tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/facebook Latest Facebook content from Econsultancy 2017-02-24T13:51:16+00:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68834 2017-02-24T13:51:16+00:00 2017-02-24T13:51:16+00:00 All the digital news stories you missed this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Instagram lets you upload multiple photos and videos at once</h3> <p>Instagram has introduced a new carousel feature so that users can upload multiple photos and videos in a single post.</p> <p>It’s based on the notion that it’s difficult to choose just one photo from an experience, so now users can choose to include up to 10 photos or videos, which followers can swipe through to view.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Surprise! Now you can share up to 10 photos and videos in one Instagram post! <a href="https://t.co/OpBAUxcmJ4">https://t.co/OpBAUxcmJ4</a> <a href="https://t.co/U2u0OmBJln">pic.twitter.com/U2u0OmBJln</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/834433357366833152">February 22, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Republicans release report detailing A/B testing for Trump campaign</h3> <p>Apparently, Donald Trump’s website generated more online revenue per visitor when it used pictures of Trump giving two thumbs up than any other photo.</p> <p>This is just one snippet of information from the RNC Testing Booklet – a report that details information about the A/B testing undertaken by the Republican’s digital team throughout Trump’s campaign. You can read the <a href="https://www.scribd.com/document/336800205/RNC-Testing-Booklet">full report here</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4135/Trump.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="648"></p> <h3>WhatsApp introduces ‘Status’ feature</h3> <p>WhatsApp has introduced ‘Status’ – a new feature that allows users to share disappearing photos and videos. It enables users to send contacts photos, GIFs or videos overlaid with drawings, emojis or captions, before the content will disappear after 24 hours.</p> <p>So, what will this mean for Snapchat? Read more about that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68830-will-snapchat-suffer-from-whatsapp-s-new-status-feature/" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> <h3>Snap starts selling spectacles online</h3> <p>So far, Snap’s video-recording glasses have only been available from special vending machines in surprise locations and from an NYC pop-up. Now, the brand has begun selling them online to US consumers for the sum of $129.99.</p> <p>The move comes ahead of the brand’s March IPO, where the company is seeking a valuation of up to $22bn.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4134/Spectacles.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="412"></p> <h3>Apple buys iCloud.net domain</h3> <p>Apple has taken ownership of iCloud.net – a domain formerly associated with a small-scale Asian social network – in a bid to eliminate market confusion over its cloud software services. Apple has refused to comment on the deal, meaning the financial details (and what it plans to do with the domain) remain unknown.</p> <h3>Uber writes to users trying to delete their accounts  </h3> <p>Uber has come under fire once again, this time for allegations made by a former employee about sexual harassment and discrimination within the company. The news has come less than a month after the #DeleteUber campaign, following the firm’s airport price surging controversy.</p> <p>With users once again trying to delete their accounts, Uber has responded by sending out a formal letter in response, explaining its position on Susan Fowler’s allegations (see below).</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="und" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/Bro_Pair">@Bro_Pair</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/Uber">@Uber</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/deleteuber?src=hash">#deleteuber</a> <a href="https://t.co/QAWOX87Wtj">pic.twitter.com/QAWOX87Wtj</a></p> — Mr. To Damn Good (@FamousCeleb) <a href="https://twitter.com/FamousCeleb/status/834567373214539776">February 23, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Facebook Messenger users can now chat to Christian Grey </h3> <p>On the back of the release of the <em>Fifty Shades Darker</em> movie<em>,</em> PersonaBots.com has created a Christian Grey character for Facebook Messenger. Kudos to the person who raised <em>that</em> mid-meeting.</p> <p>Bringing fans’ fantasies to life (well, sort of) the bot’s raunchy chat culminates in talk of the famous Red Room. As you might expect, it’s decidedly NSFW, so the below screenshot is all you’re getting.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4133/Christian_Grey_chatbot_2.JPG" alt="" width="501" height="611"></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68755 2017-02-24T12:02:09+00:00 2017-02-24T12:02:09+00:00 How charities capitalise on sponsored abstinence events Nikki Gilliland <p>While it’s certainly a positive for charities – does the trend have a shelf life? What’s more, how do charities ensure their message is delivered in the face of increasing competition?</p> <p>Here’s a look at why it’s been such an effective marketing tool so far, and a bit of insight into how it might evolve in future.  </p> <h3>What’s the appeal?</h3> <h4>Anyone can get involved</h4> <p>Sponsored abstinence events have mass appeal mainly because anyone and everyone can get involved without much effort required. Of course, giving up something <em>is</em> an effort, but the fact that it’s a passive activity – far removed from something like a skydive – means that people are more likely to sign up.</p> <h4>Builds on social media boasting</h4> <p>It’s been suggested that a lot of people participate in these events simply for the enjoyment of posting about it on social media.</p> <p>While the charitable humble brag is a well-known phenomenon, this is a particularly cynical view. But with social media reinforcement being <a href="https://www.ama.org/publications/MarketingNews/Pages/feeding-the-addiction.aspx" target="_blank">linked to a rise in dopamine levels</a> - this addictive cycle is still likely to be a contributing factor.</p> <h4>Personal challenge</h4> <p>Alongside validation from peers, the opportunity to undertake a personal challenge is also part of the abstinence appeal. In fact, many people now participate in events like Dry January even without a fundraising element, proving that charities often (ironically) capitalise on personal interest and gain.</p> <h4>Time limit</h4> <p>While Movember is not an abstinence event, it still uses the typical tactic of a one-month time frame. This can be highly effective, as people are much more likely to agree to a certain behaviour for a limited time period rather than an open-ended amount. </p> <p>Encouragingly, it’s also been suggested that people who give up something for 28 days or more are likely to stop in the long term.</p> <h3>Awareness vs. Fundraising</h3> <p>This year’s Dry January was marred by suggestions that giving up alcohol for a month could <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/12098843/Dry-January-campaign-could-do-more-harm-than-good-claims-expert.html" target="_blank">do more harm than good</a>. Specifically, it was suggested that abstinence events can lead to dangerous bingeing at the end of the month as people ‘celebrate’ its culmination.</p> <p>Meanwhile, despite the increase in popularity, it appears the charitable element (and core message) could be getting lost amid the social media noise. With three charities running alcohol abstinence events, competing for public attention has become a big challenge - especially considering the somewhat conflicting messages of each.</p> <p>Cancer Research runs a typically light-hearted campaign, focusing on the act of fundraising rather than the core message behind it. Clearly a successful tactic, it has raised an impressive £17m since launching in 2013.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3496/Dryathlete.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="600"></p> <p>In contrast, Alcohol Concern hammers home the importance of changing the core behaviour, with raising money an almost secondary factor. This has proved a problem, which has subsequently led to the charity changing its marketing approach.</p> <p>Aiming to dispel the notion that it is being preachy or condescending, it is now placing greater focus on fundraising. In 2016, it announced that it would be partnering with Virgin Money Giving to allow participants to raise money for both Alcohol Concern and a separate charity. With one in six people reportedly taking part in the event regardless of a charity link, this aimed to provide further incentive and encourage sign ups to Alcohol Concern specifically.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">No Friday night beers this week, it's <a href="https://twitter.com/dryjanuary">@dryjanuary</a>, raising money for <a href="https://twitter.com/AlcoholConcern">@AlcoholConcern</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/breastcancernow">@breastcancernow</a> <a href="https://t.co/srXiHp6ZwG">https://t.co/srXiHp6ZwG</a></p> — Paul Davis (@Saddlerpaul) <a href="https://twitter.com/Saddlerpaul/status/817507977133494272">January 6, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Ultimately then, the success of these events appears to be more related to raising awareness - be it either of the charity itself, or to a lesser extent, a health-related issue such as smoking – rather than raising money. </p> <p>In turn, perhaps whether or not people <em>do</em> raise money in the process relies on the strength (and persuasive techniques) of marketing campaigns.</p> <p>Here are a few further examples and reasons why they’re effective.</p> <h3>Effective marketing campaigns </h3> <h4>British Heart Foundation's Dechox</h4> <p>BHF raised nearly £800,000 during its first-ever ‘de-chox’ – an event that encourages giving up chocolate for March. This year, it is hoping to raise even more by focusing on the workplace.</p> <p>Building on ‘cake culture’ and the statistic that <a href="https://www.fenews.co.uk/sector-news/new-statistics-reveal-over-two-fifths-of-people-working-in-education-have-ditched-the-diet-after-eating-chocolate-on-the-job-13122" target="_blank">55% of people will eat chocolate at work</a> if it is within eyesight, the charity uses relatable messaging to encourage participation, as well as the notion that ‘we’re all in it together’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3495/Dechox_2.JPG" alt="" width="640" height="642"></p> <h4>Veganuary</h4> <p>Unlike health-related charities, Veganuary capitalises on multiple incentives to promote its meat and dairy-free month. While it champions animal welfare, it likely appeals to people who are concerned about environmental issues – plus those who are drawn into celebrity trends related to food and wellness.</p> <p>Social media plays a huge part of Veganuary’s marketing, with the charity capitalising on food inspiration to engage users. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3490/Veganuary.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="485"></p> <h4>Febfast</h4> <p>Unlike charities that promote health-related causes, e.g. smoking or drinking, Febfast uses the abstinence angle purely as a marketing tool.</p> <p>It also opens up the notion to encourage participants to give up anything they like. Whether it’s fast food or being late – its inclusive nature means there’s no reason <em>not</em> to get involved.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3491/Febfast.JPG" alt="" width="590" height="678"></p> <p>Its phrasing is also quite original, urging people to ‘hit pause’ on something rather than give it up. Deliberately avoiding any danger of sounding preachy or overly-serious, it focuses on the positive results, in both the personal and charitable sense.</p> <p><strong><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66592-why-charities-need-true-digital-transformation/"><em>Why charities need true digital transformation</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67451-the-smartest-experiential-charity-marketing-campaign-you-ll-see-this-year/"><em>The smartest experiential &amp; charity marketing campaign you'll see this year</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68781-five-ways-charities-can-encourage-more-online-donations/"><em>Five ways charities can encourage more online donations</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68830 2017-02-22T12:30:00+00:00 2017-02-22T12:30:00+00:00 Will Snapchat suffer from WhatsApp’s new ‘Status’ feature? Nikki Gilliland <p>It’s just announced the introduction of disappearing photos and videos into its messaging app, WhatsApp. Which, yes, is a feature that is pretty much identical to Snapchat Stories.</p> <p>So, what will this mean for users of both? And what about brands? Here’s a bit more on the story.</p> <h3>What is the ‘Status’ feature?</h3> <p>WhatsApp has always provided users with the option of having a ‘status’. It’s the little phrase beside a person’s name that says ‘at work’, ‘busy’ or ‘at the gym’.</p> <p>In fact, the app was originally built around this very idea, i.e. that you could let your friends or family know what you were currently up to. As the app evolved, it became one of the most under-used and forgotten about elements.</p> <p>Now, ‘status’ is being reintroduced in a big way.</p> <p>The all-new feature will let users share photos, GIFs or videos overlaid with drawings, emojis or captions. This content will be end-to-end encrypted, meaning that no outside party will be able to view it, and it will last for 24 hours before disappearing entirely.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4096/whatsapp.JPG" alt="" width="250" height="493"></p> <h3>Will it change user behaviour?</h3> <p>While Instagram also introduced this feature last year, Instagram Stories did not necessarily make much of a difference or impact when it comes to how users behave on the platform.</p> <p>Instagram can largely be a passive user experience – you can simply use it to view other people’s content if you wish. On the other hand, WhatsApp has always been inherently active. To use it, you have to be engaged in chat, or else there’s not much point. With Status, WhatsApp users will now be able to do both.</p> <h3>Will brands get involved?</h3> <p>While some brands have already been using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68695-how-brands-are-using-whatsapp-for-marketing/" target="_blank">WhatsApp for marketing purposes</a> - mainly to enable faster and more direct customer service - the new feature could open up a whole new realm of advertising opportunities.</p> <p>Despite WhatsApp being against blatant brand advertising in the past, the opportunity to monetise could prove irresistible. There have been suggestions that it could start to insert full-screen ads in-between Statuses, following the example of both Snapchat and Instagram.</p> <p>Similarly, brands could also make use of custom-made filters or emojis, using this to create a less obtrusive presence <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67529-the-rise-of-dark-social-everything-you-need-to-know/">within dark social</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4097/Whatsapp_2.JPG" alt="" width="250" height="492"></p> <h3>Will Snapchat suffer?</h3> <p>There’s no guarantee that the Status feature will even take off for WhatsApp, but with 1.2bn monthly users and 60bn messages being sent each day, I doubt it’s all that worried. After all, WhatsApp will not fundamentally change - it will retain its core messaging feature - but it will simultaneously be able to take (or attempt to take) a slice of Snapchat's pie.</p> <p>Snapchat, on the other hand, might be a little concerned. Especially considering that stats from its latest <a href="https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/02/slowchat/" target="_blank">IPO filing</a> showed that the platform’s growth slowed 82% after Instagram Stories launched. If a similar thing happens on the back of Status, it could further hinder the platform’s global growth and revenue opportunities.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68823 2017-02-21T11:56:38+00:00 2017-02-21T11:56:38+00:00 British Vogue launches Messenger chatbot for Fashion Week: Is it any good? Nikki Gilliland <p>But with a wealth of recent brand bots failing to ignite much excitement – will this be any different?</p> <p>Here are my thoughts.</p> <h3>How does it work?</h3> <p>The <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68805-are-brands-failing-to-properly-promote-their-new-chatbots/" target="_blank">bot can be found</a> on the British Vogue Facebook page or direct via Facebook Messenger.</p> <p>It follows a fairly standard formula, requiring users to select their own personal preferences about the articles they want to receive. Once you start interacting with the service, it will ask questions to determine how often you would like updates, whether you want curated highlights or all stories coming from London Fashion Week.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4010/Vogue_chatbot.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="663"></p> <p>You can also choose to ask for updates relating to specific fashion designers, e.g. Topshop Unique or Tommy Hilfiger.</p> <p>Based on these preferences, it will then deliver articles (from the Vogue website) that you will ideally find the most interesting, direct to your Messenger inbox. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4011/Vogue_chatbot_2.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="643"></p> <h3>Smart or simplistic?</h3> <p>I recently mentioned how <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68800-pizza-express-launches-booking-chatbot-is-it-any-good/" target="_blank">Pizza Express’s Messenger bot</a> is more of a multiple-choice questionnaire rather than a proper chatbot. Sadly, British Vogue’s example is a similar sort of affair, merely asking you to choose from different options rather than actually partake in any chatting activity.</p> <p>The only real difference is that it can instantly send updates or stories from a specific designer if you type in their name.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4014/Vogue_chatbot_4.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="392"></p> <p>However, even this isn’t <em>that</em> smart.</p> <p>I deliberately miss-spelled a designer’s surname to test whether or not it would still understand. It didn’t – which shows how basic the technology currently is.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4012/Vogue_chatbot_5.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="623"></p> <h3>Publishers cutting through news feeds</h3> <p>That being said, there’s certainly something for fashion fans to enjoy here. With the fast-paced nature of London Fashion Week, the service is definitely a convenient way for people to stay on top of the latest runway news. </p> <p>Users are arguably less likely to passively scroll through their news feed in search of this type of content, meaning that click-through rates could be higher if sent directly.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4013/Vogue_chatbot_3.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="513"></p> <p>This makes me think that bots like this will be more impactful when they are based around a timely or seasonal event.</p> <p>Despite British Vogue saying that the bot has the ability to evolve over time - which I assume means the service will continue even after Fashion Week has ended – will users continue to show as much interest? </p> <p>I could be wrong, but I doubt that fans are invested enough in specific designers to read every single update about them in future. Or indeed, whether there will be enough updates to even send once Fashion Week has finished.</p> <p>Likewise, there is also the danger of users getting annoyed or bored with daily updates, meaning that the bot could have a rather short shelf-life.</p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>While it’s good to see publishers experimenting with Messenger bot technology, it remains to be seen whether or not it’ll have any real impact.</p> <p>For daily readers of British Vogue, there’s definitely value in the direct and personalised interaction it offers. (Though you could also argue that email newsletters already deliver this). Similarly, it could further build on the current hype surrounding London Fashion Week. </p> <p>For general fashion fans or people less invested in the brand, the features need to be more impressive to both pique and sustain interest - especially if the aim is to tempt people away from their news feeds long-term.</p> <p><em>More chat about bots:</em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care/">What are chatbots and why should marketers care?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68046-five-pioneering-examples-of-how-brands-are-using-chatbots/">Five pioneering examples of how brands are using chatbots</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68636-pizza-express-channel-4-and-tfl-three-examples-of-brand-chatbots/">Pizza Express, Channel 4 and TFL: Three examples of brand chatbots</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68815 2017-02-20T10:52:00+00:00 2017-02-20T10:52:00+00:00 Becoming an influencer: Notes from a fledgling travel blogger Nikki Gilliland <p>I recently caught up with Marion (while she was on a jealousy-inducing trip to Guatemala) to find out how she has generated such a large following, how she works with brands, and her thoughts on travel influencers in general.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3939/Marion_Payet.JPG" alt="" width="720" height="534"></p> <p>Here’s what she said.</p> <h4> <em>Econsultancy:</em> Could you start by explaining a bit about your blog and how you got into the industry?</h4> <p><em>Marion Payet:</em> I initially started my blog because of an interest in creating something more authentic than I was seeing elsewhere. </p> <p>I recognised that I could offer more than standard recommendations from huge companies like Lonely Planet. I mean, a brand like that might tell me to go to a specific market – but how will I know if it’ll provide me with anything unique or truly interesting? I’m more inclined to trust someone with a personal point of view rather than a book that’s been written for the masses. </p> <p>So, I aimed to build something based on the notion that if you like my lifestyle and the way that I am travelling, then you would like the recommendations I make too.</p> <h4> <em>E: </em>Did you start your blog with any knowledge of influencer marketing? </h4> <p><em>MP: </em>In terms of my own background, I started in the hospitality and travel industry in Florida, then I moved to London where I worked in retail – specifically ecommerce and digital marketing. </p> <p>This is how I knew I could offer something different from other travel websites, because I already knew many tricks of the trade. </p> <p>I had worked with influencers myself through affiliate channels, and had general knowledge of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/seo-best-practice-guide/">SEO</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-search-marketing-ppc-best-practice-guide/">PPC</a>, coding, etc. – so I knew I could use this to my advantage, especially compared to other bloggers I was seeing at the time.</p> <h4> <em>E: </em>What are the main strategies you have used to build your audience?</h4> <p><em>MP:</em> I obviously have the main website, but as I didn’t originally have much money to invest, I knew that in order to drive traffic to it I needed to use another organic channel like social media. </p> <p>So, I started <a href="https://www.instagram.com/hibiscusandnomada/">with Instagram</a>, spending days and days just being really active on it, engaging with the community and making friends with mutual interests. </p> <p>Over time my presence grew. From last June to now I have managed to reach 29,000 followers, and that’s just organically, from being super active and building my own community.</p> <p>Eventually, this audience has also found its way back to my website, so now we’re at about 1,500 visits per month.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3941/HN_insta.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="420"></p> <h4> <em>E:</em> At what point did you start getting interest from brands?</h4> <p><em>MP:</em> Quite recently. Before that, it was purely me reaching out to brands through email and social media, saying this is what I do if you are interested. </p> <p>Then, about a month ago, it seemed to flip – I started to get emails every day from brands and websites saying that they had found me. As soon as I reached about 25,000 followers on Instagram, it started to happen, and then I also got quite a bit of press coverage from online and print magazines. Combined, this seemed to really ignite interest.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Do you only work with a certain type of brand, and how do you decide who to work with?</h4> <p><em>MP:</em> Absolutely, since the very beginning I’ve made a point of being picky. I’ve seen a lot of other bloggers on Instagram being quite blatant, posting photos of a watch with a mountain in the background.</p> <p>I would never want to get paid to promote a brand that I don’t believe in, so I only work those that I think are a really good fit for me.</p> <p>For example, I am now working with a brand that offers travel insurance, because I have used it myself and I know that my audience will find it useful. If I am holding an expensive watch – why would a backpacker be interested in that? I’m not scared of saying no or explaining that it won’t be a good fit, either.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> What would you say is the best way for a brand to approach an influencer?</h4> <p><em>MP:</em> A brand can usually get my attention if it is a personalised message, so not just mentioning that they have seen my blog, but pointing out a specific article or photo that they liked. </p> <p>I get countless emails saying that someone wants to work with me, so I really need to feel that there is some kind of personal connection. I can also tell if it is an email they have sent to hundreds of other bloggers – I can read between the lines. </p> <p>Lastly, I have to feel like it’s not just about them, that it’s about both of us, and that all parties will be able benefit from the deal.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How do you see influencer marketing evolving? Do you think it will reach saturation point?</h4> <p><em>MP:</em> I do think it will reach saturation point. You can tell this, not just from the amount of influencers, but the type and quality of content that they are promoting. You can usually tell that it’s not authentic, that they are staying in a hotel simply because they are being paid to – it doesn’t align with their identity or approach to travel in any way. </p> <p>This weekend I was in the south of Mexico, in a hostel that paid for my entire experience, and while the hostel is definitely a place I would stay at (and promote), my article will also include detailed information about the day-trip I went on and every single activity I did. It’s always better to promote a story rather than just a straightforward recommendation. </p> <p>I think authentic influencer marketing will evolve in this way, telling the story and entire experience of a place rather than just one aspect.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Finally, what’s the best place you’ve been or experience you’ve had thanks to your blog?</h4> <p><em>MP:</em> The best feedback I’ve had has been from my Iceland trip - I was there for a whole week over New Year. I didn’t even really plan anything, then I slowly realised that it was winter, there would only be four hours of daylight, we’d be freezing. </p> <p>Who goes to Iceland in winter? But we embraced it and ended up taking the most incredible photos. The feedback was amazing, with people commenting that they now want to visit during the winter time rather than summer, and asking questions about how we got there, how we travelled and so on. </p> <p>People don’t even think to go to a place like Iceland before they see photos and then they get obsessed with it. For us, this is so rewarding – it shows that you can truly inspire.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3940/Iceland.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="429"></p> <p><strong><em>For more on this topic, check out the following research from Econsultancy:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">The Rise of Influencers</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer/">The Voice of the Influencer</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68814 2017-02-16T11:15:00+00:00 2017-02-16T11:15:00+00:00 How utilities brands use social media for reputation management Nikki Gilliland <p>Before we go any further, what exactly is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65523-what-is-online-reputation-management-and-should-you-use-it/" target="_blank">online reputation management</a>? Well, though it largely comes under the umbrella of social media monitoring, this practice can also involve dealing with online reviews, producing content and general <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66439-three-ways-community-management-drives-loyalty-for-charities/" target="_blank">community management</a>.</p> <p>In this article, I will specifically be focusing on how utility companies use social media channels for reputation management.</p> <h3>Basic principles</h3> <p>Online reputation management on social media refers to <em>how</em> brands respond to customer conversation.</p> <p>For example, if people are complaining or even praising a service, but the brand remains entirely unresponsive – this can have a detrimental effect on its overall reputation. </p> <p>Here are a few basic rules for effective management:</p> <ul> <li>Monitor mentions</li> <li>Respond quickly</li> <li>Be transparent</li> <li>Prepare for a crisis</li> <li>Address criticism</li> </ul> <p>Let’s look at a few examples of utility brands putting the above into practice.</p> <h3>Hawaiian Electric</h3> <p>Not many electricity suppliers have an Instagram account, let alone use it to effectively communicate with customers, but Hawaiian Electric is different.</p> <p>When a storm hit shores in 2014, it utilised the channel to let customers know about areas of power outage and repairs, as well as reinforce messages about safety. It has since continued to do this, expanding its strategy to incorporate general posts relating to the local community. </p> <p>By using a visual medium like Instagram, the brand is able to project a positive image and reassure customers in the process. </p> <p>After all, while it might be useful to hear that a company is repairing a broken electricity pole, seeing a photo of it in action is far more powerful.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3927/Hawaiin_Electric.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="489"></p> <h3>SSE</h3> <p>Figures from Citizens Advice revealed that SSE received the lowest number of customer service complaints last year, making it the top energy company overall for customer satisfaction.</p> <p>A big contributing factor appears to be the way it handles queries and criticism on social media, with a fast response time and polite tone of voice across the board.</p> <p>This is particularly evident on the brand’s Facebook page, where it ‘typically replies within an hour’. And although complaints are still common, the brand’s approach appears to be effective for calming angry customers. </p> <p>With <a href="http://blogs.forrester.com/kate_leggett/15-03-03-consumer_expectations_for_customer_service_dont_match_what_companies_deliver" target="_blank">77% saying</a> that valuing the customer's time is the most important thing a company can do – a fast response is one of the most effective ways for brands to ensure that they can maintain and improve a positive reputation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3928/SSE_energy.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="469"></p> <h3>PSEG</h3> <p>PSEG – a gas and electric company based in New Jersey – shows that social media can be used for brand reputation management in alternative ways.</p> <p>In 2014, it started planning for an infrastructure upgrade to replace 250 miles of gas line - a project that would result in a lot of upheaval for local residents.</p> <p>Instead of an announcement on its website, PSEG chose to use micro-targeted Facebook ads in order to let people know what was going to happen and how it would affect them.</p> <p>When users clicked on an ad, they were taken to a specific page where they’d be able to select and view a work schedule and relating disruption.</p> <p>By utilising social media in this way, not only did PSEG demonstrate transparency, but it also pre-empted its customers' needs.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3929/PSEG.JPG" alt="" width="540" height="716"></p> <h3>Ovo</h3> <p>Brand Q&amp;A’s on Twitter are always risky. A few years ago, British Gas suffered a huge backlash from angry customers over price hikes, leaving the social media team with egg on its face and even more of a negative reputation than before.</p> <p>On the other hand, this type of activity can work well for smaller brands. Ovo is one brand that has utilised an ‘always on’ strategy to monitor brand mentions and successfully draw in new customers, often using Q&amp;As to highlight the shortcomings of competitors. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">We came here to have breakfast and help our customers. And we've just finished our toast. <a href="https://t.co/Bcr3QYnRGP">pic.twitter.com/Bcr3QYnRGP</a></p> — OVO Energy (@OVOEnergy) <a href="https://twitter.com/OVOEnergy/status/828513583000592387">February 6, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Despite its overall approach to social media being far more appealing than most utility companies – using a conversational and personal tone – Ovo has not had an entirely positive couple of years.</p> <p>Having failed to compensate customers for missed or late appointments, the company recently agreed to pay £58,000 to charity instead of undertaking formal enforcement action.</p> <p>While the experience has undoubtedly tarnished its reputation, Ovo’s charitable donation and intent to improve customer service is part and parcel of online reputation management in action.</p> <p><strong><em>Related articles:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68789-how-smart-switching-energy-apps-are-tapping-into-customer-need/" target="_blank">How smart-switching energy apps are tapping into customer need</a></em></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65478-how-20-top-uk-retailers-handle-social-customer-service/"><em>How 20 top UK retailers handle social customer service</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68805 2017-02-14T11:01:00+00:00 2017-02-14T11:01:00+00:00 Are brands failing to properly promote their new chatbots? Nikki Gilliland <p>One issue I failed to mention is that the brand doesn’t appear to be doing much to promote it. Which is odd, as how are people meant to use it if they don’t know it exists in the first place?</p> <p>Here’s a bit more info on this issue and how brands can combat it.</p> <h3>Discovering chatbots</h3> <p>In order to access the Pizza Express chatbot, I typed @PizzaExpress in the recipient search bar in Facebook Messenger. Easy enough, as it immediately appeared in the drop-down menu.</p> <p>However, I was already aware that the bot existed, and it’s likely that most existing users don’t.</p> <p>So, where else is it promoted?</p> <p>Looking at the brand’s main Facebook page, I discovered that it can also be accessed via the ‘book now’ or ‘message’ buttons, which take you straight to Messenger.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3880/Pizza_Express_page.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="635"></p> <p>Fair enough. Although, it does seem like this would be very easy to miss, even for existing fans of the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64674-how-to-market-your-branded-facebook-page/" target="_blank">Facebook page</a>. Most people find and access content directly from their news feed, so how likely is it that anyone will see this?</p> <p>Upon further inspection, I spotted that the brand has actively promoted the feature in a recent post, highlighting it in conjunction with a current Valentine’s Day special offer and urging users to book it via the chatbot.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fpizzaexpress%2Fposts%2F10155045491108139&amp;width=500" width="500" height="512"></iframe></p> <p>But, while fans might see it, what about people who occasionally (or even regularly) eat in a Pizza Express restaurant, but haven’t liked the brand’s Facebook page?</p> <p>Personally, I’ve enjoyed the odd Padana Romana in my time. I’d even go as far as saying Pizza Express is my emergency high street restaurant chain of choice, but I’d honestly never think to hit that ‘like’ button. </p> <p>In that case, I’d miss the chatbot entirely. And Pizza Express might miss out on my data and the subsequent opportunity for retargeting. </p> <p>It's also worth mentioning that anyone without Facebook Messenger installed on their smartphone will be left frustrated if they happen to click ‘book now’ on the Facebook page.</p> <h3>Promoting bots</h3> <p>From this example, we can see that brands often need to do more to promote and facilitate chatbot use. </p> <p>One option is of course cross-promotion, using social media to drive interest, and in some cases creating separate social media channels specifically for the chatbot.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fkayak.unitedkingdom%2Fposts%2F554525934735318&amp;width=500" width="500" height="517"></iframe></p> <p>This aside, one of the major issues with promotion could be related to whose responsibility the chatbot is. I recently read an article that suggested a lack of internal strategy often leads to the failure of bots, with businesses unsure whether activity should be driven by marketing, IT or customer service.</p> <p>Lastly, alongside organic promotion on social, another good option is targeted ads.</p> <p>This appears to be one of the most effective and fool-proof solutions, however, with chatbot technology still in its infancy – and with real value yet to be proven – brands will understandly feel reluctant to throw a lot of money behind promotion.</p> <p>Perhaps the recent announcement that brands can now <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/brands-can-now-promote-their-chatbots-targeted-facebook-ads-174526/" target="_blank">serve targeted ads</a> to users in Facebook Messenger (as long as they’ve previously interacted with the brand) might spur on greater promotion in future.</p> <p>While chatbots might offer the opportunity for greater engagement, brands will need to do more to ensure that customers know about them.</p> <p><strong><em>Related articles:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68532-the-case-for-chatbots-being-the-new-apps-notes-from-websummit2016/" target="_blank">The case for chatbots being the new apps - notes from #WebSummit2016</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68046-five-pioneering-examples-of-how-brands-are-using-chatbots/" target="_blank">Five pioneering examples of how brands are using chatbots</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68732-what-makes-a-good-chatbot-ux/" target="_blank">What makes a good chatbot UX?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68802 2017-02-14T10:41:36+00:00 2017-02-14T10:41:36+00:00 Five content marketing examples from dating sites and apps Nikki Gilliland <p>As online dating services become increasingly popular – with <a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/02/11/15-percent-of-american-adults-have-used-online-dating-sites-or-mobile-dating-apps/" target="_blank">15% of all American adults</a> reportedly having used one – these sites are cleverly tapping into customer demand.</p> <p>While some larger dating sites rely on television or PPC advertising, good old fashioned content marketing remains a great way to attract a clientele.</p> <p>Here’s a look at just a few examples. And to learn more on this topic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy">Content Marketing Training Courses</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-future-of-content-marketing/">The Future of Content Marketing Report</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/implementing-content-strategy-digital-best-practice/">Implementing Content Strategy: Digital Best Practice</a></li> </ul> <h3>OKCupid</h3> <p>OKCupid was one of the first online dating websites to use content to drive its overall strategy.</p> <p>The original incarnation – OKTrends – was run by the company's co-founder, Christian Rudder, who used his mathematical background to set the tone of the blog. </p> <p>Essentially, he turned statistics and user data into fascinating articles, generating huge interest from online readers in general - not just those using its main dating service.</p> <p>Since being acquired by Match.com the blog has changed, however data and insight from the dating community remains at the heart of its content.</p> <p>It also regularly posts larger features, designed to poke fun at the perils of modern dating. One recent example is the amusing ‘Dictionary for the Modern Dater’, found on its Medium blog. Managing to steer clear of the clichés of online dating, it uses relatable humour to engage and entertain readers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3867/OKCupid.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="422"></p> <h3>Match.com</h3> <p>Match.com is another site that uses data to inform its content, largely for its annual ‘Singles in America’ study, which surveys over 5,000 US singletons to create informative and in-depth infographics and blog posts.</p> <p>Last year, the ‘Clooney Effect’ was one of the most successful pieces of content to arise, subsequently being picked up by a number of high profile publishers such as Glamour and Business Insider. </p> <p>Stemming from the statistic that 87% of men would date a woman who made ‘considerably more money’ than them (like Clooney and his highly successful wife, Amal Alamuddin) – it built on themes of positivity and empowerment to generate interest. With a reported 38% increase in traffic around the period the study was published, the results speak for themselves.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3868/Match_survey.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="428"></p> <h3>eHarmony</h3> <p>Unlike the aforementioned examples, eHarmony relies on emotive storytelling rather than statistics.</p> <p>With a helpful and thoughtful tone of voice, it aims to stem the fears and general stigmas that surround online dating, using advice-based articles to drive registration on the main site. </p> <p>While some have labelled its style of content as patronising, one area where eHarmony undeniably succeeds is in user-generated content. The 'success stories' page of its website is littered with positive reinforcement, cleverly breaking down content into various categories to target a wide range of demographics and backgrounds.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3870/eharmony.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="720"></p> <h3>Tinder</h3> <p>In just two short years, Tinder acquired more than 50m users – a feat that can perhaps be put down to its shrewd use of third-party integration. </p> <p>By enabling users to sign up with their Facebook login, it cleverly cuts through the frustrations of traditional dating websites, encouraging a younger audience to download and use the app.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, Tinder is also one of the best examples of how to use social media to engage users. Not only does it integrate social on its app (now allowing users to cherry-pick the Instagram photos that they would like to show on their profile) it also populates its own social media with interesting, humorous and decidedly tongue-in-cheek content.</p> <p>For example, its Facebook page continuously drives interest. Last year, a Valentine’s Day post generated over 58,000 likes, 9,600 shares, and 2,900 comments – coming out on top in terms of engagement for online dating sites.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Ftinder%2Fphotos%2Fa.378789085524216.87768.353659601370498%2F914594031943716%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="589"></iframe></p> <h3>Hinge</h3> <p>Dating app, Hinge, has turned its back on ‘swipe culture’, recently introducing a subscription-based model to help users cultivate meaningful connections. Features of the app, unlike Tinder, are also designed to resonate on a deeper level. For example, users are required to ‘heart’ specific parts of another’s profile such as the book they’re currently reading or their go-to karaoke song.</p> <p>Hinge also builds on its positioning as a ‘relationship app’ rather than a dating app to inform its wider content marketing. </p> <p>A recent email campaign, launched in time for Thanksgiving, asked users what they were thankful for.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3874/Hinge.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="787"></p> <p>Using a seasonal theme alongside a message of gratitude – it was a clever example of how to use content to reinforce brand values and reignite user interest. </p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64270-five-dating-tips-you-can-apply-to-your-email-marketing/" target="_blank">Five dating tips you can apply to your email marketing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68068-four-ways-brands-are-marketing-through-dating-services/" target="_blank">Four ways brands are marketing through dating services</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67563-how-tinder-has-changed-ecommerce/" target="_blank">How Tinder has changed ecommerce</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68790 2017-02-13T15:08:00+00:00 2017-02-13T15:08:00+00:00 Pros and cons of creating multiple brand Facebook pages Nikki Gilliland <p>Of course, it’s not always appropriate or realistic to do this, with some arguing that it can dilute quality and even damage brand perception.</p> <p>So what’s the answer? Here are a few pros and cons to help weigh up the argument.</p> <h3>Pros</h3> <h4>Greater impact</h4> <p>While Facebook pages used to be a destination – the place users went to be able to consume content – <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66378-facebook-s-algorithm-update-what-it-means-for-marketers/" target="_blank">changes to the algorithm</a> means that these pages now act as publishers, with users being fed content directly in their News Feed. </p> <p>Meanwhile, as the algorithm rewards the most engaging content with greater reach, brands and publishers are taking advantage of this by separating out into multiple verticals or incredibly niche topics.</p> <p>One of the most successful examples of this is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68426-a-brand-that-loves-you-how-buzzfeed-uses-empathy-to-connect-with-its-audience/" target="_blank">Buzzfeed</a>, which has an impressive 90 different pages in total. With the likes of Buzzfeed BFF and Buzzfeed Weddings, it can hone in on the audience’s super specific interests, essentially hoping that the more focused a page is, the better its content will perform.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FBuzzFeedWeddings%2Fposts%2F585014391694477&amp;width=500" width="500" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With around 79 pages, Huffington Post has also demonstrated this approach – and proved it can work. For instance, a video about feminism generated 1.5m views when it was posted on the main HuffPost Facebook page, however, when it was posted on the HuffPost Women, it received 3.7m. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FHuffPostWomen%2Fvideos%2F929651497102904%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>This goes to show that putting relevant content in front of a small but highly engaged audience can generate more success than merely posting content to a large pool of people roughly interested in a similar theme.</p> <h4>Promotes localisation</h4> <p>Another reason for creating multiple Facebook pages is to promote localised content or products, where the strategy is aligned to growing a community based on geography rather than interest.</p> <p>A good example is Lululemon, the women’s sportswear brand, which has multiple Facebook pages for its various store locations around the world. Whether it's Lululemon Edinburgh or Lululemon Toronto, each page is dedicated to promoting specific in-store events (which in this case is often yoga classes) and store-specific offers. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FlululemonLondon%2Fposts%2F1319697514719040&amp;width=500" width="500" height="546"></iframe></p> <p>By doing this, the brand is able foster a real sense of community, as well as aid customer service, as most pages are run by the people who also work in the store location.</p> <h3>Cons</h3> <h4>A lack of resources</h4> <p>So, while it can clearly be beneficial, having multiple Facebook pages is not always so easy or effective. </p> <p>One of the biggest drawbacks, often for smaller brands or publishers, is simply a matter of resources. Requiring constant monitoring and attention, it is naturally easier and less time-consuming to focus on just the one page. </p> <p>Revenue can also be a big issue. Again, for bigger brands like Buzzfeed, it might be feasible to duplicate advertising across multiple pages – yet this could be a very costly and unrealistic notion for others.</p> <h4>Duplicated content</h4> <p>One of the biggest cons is keeping a steady stream of original, relevant and engaging content across the board. It is quite likely that users will like multiple pages from the same brand, which in turn means that duplicated or similar content will be less effective, not to mention off-putting for users.</p> <p>Finally, there is the suggestion that creating multiple pages for segmentation purposes is not only more hassle than its worth, but unnecessary due to the Facebook Targeting feature. This allows brands to post tailored content that can only be seen by a specific audience, meaning that you can already deliver the most relevant content to the right people.</p> <p>All in all, perhaps it depends how much effort a brand is willing to put into its Facebook presence, alongside how ready and willing the audience is to embrace it.</p> <p><em><strong>More on Facebook:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67691-content-creators-it-s-time-to-abandon-yourself-to-facebook/" target="_blank">Content creators, it's time to abandon yourself to Facebook</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67603-what-marketers-need-to-know-about-facebook-s-livestreaming-push/" target="_blank">What marketers need to know about Facebook's livestreaming push</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68415-the-low-down-on-facebook-marketplace-is-it-any-good/" target="_blank">The low-down on Facebook Marketplace: Is it any good?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68800 2017-02-13T11:20:00+00:00 2017-02-13T11:20:00+00:00 Pizza Express launches booking chatbot: Is it any good? Nikki Gilliland <p>Pizza Express is claiming to be the first restaurant in the UK to offer this, but will it catch on? And more importantly – is the chatbot any good?</p> <p>Here’s what I think. </p> <h3>What does it do?</h3> <p>While Pizza Express’s #shakethetree campaign used gamification to entertain customers, its new chatbot aims to offer greater convenience for customers who simply want to book a table.</p> <p>Instead of visiting the main Pizza Express website, it now means that customers can make a booking without leaving Facebook Messenger – giving people a direct and ‘always on’ channel of communication with the brand.</p> <p>From my own experience with the chatbot, I can confirm that it is definitely convenient. </p> <p>While there’s no actual chat involved – I was only required to select from multiple options options rather than talk to it – the process was quick and simple.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3840/Pizza_Express_2.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="667"></p> <p>It detected my location and provided me with the option of two restaurants located nearby. From there, all I had to do was select the number of people and the time.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3841/Pizza_Express_4.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="712"></p> <p>It's very simple to use, but let's face it, actively seeking out a booking on the Pizza Express website is similarly straightforward. </p> <p>My only gripe was that it felt a little strange not being sent an email confirmation of my booking. And while it asked for my telephone number, I didn’t receive anything further to suggest that it had gone through.</p> <h3>Is it too simple?</h3> <p>There’s nothing impressive about this technology. The fact that it doesn’t reply to human conversation means that it's far from actually being intelligent, and it's probably better described as a multiple choice questionnaire rather than a chatbot.</p> <p>But, do customers expect extra bells and whistles, or will they be happy with this basic (one-way) booking system?</p> <p>It’s been suggested that chatbots are suffering from over-hype, with many failing to live up to expectations of ‘conversational commerce’ and disappointing users in the process.</p> <p>It’s understandable that people might feel let down by a bot that doesn’t understand everyday speech or involves complicated sign-up processes. </p> <p>Consequently, perhaps examples like Pizza Express, which is limited but laser-focused in terms of what it claims to offer consumers, will prove more successful. Similarly, with the chatbot resulting in a tangible result – a booked table and a meal in its restaurant – it might have more of an impact that its previous incarnation, which merely involved playing a (rather disappointing) game.</p> <h3>Will other restaurants catch on?</h3> <p>For restaurants looking to implement customer service on social, booking-related chatbots could potentially provide value.</p> <p>We have already seen the likes of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/" target="_blank">Domino’s</a> and Taco Bell implementing chatbots to enable consumers to order a delivery, so perhaps a combination of the two could be next on the cards.</p> <p>One company that already aims to do this is AllSet – an app and chatbot that aims to make dining at a restaurant at lunchtime quick and hassle-free.</p> <p>Essentially, it allows you to book, order and pay for your food ahead of time, meaning there’s no waiting around during the experience. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Booked through a great new service <a href="https://twitter.com/allsetUS">@AllsetUS</a> and had delicious lunch <a href="https://twitter.com/PanameNYC">@PanameNYC</a>! I met fantastic people! I highly recommend! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Foodie?src=hash">#Foodie</a> <a href="https://t.co/FQOfhhBhuo">pic.twitter.com/FQOfhhBhuo</a></p> — Line_of_Thought (@Line_of_thought) <a href="https://twitter.com/Line_of_thought/status/822087858882220032">January 19, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>While this is a bit of a pipe dream for existing restaurant chains, it could offer a glimpse as to how chatbots could evolve in future.</p> <p><strong><em>Related articles:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68636-pizza-express-channel-4-and-tfl-three-examples-of-brand-chatbots/" target="_blank">Pizza Express, Channel 4 and TFL: Three examples of brand chatbots</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68766-i-tried-out-the-new-resident-evil-ai-chatbot-it-was-far-from-intelligent/" target="_blank">I tried out the new Resident Evil AI chatbot. It was far from intelligent.</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68208-chatbots-are-they-better-without-the-chat/" target="_blank">Chatbots: Are they better without the chat?</a></em></li> </ul>