tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/email-marketing Latest Email content from Econsultancy 2016-07-21T11:30:00+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2016-07-21T11:30:00+01:00 2016-07-21T11:30:00+01:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to a B2B report) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet, statistics and online market research with data, facts, charts and figures.The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need, to help make your pitch or internal report up to date.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Those looking for B2B-specific data should consult our <a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B Internet Statistics Compendium</a>.</strong></p> <p> <strong>Regions covered in each document (where available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68058 2016-07-12T14:51:07+01:00 2016-07-12T14:51:07+01:00 Has Amazon Prime Day 2016 made up for 2015’s #PrimeDayFail? Nikki Gilliland <p>Despite some initial fanfare, social media was soon flooded with complaints about laughable discounts and naff products, with consumers gleefully using the hashtag #primedayfail to highlight everything that went wrong.</p> <p>Today, the sales event is back, with Amazon promising even more bargains to tempt consumers.  </p> <p>But has Amazon learnt from its mistakes? Here’s the situation so far…</p> <h3>Who’s eligible?</h3> <p>The clue is in the name. The biggest and best deals are only available to Prime members. </p> <p>With last year’s event resulting in the most Prime sign-ups in a single day (and a subsequent 19m US subscribers since) – the event is clearly just a vehicle to grow Amazon's member base.</p> <p>For regular consumers, this has the power to repel rather than pull people in, especially since the retailer has been intent on hammering home the ‘exclusive’ message on all its main email, website and social media copy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6950/exclusive.PNG" alt="" width="700" height="218"></p> <p>It has to be said, there are <em>some</em> deals accessible to all, but they are extremely limited and very hard to find.</p> <p>It took a good few minutes for me to figure out that the ‘Featured Prime Day’ savings were eligible to me (a non-member).</p> <p>And let’s be honest, they’re far from exciting. (Unless vitamins and minerals are your thing...)</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6942/prime_day_deals.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="243"></p> <p>Ironically, if you’re not a Prime member, you’re the consumer that Amazon probably cares about the most today.</p> <p>However, its heavy-handed targeting means that you might feel more inclined to avoid the whole thing rather than tempted to sign up. </p> <h3>Social promotion</h3> <p>If you follow Amazon on any of its main social media channels, you’ll have seen its attempts at building excitement around the event. </p> <p>A series of countdown tweets and Facebook posts means that the event has been well signposted and cleverly executed.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Only 5 days to go!<a href="https://t.co/pRdR7iWm6z">https://t.co/pRdR7iWm6z</a> <a href="https://t.co/6O9TMNVmmD">pic.twitter.com/6O9TMNVmmD</a></p> — Amazon.co.uk (@AmazonUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/AmazonUK/status/751113558352691200">July 7, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>While the Facebook ads are slick and well-designed (with a simple and effective call-to-action for a free trial on the main site), the fact that it's so heavily geared around exclusivity surely means that non-Prime members are likely to ignore it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6945/facebook_prime_day.png" alt="" width="550" height="588"></p> <p>In terms of emails, I only received one on the morning of the event itself.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6946/Amazon_email.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="522"></p> <p>Instead of promoting the discounts, I did find it slightly off-putting that it only showcased the products – an obvious attempt to get consumers to click through to learn more.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6947/Amazon_email_deals.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="772"></p> <p>Whether or not that click converts to a purchase, again, probably depends on Prime membership status.</p> <h3>The discounts</h3> <p>One of the biggest complaints from consumers last year was that the biggest discounts were not properly promoted on the site.</p> <p>Eventually, it emerged that Amazon used a broad algorithm to select the deals, leading to a lot of random items such as tupperware and dishwasher detergent.</p> <p>This year, it’s not entirely clear how it’s been set up, but according to a company spokesperson, Amazon has ‘increased the number of deals and at the same time, increased the volume of inventory behind those deals.’</p> <p>With a dedicated homepage, showcasing a variety of categories and filter options, there is a clear attempt to give the user greater direction.</p> <p>Navigation is simple, with good signposts to point customers in the direction of 'deals ending soon' and 'recommended deals'.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6949/amazon_homepage.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="654"></p> <p>In terms of savings, there does appear to be a decent amount of products on offer, with the best being discounts being on electronics and home appliances.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6939/prime_day_deals_tech.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="481"></p> <p>However that algorithm must be working its evil magic again... I also spied far too many irrelevant items for my liking.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6941/Amazon_deals.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="510"></p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>It’s probably too early to say for sure if this year’s Prime Day has been any more successful than the last.</p> <p>While clearly an attempt to bag even more Prime memberships, what the retailer fails to realise is that the hype might do more to put people off than draw them in. </p> <p>Similarly, there's already an amusing amount of social media backlash, so Amazon clearly hasn't done much to sort out that algorithm issue.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Thanks <a href="https://twitter.com/amazon">@amazon</a>! This is just what I needed! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PrimeDayFail?src=hash">#PrimeDayFail</a> <a href="https://t.co/mIiNUs4l6u">pic.twitter.com/mIiNUs4l6u</a></p> — Martin Untrojb (@MEUntrojb) <a href="https://twitter.com/MEUntrojb/status/752805002884898820">July 12, 2016</a> </blockquote> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67979 2016-06-23T14:27:54+01:00 2016-06-23T14:27:54+01:00 The five steps to an effective and repeatable sales process Shaun Haase <p dir="ltr">The most important thing to remember is to establish clearly defined goals early on to ensure that your sales team is on the same course of action as you.</p> <p dir="ltr">By developing and implementing a strategy that’s consistent across all of your customer segments and touchpoints, your sales team becomes a well-oiled machine that offers the same impeccable service and experience that is in line with your company’s bottom line.</p> <p dir="ltr">Here are five steps to help you get started:</p> <h3 dir="ltr">1. Segment your leads</h3> <p dir="ltr">Organizing your leads is the key to success. Business is done by people, and as such, there is enormous value in noting the unique attributes and preferences of each potential or existing customer.</p> <p dir="ltr">From the industry they’re in, to their communication preferences, remembering the specific needs of each lead helps establish your sales team as more personable, relatable and thoughtful.</p> <p dir="ltr">This level of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66576-why-make-it-personal-personalisation-vs-contextualisation/">personalization</a> can only be achieved by segmenting your customers, either based on their industry, opportunity or other variables.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6380/segment.jpg" alt="" width="545" height="362"></p> <p dir="ltr">Lead segmentation can also help reduce the number of emails sent, increase the open rate for each message and help your sales team gain valuable insight into what does and doesn’t work.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sales teams will be able to cater to customers in a more personalized way, which can lead to higher conversion rates because they feel like a person is reaching out to them, not Mailchimp.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">2. Start with the full cycle in mind</h3> <p dir="ltr">Initiate the sales cycle with communication that’s warm and inviting.</p> <p dir="ltr">The first point of communication should bring awareness of your product to the customer; it’s certainly not the time for a hard sell, though the time for this will surely come.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you jump too early, you’ll be putting yourself at risk of alienating the potential customer even before they’ve had a chance to learn about what you have to offer. </p> <p dir="ltr">Use the first touchpoint to get to know the customer. When you better understand their desires and pain points, you’ll be able to craft a relevant message that speaks to their exact needs.</p> <p dir="ltr">More importantly, see this first step as part of a larger story that’s weaved together through multiple touchpoints.</p> <p dir="ltr">What is the key message you want to convey to this customer? Be brief, to the point and think carefully about a messaging tactic that will resonate with your target audience. </p> <p dir="ltr">You may also encounter customers who are familiar with your product and have already shortlisted you as a viable solution. Don’t be too pushy but do try to feel customers out.</p> <p dir="ltr">Give every customer the opportunity to take action with a simple call-to-action that empowers them to move forward if so desired. </p> <h3 dir="ltr">3. Utilize feedback to refine your pitch</h3> <p dir="ltr">Customer feedback can dramatically enhance the effectiveness of your messaging and communications.</p> <p dir="ltr">By analyzing email open and response rates from previous campaigns along with a customer sentiment audit, you’ll be able to uncover valuable insights on customer interest or lack thereof.</p> <p dir="ltr">If the messaging you’re using is not hitting your engagement targets, take the time to evaluate the issue and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64116-a-b-testing-software-recommendations-from-four-ecommerce-experts/">try A/B testing</a> different variations of your core message.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6381/alphabet.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="472"></p> <p dir="ltr">You might even find that you need to expand your predefined customer segments to ensure that all customers are being ushered down the most effective sales path for them. </p> <p dir="ltr">Utilising existing feedback on your outreach is important when optimizing your sales strategy.</p> <p dir="ltr">You’ll quickly learn which types of messages and approaches work best on each group, and you’ll also be able to better identify which customer segments are proving to be the most valuable.</p> <p dir="ltr">By regularly monitoring and adjusting your communications, you’ll create a much more efficient and lucrative sales pipeline.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">4. Connect with your warmest leads</h3> <p dir="ltr">Once you get further along in your conversations, you’ll have a better sense of which leads are the most promising.</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s now time to connect personally with each of your warmest leads. Offer to connect over a phone call or in person.</p> <p dir="ltr">By doing so, you’ll be able to directly address any potential questions/concerns while creating a deeper connection with each lead.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you’re lucky enough to generate many warm leads and haven’t done so already, you need to be <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64545-what-is-crm-and-why-do-you-need-it/">utilizing a CRM</a> to track and manage these relationships.</p> <p dir="ltr">A CRM becomes increasingly important as the sales process progresses so it’s best you implement one early on.</p> <p dir="ltr">The right CRM will ensure that you are maximizing the conversion potential of your warmest leads. </p> <h3 dir="ltr">5. Don’t be afraid to use incentives</h3> <p dir="ltr">Now that you’ve established rapport with potential customers, it’s time to close the deal. Start by sending a follow-up reminder with the key benefits and solutions of your product/service.</p> <p dir="ltr">At this point, your lead should have all pertinent information about your product/service so keep it short, simple and to the point.</p> <p dir="ltr">If they’re still on the fence, try presenting them with a limited-time promotion to give them an immediate incentive to convert right then and there.</p> <p dir="ltr">Rather than dwelling on the lost revenue from the promotion, consider the potential lifetime value that customers can provide.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p dir="ltr">Creating a scalable and repeatable sales process is a relatively straightforward endeavor but the true challenge is remembering to continually adapt your processes to the needs of your customers.</p> <p dir="ltr">When you have a clearly defined process in place, it becomes much easier to scale your sales team and keeps them focused on what they do best: close deals.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67969 2016-06-22T10:39:00+01:00 2016-06-22T10:39:00+01:00 Five ways Emerald Street is delivering irresistible email content Nikki Gilliland <p>But I recently realised that since signing up to Emerald Street, Stylist’s free daily subscription, I have more or less read every single one. </p> <p>For me, it is a welcome distraction on any given day. Here are the reasons why.</p> <h3>Unobtrusive style</h3> <p>Email <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64878-45-words-to-avoid-in-your-email-marketing-subject-lines/">subject lines</a> are often deliberately inflammatory, designed to entice the reader to click at all costs.</p> <p>One thing I like about Emerald Street is that it doesn’t feel the need to use clickbait. </p> <p>More often than not, the subject lines are related to just one feature from the email. Sometimes, they’re incredibly short. Others pose questions or include intriguing quotes – but they’re never outlandish or misleading.</p> <p>Editor Anna Fielding once said that the best thing about her job was that “every day, we get to make 70,000 women stop to take five minutes for themselves. I know how rare that is in modern offices.” - Now with 150,000 subscribers, women are clearly spreading the word.</p> <p>As well as piquing interest in an understated way, Emerald Street succeeds in offering something reliable – a characteristic that is far more valuable than clickbait in the long run. </p> <p>With emails arriving at the same time each day, it also encourages the reader to form a habit.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6214/Emerald_Street_subject_line.PNG" alt="" width="509" height="34"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6220/Emerald_Street_subject_line_2.PNG" alt="" width="509" height="32"></p> <h3>Honest attitude</h3> <p>Emerald Street has built on Stylist’s reputation as a trusted and intelligent voice for women.</p> <p>In line with this, every email includes the ‘Emerald Street promise’ – a section of copy succinctly summing up the company’s attitude towards advertising.  </p> <p>By promising not to promote anything for the sake of it, Emerald Street offers readers trust and authenticity. </p> <p>In today’s market, where it’s common behaviour for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67923-influencer-marketing-is-becoming-a-joke-what-can-brands-do-about-it/">brands to pay influencers</a> and sponsor editorial content, Emerald Street’s promise of transparency is a breath of fresh air. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6215/Emerald_Street_promise.PNG" alt="" width="537" height="227"></p> <h3>Uncluttered design</h3> <p>With one main editorial feature and around four or five other sections, Emerald Street maintains a fairly standard and consistent formula.</p> <p>The email itself is not particularly ground-breaking in terms of design. In fact, it’s quite basic, mainly focusing on the copy and a select few high-quality images.</p> <p>Of course, advertising is included, but with just one or two ads placed on the right-hand side of the template, it is hardly distracting.</p> <p>With visible social buttons and handy ‘forward to a friend’ features, the email also encourages sharing as well as promotes other social media channels.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6224/Email_design.PNG" alt="" width="750" height="636"></p> <h3>Relatable tone</h3> <p>One reason I enjoy reading Emerald Street is that it reflects how real women actually speak to each other.</p> <p>Many women’s magazines can be patronising, clichéd or just plain annoying – focusing on shallow topics or subjects that are far removed from the reality of daily life. </p> <p>Instead, Emerald Street focuses on the subjects that women actually care about.</p> <p>Sure, it can be light - about lipsticks or where to go for lunch – but it can also be in-depth, with a lot of content related to important and timely issues.</p> <p>Another feature I often use is 'today's talk' - a selection of links to other interesting online news and content.</p> <p>By also making references to the people who work at the publication itself, Emerald Street demonstrates how a personal and relatable tone is often the most engaging.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6221/Emerald_street_recommendation.PNG" alt="" width="470" height="320"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6222/Recommendation_2.PNG" alt="" width="324" height="386"></p> <h3>Valuable content</h3> <p>As well as enjoying its conversational <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65198-a-simple-tip-for-improving-your-brand-tone-of-voice-guidelines/">tone of voice</a>, I often find myself going back to Emerald Street because it is downright useful.</p> <p>One of my favourite features is ‘Cocktails and Cappuccinos’ – recommendations of places to eat and drink in London.</p> <p>With a comprehensive map that lists all the places ever featured on Emerald Street, it also shows that email content does not have to be disposable. </p> <p>Its recommendations about fashion, food and art are highly accessible and easy to relate to.</p> <p>With Stylist readers lapping up the reviews section, Emerald Street originally began with the intent of producing content that helps people plan their lives.</p> <p>This insight into what the audience wants has undoubtedly played a part in its success.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6218/Cocktails_and_cappucinos.PNG" alt="" width="750" height="573"></p> <p>By providing links along with recommendations, whether for a place to go for dinner or a new book, it encourages the reader to act.</p> <p>As a result, Emerald Street ensures that it will be remembered as the source, in turn giving the reader a reason to click 'read' the next time its email arrives.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6223/Emerald_Street_map.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="404"></p> <p>A shining example of how to do editorial-style emails - there's a lot to learn from Emerald Street.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/934 2016-06-21T14:00:00+01:00 2016-06-21T14:00:00+01:00 Digital Marketing Template Files Econsultancy <h3>Overview</h3> <p><strong>Digital Marketing Template Files</strong></p> <p><strong>Authors:</strong></p> <ul> <li>James Gurd, Owner and Lead Consultant, <a title="Digital Juggler" href="http://digitaljuggler.com/">Digital Juggler</a> </li> <li>Ben Matthews, Director, <a title="Montfort" href="http://montfort.io/">Montfort</a> </li> <li>Ger Ashby, Head of Creative Services, <a title="Dotmailer" href="https://www.dotmailer.com/">Dotmailer</a> </li> <li><a title="Starcom Mediavest Group" href="http://smvgroup.com/">Starcom Mediavest Group</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>Files available:</strong> 10 file bundles, 50+ individual template files<br></p> <p><strong>File titles:</strong> See sample document for full breakdown of section and file information.</p> <h3>About these files</h3> <p>Need help with an area of digital marketing and don't know where to start? This pack of downloadable files contains best practice templates that you can use in your digital marketing activities. Feel free to adapt them to suit your needs.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jxKmQGxspc8?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Contents</h3> <p>In this release we have 10 template bundles containing over 50 individual template files for digital marketing projects.</p> <p><strong>Download separate file bundles below:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Affiliate Marketing</li> <li>Content Marketing</li> <li>Display Advertising *to be published soon*</li> <li>Ecommerce Projects</li> <li>Email Marketing</li> <li>Search Engine Marketing: PPC</li> <li>Search Engine Marketing: SEO</li> <li>Social Media and Online PR</li> <li>Usability and User Experience</li> <li>Web Analytics</li> </ul> <p><strong>The template files bundle also includes a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/small-business-online-resource-manager/">Small Business Online Resource Manager</a> that </strong><strong>can help you effectively manage and own your online assets.</strong></p> <p><strong>There's a free guide which you can download to find out more about exactly what is included.</strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67912 2016-06-08T11:58:37+01:00 2016-06-08T11:58:37+01:00 Five reasons your CRM isn't actually increasing sales Shaun Haase <p>On the other hand, a recent survey by Software Advice revealed that 74% of companies using the right <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64545-what-is-crm-and-why-do-you-need-it/">CRM</a> for their business say that it has improved their access to customer data, therefore allowing them to improve lead conversion and ultimately increase sales.</p> <p>If your CRM is not working for you, here are five common reasons why:</p> <h3>1. No overarching strategy with relevant sales goal metrics</h3> <p>It’s critical that sales and marketing teams work closely together to set an overarching strategy with specific sales goals that can be tracked using a CRM, for example: lead conversions rates for specific sales pipelines.</p> <p>Often times, companies don’t have a clear strategy or a system for tracking metrics like these, instead using their CRM as a glorified contact management system.</p> <p><em>Stock photo of a pipeline</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5818/pipeline.jpg" alt="" width="843" height="468"></p> <p>If you don’t currently have predefined goals and metrics, then you might be losing out on one of the key features of your CRM which should be providing a clear overview of your sales pipeline progress.</p> <p>In order to keep your business on the track to sales growth, make sure that you set aside time to establish a clear strategy, define which sales metrics will be relevant and have both marketing and sales teams meet regularly to track progress through your CRM. </p> <h3>2. Not utilizing CRMs effectively</h3> <p>According to a research report by BuyerZone, 91% of companies with more than 11 employees use CRM software and have great initial intentions for getting the most value out of them, yet after their teams utilize it for the first few months, usage wanes.</p> <p>Many times, sales teams stop using CRMs altogether as they find it tedious to have to constantly update contact information.</p> <p>Sales professionals often complain that inputting data into CRMs takes time away from pursuing opportunities. CRMs should be used to enable your sales teams, not hinder their productivity.</p> <p>If CRMs are a drain on your team’s time, reduce complexity by utilizing tools that make it easier to input data, or find a new CRM that provides automated data entry, better functionality and seamless integration with other enterprise software.</p> <h3>3. Too complicated &amp; too expensive to maintain</h3> <p>Companies often use the same CRM software that successful large enterprises use in order to be competitive.</p> <p>Unfortunately, these popular CRMs can be very difficult to integrate due to their complex design, and are therefore not ideal for every type and size of company.</p> <p>These CRMs often require a lot of money and time, since you must also hire third-party vendors to customize the system for specific business needs as well as train your teams to use them.</p> <p>If you use one of the more popular CRM systems out of the box, there’s a good chance it may have been configured incorrectly and it could be costing you both time and money as your teams will not be able to fully utilize it to its full capacity. </p> <p>CRM software should be simple to integrate and easy to use from the beginning.</p> <p>If your CRM is still giving you problems even after customizing it and your employees are constantly having to ask for assistance on how to do specific tasks, it may be time for you to seek out a much simpler CRM solution. </p> <h3>4. Using a stand-alone CRM</h3> <p>Stand-alone CRMs are a holdover from many years ago and are very inefficient at transferring disparate data from the different tools that businesses often use, such as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-marketing-buyers-guide/">email marketing software</a> for managing outbound communications.</p> <p>A better solution – which many companies are using these days – is a fully integrated cloud-based CRM, as it presents a much more efficient way of integrating into the tools you regularly use.</p> <p>Six years ago, only 12% of businesses used cloud-based CRM while today this number has increased to 87% and continues to grow every day.</p> <p><em>Some clouds</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5819/clouds.jpg" alt="" width="846" height="483"></p> <p>The benefits of fully integrated cloud-based CRMs are plentiful: they allow everyone on your team to easily access important information anywhere, transfer data from different programs and often automatically update data other sources.</p> <p>All of this then leads to a speedier workflow and always up-to-date sales and contact data. </p> <h3>5. Living with poor data quality</h3> <p>Data migration, integration and management are critical for a well-run CRM.</p> <p>If your data is not aligned correctly or you have information in the wrong place, then your sales team will lose out on potential leads with missed follow-up appointments or incorrect contact information.</p> <p>For this reason, it is important that someone regularly checks the data within your CRM system to remove duplicates, update contact information and standardize content.</p> <p>Data inaccuracy is one of the biggest problems with CRM systems, but at the same time is also one of the easiest to fix if time is dedicated to maintaining it on a regular basis. </p> <h3>In summary...</h3> <p>Here we’ve highlighted a few of the potential reasons why your CRM might not be helping increase your sales. If you suffer from any of these factors, it is time for you to take action now.</p> <p>Create a plan for improvement or find a CRM solution better tailored to your company’s needs.</p> <p>A CRM is a great tool for helping you increase sales but also one that must be continuously refreshed and utilized in the most appropriate manner to reap the greatest benefit.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67815 2016-05-06T10:02:43+01:00 2016-05-06T10:02:43+01:00 Why marketers are failing to make the most of automated emails Nikki Gilliland <p>So why is email automation such a tricky tool to master? </p> <p>Here are some key findings from the report.</p> <h3>Pulling the trigger</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65212-what-is-marketing-automation-and-why-do-you-need-it/">Automated emails</a> are triggered by consumer behaviour, but it seems a lot of companies feel comfortable focusing on just a few core actions.</p> <p>With 46% of automated emails being triggered by new customer sign-ups, the welcome email has long reigned supreme. However, it is certainly not the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63003-20-automated-emails-your-customers-won-t-delete/">only trigger</a> worth using.</p> <p>Thankfully, some organisations are slowly starting to catch on to other types of consumer behaviour.</p> <p>The below graph demonstrates how lapsed customers, abandoned baskets and content downloads are also being targeted.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4656/email_sign_ups.PNG" alt="" width="750" height="661"></p> <h3>Breaking the barrier</h3> <p>For those client-side, the biggest reason cited for letting automated emails fall by the wayside is not having the time to make it happen.</p> <p>Despite this seeming at odds with the very reasons for using automated emails in the first place - saving you the hassle of sending out multiple manual emails - a lack of resources does seem to be a big issue. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4658/company_barriers.PNG" alt="" width="750" height="739"></p> <p>Meanwhile, for agencies, low budgets and a lack of skills are called out as the biggest obstacles. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4657/agency_barriers.PNG" alt="" width="750" height="705"></p> <h3>Going automatic</h3> <p>So how can automated email be used to its full potential in future?</p> <p>Here are three ways companies can begin to reap the rewards of this widely underused marketing tool.</p> <h4>1. Be creative.</h4> <p>Whether it’s a birthday, social media plug, or a simple a thank you for buying – marketers need to expand the reasons they reach out to customers.</p> <p>Often, the more creative the trigger, the greater the customer engagement.</p> <p>With the likes of Ray Ban demonstrating the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67717-ray-ban-s-10-month-delay-in-sending-post-sales-email-isn-t-as-strange-as-it-seems/">success of the long-game</a>, it’s important to remember that there are no set rules to follow.</p> <h4>2. Mobile-optimise the customer journey.</h4> <p>With 46% of company marketers aiming to use automation to enable one-to-one communication with customers, being ‘mobile-first’ is key.</p> <p>With more than half of emails now being opened on a mobile device, it is not simply about how the email appears on a device, but how it can increase conversion rates.</p> <h4>3. Be customer-centric.</h4> <p>Finally, while technological innovation is important, consumer relevance should be the core reason for any automated email campaign.</p> <p>Whether the customer receives an email via an app or on desktop, if it’s not relevant, it’s not worth opening.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4659/email_innovation.PNG" alt="" width="750" height="610"></p> <p><strong>To find out more on this topic, you can download the full <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census-2016/">Email Marketing Industry Census 2016</a>. </strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4090 2016-04-12T10:00:00+01:00 2016-04-12T10:00:00+01:00 Email Marketing Industry Census 2016 <p>The tenth annual <strong>Email Marketing Industry Census</strong>, sponsored by <a href="http://www.adestra.com">Adestra</a>, is based on the largest UK survey of email marketers.</p> <p>The census looks at the amount and type of email marketing carried out by organisations, the way that email marketing is conducted, issues affecting the industry and the effectiveness of email compared to other digital marketing channels.</p> <p>With <strong>ten years' worth of data to assess</strong>, this provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the state of the industry and find out how those at the coalface of email marketing are operating.</p> <p>This report looks in detail at the approaches taken and the resources given to email marketing, as well as issues regarding effectiveness, personalisation, marketing automation, mobile and the future of email.</p> <p>Over 1,100 respondents took part in the 2016 Census, which took the form of an online survey in February and March 2016.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>Find out how a variety of trends around email practices, budgets and opinions have changed over ten years.</li> <li>Discover other marketers' opinions on what the future of email will look like.</li> <li>Benchmark your own practices with the activities of marketers maximising their email activities.</li> <li>Understand the challenges organisations are facing in improving their email capabilities.</li> </ul> <h2>Key findings from the report</h2> <ul> <li>Email again delivers highest ROI ahead of SEO, but is not receiving the budget spend</li> <li>Delivering advanced segmentation continues to be a challenge</li> <li>Lack of resources impacting a clear strategy for mobile optimisation</li> <li>Tactics used for mobile optimisation and increasing complexity</li> <li>More work to be done to achieve success in implementing automated email programmes</li> <li>Use of third-party email systems increases significantly</li> <li>Focus for the future</li> </ul> <h2>Expert insight</h2> <p>The <strong>86-page</strong> 2016 census report contains insight and comment from leading experts in the email marketing world and associated digital sectors, including:</p> <ul> <li>Kath Pay, Founder &amp; Senior Consultant, Holistic Email Marketing</li> <li>Jordie van Rijn, eCRM and Email Marketing Consultant, eMailMonday</li> <li>Tim Watson, Email Marketing Consultant, Zettasphere</li> </ul> <h2>Features of the report</h2> <ul> <li>Approach to email</li> <li>Email effectiveness</li> <li>Place in the organisation</li> <li>Mobile</li> <li>Personalisation</li> <li>Marketing automation</li> <li>Improving email marketing for the future</li> </ul> <p><strong>You can download a free sample of the report to learn more.</strong></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TotoIZdle3c?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67717 2016-04-07T11:07:50+01:00 2016-04-07T11:07:50+01:00 Ray Ban’s 10-month delay in sending post-sales email isn’t as strange as it seems David Moth <p>At first I assumed it was a glitch, as Ray-Ban was asking for me to review my ‘recent purchase’.</p> <p>But that strange turn of phrase aside, it’s clear that the email was actually very cleverly timed.</p> <p>Allow me to quickly avail you of the three reasons I’m a fan of this email.</p> <p><em>The email in question</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3692/Screen_Shot_2016-04-06_at_15.19.30.png" alt="" width="551" height="638"></p> <p>And for more on this topic, book onto our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/email-marketing/">Email Marketing Training Course</a> or check out these posts:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/9366-ecommerce-consumer-reviews-why-you-need-them-and-how-to-use-them/">Ecommerce consumer reviews: why you need them and how to use them</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67358-nine-email-marketing-trends-set-to-dominate-2016/">Nine email marketing trends set to dominate 2016</a></li> </ul> <h3>1. The email neatly coincides with the beginning of summer</h3> <p>Ray-Ban’s email was cunningly timed to coincide with the clocks going forward, which means it’s technically British summer time.</p> <p>Obviously it’s actually still cold and raining here in London, but the evenings are longer and there is the sense that summer is just around the corner.</p> <p>The email imagery and copy reinforce that feeling and attempt to associate both my sunglasses and the Ray-Ban brand with summertime.</p> <p>This increases the chances that I’ll leave a positive review.</p> <h3>2. I’ve had time to use the product</h3> <p>As mentioned, it’s common for post-sales emails to arrive within a few days of the product.</p> <p>For most items this is a good idea, as you strike while the iron is hot and the customer is still excited about whatever it is they bought.</p> <p>Give the customer long enough to get some initial use out of their new item, but don’t wait so long that they’ve lost interest in it.</p> <p>In the case of my sunglasses, you need to remember that I live in England so even though I bought them in the summer there’s no guarantee I’ll have got much use out of them. I’m not Bono.</p> <p>Thankfully I’ve been on a few holidays recently and have fallen deeply in love with my Ray-Bans.</p> <p>So although 10 months is potentially a bit too long to wait before asking for a review, there’s a strong argument for giving customers a bit of time to get good use out of the product before asking for feedback.</p> <h3>3. It might spur me into another purchase</h3> <p>Ray-Ban’s email might purport to be asking for a review, but it’s also a timely reminder that summer is almost upon us.</p> <p>I’m not the sort of person who buys new sunglasses every year, but some people do.</p> <p>These people might be spurred on to browse Ray-Ban’s website to check out the latest product options, potentially clinching both a product review and another sale.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>Not all companies are going to benefit from waiting 10 months before asking for a review. </p> <p>For example, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67014-fast-fashion-how-to-keep-up-with-the-new-ecommerce-trend/">fast fashion brands</a> rely on the fact that customers are constantly replenishing their wardrobes. A 10-month gap would mean the item is likely discontinued and the customer would have forgotten about it and moved on.</p> <p>And I’m not entirely convinced that Ray-Ban will achieve great results from this particular email. Who really writes a review 10 months after buying sunglasses?</p> <p>But it’s definitely worth testing this type of email marketing, particularly if the timing (e.g. the start of summer) is relevant to the brand.</p> <p>It might not garner many reviews, but it keeps the brand top-of-mind and might encourage some additional sales before summer.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/937 2016-03-23T11:50:00+00:00 2016-03-23T11:50:00+00:00 Email Marketing – Digital Marketing Template Files Econsultancy <h3>Overview</h3> <p><strong>Digital Marketing Template Files: Email Marketing</strong></p> <p><strong>Authors:</strong></p> <ul> <li>James Gurd, Owner and Lead Consultant, Digital Juggler</li> <li>Ger Ashby, Head of Creative Services, <a title="Dotmailer" href="https://www.dotmailer.com/">Dotmailer</a> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Files included:</strong> 7 files </p> <p><strong>File titles:</strong> Building an Email Marketing Programme, Campaign Compliance Audit, Email Campaign Report, Email Design Guidelines Campaign Schedule, Email Monthly Report, Email Multi-Client Monthly Report</p> <h3>About these templates</h3> <p><strong>Who created these template files?</strong></p> <p>In some cases Econsultancy has created the templates. In others we have gone to leading experts in the relevant area and they have provided the files. Details of those people are given where appropriate in the descriptions that follow.</p> <p><strong>How should these files be used?</strong></p> <p>Email marketing is popular as ever - so how do you run efficient campaigns, or even get started? We've created generic templates that get to the core of what you should be considering, in order to engage in successful email marketing activity.</p> <h3>Contents</h3> <p>In this release we have a template bundle containing seven individual files to help you understand email marketing in greater detail.</p> <p><strong>Download separate files on the report page below.</strong></p>