tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/facebook Latest Facebook content from Econsultancy 2017-01-12T14:50:39+00:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68695 2017-01-12T14:50:39+00:00 2017-01-12T14:50:39+00:00 How brands are using WhatsApp for marketing Nikki Gilliland <p>Here’s a look at a few examples.</p> <h3>Clarks</h3> <p>Shoe retailer Clarks was one of the first brands to use WhatsApp for marketing purposes.</p> <p>In 2015, it rolled out an interactive storytelling campaign to promote its popular Desert Boot, using WhatsApp to connect customers with ‘key figures from subcultures of the past 65 years’. </p> <p>The campaign involved live-chatting with three characters with links to the Desert Boot and its place in history, taking users on a journey back to 1960s Paris, the Mod era, and the Reggae generation of Jamaica.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2965/Clarks.JPG" alt="" width="380" height="675"></p> <p>Aiming to change people’s perception of the brand, the decision to use WhatsApp was related to an increased targeting of millennials, with Clarks using the medium of live chat to better engage with a young demographic. </p> <p>By focusing on the idea that millennials crave rich and engaging ‘experiences’ rather than one-sided marketing, it cleverly brought storytelling into the world of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67536-three-dark-social-channels-with-a-billion-active-users-how-to-use-them/" target="_blank">dark social</a>.</p> <h3>Hellman’s</h3> <p>Tapping into common cooking dilemmas, mayonnaise brand Hellman’s used WhatsApp to give Brazilian consumers a customized experience. </p> <p>Once they signed up for the WhatsCook campaign online, users were asked to take photos of the contents of their refrigerator so that chefs could offer tips and advice on what to make with the ingredients. </p> <p>While users could also access the service via social media platforms, using WhatsApp enabled a much more direct and personal element, with questions being answered in the moment of need. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xYN9A09iy5Y?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With 13,000 signing up for the service and <a href="http://www.digitaltrainingacademy.com/casestudies/2016/03/social_messaging_case_study_hellmanns_successfully_taps_into_whatsapp.php" target="_blank">99.5% of users reporting approval</a>, the campaign proved to be a success in Brazil. As a result, it was then launched in Uruguay, Chile and Argentina.</p> <p>An early adopter of WhatsApp, Hellman’s proves that mobile messaging can be an ideal platform to solve specific needs of consumers. </p> <p>It also shows how brands can use WhatsApp as a place for educational content, similar to the vein of cookery videos or beauty tutorials on YouTube. </p> <h3>Agent Provocateur</h3> <p>As part of its 2016 Christmas campaign, British lingerie brand Agent Provocateur rolled out ‘Ménage à Trois’ – a personal shopping service on WhatsApp.</p> <p>Designed to increase levels of personalisation, the service involved couples partaking in a three-way conversation with an Agent Provocateur agent, who would then offer lingerie suggestions based on personality and preferences.</p> <p>As you might expect from the brand, it’s a rather a risqué example, but by asking people to actively seek out the service, it ensured only those who were keen would get involved.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2964/Agent_Provocateur.JPG" alt="" width="340" height="703"></p> <p>It's also a good example of how WhatsApp can be used for shopping inspiration as well as direct customer service. </p> <p>With mobile traffic reportedly <a href="http://www.startupdonut.co.uk/news/startup/christmas-2016-sees-surge-mobile-shopping" target="_blank">rising 26% last Christmas</a>, Agent Provocateur cleverly capitalised on consumers searching for gifts via their smartphone.</p> <h3>Buyagift</h3> <p>Last year, online gift retailer Buyagift began experimenting with WhatsApp to inform customers about deals and discounts on the site.</p> <p>By sending alerts direct to WhatsApp, the service was a way of prompting immediate action from customers, building on the idea that receiving a personal message on mobile feels more exclusive than an email.</p> <p>Despite the sales-driven nature of the service, it’s an interesting case of a brand using the app to promote consumer perks like deals and competitions. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2963/Buyagift.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="473"></p> <h3>BBC</h3> <p>The BBC first used WhatsApp during the 2014 Ebola crisis to update people about the virus in West Africa.</p> <p>More recently, BBC Africa launched an innovative WhatsApp series titled ‘Young, Angry and Connected’, telling the story of marginalized young Africans who are using social media and messaging apps to get their voices heard.</p> <p>Sending a short daily clip to anyone subscribed to the service, ‘Young, Angry and Connected’ is a powerful illustration of how news sites and publishers can instantly reach users.</p> <p>While it is reliant on getting people to subscribe, the opt-in element is also part of its appeal, with the assurance that users will already be invested and engaged.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Young, angry and connected</p> <p>Did you miss our <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/WhatsApp?src=hash">#WhatsApp</a> series from <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DRCongo?src=hash">#DRCongo</a>?</p> <p>Watch:</p> <p><a href="https://t.co/Lm9JrFzz0Q">https://t.co/Lm9JrFzz0Q</a></p> — BBC Africa (@BBCAfrica) <a href="https://twitter.com/BBCAfrica/status/711512932572667904">March 20, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>It’s clear that consumers are now more willing than ever to interact with brands on messaging apps. Since <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68046-five-pioneering-examples-of-how-brands-are-using-chatbots/">chatbot technology</a> launched on Facebook Messenger, 30,000 bots have been built for the platform, with many brands concentrating <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68636-pizza-express-channel-4-and-tfl-three-examples-of-brand-chatbots/" target="_blank">efforts in this area</a>.</p> <p>That doesn’t mean that WhatsApp should be ignored, with the previous examples showing its potential for engaging consumers in a more intimate way.</p> <p>While WhatsApp remains a bot-free zone for the time being, it’s worth keeping an eye on how brands make use of the service in future.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68678 2017-01-09T14:07:00+00:00 2017-01-09T14:07:00+00:00 The impact of artificial intelligence on the travel industry Nikki Gilliland <p>More specifically, the use of artificial intelligence in the travel industry. Why? Well, it’s already making waves. </p> <p>Providing travel brands the perfect opportunity to connect with consumers and enhance customer service - we’ve seen a number of businesses experimenting with the technology.</p> <p>Here’s how, along with a few of the most interesting examples to catch my eye.</p> <h3>Customer service</h3> <p>Customer service can make or break a hotel’s reputation. Consequently, AI’s ability to pre-empt and predict exactly what the customer needs and wants is one reason why hotels are cottoning on to the idea.</p> <p>Hilton is one of the most well-known examples, last year teaming up with IBM’s Watson to create Connie – a robot that provides help and information to hotel guests during their stay.</p> <p>Connie works by drawing on information from Wayblazer – a travel advice tool that also uses Watson – as well as human speech. Essentially, the more people talk to Connie, the more it will be able to interpret and analyse natural language.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jC0I08qt5VU?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>It’s certainly an original and innovative new concept for guests. The question is – will people be put off by speaking to a robot rather than a human?</p> <p>According to a <a href="http://press.travelzoo.com/robophiles--robophobes--britons-divided-over-use-of-robots-in-travel" target="_blank">recent study by Travelzoo</a>, this is becoming less of an issue as time goes on. From a survey of more than 6,000 travellers, it found that two thirds of respondents would be comfortable with robots being used in the travel industry.</p> <p>What’s more, 80% expect robots to play a part in many aspects of life by 2020.</p> <h3>Data analysis</h3> <p>Dorchester Collection is another hotel chain to make use of AI. However, instead of using it to provide a front-of-house service, it has adopted it to interpret and analyse customer behaviour in the form of raw data.</p> <p>Partnering with technology company, RicheyTX, Dorchester Collection has helped to develop an AI platform called Metis.</p> <p>Delving into swathes of customer feedback such as surveys and reviews (which would take an inordinate amount of time to manually find and analyse) it is able to measure performance and instantly discover what really matters to guests.</p> <p>For example, Metis helped Dorchester to discover that breakfast it not merely an expectation – but something guests place huge importance on. As a result, the hotels began to think about how they could enhance and personalise the breakfast experience.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">The first cup of the day is the best... <a href="https://twitter.com/TheDorchester">@TheDorchester</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Parcafe?src=hash">#Parcafe</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Coffee?src=hash">#Coffee</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TheDorchester?src=hash">#TheDorchester</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DCMoments?src=hash">#DCMoments</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/London?src=hash">#London</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ParkLane?src=hash">#ParkLane</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LuxuryHotels?src=hash">#LuxuryHotels</a> <a href="https://t.co/FL505EmlaF">pic.twitter.com/FL505EmlaF</a></p> — Nathan Lewis (@_Nathan_Lewis_) <a href="https://twitter.com/_Nathan_Lewis_/status/803941091112288256">November 30, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>With 81% of people believing that robots would be better at handling data than humans, there is also a certain level of confidence in this area from consumers.</p> <h3>Direct messaging</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care/" target="_blank">Chatbot technology</a> is another big strand of AI, and unsurprisingly, many travel brands have already launched their own versions in the past year or so.</p> <p>Skyscanner is just one example, creating a bot to help consumers find flights in Facebook Messenger. Users can also use it to request travel recommendations and random suggestions.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2811/Skyscanner.JPG" alt="" width="300" height="528">  </p> <p>Unlike ecommerce or retail brands using chatbots, which can appear gimmicky, there is an argument that examples like Skyscanner are much more relevant and useful for everyday consumers.</p> <p>After all, with the arrival of many more travel search websites, consumers are being overwhelmed by choice – not necessarily helped by it. </p> <p>Consequently, a bot like Skyscanner is able to cut through the noise, connecting with consumers in their own time and in the social media spaces they most frequently visit.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2812/Skyscanner_2.JPG" alt="" width="300" height="523"></p> <h3>Future potential</h3> <p>So, we’ve already seen the travel industry capitalise on AI to a certain extent. But how will it evolve in the coming year?</p> <p>Here are a few suggestions:</p> <h4>Business travel</h4> <p>Undoubtedly, we’ll see many more brands using AI for data analysis as well as launching their own chatbots. There’s already been a <a href="https://skift.com/2016/10/11/expedia-plans-to-use-artificial-intelligence-for-customer-service/" target="_blank">suggestion that Expedia is next</a> in line, but it is reportedly set to focus on business travel rather than holidaymakers.</p> <p>Due to the greater need for structure and less of a desire for discovery, it certainly makes sense that artificial intelligence would be more suited to business travellers. </p> <p>Specifically, it could help to simplify the booking process for companies, as well as help eliminate discrepancies around employee expenses. </p> <p>With reducing costs and improving efficiency two of the biggest benefits, AI could start to infiltrate business travel even more so than leisure in the next 12 months.</p> <h4>Voice technology</h4> <p>Lastly, we can expect to see greater development in voice-activated technology.</p> <p>With voice-activated search, the experience of researching and booking travel has the potential to become quicker and easier than ever before. Similarly, as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68499-the-problem-with-voice-user-interfaces-like-amazon-alexa/">Amazon Echo</a> and Google Home start to become commonplace, more hotels could start to experiment with speech recognition to ramp up customer service.</p> <p>This means devices and bots (like the aforementioned Connie) could become the norm for brands in the travel industry.</p> <p><strong><em>Related articles:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67745-15-examples-of-artificial-intelligence-in-marketing/" target="_blank">15 examples of artificial intelligence in marketing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68466-could-ai-kill-off-the-conversion-optimisation-consultant/" target="_blank">Could AI kill off the conversion optimisation consultant?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68158-five-ways-artificial-intelligence-can-help-marketers-enhance-the-customer-experience/" target="_blank">Five ways Artificial Intelligence can help marketers enhance the customer experience</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68684 2017-01-06T11:34:00+00:00 2017-01-06T11:34:00+00:00 The best social media campaigns and stories from December 2016 Nikki Gilliland <h3>Paddy Power trolls Southern Rail</h3> <p>It’s been a miserable winter for Southern Rail commuters so far, but just before Christmas, those ol’ jokers at Paddy Power offered up a lifeline.</p> <p>It launched a ‘cancellation insurance’ bet – offering long-suffering passengers the chance to win money should Southern Rail mess up their journeys on Christmas Eve.</p> <p>Paddy Power took bets on Southern Rail’s 32 routes, with odds of five to one per line.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Stakes on a train! Read how we’re offering ‘cancellation insurance’ on Southern Rail trains tomorrow here <a href="https://t.co/rD9atVGXZO">https://t.co/rD9atVGXZO</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/YouBeauty?src=hash">#YouBeauty</a></p> — Paddy Power (@paddypower) <a href="https://twitter.com/paddypower/status/812244395089129472">December 23, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Budweiser gives revellers a free Uber</h3> <p>In a similarly travel-themed campaign, Budweiser teamed up with Uber to discourage drink driving on Christmas Eve.</p> <p>Throughout December, Uber had been giving free rides worth £15 to new customers. However, on the 24th, it opened up the offer to all users in order to prevent revellers from driving under the influence.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2841/Budweiser_Uber.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="379"></p> <h3>Spotify says good riddance to 2016</h3> <p>Spotify launched a data-driven campaign to say “Thanks 2016. It’s been weird”. I wrote about how the campaign cleverly makes use of listener data <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68626-three-reasons-to-appreciate-spotify-s-latest-data-driven-ad-campaign" target="_blank">in this article</a>. </p> <p>Meanwhile, it seems not everyone appreciated the brand’s attempt at humour. </p> <p>A photoshopped version of a billboard ad recently went viral, with the perpetrator evidently disgruntled at how the streaming service compensates musicians. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fwearespectres%2Fposts%2F10154205420427844%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="630"></iframe></p> <h3>Instagram Stories introduces stickers</h3> <p>Instagram has introduced yet another new feature to Stories, this time in the form of stickers that display locations, time, weather conditions and emojis. </p> <p>Much like Snapchat geofilters, it is an attempt to make the feature much more fun and creative. As of yet, there’s been no word whether Instagram will introduce sponsored or branded stickers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2842/Instragram_Stickers.JPG" alt="" width="246" height="441"></p> <h3>Twitter launches 360-degree live video</h3> <p>In late December, Twitter launched a new live video feature, allowing users to stream live in full 360-degrees using Periscope technology. </p> <p>While only ‘select partners’ can currently broadcast live in 360-degrees, all users are able to watch, gaining greater insight into surroundings and exclusive views of behind-the-scenes.</p> <p>The first-ever 360-degree live video was from broadcaster Alex Pettitt, showcasing a Florida sunset.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">360 Sunset in Florida. First ever <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Periscope360?src=hash">#Periscope360</a> with <a href="https://twitter.com/brandee_anthony">@Brandee_Anthony</a> <a href="https://t.co/AZWbnnT15S">https://t.co/AZWbnnT15S</a></p> — Alex Pettitt (@Alexpettitt) <a href="https://twitter.com/Alexpettitt/status/814229532576124928">December 28, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>H&amp;M wins favour with Christmas ad</h3> <p>From John Lewis’s underwhelming attempt to Pret’s impressive effort – there were many festive ads to relish throughout December.</p> <p>Though rather late to the party, H&amp;M’s ‘Come Together’ ad was met with lots of approval online.</p> <p>Directed by Wes Anderson and starring Adrian Brody, the short film told the story of train passengers travelling home for the holiday period. </p> <p>Capturing storytelling elements – and a slice of Wes Anderson’s artistic magic – it was a December highlight. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VDinoNRC49c?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Burberry celebrates 160th anniversary with cinematic short</h3> <p>Burberry marked its 160th anniversary with an ad deliberately designed to feel like a movie trailer.</p> <p>Featuring clothes from the brand’s winter collection, the three-minute short is inspired by the brand’s founder, Thomas Burberry, and stars the likes of Sienna Miller and Domhnall Gleeson.</p> <p>Social media conversation was largely positive, with many calling for a sequel to the video or for the brand to release a full-length feature.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6D5IZtDCS5c?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Trump tweets his enemies</h3> <p>While Obama saw in the new year with a series of reflective tweets, Donald Trump took to the medium to offer up a less inspiring message.</p> <p>He wrote: “Happy New Year to all, including to my many enemies and those who have fought me and lost so badly they just don’t know what to do. Love!”</p> <p>With Trump continuously taking to Twitter to post his latest musings, it’s been suggested that the new President could be the platform’s <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/jan/05/can-donald-trump-save-twitter" target="_blank">biggest marketing card</a> to date. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Happy New Year to all, including to my many enemies and those who have fought me and lost so badly they just don't know what to do. Love!</p> — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) <a href="https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/815185071317676033">December 31, 2016</a> </blockquote> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68663 2017-01-06T10:45:00+00:00 2017-01-06T10:45:00+00:00 Why online publications are ditching comments sections for social Nikki Gilliland <p>Unsurprisingly, Vice isn’t the only platform to take this stance. Others like USA Today, the Verge and Recode have all chosen to remove their comments sections entirely.</p> <p>So, why have these sites had enough? And how will this affect online forums in future?</p> <p>Here’s a bit of insight into the story.</p> <h3>Removing the burden</h3> <p>For Vice and many other platforms, the burden of monitoring the comments section has overtaken any benefit. </p> <p>First introduced to drive interaction and collaboration from readers, many comments sections have veered away from organic conversation into sheer chaos. Back in 2012, the founder of Gawker Media, Nick Denton, stated that 80% of reader comments on his sites were either irrelevant or toxic.</p> <p>Since then the situation appears to have worsened, with many more publications switching off comments out of frustration over anti-social behaviour and harrassment of writers.</p> <p>On the other hand, there are those that persevere. The Times strictly monitors all comments, only allowing them to be published if they are on-topic and not abusive (although it says that moderation is still the ‘subjective’ responsibility of staff).</p> <p>Similarly, the<em> </em>Guardian – a publication that maintains that “in so many cases journalism is enriched by responses from its readers” - monitors comments based on a list of community guidelines.</p> <p>Interestingly, last year the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/apr/12/the-dark-side-of-guardian-comments">Guardian undertook a study</a> to discover the extent of the abuse that occurs below the line. While it found that just 2% of overall comments are blocked (based on analysis on comments left since 2006), out of the most-abused writers, the majority were both women and/or black.</p> <p>It is clear that even on the strictest of sites, comments are not merely argumentative or irrelevant, but largely marred by bigotry. As a result, the Guardian concludes that, as anti-social behaviour is neither natural or inevitable, it is a cultural problem that we must collectively work to solve. </p> <p>So what can media organisations do to make online conversations constructive and more inclusive?</p> <h3>Making the switch to social</h3> <p>While publications like the Guardian are improving safeguards, as well as cutting down on the places where comments are open, others are using social media as an alternative. </p> <p>So what are the advantages of this shift?</p> <h4>A natural transition</h4> <p>Many publications are now finding that readers naturally choose to leave feedback on Facebook and Twitter rather than anywhere else, meaning that turning off the comments section has no real impact.</p> <p>With audiences already using these platforms to discuss topical events and current affairs, it also makes sense for brands to infiltrate these spaces where users are already active and engaged.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Ftheguardian%2Fposts%2F10154912671761323&amp;width=500" width="500" height="517"></iframe></p> <h4>Self-moderation</h4> <p>While Twitter has an ongoing problem with trolls, spaces like Facebook are more likely to be self-moderated by users, simply because they are commenting as their real selves.</p> <p>Unlike comments sections, where anonymous posts and pseudonyms are common practice, Facebook helps foster a sense of community - especially among loyal and regular readers.</p> <h4>Greater engagement</h4> <p>Publications that have turned off comments sections have reported seeing higher engagement on social media.</p> <p>This is mainly because users who might not go out of their way to leave a comment below the line feel more comfortable and inclined to do so on social - not to mention the fact that Facebook and Twitter are more aligned to mobile use. </p> <h4>Curated discussions</h4> <p>On social media, online publications are able to encourage the right kinds of discussion due to greater control over the medium.</p> <p>For example, if there is a particular article that has the potential to be inflammatory, it might not choose to promote it - or only post it on a platform that is suited to the conversation or audience.</p> <p>With dedicated teams already monitoring social media, it is also a matter of using resources in the right way. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FVICE%2Fposts%2F1515045995195320&amp;width=500" width="500" height="479"></iframe></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68662 2016-12-23T10:06:08+00:00 2016-12-23T10:06:08+00:00 10 festive digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Oh, and don’t forget to check out the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more!</p> <p>Here goes nothing…</p> <h3>Second week in December generates more conversions for online retailers</h3> <p>New data from Qubit has revealed the trends impacting online retail this Christmas.</p> <p>From analysis of 74m visits to 120 UK and US online retailers, it found that the third and fourth of December was the most popular Christmas shopping weekend for consumers to visit online retailers.</p> <p>However, the 10th and 11th of December was more successful overall, with online retailers converting a smaller number of consumers for slightly higher levels of revenue. Despite there being 5.51% fewer visitors than the previous weekend, conversion rates were 10.36% higher, with 0.92% more revenue generated.</p> <h3>Half of UK Christmas shoppers looking for last-minute bargains</h3> <p>According to recent research by SAS, nearly half of British consumers joining the Christmas shopping rush this week will be holding out for bargains.</p> <p>Despite the biggest discounting weekend of the year, Black Friday and Cyber Monday, already being behind us, nearly a quarter of UK consumers will be leaving it until the last week before Christmas to buy gifts. </p> <p>What’s more, with 46% of shoppers citing the economy as having the biggest impact on how they will shop for gifts this year, nearly half will be on the look-out for last minute bargains.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2630/christmas_shopping.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="433"></p> <h3>The impact of ‘Smart Christmas’ for marketers</h3> <p>Based on this year’s Black Friday sales, the Chartered Institute of Marketing has predicted that smart devices – e.g. health devices and virtual reality – will be the top selling gifts this Christmas.</p> <p>However, it has also indicated that while this presents opportunity for marketers in 2017 – it could also pose problems.</p> <p>When it comes to health devices, the CIM suggest that brands need to be wary of data handling, as 57% of consumers do not trust organisations to use their data responsibly.</p> <p>Similarly, despite the growing popularity of virtual reality – and the Oculus headset set to be a popular gifting option – marketers need to consider whether or not virtual reality is truly an appropriate way to engage customers, or whether they are just jumping on the bandwagon.</p> <h3>Nearly a third of influencers regularly promote charities</h3> <p>According to new data from Buzzoole, social media influencers are challenging the perception of younger generations by regularly supporting charities.</p> <p>It found that 28% of social media influencers regularly support charities on their channels, with 74% saying that raising awareness of the causes they care about was a key priority for them. Likewise, 87% said sharing their own personal experiences is important, while 61% agreed that helping people is a big factor in what they do.</p> <p>Children’s and cancer charities are the most popular charities to talk about, with 19% and 21% of influencers citing these respectively.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Thank you <a href="https://twitter.com/Zoella">@Zoella</a> &amp; <a href="https://twitter.com/PointlessBlog">@PointlessBlog</a> for granting 5wishes yesterday &amp; to <a href="https://twitter.com/lolascupcakes">@lolascupcakes</a> for the fab cupcake workshop! <a href="https://t.co/s04ZeyA2qY">pic.twitter.com/s04ZeyA2qY</a></p> — Rays of Sunshine (@RaysofSunshine) <a href="https://twitter.com/RaysofSunshine/status/720207773586321408">April 13, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Period between Christmas and New Year predicted for peer-to-peer shopping surge </h3> <p>Unwanted gifts are set to power a surge in online shopping between Christmas and New Year, according to new data released by eBay Advertising.</p> <p>In 2015, consumers were looking to snap up a bargain as early as Christmas Day, with “unwanted christmas present” being the most searched for item on eBay, dropping no lower than number two until 9pm that evening. </p> <p>If that is anything to go by, 2016 looks set to provide a similar opportunity for disappointed folk.</p> <h3>Amazon is the most valuable retail brand in the world</h3> <p>In a report on the <a href="http://www.kantarretail.com/brandz-top-25-most-valuable-global-retail-brands-20162017/">top 25 most valuable retail brands</a> in the world, BrandZ’s has named Amazon as the number one.</p> <p>With an estimated value of $98.98bn, the online retailer’s brand value has gone up by 59% year-on-year, outperforming others like Alibaba, Home Depot and Walmart.</p> <p>Though the list mainly features US brands, UK retailers Tesco and Marks &amp; Spencers were featured, coming in at numbers 15 and 24 respectively.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2628/Tesco.JPG" alt="" width="250" height="369"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2629/M_S.JPG" alt="" width="250" height="368"></p> <h3>53% of consumers happy to interact with brands on messaging apps</h3> <p>In a poll of 2,000 consumers in the UK and France, Kenshoo found that just over half are open to interacting with brands on Whatsapp and Facebook Messenger – as long as they can block brands they are not interested in.</p> <p>The study found that 51% of app users see messaging as faster and more immediate than email interactions, while 48% feel it is less hassle than speaking to a company on the phone.</p> <p>Another advantage of brands using messaging apps could be convenience for joint purchases, with 15% of consumers liking the idea of a group interaction to discuss travel research, for example.</p> <p>Similarly, finding information quickly is also a positive, with 33% liking the fact that messaging apps retain conversations, meaning there is no need to search through previous emails or notes from telephone calls.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2625/Most_used_apps.JPG" alt="" width="571" height="464"></p> <p><em>(Most used apps)</em></p> <h3>Black Friday results in growth rate of 22.9% in Novemeber YoY </h3> <p>The latest figures from the IMRG Capgemini eRetail Sales Index have revealed how retailers slashed prices throughout Black Friday weekend.</p> <p>The category which saw the sharpest drop in prices was electricals, with the average basket value falling to £119 in November – a decrease of 18.5% on the previous month and 22.7% from November 2015.</p> <p>Average basket values decreased in all sectors from the previous month, apart from home &amp; garden, resulting in a year-on-year growth rate of 22.9% in November.</p> <h3>Boohoo is the top brand for Facebook Live video in 2016</h3> <p>With <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68640-why-live-video-was-the-biggest-social-trend-of-2016">live streaming truly taking off in 2016</a>, Socialbakers has rounded up the brands whose Facebook Live videos performed the best.</p> <p>With 313,282 interactions, Boohoo’s black Friday giveaway comes in at the top spot, followed by the Body Coach’s Live Hiit, which generated 22,303 interactions.</p> <p>Here is the top five:</p> <ol> <li>Boohoo.com – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/boohoo.com/videos/1442411715776720/" target="_blank">Live Black Friday give away</a> (313,282 interactions)</li> <li>The Body Coach – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/JoeWicksTheBodyCoach/videos/1064153536991915/">Live Hiit</a> (22,303 interactions)</li> <li>Xbox UK – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/xboxuk/videos/10153935439346344/">Forza Horizon 3</a> (18,554 interactions)</li> <li>Oh Polly – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ohpollyfashion/videos/927381400731700/">Online competition</a> (11,345 interactions)</li> <li>Chain Reaction Cycles – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ChainReactionCycles/videos/10154549688487359/">Online competition</a>: Unior toolkit (9,343 interactions)</li> </ol> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fboohoo.com%2Fvideos%2F1442411715776720%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Online searches for cocktails peak on Christmas Day and NYE </h3> <p>According to Equimedia, drinks and spirits brands should be doing more to capitalise on search interest in the run up to Christmas.</p> <p>From research of 39 separate cocktail types categorised by their main spirit ingredient, it found that searches for cocktail recipes are at their peak on Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve.</p> <p>However, with conversions unlikely at this point, brands should be engaging consumers as interest ramps up throughout the festive period – with the aim of inspiring them to stock up in advance.</p> <p>Equimedia has also highlighted the dominance of major brands, with Smirnoff Vodka outranking all other types of vodka, and Jack Daniels doing the same for whiskey. Despite this, the rise in popularity of artisan gin shows there is opportunity for smaller brands, with Sipsmith now within striking distance of Gordons Gin as the most-searched for in the cateogory.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68653 2016-12-21T14:00:00+00:00 2016-12-21T14:00:00+00:00 Social Quarterly Q4: How four platforms are combatting online abuse Nikki Gilliland <p>Meanwhile, here’s a short summary of how four of big platforms are taking steps to stamp out abuse.</p> <h3>Twitter mute function</h3> <p>If you’re always being bombarded by notifications, you can now use Twitter’s mute feature to opt out of seeing specific conversations and filter out words or phrases.</p> <p>Not only is this useful for users who often get caught up in irrelevant threads, but it’s also part of Twitter’s wider push to take harassment seriously.</p> <p>Alongside the muting options, Twitter has also improved the options for reporting hate on the platform, allowing bystanders to also report instances of abuse as well as the victim. Twitter has also introduced further internal training to help employees effectively deal with the problem.</p> <p>With two potential buyers, Disney and SalesForce, both <a href="http://www.theverge.com/2016/10/19/13328380/twitter-abuse-disney-salesforce-bids-pulled" target="_blank">allegedly backing out</a> due to Twitter’s ongoing abuse issue - the update has been a long time coming.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Want to stop getting notifications for Tweets that contain certain words, usernames, or hashtags? We're giving you that control. <a href="https://t.co/awoNHUYbTG">pic.twitter.com/awoNHUYbTG</a></p> — Safety (@safety) <a href="https://twitter.com/safety/status/798571375065632768">November 15, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Tinder gender options</h3> <p>Last year, Tinder came under fire for allegedly discriminating against Transgender people, after many had their accounts wrongly suspended.</p> <p>Since then, the platform has taken steps to combat this notion, launching its #AllTypesAllSwipes campaign and introducing new gender options.</p> <p>While users could only previously choose between male or female, there are now 37 different gender types in the app, including gender nonconforming, pangender and androgynous.</p> <p>Users can also choose to describe their gender in their own words, as well as decide whether or not to display it in their bio.</p> <p>With Tinder also recently launching on Apple TV (along with a <em>very</em> family-orientated video ad) – it’s clear that the dating app is keen to widen its user-base and become more inclusive to all.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/H2nfGYu3hwA?wmode=transparent" width="710" height="399"></iframe></p> <h3>Instagram comment options</h3> <p>Justin Bieber famously shut down his Instagram account earlier this year following the abuse of his new girlfriend, Sofia Ritchie.</p> <p>It's just one example of trolling getting out of hand on Instagram, which the brand has recently attempted to bring under control with the introduction of three new features.</p> <p>Now, all users can turn off comments on individual posts, remove followers on private accounts, and show support for comments.</p> <p>The option to disable comments has obvious benefits, however the new ‘like’ feature is one of the most interesting developments. It is the same function that you can use on Facebook, allowing anyone like a comment (which then shows up in the form of a heart symbol).</p> <p>Essentially, it is designed to spread positivity, with the idea being that users will feel more inclined to leave kind and supportive comments – especially if there is a chance that the person who posted the photo - perhaps a celebrity or influencer - will also show their appreciation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2540/Insta_comments.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="433"></p> <h3>Reddit filtering tool</h3> <p>The CEO of Reddit, Steve Huffman, recently admitted to altering comments that criticised his decision to ban the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2016/11/23/fearing-yet-another-witch-hunt-reddit-bans-pizzagate/" target="_blank">‘Pizzagate’</a> subreddit thread.</p> <p>Huffman edited the comments, replacing his own handle with the names of moderators of a pro-Donald Trump subreddit called "r/the_donald.</p> <p>Naturally, the controversy has led to even more criticism, especially as Reddit is known for being a space for “authentic” conversation.</p> <p>However, Huffman has since apologised, saying “I understand what I did has greater implications than my relationship with one community, and it is fair to raise the question of whether this erodes trust in Reddit”.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Reddit has also decided to take a more proactive approach to policing negative behaviour, introducing a new feature that allows users to filter out subreddits from their personal r/all page.</p> <p>So far, the action can only be done on the desktop version of Reddit, however it is due to be rolled out across all channels at a later date.</p> <p>With Huffman’s own actions being an attempt to ‘troll the trolls’, it is clear that the platform’s abuse issue has been getting out of hand of late, undoubtedly fuelled by political events this year. </p> <p>However, now taking a firmer stance on ‘toxic users’, it’s more evidence of online platforms cracking down on the problem as we head into 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2541/Reddit_filter.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="368"></p> <p><em><strong>For more, don't forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-quarterly-q4-2016/">Social Quarterly Q4</a>.</strong></em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68640 2016-12-20T11:07:00+00:00 2016-12-20T11:07:00+00:00 Why live video was the biggest social trend of 2016 Nikki Gilliland <p>So why was has live video become such an important medium for brands? And what exactly should they be doing to capitalise on it in 2017?</p> <p>Let’s delve into the topic a little more.</p> <p>(Note: Despite other platforms introducing live video features, this article mainly focuses on Facebook)</p> <h3>Why are brands using live video?</h3> <p>When <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67603-what-marketers-need-to-know-about-facebook-s-livestreaming-push/" target="_blank">Facebook Live launched</a> last year, it certainly wasn’t the beginning of live video being used as a content marketing tool.</p> <p>We'd already seen many brands experimenting with Periscope for about a year or so, including early pioneers like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66564-how-brands-can-use-periscope-and-meerkat/" target="_blank">Red Bull and Mastercard</a>.</p> <p>However, with the arrival of the live video functionality on Facebook, the opportunity for brands to reach a bigger demographic came into play. </p> <p>With many already having an existing and well-established audience on the platform, it certainly made sense to start using it as the main output for live streaming.</p> <p>This year, we've also seen Instagram rolling out two new features, following on from Instagram Stories in August.</p> <p>The first, Instagram Live, allows users to live stream (before the video disappears for good when the broadcast comes to an end). The second feature is an update to direct messages, meaning that users can also send disappearing photos and text when communicating in a thread.</p> <p>Of course, we can't ignore the continued popularity of Snapchat either. Currently, the platform is said to generate a mammoth 10bn video views a day (up from 4bn a day in 2015), overtaking Facebook's last count of 8bn. When you take into account that Snapchat has a fraction of the daily users that Facebook does - 60m compared to 1.18bn - this is all the more impressive.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, live video is now being taken seriously by brands of all kinds, with the medium becoming a core part of social media marketing strategies.</p> <p><em>Mastercard was an early adopter of live video.</em></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">|LIVE NOW| Watch <a href="https://twitter.com/Harris_English">@Harris_English</a> &amp; <a href="https://twitter.com/Morgan_Hoffmann">@Morgan_Hoffmann</a> share <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PricelessGolf?src=hash">#PricelessGolf</a> tips <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/meerkat?src=hash">#meerkat</a> <a href="http://t.co/9mm2W0Kn2q">http://t.co/9mm2W0Kn2q</a></p> — Mastercard (@Mastercard) <a href="https://twitter.com/Mastercard/status/600316262862954496">May 18, 2015</a> </blockquote> <h3>Why is live video so effective?</h3> <p>Firstly - and forget the live aspect for a moment - more people are watching videos on social platforms than ever before. According to Cisco’s Visual Networking Index, video will account for <a href="http://tubularinsights.com/2019-internet-video-traffic/" target="_blank">80% of all consumer Internet traffic</a> by 2019.</p> <p>Video is easier to consume than written content, with increased data and faster load times also resulting in people watching more videos on mobile - and sharing them too.</p> <p><a href="https://ondeviceresearch.com/blog/iab:-mobile-video-usage,-a-global-perspective" target="_blank">68% of users</a> are said to share the videos they watch on their smartphones, meaning that the most-used apps are ideal spaces for brands to infiltrate.</p> <p>Secondly then, alongside a desire to access the medium, live video also opens up an interactive and instantaneous connection with brands and well-known personalities.</p> <p>Allowing brands to broadcast live and ‘in the moment’, it means that viewers can also feel part of the action, creating a strengthened bond and connection.</p> <p>What’s more, it also allows for instant feedback, with viewers even more likely to comment and engage if there’s a chance the creator might also respond or say their name in real-time. Mark Zuckerberg himself has suggested that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/68640-why-live-video-was-one-of-the-biggest-social-media-trends-of-2016/edit/people%20were%20watching%20live%20streams%20three%20times%20longer%20and%20commenting%2010%20times%20more%20than%20on%20regular%20vi%E2%80%A6%20" target="_blank">people watch live streams three times longer</a> and comment 10 times more than on regular videos.</p> <p>Facebook Live also has a few additional features which has ramped up brand-involvement.  Users can watch a stream even after it has finished and privacy filters mean brands can pick and choose the people they want to see a video. This adds an additional ‘exclusive’ element for fans, as well as a more tailored experience all round.</p> <h3>Types of live video</h3> <p>Brands used live video for a variety of different reasons in 2016.</p> <p>Lets’s take a look at a select few...</p> <h4>News and politics</h4> <p>Another big trend in 2016 has been the politicisation of social media, with both the Brexit referendum and the US election causing huge spikes in political-related content.</p> <p>Putting aside any controversy over the platform’s involvement with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68547-how-advertisers-are-being-exploited-by-fake-news-sites/" target="_blank">fake or biased news</a>, we can certainly see how brands and publishers jumped on these timely events to reach users in the moment.</p> <p>CNN was one broadcaster to make use of the opportunity to stream live, with its election results video resulting in 24m views, making it one of the top ten most-watched live videos of the year.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fcnn%2Fvideos%2F10155576641936509%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h4>Education and communication</h4> <p>Live streaming is also very effective for conveying what’s going on behind-the-scenes.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68090-how-zsl-london-zoo-is-using-facebook-video-to-drive-social-growth/" target="_blank">ZSL London Zoo is a great example</a> of this, using the medium to communicate the work being done by the zoo as well as by its conservation scientists out in the wild.</p> <p>By combining three elements that it knows its audience is interested in – the cute, the wondrous and the weird – it ensures user interest.</p> <p>Similarly, by capitalising on Facebook Live’s autoplay function and integration into newsfeeds, it has found far bigger reach than when it was previously using Periscope.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fzsllondonzoo%2Fvideos%2F756217194414741%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <h4>Humour and fun</h4> <p>For brands that make content merely to delight and entertain an audience, Facebook Live is an ideal medium.</p> <p>LadBible in particular is a good example of how to captivate users with light-hearted and cliff-hanger style content.</p> <p>It builds on the notion that views won’t be able to tear themselves away from a live stream because they’re hooked into what’s unfolding – regardless of how ridiculous it is.</p> <p>Case in point, this July live stream of a line-up of melting lollies…</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FLADbible%2Fvideos%2F2783253238388515%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <p>Of course, we can’t fail to mention Buzzfeed’s watermelon video, which drew 800,000 people at the time - a figure comparable to live TV.</p> <p>Since then, it has gone on to generate over 11m views in total.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FBuzzFeed%2Fvideos%2F10154535206385329%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <h4>Regular series</h4> <p>While many take a one-off approach, other brands have been using Facebook Live to create a new kind of serialised content.</p> <p>Makeup brand Benefit hosts a weekly series called ‘Tipsy Tricks’, which is usually held on the same day and the same time each Thursday.</p> <p>By sticking to a schedule, Benefit is banking on viewers getting into the habit of tuning in, much like they would a TV series.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbenefitcosmetics%2Fvideos%2F10154080819678148%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <p>What’s more, the brand also builds on the interactive element by using viewer comments and feedback to inform the direction of the content or what will be discussed in next week’s show. </p> <h3>What’s next for live video?</h3> <p>With many of our experts also predicting <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68630-social-media-in-2017-what-do-the-experts-predict/" target="_blank">live video to be big news in 2017</a>, it’s clear that this year has been a case of trial and error.</p> <p>For Facebook, it certainly hasn't all been smooth sailing. Concern over the platform’s graphic content censorship policy arose after it streamed footage of the aftermath of a fatal shooting, before the video also disappeared due to a supposed ‘glitch’.</p> <p>Facebook has since <a href="http://newsroom.fb.com/news/h/community-standards-and-facebook-live/" target="_blank">reiterated its stance</a> on graphic content, however, it surely remains a sensitive issue. </p> <p>For brands, the potential earnings from advertising will undoubtedly continue to be a big draw. In June, it was revealed that Facebook had paid 140 media companies a combined $50m to create videos for Facebook Live. The list – including everyone from Gordon Ramsay to Mashable – demonstrated the brand’s intent to promote the product.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2434/Facebook_Live.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="449"></p> <p>As we head into 2017, there's also the announcement that Facebook is to expand its broadcast feature to enable 360 degree video.</p> <p>It's an interesting development, which will ultimately combine the immersive aspect of 360 technology with the instant and engaging features of live.</p> <p>So, keep your eyes peeled this time next year, as we'll undoubtedly be looking back at how the biggest brands capitalised on it.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68614 2016-12-19T15:30:00+00:00 2016-12-19T15:30:00+00:00 Why HotelTonight’s holiday campaign is a humorous hit Nikki Gilliland <p>While most marketing focuses on ‘family togetherness’ at this time of year, HotelTonight is instead promoting the idea that, sometimes, there’s such a thing as <em>too much</em> family time.</p> <p>It was originally launched for Thanksgiving in the US, but it’ll stay relevant throughout Christmas.</p> <p>Here’s just three reasons why it works so well.</p> <h3>Goes against tradition</h3> <p>HotelTonight offers consumers the chance to book last minute hotel rooms via its app or mobile website, similar to the likes of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67402-how-hotels-com-uses-email-to-keep-me-as-a-loyal-customer/" target="_blank">Hotels.com</a> or LateRooms.</p> <p>In contrast to the aforementioned examples, HotelTonight doesn’t tend to focus on inspirational travel content.</p> <p>Instead, it boldly takes a different tack.</p> <p>This year, its "Visit, Don't Stay” campaign is based on the simple idea that you might not want to stay with your family at Christmas time.</p> <p>It has created a variety of funny print ads to demonstrate why.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2204/HotelTonight_1.JPG" alt="" width="390" height="785"></p> <p>Choosing to go against the sickly-sweet theme of family togetherness, it cleverly takes the simple and highly relatable idea – that we might have to put up with family rather than enjoy seeing them – and runs with it. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2205/HotelTonight_2.JPG" alt="" width="390" height="786"></p> <p>It gets the balance right, too.</p> <p>The anti-family feeling comes off as jovial rather than hateful or serious, conveniently promoting the brand's promise of a room whenever you need it.</p> <h3>Gets consumers involved</h3> <p>Alongside humorous print and video ads, HotelTonight has been rolling out efforts to engage consumers on social media.</p> <p>This is in the form of a competition, whereby users are asked to explain their own reasons for not staying the night at a family member’s house, with the best (or worst) winning HotelTonight credits as a rewards.</p> <p>Using the hashtag #HotelTonight on Facebook and Twitter, it’s easy to get involved, with a presence on multiple platforms leading to high visibility and increased awareness of the brand. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FHotelTonight%2Fposts%2F1170087673026775%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="391"></iframe></p> <h3>Creates something memorable</h3> <p>With most travel brands going for an experience-led approach – building on the idea that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68428-how-travel-brands-are-capturing-millennial-interest-on-mobile/" target="_blank">millennials in particular crave adventure and spontaneit</a>y – HotelTonight’s focus on humour makes a nice change.</p> <p>With CMO, Ray Elias, suggesting that the company’s competition is “big brands with deep war chests that have been advertising for years” – its clearly designed to be disruptive. Its highly visual nature sets it apart.</p> <p>Others try to do this by creating a distinctive tone of voice. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68375-airbnb-how-its-customer-experience-is-revolutionising-the-travel-industry/" target="_blank">AirBnB</a> is welcoming and reassuring, for example, while <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68201-how-hostelworld-uses-video-to-connect-with-target-audience-of-young-travellers/">HostelWorld</a> is overly comical. </p> <p>However, words are limited in the “Visit, Don’t Stay” campaign.</p> <p>In fact, the video ads include no spoken words whatsoever.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ya9Tzl0LUYo?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>A bold image and tagline of “Family overload?” is all that’s needed, resulting in a simple but memorable message.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/o88DK3IF90M?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>So, if you’re one of those people who’s a bit concerned about staying with the family in a few weeks’ time – at least you can take comfort in these gloriously relatable ads.</p> <p><em><strong>Now read:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68154-16-ad-examples-that-prove-print-isn-t-dead/">16 ad examples that prove print isn't dead </a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68644 2016-12-16T10:37:23+00:00 2016-12-16T10:37:23+00:00 All the digital news stories you missed this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please enjoy.</p> <h3>Yahoo admits to data hack</h3> <p>Yahoo has admitted that 1bn user accounts may have been affected in a hacking attack dating back to 2013.</p> <p>Separate to the 2014 attack that affected 500m Yahoo accounts, it is said to the biggest data breach of all time.</p> <p>Yahoo has linked the hacking to state-sponsored activity, and has urged account users to change passwords and security questions.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2470/Yahoo_Mail.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="333"></p> <h3>Facebook introduces 360-degree live video</h3> <p>Facebook Live and Facebook 360-degree video used to be separate mediums.</p> <p>This week, Facebook has announced the two can now be integrated, with the introduction of 360 video to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/" target="_blank">Facebook Live</a> experience.</p> <p>The first ever example has been produced in partnership with National Geographic, giving users an immersive look at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnatgeo%2Fvideos%2F10154187427528951%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Simpsons show Starbucks appreciation with animated shorts</h3> <p>Who knew the Simpsons were such big fans of Starbucks?</p> <p>It’s been revealed that three of the show’s writers have created a mini-series especially for the coffee chain.</p> <p>Since spending over three years drinking lattes and draining the internet at a Los Angeles branch of Starbucks, Joel Cohen, Rob LaZebnik and John Frink decided to create an animation for the Wi-Fi landing page.</p> <p>The series, titled ‘1st and Main’, is made up of eight weekly animated shorts, each about 60 to 90 seconds long.</p> <p>You can catch it on the Starbucks website soon, or via stores' Wi-Fi portals from January.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/i8O1XqVop2o?wmode=transparent" width="940" height="529"></iframe></p> <h3>Facebook to hire a head of news</h3> <p>On the back of intense scrutiny over fake news, Facebook is now looking to hire an “experienced news executive” to help combat the problem.</p> <p>The person, with over 20 years of experience required, will be the “public-facing voice of Facebook and its role in the news ecosystem”.</p> <p>Despite Facebook repeatedly denying its role as a news organisation in the past, this is perhaps the first real hint that it is finally accepting the idea.</p> <h3>Apple adds hundreds of new emojis</h3> <p>Whether you love them or hate them, there’s now more <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66547-three-ways-brands-are-using-emojis/" target="_blank">emojis</a> than ever before.</p> <p>This week, Apple unveiled hundreds of new ones along with its iOS 10.2 software update.</p> <p>Along with exotic animals and popular food (including the long-awaited avocado), there are also more professions such as the teacher, scientist and pilot.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2472/new_emojis.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="362"></p> <p>Oh, and let’s not forget the perfect emoji to sum up 2016… the black heart.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2473/Black_heart_emoji.JPG" alt="" width="217" height="179"></p> <h3>Amazon makes first-ever UK drone delivery</h3> <p>Amazon has revealed that it made its first-ever delivery by drone last week, 13 minutes after it was ordered.</p> <p>Part of a trial for Prime Air, it successfully delivered a bag of popcorn and an Amazon Fire TV stick to a man named Richard in Cambridgeshire – who just so happens to live near the drone depot.</p> <p>With strict government regulations in the UK, Amazon is limited in terms of how it can test the service, however, the delivery marks the brand’s intent to hit its 2018 target for widespread launch.</p> <h3>Twitter launches live video </h3> <p>As part of its latest update, Twitter has unveiled a new feature that lets users broadcast live.</p> <p>The feature is ‘powered by Periscope’ - the live streaming app that Twitter acquired for an undisclosed sum last year.</p> <p>Now, as long as users have Periscope installed on their phone, anyone can broadcast live directly within the Twitter app.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2475/Twitter_Go_Live.JPG" alt="" width="480" height="452"></p> <h3>Tinder on your telly box</h3> <p>If Corrie or the Queen’s Speech gets a bit too dull this Christmas, why not spice things up with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67563-how-tinder-has-changed-ecommerce/" target="_blank">a bit of Tinder</a>?</p> <p>The dating app is now available to use on Apple TV, meaning users can swipe right with their Siri remote (and the support of the entire family).</p> <p>Part of Tinder’s efforts to grow and diversify its user-base, it has described it as the “same dynamite swiping experience you know and love - just bigger, better and streaming live from your living room.”</p> <p>Merry Christmas, Nan.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sDIgGqS1VGU?wmode=transparent" width="746" height="420"></iframe></p> <h3>JustEat devours HungryHouse</h3> <p>JustEat is hoping to expand its presence in the food delivery market by buying its biggest UK rival, Hungry House.</p> <p>It is paying £200m for the company, with the promise of a further £40m if it hits performance targets. </p> <p>The deal is still to be cleared by the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), but if so, it will rapidly accelerate JustEat’s growth.</p> <p>In a separate deal, JustEat has also announced the acquisition of the Canadian company, SkipTheDishes, for a reported £66.1m.</p> <h3>Chicken Connoisseur goes viral</h3> <p>We love a bit of silly social media news, so what better way to finish off this week’s roundup than by celebrating the viral success of the chicken connoisseur?</p> <p>If you haven’t discovered him yet, he’s a young man who goes around sampling London’s ‘pengest munch’ in search of the city's best chicken shop.</p> <p>Since going viral, and even appearing on ITV London news, the aspiring food critic has seen his YouTube subscribers skyrocket to over 200,000.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/C0_1g5FVYAc?wmode=transparent" width="520" height="293"></iframe></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4358 2016-12-15T13:00:00+00:00 2016-12-15T13:00:00+00:00 Social Quarterly: Q4 2016 <p>Social media evolves rapidly, and the <strong>Social Quarterly</strong> provides an overview of the latest trends in the industry. It contains information which can be translated into your own documents, allowing you to prepare a pitch or use internally at a moment's notice.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly examines the current social media landscape, trends and updates on various social platforms and considers what will happen next. Updated four times per year, it will help to quickly surface statistics and trends you can use and react to immediately.</p> <p>This time, the <strong>fourth edition of the Social Quarterly </strong>looks at updates to Instagram Stories, Facebook's inflated metrics and a new milestone for Pinterest, along with other rumours, new features and platform developments.</p> <p>Bringing to life data from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> and the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/">Econsultancy blog</a>, the Social Quarterly is the best of social in an easy-to-digest format.</p> <p>The Social Quarterly will allow you to:</p> <ul> <li>Stay up to date with regular developments across multiple social media platforms.</li> <li>Present and pitch at short notice with clear and effective data.</li> <li>Pinpoint areas in which you want to find out more and use the linked Econsultancy resources and blog posts to do this.</li> <li>Spot potential ways your company could be using social media but is not currently.</li> </ul>