable, as Facebook brings Facebook-like self-serve advertising to Instagram, Instagram's massive reach coupled with granular targeting could make it a much more versatile and attractive ad platform.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69060 2017-05-08T10:00:00+01:00 2017-05-08T10:00:00+01:00 Why brands can’t resist partnering with Buzzfeed Tasty on Facebook Nikki Gilliland <p>So, why can’t users get enough of Buzzfeed’s take on food? More importantly, why are other brands (even in industries other than FMCG) falling over themselves to get involved?</p> <p>I recently heard Ashley McCollum, general manager at Buzzfeed Tasty, speak about this topic at Millennial 20/20. Here are a few key takeaways.</p> <h3>Adapting to the changing nature of food and social</h3> <p>When Buzzfeed Tasty first began, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67856-four-delicious-examples-of-food-drink-brands-on-instagram/" target="_blank">food content</a> on the internet was vastly different, being more about food porn and Pinterest-style imagery than everyday recipe videos. Since then, consumer interest has shifted towards fast and simple how-to's, prioritising the contrasting verticals of comfort and health.</p> <p>Content relating to these trends tend to be the most relatable and easy to replicate at home. In fact, according to Ashley, 50% of the audience has at some point made a Tasty recipe themselves. The most common type of comment is also a user tagging family or friends and saying ‘we should make this at the weekend’.</p> <p>This accessibility has undoubtedly been a huge factor in Buzzfeed’s success. And be it pizza cones or grow-your-own herbs – it is the publisher’s ability to tap into current trends and user interests that has helped audience figures to sky-rocket.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbuzzfeedpropertasty%2Fvideos%2F1852979081581430%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <h3>Accidentally global</h3> <p>The relatable nature of food also links back to why Tasty started, first being launched as an experiment to crack Facebook video.</p> <p>The fact that it has generated international interest is a happy accident. But that's the beauty of it, of course, with videos resonating regardless of language or location. The content disrupts the inaccessiblity of restaurants and high-end chefs, with videos that are short, relatable and easy-to-follow being watched in home kitchens around the world.</p> <p>So while they might have started out as part of an experiment, Buzzfeed’s spin-off channels have gone on contribute to the brand’s global audience growth. Proper Tasty might be a local channel, but content created for the platform has been replicated in other European markets. Meanwhile, Proper Tasty itself has also seen an increase in views for videos that celebrate global cuisine.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbuzzfeedpropertasty%2Fvideos%2F1889978077881530%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <h3>Loyalty in a crowded marketplace</h3> <p>More brands are now working on sponsored content with Buzzfeed on the basis of its growth – even choosing Tasty over other established industry publishers like the Food Network. Reach and scale is just one reason, of course. Engagement is perhaps the biggest driver. </p> <p>With content that's tailor-made for Facebook - where features like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67442-how-to-create-facebook-video-ads-that-cater-for-silent-autoplay/" target="_blank">auto-play and subtitles</a> enable users to watch directly from their feed – comments and views are typically high.</p> <p>Take the below video of a cheese fondue bowl, for example, which has had 12m views and over 43,000 shares since it was published.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbuzzfeedpropertasty%2Fvideos%2F1905931132952891%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <p>As Ashley pointed out, it is also Buzzfeed’s existing brand reputation that has generated such a large and loyal audience. Users can spot a Buzzfeed copycat a mile off, with similar formats coming across as unoriginal as a result. </p> <h3>Connection between food and lifestyle</h3> <p>While access to Tasty’s audience undoubtedly holds appeal, it's easy to assume that only FMCG brands would naturally align with the theme and style of its content. This is not the case. In fact, auto, finance and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67786-10-great-sports-digital-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">sports</a> are growing categories for Tasty and Proper Tasty, with brands across all industries showing interest in producing partnered content related to the core topic.</p> <p>Again, this boils down to the fact that food is an intrinsic part of all aspects of life, extending out of the kitchen and into other areas such as travel, home, and even fashion (demonstrated by the below image from ASOS).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5894/ASOS_burger.JPG" alt="" width="460" height="598"></p> <h3>Proof is in the pudding</h3> <p>So, what kind of success are brands seeing with Buzzfeed Tasty? Ashley highlighted the example of Oster Grill, whose minute-long video featuring a jalapeño and cheese-stuffed hamburger generated 20m views over the course of a single weekend.</p> <p>As a result of this, the brand requested that Buzzfeed pull the plug on its planned follow-up videos. The reason being that they had completely sold out of stock and were unable to meet customer demand.</p> <p>Success stories aside, it is also clear that Buzzfeed does not rest on its laurels. As a data-driven company it continuously uses data science to drive and inform decision-making. </p> <p>It recently partnered with Quaker Oats on a campaign that had already launched in the US. However, from looking at metrics from across the pond, it recognised that users were switching off during beauty shots – i.e. moments with zero context or information about how to actually make the oats.</p> <p>By making the video more utility-driven, the UK version ended up performing 20 times better than the US campaign, proving that even the biggest brands can benefit from a test and learn approach.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbuzzfeedpropertasty%2Fvideos%2F1823070134572325%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <p><em><strong>More on Buzzfeed:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67150-buzzfeed-the-art-and-science-of-social-video/" target="_blank">Buzzfeed: The art and science of social video</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68426-a-brand-that-loves-you-how-buzzfeed-uses-empathy-to-connect-with-its-audience/" target="_blank">A brand that loves you: How Buzzfeed uses empathy to connect with its audience</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69056 2017-05-04T14:11:38+01:00 2017-05-04T14:11:38+01:00 Bloomberg's Trigr will let advertisers deliver custom ads based on market conditions Patricio Robles <p>"Advertisers are clamoring to reach the right audience with the right content," Derek Gatts, Bloomberg Media's global technology and product head, told AdAge. "But there isn't a lot of conversation aligned with the 'when'."</p> <p>He further explained, "When markets are moving, our traffic booms. We saw that with the instability in Greece, Brexit, the US election – people come to Bloomberg when there is instability in the market because they want to know what the next steps are for their portfolio."</p> <p>Markets, of course, move up and down, and the direction they're moving can dramatically influence the moods of the people who are involved in them.</p> <p>As Bloomberg sees it, this creates an opportunity for advertisers to serve different messages that are appropriate in the context of what's happening in the markets. For example, Gatts says, "Luxury brands want to identify an audience that can spend $25,000 for a Rolex. What better time to advertise to an affluent audience than the moment they just made a ton of money?"</p> <p>With Trigr, advertisers can set triggers to deliver different creative based on granular market-based criteria, such as the performance of broad and category-specific indexes like the S&amp;P 500, various commodities, and stock exchanges in specific countries. Bloomberg will also give advertisers the ability to create triggers around a select number of specific companies.</p> <p>Trigr ads will be sold on a CPM basis and the Trigr technology is based on Bloomberg's own ad server, so Bloomberg can integrate it into any of its offerings that contain advertising, although it did hint that Trigr might be applied to ads "beyond Bloomberg's walls" as well.</p> <h3>The rise of emotional advertising?</h3> <p>Interestingly, Bloomberg's unveiling of Trigr comes at a time when Facebook has sparked interest in the idea of advertising to consumers based on their emotions.</p> <p>The world's largest social network is <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/01/facebook-advertising-data-insecure-teens">under fire</a> after a leaked internal document obtained by The Australian revealed that Facebook had told advertisers it can identify when young users feel "stressed," "defeated," "overwhelmed," "anxious," "stupid," "useless" and like a "failure." That knowledge of users' emotional states could in turn be used to target these users with advertisements.</p> <p>Facebook now claims that it doesn't allow advertisers to target users based on its analysis of their emotional states, but Antonio Garcia-Martinez, a former Facebook product manager, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/02/facebook-executive-advertising-data-comment">claims</a> the company <em>could</em> do this and questions why it would mention the capability in a presentation for advertisers if it had no intention of allowing those advertisers to use it. According to Garcia-Martinez, "The hard reality is that Facebook will never try to limit such use of their data unless the public uproar reaches such a crescendo as to be un-mutable."</p> <p>But while Facebook's capability might cast doubt on the concept of emotion-based advertising, Bloomberg's Trigr demonstrates that there are probably reasonable proxies for emotion that don't rely on mining user data and thus aren't so creepy for advertisers to use.</p> <p>The real question, of course, is just how powerful this will be in the real world. There's no doubt that a major market move might make some individuals happy for a day or two, but will it be enough to convince them to shell out $25,000 for Rolex watches and other luxury goods that they wouldn't have purchased otherwise, or would have purchased well in the future instead? Thanks to Trigr, advertisers will soon have the ability to find out.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4147 2017-05-02T12:45:00+01:00 2017-05-02T12:45:00+01:00 Social Media Best Practice Guide <p>According to research by GlobalWebindex, <strong>93% of internet users have at least one social media account</strong>. With social media touching so many areas of an organisation, the process of getting social media right has never been more important.</p> <p>This <strong>Social Media Best Practice Guide</strong> contains actionable, real-world insight with detailed explanations to help you start and improve your performance on social media platforms.</p> <p>In order to enable you to quickly access the information you need to start improving your marketing efforts, the guide is available as two individual reports:</p> <h3><strong>1. <a title="Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-strategy-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide</a></strong></h3> <p>The aim of this research is to identify <strong>best practice approaches, techniques, measurement considerations, challenges and opportunities for creating your social media strategy.</strong></p> <p>As social media platforms continue to evolve at a rapid rate we also cover some of the exciting developments taking place in social media.</p> <h3><strong>2. <a title="Social Media Platforms Overview" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-platforms-overview/">Social Media Platforms Overview</a></strong></h3> <p><strong>We've updated our social media platforms overview guide in 2017</strong> to account for the rapid developments occurring in this space. This report's purpose is to provide <strong>a snapshot of the major social media platforms and the most pressing considerations for marketers looking to generate the most value from social media</strong>.</p> <p>It provides a summary of the main features of these platforms, and outlines some of the options available to marketers when developing a paid, owned and earned strategic approach to social media marketing and communications.</p> <p>From Snapchat Lenses and Geofilters and Facebook's latest innovations to Live Video, Augmented Reality and Chatbots, our 2017 edition will ensure that you're up to date with the latest platform trends.</p> <p>Throughout both reports, we bring you <strong>examples of how companies are using social media in different ways, as well as insights from companies interviewed</strong> specifically for these guides.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_IhT9S2YEyY?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h2>Methodology</h2> <p>The methodology involved two main phases:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Phase 1:</strong> Desk research to identify relevant issues, examples and models.</li> <li> <strong>Phase 2:</strong> A series of in-depth interviews (20 interviews in total) with a range of senior digital and non-digital marketers, communications leads and social media strategists. Interviewees for the research covered sectors as diverse as aerospace, retail, hospitality, public sector (including government), SaaS, FMCG, non-profit, agency, financial services and media.</li> </ul> <h2>Lead author</h2> <p>The lead author for our social media best practice guides is <strong>Michelle Goodall</strong>, an experienced consultant. She has more than 17 years’ B2C and B2B experience client and agency-side, providing digital transformation and social media strategy advice and support.</p> <p>She has worked with a wide range of clients, including London2012, BBC, Direct Line Group, Multiple Sclerosis Society, Barclays Bank, Coca Cola, Unilever, US Embassy, and many others.</p> <p>Michelle is a trainer and consultant for Econsultancy and can generally be found curating things that smart people write / make / do and getting to grips with Peach and other peripheral / transformative / game-changing technologies for her clients.</p> <h2>Contributors</h2> <p>The author and Econsultancy wish to extend sincere thanks to the following respected professionals who have contributed to the report:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Richard Bagnall</strong> – CEO, PRIME Research UK &amp; SVP PRIME Research Europe</li> <li> <strong>Vikki Chowney</strong> – Director of Content &amp; Publishing Strategies, H+K Strategies</li> <li> <strong>Sarah Coggins</strong> – VP, PR and Social Media, Virgin Atlantic</li> <li> <strong>Raluca Efford</strong> – Head of Digital and Social Media Marketing, Direct Line Group</li> <li> <strong>Marisol Grandon</strong> – Head of Creative Content, The Department for International Development (DFID)</li> <li> <strong>Katie McDermott</strong> – Marketing Director, Gourmet Burger Kitchen</li> <li> <strong>Will McInnes</strong> – Chief Marketing Officer, Brandwatch</li> <li> <strong>Kerry Taylor</strong> – Senior Vice President Director of Television, MTV Networks</li> <li> <strong>Guy Stephens</strong> – Social Customer Care Consultant, IBM</li> <li> <strong>Stephen Waddington</strong> – Partner and Chief Engagement Officer, Ketchum</li> <li> <strong>Scott Wilkinson</strong> – Head of Brand, Acquisitions and Digital, Virgin Media Business</li> <li> <strong>Tom Barker</strong> – Head of Digital, National Trust</li> <li> <strong>Rachel Miller</strong> – CEO, IC Crowd</li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4148 2017-05-02T12:45:00+01:00 2017-05-02T12:45:00+01:00 Social Media Platforms Overview <p>Part of our <a title="Social Media Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Best Practice Guide bundle</a>,<strong> we've updated and refreshed this report for 2017</strong> to reflect on the latest trends and to provide <strong>a snapshot of the major social media platforms and the most pressing considerations for marketers looking to generate the most value from social media</strong>, as well as what to consider when making the business case for social media platforms.</p> <p>From Snapchat Lenses and Geofilters and authentic content such as Live Video to the opportunities of augemented reality and chatbots in social media, we've got the latest trends covered in this 2017 edition of Econsultancy's social platforms overview. </p> <p>The report provides a summary of the main features of social media platforms, and outlines some of the options available to marketers when developing a paid, owned and earned strategic approach to social media marketing and communications.</p> <p>Throughout the report, we bring you <strong>examples of how companies are using social media in different ways, as well as insights from companies interviewed</strong> specifically for this guide.</p> <p>For more details on <strong>best practice approaches, techniques, challenges and opportunities for creating your social media strategy</strong>, read the complementary <strong><a title="Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-strategy-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Strategy Best Practice Guide</a></strong>.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_IhT9S2YEyY?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h2>Methodology</h2> <p>The methodology involved two main phases:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Phase 1:</strong> Desk research to identify relevant issues, examples and models.</li> <li> <strong>Phase 2:</strong> A series of in-depth interviews (20 interviews in total) with a range of senior digital and non-digital marketers, communications leads and social media strategists. Interviewees for the research covered sectors as diverse as aerospace, retail, hospitality, public sector (including government), SaaS, FMCG, non-profit, agency, financial services and media.</li> </ul> <h2>Lead author</h2> <p>The lead author for our social media best practice guides is <strong>Michelle Goodall</strong>, an experienced consultant. She has more than 17 years’ B2C and B2B experience client and agency-side, providing digital transformation and social media strategy advice and support.</p> <p>She has worked with a wide range of clients, including London2012, BBC, Direct Line Group, Multiple Sclerosis Society, Barclays Bank, Coca Cola, Unilever, US Embassy, and many others.</p> <p>Michelle is a trainer and consultant for Econsultancy and can generally be found curating things that smart people write / make / do and getting to grips with Peach and other peripheral / transformative / game-changing technologies for her clients.</p> <h2>Contributors</h2> <p>The author and Econsultancy wish to extend sincere thanks to the following respected professionals who have contributed to the report:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Vikki Chowney</strong> – Director of Content &amp; Publishing Strategies, H+K Strategies</li> <li> <strong>Marisol Grandon</strong> – Head of Creative Content, The Department for International Development (DFID)</li> <li> <strong>Will McInnes</strong> – Chief Marketing Officer, Brandwatch</li> <li> <strong>Kerry Taylor</strong> – Senior Vice President Director of Television, MTV Networks</li> <li> <strong>Tom Barker</strong> – Head of Digital, National Trust</li> <li> <strong>Rachel Miller</strong> – CEO, IC Crowd</li> <li> <strong>Stephen Waddington</strong> – Partner and Chief Engagement Officer, Ketchum</li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69049 2017-05-02T11:25:16+01:00 2017-05-02T11:25:16+01:00 The best social stories and campaigns from April 2017 Nikki Gilliland <h3>Airbnb introduces ‘humanless host’ on April Fool’s Day</h3> <p>Airbnb was just one of many brands to mark April Fool’s Day this year, using the opportunity to introduce the ultimate in home rental innovation – the ‘humanless host’. The ad features Brandon, a robot that – in Airbnb's own words – bridges the gap between ‘what is magical and what is easy’.</p> <p>Despite the convenience, it turns out technology can't always be trusted. Brandon eventually runs out of battery, proving why the human-approach isn’t so bad after all.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vpLy4D8Tg4Q?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Instagram reaches 700m monthly users</h3> <p>Instagram hit yet another milestone last month, announcing that it now has 700m monthly users. </p> <p>The platform’s growth appears to be accelerating at a rapid rate, with the news coming just four months after it reached 600m. This could suggest that it won’t be too long before it joins Facebook and WhatsApp in the one-billion-users club. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">We’re thrilled to announce that our community has grown to 700 million. From all of us at Instagram, thank you! <a href="https://t.co/1ynZNkKf3m">https://t.co/1ynZNkKf3m</a> <a href="https://t.co/9FfCLvz4Fy">pic.twitter.com/9FfCLvz4Fy</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/857218250509340672">April 26, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Pepsi criticised over tasteless ad</h3> <p>At the beginning of April, Pepsi released a controversial ad that appeared to trivialise the Black Lives Matter movement. It involved Kendall Jenner joining some kind of demonstration and magically defusing the situation with a good ol' can of pop.</p> <p>Despite Pepsi defending the ad, saying that it depicts ‘a moment of unity’, it was widely criticised for trivialising social justice in order to sell soft drinks. The ad was eventually pulled from YouTube and the campaign was cancelled.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5829/Pepsi.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="403"></p> <h3>Heineken uses real-life social experiment for ‘Open Your World’ campaign </h3> <p>In contrast to Pepsi's misjudged attempt, Heineken unveiled a campaign based on the premise that having a simple conversation over a beer can help bring people together – even those with jarring political beliefs. </p> <p>The ‘Worlds Apart’ ad involves a real-life social experiment whereby three sets of strangers with opposing beliefs were asked to complete a series of tasks together. Only later did they discover the extent of their differences, before being given a choice to leave or discuss things over a beer.</p> <p>The fact that the ad comes hot on the heels of Pepsi’s recent failure appears to be a coincidence, yet many have praised the beer brand’s mature and meaningful approach.  </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8wYXw4K0A3g?wmode=transparent" width="518" height="301"></iframe></p> <h3>LinkedIn reaches half a billion members worldwide</h3> <p>April was also a good month for LinkedIn, as the networking platform celebrated reaching 500m members worldwide. </p> <p>Brits appear to be particularly active on the platform, with 23m members coming from the UK alone. London also tops the list for the most connected city in the world, with users having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>This comes after the platform unveiled a (controversial) redesigned version of its desktop site, complete with new messaging and search features. </p> <h3>Dolce &amp; Gabbana receives backlash over China campaign</h3> <p>Dolce &amp; Gabbana was another brand on the recieving end of criticism. This time, it was for using stereotypical images in its D&amp;GLovesChina campaign – part of promotional activity for its first Beijing fashion show.</p> <p>Social media users argued that the brand was glorifying ‘backward’ stereotypes instead of showing the progressive side of modern China. As a result, D&amp;G quietly removed the images from its Weibo and WeChat accounts. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5828/Dolce_and_Gabbana.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="450"></p> <h3>Burger King sneakily activates Google Assistants during ad</h3> <p>Burger King released a particularly clever ad last month, designed to activate Google Assistants on viewer’s phones and home devices. The 15-second video involves a Burger King employee leaning into the camera and asking “Okay Google, what is the Whopper burger?”</p> <p>However, Burger King was perhaps a little too sneaky for Google’s liking, as reports suggest that devices stopped responding to the prompt a few hours after the ad was launched.</p> <p>Google has not confirmed whether or not it updated software to prevent it. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/U_O54le4__I?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Facebook unveils developments in F8 event</h3> <p>Finally, Facebook announced a number of developments during F8 last month, including new AR and VR technology.</p> <p>I recommend reading <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69013-what-do-facebook-s-new-vr-and-ar-platforms-mean-for-marketers/" target="_blank">Ben Davis's article</a> for an in-depth breakdown.  </p> <p><strong><em>For more on this topic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/social/"><em>Social media training courses</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-best-practice-guide/"><em>Social media best practice guide</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69042 2017-04-28T11:15:00+01:00 2017-04-28T11:15:00+01:00 Driven by mobile, digital overtakes TV in US ad spend for the first time Patricio Robles <p>The milestone is one that industry analysts and observers have been waiting for and 2016 also brought with it another milestone: for the first time, mobile ads produced more revenue than desktop ads.</p> <p>All told, digital ad revenue in the US hit a record $72.5bn last year, up from $59.6bn in 2015. Mobile ads were responsible for $36.6bn of that, a massive 77% year-over-year gain.</p> <p>A good portion of mobile's gains were due to the growing popularity of mobile video ads. Spend on those skyrocketed by 145% year-over-year to reach $4.2bn, which helped fuel a 53% year-over-year jump in digital video ad spend overall. That figure now stands at $9.1bn.</p> <p>Spend on social ads, which in recent years have become a staple of many advertisers' digital campaigns, grew 50% to $16.3bn. Even search managed to produce a 19% gain to reach $35bn in spend.</p> <p>According to the IAB, mobile's ascendency across all digital channels is not surprising. "This increasing commitment [to mobile] is a reflection of brands’ ongoing marketing shift from 'mobile-first' to 'mobile-only' in order to keep pace with today's on-the-go consumers," IAB president and CEO Randall Rothenberg stated. </p> <p>"In a mobile world, it is no surprise that mobile ad revenues now take more than half of the digital market share," IAB EVP and CMO David Doty added.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5773/iabchart.png" alt="" width="705" height="488"></p> <h3>The rich get richer</h3> <p>While digital's eclipsing of television in terms of ad spend is no doubt good news for the digital economy generally, not everybody is benefiting equally from the growth of digital ad spend. By most estimates, two companies, Google and Facebook, have realized the vast majority of ad revenue growth, leading some to label the two companies a duopoly.</p> <p>According to Digital Content Next's Jason Kint, Google and Facebook took 89% of the growth last year. Brian Wieser of Pivotal Research <a href="http://fortune.com/2017/04/26/google-facebook-digital-ads/">estimates</a> that amazingly the two companies were the beneficiaries of close to 100% of the growth.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">so <a href="https://twitter.com/iab">@IAB</a> just dropped 2016 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/s?src=hash">#s</a>. Duopoly in full force -&gt; takes 89% of growth. "Everyone Else" loses more share courtesy of Facebook. <a href="https://twitter.com/DCNorg">@dcnorg</a> <a href="https://t.co/urglxDrooM">pic.twitter.com/urglxDrooM</a></p> — Jason Kint (@jason_kint) <a href="https://twitter.com/jason_kint/status/857255714678603777">April 26, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>The IAB disputes such claims. "73% of revenues in Q4 came from the top 10 digital companies, but they only contributed 69% of the growth," the IAB's Doty <a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/digital-ad-revenue-surpasses-tv-desktop-iab/308808/">told AdAge</a>. "That means 31% of the growth came from companies outside the top 10." He also stated that some estimates count revenue outside of the US and don't account for traffic acquisition costs.</p> <p>But even if the estimates of how much Google and Facebook are taking as the digital ad spend pie grows are slightly exaggerated, it's clear from the companies' <a href="https://abc.xyz/investor/news/earnings/2016/Q4_alphabet_earnings/">financial</a> <a href="https://investor.fb.com/investor-news/press-release-details/2017/facebook-Reports-Fourth-Quarter-and-Full-Year-2016-Results/default.aspx">reports</a> that advertisers are funnelling increasingly large sums of money to the two internet giants.</p> <p>At the same time, other notable players, like Twitter, are losing. The still-popular microblogging platform has finally managed to grow its monthly users by a meaningful amount, but despite user growth Twitter <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/apr/26/twitter-revenues-fall-first-quarter-results-advertising">just reported its first quarterly revenue decline</a> and acknowledged that it is facing "revenue headwinds."</p> <p>While Google and Facebook face some challenges of their own, including <a href="https://digiday.com/uk/youtube-ad-boycott-concisely-explained/">an advertiser boycott</a> and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/apr/26/facebook-must-step-up-fake-news-fight-before-uk-election-urges-mp">criticism over fake news</a>, every indication is that the two companies, official duopoly or not, will continue to dominate internet advertising. Whether that's ultimately a good or bad thing for digital ad economy remains to be seen.</p> <p><strong><em>For more digital marketing and ecommerce data, download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/">Econsultancy Internet Statistics Compendium</a>.</em></strong></p>