tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/email-marketing Latest Email content from Econsultancy 2017-04-21T12:55:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2017-04-21T12:55:00+01:00 2017-04-21T12:55:00+01:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to two sector-specific reports, B2B and Healthcare &amp; Pharma) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet statistics and digital market research with data, facts, charts and figures. The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need - a huge time-saver for presentations and reports.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Sector-specific data and reports are available under the following areas:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-and-pharmaceuticals-internet-statistics-compendium/">Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Financial Services and Insurance Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/financial-services-and-insurance-internet-statistics-compendium/">Financial Services and Insurance</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Retail Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/retail-statistics-compendium/" target="_self">Retail</a></strong></li> </ul> <p><strong>Regions covered in each document (where data is available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69008 2017-04-20T01:01:00+01:00 2017-04-20T01:01:00+01:00 Which channels do marketers really use? Jeff Rajeck <p>Part of what makes marketing interesting is that the discipline is constantly evolving. Hardly a week goes by without some major change to a consumer service or a new way to use a platform to engage with our audiences.</p> <p>Yet sometimes the pace of change can be overwhelming. It's often difficult to both keep up with the latest innovations and stay on top of daily marketing tasks.</p> <p>To find out just how necessary it is for marketers to be familiar with the latest platforms, <strong>we surveyed over 200 marketers in Australia and New Zealand about the channels they use for their marketing efforts</strong>. Below are some of the surprising findings along with some commentary.</p> <p>For more data from the survey please refer to the Econsultancy report, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/cross-channel-marketing-in-australia-and-new-zealand">Cross-Channel Marketing in ANZ</a>, produced in association with IBM Marketing Cloud.</p> <h3>1. Conventional digital channels still rule</h3> <p>First off, the survey results make it clear that <strong>marketers are most frequently using familiar digital touchpoints for their marketing efforts</strong>. Social media, email, and SEO (natural search) are all used by more than eight in ten marketers (87%, 87%, 81% respectively).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5487/top__5_channels.png" alt="" width="800" height="514"></p> <p>One reason these channels are the most popular is because <strong>companies tend to use channels which are well-understood and easy to integrate into overall marketing activity.</strong></p> <p>The conventional channels are also where the brands' customers are spending their time.   </p> <ul> <li> <strong>Email</strong>: According to the <a href="http://www.radicati.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Email-Statistics-Report-2015-2019-Executive-Summary.pdf">Radicati group</a>, more than 2.5bn people use email every month.  </li> <li> <strong>Social</strong>: The largest global social network, Facebook, <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2017/02/01/technology/facebook-earnings/">is now approaching 2bn monthly active users (MAUs)</a>.</li> <li> <strong>Search</strong>: Google has announced that its search platform has <a href="http://www.theverge.com/2016/2/1/10889492/gmail-1-billion-google-alphabet">at least 1bn MAUs</a>.</li> </ul> <p>When the usage of these platforms is compared to, say, Snapchat, we can easily see why marketers are so much more likely to use them.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5486/1.png" alt="" width="800" height="371"></p> <h3>2. Offline touchpoints are still relied upon by many brands</h3> <p>A somewhat surprising result from the survey is that <strong>offline touchpoints are still a significant part of the marketing mix.</strong> While point-of-sale and call centres are only used by around one in three companies (34% and 31% respectively), traditional media and events are used by significantly more (47%, 71% respectively).</p> <p>The popularity of offline touchpoints makes a bit more sense when data from <a href="https://www.consumerbarometer.com">recent research from Google</a> is considered.</p> <p>Google recently surveyed consumers in Australia and New Zealand and reported that only <strong>just over half of consumers (58% Australia, 53% New Zealand) used an online channel to research or purchase a product.</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5489/google1.png" alt="" width="800" height="348"></p> <p>So to reach customers where they are likely to research their products and buy them, marketers must still operate offline to a significant extent.</p> <h3>3. Mobile is not as popular as you might think</h3> <p>Another interesting survey result is that mobile touchpoints are less popular in Australia and New Zealand than offline channels.</p> <p>Though the mobile web is used by nearly half (49%) of client-side respondents, mobile messaging, mobile apps, messaging apps and mobile push notifications are each only part of less than one in four companies' marketing efforts (23%, 22%, 10%, 7%, respectively).</p> <p>This apparent lack of enthusiasm for mobile is even more confusing considering the relatively high penetration of smartphones in the region. More than <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/257041/smartphone-user-penetration-in-australia/">80% in Australia</a> and <a href="http://www.researchnz.com/pdf/special%20reports/research%20new%20zealand%20special%20report%20-%20use%20of%20smartphones.pdf">70%  in New Zealand</a> use mobile devices with internet connectivity.</p> <p>But going back to Google's Consumer Barometer data offers a reasonable explanation. When asked where in the buying cycle did people use a smartphone, <strong>fewer than 50% use a smartphone for anything at all in the buying cycle and only around 10% use a smartphone for buying.</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5490/google2.png" alt="" width="800" height="185"></p> <p>So while there is a lot of advice out there about how brands should 'embrace' mobile and aim to be 'mobile-first', <strong>i</strong><strong>t seems that consumers are not quite there yet with mobile. </strong></p> <h3>4. Messaging apps hardly appear on brands' radars</h3> <p>From our data, it seems that the biggest chasm between conventional wisdom and reality concerns messaging apps. If you read the tech press, you'd be forgiven for thinking that messaging apps dominated our culture and each change to these apps affects millions of lives. Marketers, one might think, should be flocking to them in droves.</p> <p>While there is some chance that this is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68429-six-things-marketers-should-know-about-social-media-in-asia-pacific/">true in China</a>, <strong>marketers in Australia and New Zealand indicated that messaging apps are not popular channels for marketing in the region.</strong> A mere 10% of client-side marketers use messaging apps and only 15% of agency marketers said the same.</p> <p>From other data, it's clear that the problem with messaging apps isn't consumer interest. <a href="http://www.onmsg.com.au/">According to messaging app agency On Message</a>, Australia will have over 11m messaging app users in 2017 and messaging apps are the primary form of contact for more than half (54%) of 15-19 year olds in the country.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5491/On_Message.png" alt="" width="800" height="234"></p> <p>Instead, it is much more likely that <strong>messaging apps are still simply too difficult to use for marketing.</strong> Besides some basic self-service ads on Facebook Messenger, engaging with messaging users requires dedicated resource to build contact lists, 'man' the consumer outreach or customer service desk, and build bots to handle incoming traffic.</p> <p>This is not to say that marketing via messaging apps will never happen, but rather that it is likely that it will be some time before most brands have to worry about engaging their customers on these platforms.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69015 2017-04-19T14:10:00+01:00 2017-04-19T14:10:00+01:00 Three key findings from the 2017 Email Marketing Census David Moth <p>This year’s report sees the introduction of new questions about the use of metrics, the application of artificial intelligence and the impact of Brexit on how companies are approaching the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).</p> <p>As well as the usual, in-depth analysis of survey data and a comparison with results from previous years, the report also contains a treasure trove of insights from nine leading email marketing experts.</p> <p>Here are three of the headline findings from this year’s report.</p> <h4>1. Marketers get to grips with automation, helped by improved technology</h4> <p>The increased use of automated email marketing is a key theme of this year’s Email Census as marketers strive to get better return on investment from this channel, while simultaneously offering a more relevant, timely and targeted experience to subscribers.</p> <p>The proportion of marketers who say they have been ‘very’ or ‘quite’ successful in implementing automated email marketing programmes has increased from 62% in 2016 to 67% this year.</p> <p>Asked to select the three most important features of an email service provider’s technology platform, two-thirds (66%) selected marketing automation capability. This has now overtaken user-friendly interface (60%) as the single most important attribute of an ESP, underscoring the importance that marketers are now attaching to automation.</p> <p><em>Q. What are the most important attributes of an email technology provider?</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5537/email_technology_attributes.png" alt="" width="650"></p> <p>According to Jordie van Rijn, eCRM and email marketing consultant at <a href="http://www.emailmonday.com/">eMailMonday</a>: “Marketing automation and email marketing are growing towards each other, to the point that it is unthinkable that an ESP lacks basic automation and triggered campaigns. With the dawn of more sophisticated marketing automation functionality, usability becomes the differentiator.”</p> <h4>2. True personalisation at scale remains elusive for many businesses, though more companies are now reaping the benefits</h4> <p>Email personalisation done properly is currently the preserve of only a minority of businesses, but this percentage is increasing. The proportion of companies who say they can send emails based on individual activities and preferences throughout the funnel at scale has almost doubled from 8% to 15%.</p> <p>Almost three-quarters (71%) of companies adopting personalisation to this degree report an ‘excellent’ or ‘good’ performance from their email campaigns, compared to only 35% for companies who say they ‘are not yet working towards this’.</p> <p><em>Q. Which statement best describes your ability to provide personalised email campaigns?</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5538/personalised_email_campaigns.png" alt="" width="650"></em></p> <p>Personalisation (30%) is the area of email marketing where most respondents say they need to focus on during 2017, ahead of automated campaigns (28%), which was the number one priority area last year.</p> <p>Kath Pay, founder and senior consultant at Holistic Email Marketing, said: “Personalisation at scale is a no-brainer. It can result in providing the consumer with relevant and valuable offers and content served up specifically for that individual based upon their past behaviours (both email and web) and transactions, as well as their lifecycle or buying funnel stage that they’re in.”</p> <h4>3. Companies continue to adapt to consumer use of different devices</h4> <p>The largest jump in terms of uptake of a particular tactic this year is for mobile device optimisation, with almost three-quarters (73%) of companies now doing this compared to just under two-thirds (64%) last year. This 14% increase shows that many marketers are still adapting to the use of mobile devices, even 10 years after the launch of the first iPhone heralded the arrival of smartphones.</p> <p>Nine in ten (90%) company respondents report that they have some form of strategy for optimising email marketing for different devices, up from 86% in 2016, but the proportion of marketers that describe their approach as ‘quite’ or ‘very’ advanced has only moved up one percentage point from 2016, to just 22%.</p> <p>According to Riaz Kanani, MD and co-founder at Radiate b2b: “Designing for mobile is clearly something that is an accepted part of building an email campaign today, with the proportion of marketers without a strategy for mobile almost halving to only 10% in the past few years.</p> <p>"The importance of thinking beyond the email remains though, with responsive landing pages and directly linking to an app critical to increasing conversion rates in mobile.”</p> <p>As was the case last year, a lack of resources (including budget and staff) is seen as the main barrier to success when it comes to effectively optimising email campaigns for different devices.</p> <p>According to the report, a mobile-first approach may be suitable for some types of business, but, given that huge volumes of emails are still consumed on desktop PCs and laptops, companies should ultimately seek to have an approach to email which is device-agnostic.</p> <p><em>Q. What is the main barrier to success when it comes to effectively optimising your email campaigns for different devices?</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5539/email_campaign_barriers.png" alt="" width="650"></em></p> <p><strong><em>For more data and insights, download the full <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census">2017 Email Marketing Industry Census</a>.</em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4457 2017-04-19T09:00:00+01:00 2017-04-19T09:00:00+01:00 Email Marketing Industry Census 2017 <p>The 11th annual <strong>Email Marketing Industry Census</strong>, published in partnership with <a href="http://www.adestra.com">Adestra</a>, is based on the largest UK survey of email marketers.</p> <p>The census takes an in-depth look at email practices being adopted, the resources being dedicated to email and the channel's effectiveness compared to other types of marketing.</p> <p>Personalisation, marketing automation, optimisation for different devices and the future of email are all themes that are revisited in this year's Census, and there are also new questions about the <strong>use of metrics</strong>, the <strong>application of artificial intelligence</strong> and the <strong>impact of Brexit</strong> on how companies are approaching the <strong>EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)</strong>.</p> <p>With <strong>11 years' worth of data to assess</strong>, this provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the state of the industry and find out how those at the coalface of email marketing are operating.</p> <p>Over 1,000 respondents took part in the 2017 Census, which took the form of an online survey in February and March 2017.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>Find out how a variety of trends around email practices, budgets and opinions have changed over 11 years.</li> <li>Discover other marketers' opinions on what the future of email will look like.</li> <li>Benchmark your own practices with the activities of marketers maximising their email efforts.</li> <li>Understand the challenges organisations are facing in improving their email capabilities.</li> </ul> <h2>Key findings from the report</h2> <ul> <li>Marketers get to grips with automation, helped by improved technology</li> <li>Email reigns supreme when it comes to delivering ROI, though companies must do more to measure success</li> <li>Companies are still under-investing in a channel which drove an estimated £29bn in UK online retail sales in 2016</li> <li>Companies continue to adapt to consumer use of different devices</li> <li>True personalisation at scale remains elusive for many businesses, though more companies are starting to reap the benefits</li> <li>Census shows signs of inertia and lack of understanding around EU data law changes</li> <li>Segmentation continues to deliver</li> <li>Responsibility for email shifts from the individual to the team</li> <li>Artificial intelligence can improve email marketing performance</li> </ul> <h2>Expert insight</h2> <p>The <strong>80-page</strong> 2017 report contains insight and comment from leading experts in the email marketing world and associated digital sectors, including:</p> <ul> <li>Andrew Campbell, Martech Director, First 10</li> <li>Chris Combemale, Group CEO, DMA</li> <li>Riaz Kanani, Joint MD and Co-Founder, Radiate b2b</li> <li>Dave Littlechild, Email, Ecommerce and Sales &amp; Marketing Consultant</li> <li>Kath Pay, Founder and Senior Consultant, Holistic Email Marketing</li> <li>Jordie van Rijn, eCRM and Email Marketing Consultant, eMailMonday</li> <li>Philip Storey, Email Marketing and CRM Strategy Consultant, CEO at Enchant Agency</li> <li>Tim Watson, Email Marketing Consultant, Zettasphere</li> </ul> <h2>Features of the report</h2> <ul> <li>Approach to email</li> <li>Email effectiveness</li> <li>Place in the organisation</li> <li>Optimising for different devices</li> <li>Personalisation</li> <li>Marketing automation</li> <li>Improving email marketing for the future</li> </ul> <p><strong>You can download a free sample of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3231 2017-03-21T16:51:04+00:00 2017-03-21T16:51:04+00:00 Email Marketing - Advanced <p>Give your email campaigns an injection of fresh thinking in this fantastic email marketing workshop.</p> <p>You’ll gain advanced, strategic email marketing training and get the opportunity to have your email campaigns reviewed by an industry expert who will provide practical tips for improvement.</p> <p>Strictly limited to 10 places, the workshop allows for plenty of interaction and you’ll be able to bounce ideas off other experienced marketers.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3178 2017-03-21T11:39:19+00:00 2017-03-21T11:39:19+00:00 Intensive: Mastering eCRM <p>Implementing a robust CRM strategy delivers vastly improved effectiveness in your marketing programmes. This three day course will help you understand how CRM can help your business and give you the practical skills to apply and assess CRM techniques in the real world.</p> <p>Econsultancy’s intensives are three-day programmes offering you a deep dive into specific digital disciplines. With content drawn from our academically accredited digital certificates, the intensives offer the practical training without the need for long term commitment.</p> <p>Intensives:</p> <ul> <li>Are led by practitioner trainers</li> <li>Include access to resources to support the training</li> <li>Allow delegates to implement and evaluate what they’ve learnt through ‘homework’ and trainer feedback after training</li> <li>Lead to an Econsultancy certificate of completion</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68886 2017-03-10T14:45:00+00:00 2017-03-10T14:45:00+00:00 10 mega digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Correlation between spam rates and subscriber engagement</h3> <p>The latest report from Return Path highlights how industries that outperform the average on key email marketing metrics (like read rate, reply rate etc.) also see less email delivered to spam folders.</p> <p>While the <a href="https://returnpath.com/downloads/hidden-metrics-email-deliverability/?sfdc=70137000000MhwH" target="_blank">Hidden Metrics of Email Deliverability</a> shows that overall spam placement has increased slightly year on year  - from 13% in 2016 vs 12% in 2015 - levels of positive engagement have significantly improved.</p> <p>In terms of industries, the banking and finance and distribution and manufacturing categories saw just 6% of email delivered to spam folders, while this figure rose to 28% in the automotive category. </p> <p><em>Chart shows percentage of email delivered to spam folders</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4558/Spam_rate.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="353"></p> <h3>Generation X perform four in 10 family travel searches</h3> <p>New research from Bing Ads has revealed how families are searching for holiday inspiration and services online.</p> <p>The <a href="https://advertise.bingads.microsoft.com/en-us/insights/set-sail-for-family-travel-searches-and-clicks" target="_blank">report</a> shows that 59% of searches for family holidays are undertaken by women compared to 41% by men. Similarly, Generation X (those aged 35 to 59) perform four of every 10 searches.</p> <p>Other highlights from the report include how consumers are more likely to use mobile devices to search for inspiration and PCs or tablet devices to make a final reservation. Meanwhile, it appears consumers dream of visiting the beach all year long, meaning companies need to invest in year-round campaigns to capture this evergreen interest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4559/Bing_Ads.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="221"></p> <h3>Nine in 10 consumers concerned about how companies use personal data</h3> <p><a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170307005123/en/Global-Study-Ten-Consumers-Concerned-Data-Security" target="_blank">New research</a> from Verint has found that while more consumers crave highly personalised customer service, they are also increasingly sceptical about how businesses collect and store personal data. </p> <p>From a study of more than 24,000 consumers, 80% said they like service that is personalised to their needs (which in turn relies on the use of customer data to deliver). </p> <p>However, 89% of consumers also want to know how companies keep their personal information secure, and 86% insist that they should know when their data is passed on to third parties.</p> <h3>Kinetic emails increase unique click rates by 18%</h3> <p>Experian’s Q4 2016 <a href="http://www.experian.com/marketing-services/email-benchmark-q4-2015.html" target="_blank">Email Benchmark Report</a> has revealed that kinetic emails – i.e. those that include interactive content like carousel navigation - see greater levels of engagement than any other kind.</p> <p>From analysis of seven brands in 2016, kinetic emails were found to increase unique click rates by as much as 18.3% and click-to-open rates by more than 10% compared to standard emails.</p> <p>The report also highlights that email volume increased 17.4% year-over-year, while metrics like click and transaction rates, revenue per email and average order volumes all remained relatively stable during the same period.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4557/Kinetic_emails.JPG" alt="" width="609" height="446"></p> <h3>British SMEs grow online exports by more than a third</h3> <p>New data from <a href="https://www.paypal.com/stories/uk/open-for-business-paypal-reveals-online-exports-boom" target="_blank">PayPal</a> has revealed how small and medium-sized businesses benefitted from the record lows of the pound last year. </p> <p>SMEs in the UK saw their rate of growth treble to 34% year-on-year from July to December 2016. Similarly, while there was an uplift in PayPal sales for British businesses overall, the biggest impact was seen on small and medium-sized organisations, with the amount international shoppers spent with UK SMEs rising 13% per transaction in the last six months of 2016. </p> <p>Fashion and sports experienced the highest growth, with a 49% year-on-year increase in goods from these categories sold to international shoppers.</p> <h3>Native video ads boost ROI</h3> <p>Yahoo’s <a href="http://b2bmarketing.yahoo.net/yfp-state-of-native/infographic?utm_source=AYC&amp;utm_campaign=Q12017YFPStateofNative&amp;utm_medium=organic" target="_blank">State of Native</a> report suggests that native advertising continues to reign supreme, with the brand seeing exponential growth of native ad consumption in all regions and across all devices.</p> <p>Data from more than 74.5bn native ad impressions show that publishers have seen a 446.7% lift in eCPMs (effective cost per thousand ad impressions) on native video ad placements compared to display.</p> <p>The report also highlights how consumer engagement for specific apps and devices vary by time of day and location. For example, in the US, users spend the late afternoons and evenings on their smartphones, while their nights are spent on desktop. This is compared to other parts of the world, where nights are typically spent on smartphones. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4561/Yahoo.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="286"></p> <h3>Household gifts drive the biggest basket value for Mother’s Day</h3> <p>According to Criteo, Brits are still lacking in imagination when it comes to buying Mother’s Day gifts online.</p> <p>Data reveals that household gifts such as kitchen, laundry appliances and vacuums drive the biggest basket value for online sales. Similarly, gardening tools typically see a boost in sales with spring just around the corner. Last year, there was a 193% increase in units sold in the two week’s leading up to Mother’s Day.</p> <p>In 2016, it was suggested that we spent a total of <a href="http://www.cityam.com/235965/mothers-day-2016-brits-will-spend-928m-this-year-on-mothers-day-gifts" target="_blank">£928m on the day</a>, with this figure expected to rise even higher this year.</p> <h3>TV accounts for 94% of viewed video ads in the UK</h3> <p>New data from <a href="https://www.thinkbox.tv/News-and-opinion/Newsroom/TV-accounts-for-94-percent-of-video-advertising" target="_blank">Thinkbox</a> has revealed that TV accounted for 93.8% of video ads viewed in the UK in 2016. This is the equivalent of 18 minutes and 53 seconds a day.</p> <p>These figures are slightly down on 2015, when TV saw a share of 94.4%. However, other forms of video advertising saw far less engagement, with YouTube accounting for 0.7% of viewed video ads in 2016, while other online video (including Facebook) collectively accounted for 5.2%.</p> <p>The average person is said to have watched 20 minutes of video ads a day in 2016, while total daily video consumption increased to 4 hours, 37 minutes in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4562/Thinkbox.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="435"></p> <h3>Wearables now at an all-time high</h3> <p>The International Data Corporation has revealed that the global wearables market reached a new <a href="http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS42342317" target="_blank">all-time high</a> in the fourth quarter of 2016. In this period, 33.9m units were shipped, representing a year-on-year growth of 16.9%.</p> <p>A total of 102.4m wearable devices were shipped in 2016 – a figure up 25% year-on-year. Insight suggests this could be due to single purpose devices evolving into hybrid ones, fusing together multiple health and fitness capabilities with smartphone technology.</p> <p>In terms of brand dominance, Fitbit continued to reign supreme, with 22.5m shipments being made over the course of the whole year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4560/IDC_wearables.JPG" alt="" width="457" height="396"></p> <h3>64% of decision-makers say sales and marketing teams could be more aligned</h3> <p>According to a YouGov survey of 725 business leaders, commissioned by Huthwaite International, 92% of respondents believe sales and marketing teams should work closely together.</p> <p>Despite this fact, 64% also say that sales and marketing teams need to do more to facilitate this alignment. </p> <p>When it comes to the benefits of working more closely, 52% cited a consistent message delivered to clients and prospects, while 50% said the opportunity to gain new customers. Just 8% of respondents said they didn’t believe there was any benefit.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68824 2017-02-21T09:57:00+00:00 2017-02-21T09:57:00+00:00 10 examples of welcome emails of varying quality from online retailers Nikki Gilliland <p>Despite this, however, <a href="http://performancein.com/news/2017/01/27/why-email-still-king-and-how-be-better-it/" target="_blank">only 51% of the UK’s top ecommerce brands</a> are reportedly sending dedicated welcome emails. Similarly, just 26% use customer names in a first email, while 11% personalise their interactions further.</p> <p>With this in mind, I decided to take a look at how a few top retailers are faring on this front. While I wrote a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67872-email-newsletter-sign-ups-how-fashion-brands-welcome-new-subscribers/" target="_blank">similar article</a> last year, this time I will focus purely on the email content and incorporate non-fashion brands, too.</p> <p>Here are 10 examples, with insight on what they’re doing right (or wrong).</p> <h3>Topshop</h3> <p>First up, Topshop, which goes for an image-heavy hello.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4019/Topshop_1.JPG" alt="" width="470" height="839"></p> <p>While there doesn’t seem to be anything personal about the email at first, there is a prompt for customers to enter in their birthday.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4039/Topshop_2.JPG" alt="" width="470" height="226"></p> <p>Not only does this present an opportunity for Topshop to capture data, but it also gives an incentive for customers to click through to the site itself and (hopefully) have a bit of a browse.</p> <h3>Warehouse</h3> <p>Warehouse is another fashion retailer that opts for impactful imagery. However, it lets itself down a little by failing to offer any personal messaging or strong calls-to-action.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4021/Warehouse_1.JPG" alt="" width="485" height="621"></p> <p>That being said, it nicely highlights its USP – emphasising its delivery and return options and showcasing where customers can find the brand on social.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4045/Warehouse_2.JPG" alt="" width="485" height="572"></p> <h3>West Elm</h3> <p>The welcome email from furniture retailer, West Elm, is strong on many fronts.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4023/West_Elm_1.JPG" alt="" width="485" height="739"></p> <p>Not only does it showcase its various category ranges, but it also gives customers a special 10% discount just for signing up – a nice way to offer instant value and encourage a conversion.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4024/West_Elm_2.JPG" alt="" width="485" height="625"></p> <p>This, alongside a personal tone and promotion of its social media and London store, means it's covering multiple bases in a single email.</p> <p>It could be argued that West Elm tries to pack too much in, but welcome emails achieve high open rates so it's worth testing which elements people are most receptive to.</p> <h3>Farfetch</h3> <p>I had high hopes for Farfetch’s welcome email, however it’s pretty lacklustre in both design and content.</p> <p>Choosing a ‘thank you’ message over a ‘welcome’ could mean users are less likely to browse there and then. For example, the brand could have also said ‘check out our offers’ rather than ‘you’ll now receive offers’ - a subtle change in tone but one that could make a big difference.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4040/Farfetch__1_.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="472"></p> <p>Lastly, I feel like the email could have done with an image or some sort of editorial content at the very least. It's interesting to note the very different designs chosen by Farfetch and West Elm.</p> <h3>Oasis</h3> <p>Despite the Oasis website offering a whole host of enjoyable features, its welcome email doesn’t quite reflect this.</p> <p>It’s still good – there’s a free delivery code included and prominent call-to-action to start shopping – however it lacks any real personalisation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4026/Oasis.JPG" alt="" width="485" height="783"></p> <p>Similarly, while the design is subtle, I can’t help thinking that it could do with a few eye-catching photos, though that might detract from the CTA.</p> <h3>Jo Malone</h3> <p>This welcome message is designed to make each consumer feel special, using the ‘world of Jo Malone’ premise to promote a sense of email exclusivity. </p> <p>With the prompt to ‘discover more’ as well as the promise of a welcome gift, it is sure to drive customers on-site. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4027/Jo_Malone.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="861"></p> <p>I also like the fact that it highlights online perks like samples and the Jo Malone signature box – these are small but lovely features that are ideal for highlighting in a welcome email.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4028/Jo_Malone_2.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="883"></p> <h3>Lakeland</h3> <p>Unlike many of the aforementioned brands, homeware retailer Lakeland goes all out with its welcome message. Unfortunately, it could be a case of clutter over substance.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4029/Lakeland_1.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="857"></p> <p>While a focus on trust and privacy might help to reassure customers, surely signing up to the newsletter means people are already happy to give away data? Likewise, addressing the customer by their surname comes off as too formal.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4030/Lakeland_2.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="849"></p> <p>The second half of the email is a bit more appealing, however, nicely pointing the user to editorial content, social, and customer service.</p> <h3>Net-a-Porter</h3> <p>This example from Net-a-Porter is one of the best on the list, mainly because of a strong focus on personalisation.</p> <p>By prompting users to choose their favourite designers and create their own wish-lists, there is an immediate indication that future emails will be personally tailored to taste.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4031/Net-A-Porter.JPG" alt="" width="530" height="876"></p> <p>Similarly, the editorial-style design is pleasing on the eye, prompting users to check out the content <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68219-four-things-brands-can-learn-about-content-marketing-from-net-a-porter/" target="_blank">found elsewhere on the site</a>.</p> <h3>Marks and Spencer</h3> <p>M&amp;S delivers a subtle but effective first impression to email customers.</p> <p>I particularly like how it promotes the breadth of its products – and the ‘offers’ tab highlighted in red is bound to drive purchases.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4032/M_S.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="802"></p> <p>Likewise, the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64943-12-excellent-ways-to-present-ecommerce-shipping-information/" target="_blank">delivery and returns information</a> helps to provide reassurance.</p> <h3>Whistles</h3> <p>Finally, we’re finishing off with Whistles and its highly impactful welcome.</p> <p>By labelling email customers as the Whistles ‘community’, there is an immediate sense of inclusivity, while the prompt to ‘shop new in’ highlights the fresh and regularly updated product pages.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4033/Whistles_1.JPG" alt="" width="520" height="776"></p> <p>The brand also incorporates social right from the get-go, encouraging consumers to check out its various channels.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4036/Whistles_2.JPG" alt="" width="520" height="785"></p> <p><strong><em>To learn more on this topic, check out Econsultancy’s range of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/email-ecrm/">email marketing training courses</a>.</em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68776 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 10 astounding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>As always, the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> is ready and waiting if you’re in the mood for something a little extra.</p> <h3>34% of brands admit internal silos</h3> <p>New research from Oracle highlights how closer collaboration between sales and marketing teams is required to better target audiences and increase sales.</p> <p>However, despite also recognising the need, many organisations are failing to put it into practice. </p> <p>The Oracle survey found that 34% of brands admit their sales, marketing and customer service teams work completely independently of each other, leading to a lack of customer insight.</p> <p>In terms of the reasons why, 33% blame it on their current systems and technologies, while 30% say their corporate culture makes it tricky for sales and marketing teams to align priorities.</p> <h3>Millennials increasingly influencing tech-buying decisions</h3> <p>With millennials predicted to make up 50% of the US workforce by 2020, <a href="https://business.linkedin.com/marketing-solutions/blog/marketing-for-tech-companies/2017/millennials-and-gen-x-decision-makers-achieving-more--together">Linkedin has been exploring how younger generations</a> are influencing technology buying decisions in the workplace.</p> <p>In a survey of 5,470 global professionals, it found that 61% of younger millennials (age 19-25) contribute to their companies’ technology purchases, with one in three already being decision-makers. Older millennials (those aged 25-35) are said to have even more influence, with 68% contributing to decisions.</p> <p>Lastly, Generation X still holds the power, with 85% of employees aged 36-50 deciding technology purchases or managing the budget.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3667/Linkedin.JPG" alt="" width="428" height="519"></p> <h3>Searches for US visas surge following travel ban</h3> <p>Following Trump’s travel ban, Hitwise data has revealed that searches for American visas have since increased by 34%. More specifically, searches for “visa for USA from UK” and “US visa waiver” have been among the highest.</p> <p>This is similar to what happened after Brexit, when Hitwise witnessed a 300% increase in searches related to moving to the EU. </p> <p>Following the week’s news coverage, approximately one in every 10,000 searches over three days related to the “travel ban”, which is an increase of 2,045% since January 28.</p> <h3> </h3> <h3>One in 10 Gmail users say emails are miscategorised</h3> <p>Gmail’s automatic sorting feature is proving less than effective, with one in 10 users reporting incorrectly categorised messages.</p> <p>This is according to new research from Return Path, leading to warnings that marketers should be more vigilant about how and where their messages are being delivered.</p> <p>The study found that 45% of tabbed inbox users check the ‘Promotions’ tab - used to aggregate marketing promotions and other offers - at least once per day. As a result, if marketing email is delivered to another tab, it could be missed entirely.     </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3665/gmail.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK consumers spent the most via mobile last Christmas </h3> <p>According to Adobe’s latest Digital Index, UK shoppers spent more via mobile last Christmas than the US or any other European nation. </p> <p>Data shows that 60% of online visits to UK retailers over Christmas were made on mobile, and of every £10 spent online in the UK, £4.10 came from a mobile device. </p> <p>Insight suggests that this could be due to a rise in last-minute buying, with the amount spent on the last Monday before Christmas increasing by 50% in 2016.</p> <h3>Live chat leads to greater customer loyalty</h3> <p>A new <a href="https://skilled.co/resources/live-chat-best-customer-service-right-now/" target="_blank">infographic</a> by Skilled highlights how live chat on ecommerce sites can lead to increased levels of customer satisfaction and loyalty.</p> <p>Studies show that 63% of live chat users said they are more likely to return to the site as a result. Interestingly, Mexico is said to be the leader of live chat, with the highest customer satisfaction rate of 94.11%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3663/Skilled.JPG" alt="" width="674" height="342"></p> <h3>Nearly two in five shoppers have used their phone to pay in-store</h3> <p>MEF’s <a href="http://mobileecosystemforum.com/mobile-money-report/" target="_blank">Mobile Money Report</a> has revealed that mobile payments are on the rise, with nearly two in five shoppers using their smartphone to make a purchase in-store.</p> <p>From analysis of 6,000 consumers in nine countries, it also found that 78% of people have made a purchase using an app or mobile site.</p> <p>Mobile banking looks to be on a similar path, with 61% of respondents saying they now use their mobile phone to bank, and 44% using an app to check their balance.</p> <h3>Consumers see over half of brand content as ‘clutter’</h3> <p>The <a href="http://www.meaningful-brands.com/en" target="_blank">Meaningful Brands</a> report by Havas has revealed that over half of consumers view brand content as poor or irrelevant.</p> <p>In a study of 375,000 people across 33 countries, Havas found that while 84% of respondents expect brands to produce content of some kind, 60% of it fails to deliver any personal benefit.</p> <p>Consequently, we can see that the greater the impact on a person’s well-being, the more likely content is to be perceived as meaningful or effective.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3664/Havas.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="426"></p> <h3>80% of marketers describe data as ‘critical’ to success</h3> <p>A new GDMA survey has highlighted how customer data has become an indispensable asset, with 80% of global respondents citing it as critical to their marketing efforts.</p> <p>UK marketers are increasingly relying on data, coming top of all countries when asked about its importance.</p> <p>As a result, investment in data-driven marketing and advertising is still on the rise, with over half of global respondents saying they increased their spending in this area in 2016.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68727 2017-01-20T14:14:00+00:00 2017-01-20T14:14:00+00:00 10 of the best digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Don’t forget, you can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more insight.</p> <p>On we go...</p> <h3>Less than half of consumers satisfied with retail apps</h3> <p>New research from Apadmi has found that retail apps are failing to meet the expectations of consumers, with just 40% of UK consumers being satisfied with the apps they’ve downloaded in the past.</p> <p>Nearly one in five say they would like retailers to invest more heavily in improving apps, while 30% would be more likely to use them if they had a wider range of features. </p> <p>Lastly, 25% of consumers say they would think less of a retailer that failed to update its app regularly.</p> <h3>Online searches for food trends increase</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise has revealed that online searches related to diet, nutrition and super-food have risen by 70% in the past two years. Searches for ‘gluten-free’ have become particular popular, rising 141% since 2014. </p> <p>Meanwhile, searches for ‘paleo’ enjoyed a big spike at the start of 2016, however with New Year’s resolutions waning, interest declined as the months passed.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3234/Gluten_Free_Searches.png" alt="" width="624" height="310"></p> <h3>92% of online consumers don’t intend to buy during a first visit </h3> <p>A new report by Episerver has discovered that too much of a focus on conversion means retailers could be missing out on opportunities for engagement.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 consumers, it was found that 92% who visit an ecommerce website or mobile app with the intent of buying rarely or never complete checkout.</p> <p>This reflects the importance of relevant and engaging content that supports the entire purchase journey, rather than content that's geared around getting consumers to buy.</p> <h3>Location &amp; convenience drives supermarket shoppers </h3> <p>Despite continual ‘price wars’ between the big four supermarkets, consumers don’t choose where to shop based on low prices - this is according to a new study by TCC.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,530 UK shoppers, proximity and location was found to have the biggest influence on where consumers shop, with 48% of Brits citing this as the main factor. </p> <p>40% of survey respondents said a decent range of products and services, 39% said habit and familiarity, while just 34% said low prices. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3243/sainsburys.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="433"></p> <h3>Half of students predict online tracking would improve grades</h3> <p>According to new research by Kortext, 47% of students believe that they would achieve better grades if their lecturers were able to track their study habits throughout the academic year.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 current and former students, 91% said they would be happy for universities to use analytics to track weekly progress, while 76% said that a closer monitoring of study habits would lead to fewer university dropouts.</p> <h3>Over 50s spend 71% more per visit than younger shoppers</h3> <p>Coniq has found that shoppers over the age of 50 tend to spend 71% more in shopping centres than younger people, despite visiting 25% less.</p> <p>The research also found that the over 50s complete around 45% of transactions per trip, which is a much higher amount compared to other consumer age groups. Likewise, older consumers were found to make use of 31% more offers than younger age demographics.</p> <p>For retailers, this proves the importance of older consumers, with the over 55s now expected to make up two thirds of all retail activity by 2025.</p> <h3>Advertisers wasted over 600m on non-viewable ads in 2016</h3> <p>According to the latest report from Meetrics, UK advertisers spent approximately £606m on online ads that failed to meet the minimum viewability standards in 2016.</p> <p>In the final quarter of the year, just 49% of banner ads met the recommendation that 50% of the ad is in view for at least one second.</p> <p>Despite the figure being a slight improvement on Q2, it still remains a noticeable drop from the 54% viewability level of Q1 2016.</p> <p>In comparison to other European countries, this means the UK is lagging behind, with Austria and France having 69% and 60% viewability levels respectively. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3229/Viewability.png" alt="" width="540" height="371"></p> <h3>50% of consumers uninspired by finance marketing</h3> <p>A new study by 3radical has delved into consumer perceptions of marketing campaigns across the UK’s largest industries.</p> <p>Efforts from banks and brands within the finance industry were found to be the most ineffective, with 50% of survey respondents citing marketing campaigns as uninspiring. </p> <p>38% of consumers said the same thing about fashion and beauty marketing, making it the second-worst performing industry. In contrast, supermarkets and technology brands both scored well, with 80% of Brits believing supermarkets’ marketing to be effective, and 79% saying the same for technology brands.</p> <h3>Email rated as the best performing marketing channel</h3> <p>According to the DMA’s latest benchmarking report, email remains in good health, with 41% of marketers rating it as the best-performing channel.</p> <p>Now at 98%, email delivery rate is at its highest ever, increasing by 11 percentage points since 2010. </p> <p>Lastly, despite some decline in recent years, unique open rates and unique click-to-open rates remain steady, currently at 15% and 20% respectively.</p> <p><em>Total emails delivered</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3227/DMA_email.JPG" alt="" width="622" height="404"></p> <h3>Aldi named as one of the UK’s most customer-centric retailers</h3> <p>Dunnhumby’s latest global index report has revealed that Aldi, Lidl and Tesco are the UK’s most customer-centric retailers.</p> <p>The findings are based on the key drivers behind a customer’s likelihood to repurchase from a retailer as well as desire to recommend it, including factors like ‘affinity’, ‘range and service’ and ‘rewards’.</p> <p>Aldi was ranked highest for ease and price, Tesco for its customer loyalty programmes, and Lidl for its value-focused approach.</p>