tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/data-analytics Latest Data & Analytics content from Econsultancy 2017-04-26T12:24:21+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69034 2017-04-26T12:24:21+01:00 2017-04-26T12:24:21+01:00 Amazon launches 'Subscribe with Amazon' to help companies sell subscriptions Patricio Robles <p>The <a href="https://www.subscribewithamazon.com/">marketplace</a>, which is said to have been in development for the past year, was born out of Amazon's homegrown subscription initiatives. "Over the years, Amazon has gained extensive experience in the memberships and subscriptions space, innovating across programs like Prime and Kindle Unlimited," Lovina McMurchy, the GM of Subscribe with Amazon, <a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170424005365/en/Amazon-Launches-Self-Service-Marketplace-Subscription-Providers">explained</a> in a press release. </p> <p>Vendors interested in selling through Subscribe with Amazon have access to self-service tools that allow them to create detail pages for their offerings. An API allows vendors to receive order data and updates from Amazon so that they can automate the management of subscriptions. As one would expect, Amazon is giving vendors the ability to sell subscriptions with different terms, such as monthly and annual, and also allows them to offer introductory pricing to new subscribers.</p> <p>Initial Subscribe with Amazon partners include Disney Story Central, The Wall Street Journal and Dropbox. Currently, Subscribe with Amazon is accepting applications from vendors that sell digital content, but it would not be surprising to see Amazon later extend it to subscription services that offer physical products.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5680/subscribewithamazon.png" alt="" width="768" height="450"></p> <h4>Distribution, but at what cost?</h4> <p>Subscribe with Amazon's primary value proposition is that it offers subscription vendors a marketplace through which they can sell to Amazon's massive customer base. To help them sell, Amazon is even offering vendors the ability to create special promotions for Prime members, which are now estimated to number more than 65m.</p> <p>For example, one Subscribe with Amazon launch partner, Texture, offers a 50% discount to Prime members for the first six months of a subscription to its digital magazine service.</p> <p>In addition to helping vendors market their wares, Subscribe with Amazon could, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68792-amazon-payments-usage-grows-should-you-adopt-it/">like Pay with Amazon</a>, reduce purchase friction because it enables Amazon customers to purchase and manage subscriptions through their existing Amazon accounts, speeding the purchase process and reducing concerns about trust. Such concerns are often more pronounced in subscription purchases because charges are recurring. </p> <p>But despite the appealing aspects of Subscribe with Amazon, vendors will probably want to think carefully before they embrace Amazon's new offering.</p> <p>First, there's the issue of margin. Amazon takes a 30% cut of subscription revenue in the first year. That drops to 15% after the first year. While giving up 30% and then 15% might make sense for some vendors – it's in line with what other distribution channels charge – it might not make sense for others and vendors will want to do the math to determine the potential impact on the profitability of their business, especially if they consider that some Subscribe with Amazon subscriptions may displace some portion of subscriptions that would otherwise be sold direct.</p> <p>Second, there's the issue of data and customer ownership. While Amazon is giving vendors access to order data through an API, Subscribe with Amazon will obviously give the online retail giant the ability to collect significant data about its vendors. And it will own the relationships with customers who purchase using Subscribe with Amazon.</p> <p>Data and customer ownership is a thorny issue for vendors. After all, Amazon increasingly competes with companies that sell in its marketplaces. For example, it has launched its own private brands in categories ranging from apparel to electronics accessories. Some companies believe that Amazon <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67769-the-rise-of-amazon-s-private-labels-shows-the-perils-of-not-owning-your-data-customers">has used its vast trove of sales data to identify products that its private labels should sell</a>.</p> <p>Given that Amazon already operates a number of digital subscription services of its own, the company's actions in other markets make it clear subscription vendors will have no choice but to consider that Subscribe with Amazon could eventually help the retail giant at their expense.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68986 2017-04-24T15:00:00+01:00 2017-04-24T15:00:00+01:00 How AI is bound to change B2B sales and marketing forever Maz Nadjm <p>As a result, our experiences as consumers and humans becomes more seamless and pleasant. It doesn’t take long to get used to this, to the point that some of us are now starting to expect a certain level of personalisation prompted by artificial intelligence systems in our interactions with brands in the B2C space.</p> <p>As <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67745-15-examples-of-artificial-intelligence-in-marketing/">AI technologies</a> become the norm, B2B companies will be expected to provide the same level of smart automation as their B2C counterparts. Most professionals are well aware of this; according to a recent report by Demandbase, <a href="https://www.demandbase.com/press-release/marketing-executives-predict-artificial-intelligence-will-revolutionize-marketing-2020/">80% of B2B marketing executives</a> predict artificial intelligence will revolutionise marketing by 2020. </p> <p>Yet, only 10% of them are currently using AI for their business. Even more interestingly, a recent Forrester study reported that <a href="https://www.forrester.com/One+Million+B2B+Sales+Jobs+Eliminated+By+2020/-/E-PRE7784">nearly 75% of B2B buyers prefer to buy online</a> when purchasing products for work, yet just 25% of B2B companies actively sell online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5368/AiBlog1-02.png" alt="" width="678" height="425"></p> <p>B2B marketing and sales departments that will become early adopters of AI are bound to see amazing results very quickly. But in order to get started and to build a strong business case for this type of technology within your organisation, it is essential to understand how it can benefit your business right now, and not in a futuristic tomorrow. </p> <p>There are two areas in particular where AI and machine learning can help B2B sales and marketing teams achieve their ambitious goals right now:</p> <h4>1. Better insights, better strategy</h4> <p><a href="https://www.salesforce.com/form/pdf/state-of-the-connected-customer.jsp">Salesforce’s 2016 Connected Customer report</a> highlighted that by 2020 57% of business buyers will switch brands if a company doesn’t actively anticipate their needs. It is not uncommon to read about this being the ‘era of the customer’, and companies that can really put their clients and prospects at the centre of their marketing and sales efforts are bound to win big in the short term.</p> <p>With the right kind and the right amount of data, B2B businesses will be able to design strategies that will anticipate the needs of their customers at an unprecedented level. The same way our ‘Discover Weekly’ Spotify playlist seems to know us better than we know ourselves, B2B vendors can use behavioural analysis and machine learning to understand their customers’ pain points and suggest ad hoc solutions in a cost-effective and efficient way. </p> <p>As much as ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/predictive-analytics-report/">predictive analytics</a>’ sound like something out of a 1970s sci-fi film, truth is that they are already part of our lives. When building the audience for a specific Facebook ad or letting Mailchimp optimise the best time to send out your monthly newsletter, all you are doing is allowing a software to suggest a course of action based on the data it already has. </p> <p>As time goes by and the amount of data available to us grows to unimaginable amounts, this process is only bound to become more and more refined.</p> <p> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5366/aiblogpost3-03__1_.png" alt="" width="440" height="378"> </p> <h4>2. More time to do your (real) job</h4> <p>Since the beginning of time, good technology has been amazing at helping us be more productive. What was true for the invention of the wheel is certainly still relevant in the age of software that can learn from the outcome of their own assumptions and actions (aka artificial intelligence). Both sales and marketing teams can see a spike in productivity when implementing the right kind of AI tech.</p> <p>When it comes to sales teams, a well-functioning process including AI technology can save hours, if not days, on a weekly basis spent on prospecting. Who has clicked on your email, who has engaged with your LinkedIn post, and was there a commonality between the pieces of content that raised that person’s interest? </p> <p>What was, until now, up to a salesperson’s instincts to identify and understand can be easily turned into consumable data to be analysed by a smart programme. The result is that sales teams can spend a lot more time on building meaningful relationships and starting real conversations with prospects and customers while gaining a deeper understanding of their existing pain points. </p> <p>Through AI-powered smart content discovery, sales teams can source the most relevant information to share with their prospects on social media to address their challenges in a timely and non-intrusive way.</p> <p>But sales teams are not the only ones to benefit from smart machines crunching data faster than any human being (however smart they may be). When freed by the burden of data cleaning, marketing teams can spend more time on what makes their job so great: creativity. </p> <p>Good machine learning helps you understand your audience and your buyer personas at a much deeper level and develop a message that will be relevant to them at the most convenient time. When data sorting is being taken care of in a time-saving way, marketers’ time can be freed up and be spent on creating original and truly outstanding ideas. </p> <h4>In summary...</h4> <p>In contrast to what a lot of us may think, AI is already part of our lives.</p> <p>Those B2B companies that see its potential and take concrete steps towards implementing these new technologies within their sales and marketing departments will be the most likely to succeed in the next few years.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:RoundtableEvent/866 2017-04-04T11:44:17+01:00 2017-04-04T11:44:17+01:00 Data Driven Marketing <p>In the digital age we’re led to believe that all marketing should be data-driven, but that often isn’t the case. Econsultancy research shows that 25% of marketers use analytics to drive actionable recommendations, while a further 60% are ’sometimes’ able to make data-driven decisions.</p> <p>It seems that turning those data lakes into actionable insights remains an ongoing challenge for most marketers. So how can we begin to better exploit the data we have available?</p> <p>This roundtable discussion will give attendees the chance to discuss how best to implement and optimise a data-driven marketing strategy. Talking points could include:</p> <ul> <li>The fundamentals of a data-driven strategy.</li> <li>How to move from reporting to offering insights and advice.</li> <li>How to improve your own analytical skills.</li> <li>Which analytics tools are worth using? And which should be avoided?</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4456 2017-03-31T15:48:00+01:00 2017-03-31T15:48:00+01:00 Measuring ROI on Influencer Marketing <h2>Overview</h2> <p>Marketers spent between £20,000 and £40,000 per influencer marketing programme last year, which is expected to double in 2017. However, proving ROI on influencer marketing has been identified as one of the biggest challenges by brands and influencers alike.</p> <p>The Measuring ROI on Influencer Marketing best practice guide, produced in association with Fashion and Beauty Monitor, is aimed at helping marketers understand the challenges at hand, explore standardised metrics being used by the fashion and beauty industry and learn best practice tips that will help action a more profitable influencer marketing strategy.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>The importance of measuring ROI on influencer marketing </li> <li>Why bigger influencers aren't necessarily better</li> <li>Industry attitudes and perceptions on measuring ROI</li> <li>What benchmarks are currently available?</li> <li>The metrics that brands are using to measure ROI</li> <li>Should ROI be measured on sales and conversion?</li> <li>Action points and best practice tips</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68916 2017-03-30T15:15:00+01:00 2017-03-30T15:15:00+01:00 Is cost-per-offline-visit the future of mobile advertising? Patricio Robles <p>Location-based adtech firm xAd thinks so. xAd, which uses a proprietary platform to "[automate] geo-boundaries around key places and points of interest" and says it delivers ads to 500m users each month, recently <a href="http://www.xad.com/press-releases/xad-pushes-industry-forward-introducing-first-market-cost-per-visit-model-guaranteeing-offline-visits/">announced</a> a new pay-per-visit ad offering in the US that will allow advertisers to pay for ads only when they drive consumers through the doors of their stores.</p> <p>According to the company, "This new model represents a major shift in accountability from the buyer to partner solution, bringing improved transparency and accountability to the advertising industry.</p> <p>"With the advent of fake news and some of the industry's most plaguing questions surrounding 'the quality and efficacy of served impressions,' xAd's move toward a more advanced performance-based model takes the complexity out of having to navigate industry pitfalls like viewability and ad fraud."</p> <p>The pay-per-visit offering features third-party verification of visits through Placed, a location measurement firm, and xAd says that The Home Depot and Applebee's have signed on as launch partners. xAd isn't revealing how much advertisers will pay for each visit; its website states that pricing "varies by industry."</p> <h3>Is the location marketing era finally upon us?</h3> <p>Some, like UM Worldwide's US digital head Joshua Lowcock, thinks pay-per-visit could be as important a development as pay per click was. "The difference is, there are no accidental clicks when it comes to foot traffic. If a brand's focus is to drive store visits, you should be able to pay for those visits. Now you can align strategy directly to investment, creating an efficient, powerful buying model, one I believe can really cement location as a strategic must for marketers," he said.</p> <p>Indeed, location looks like it will soon be a strategic must for marketers as more and more companies decide to offer up the location technologies they've developed to marketers.</p> <p>For example, Foursquare, which now describes itself as a "technology company that uses location intelligence to build meaningful consumer experiences and business solutions," <a href="https://medium.com/foursquare-direct/on-announcing-foursquares-pilgrim-sdk-cb3f6ab9cfa8#.3wadm7oau">just announced</a> that it is opening up a software development kit that will allow developers to incorporate Pilgrim, its core technology platform behind its Places database, stop detection, and snap-to-place awareness, into their apps.</p> <p>And <a href="https://medium.com/foursquare-direct/introducing-foursquare-analytics-a-dynamic-foot-traffic-dashboard-for-brands-9ce60aa93b42#.acdd9c2r7">it's launching</a> Foursquare Analytics, a "dynamic foot traffic dashboard for brands" that is currently being used by brands including Taco Bell, TGI Fridays, H&amp;M, Lowe's and Equinox.</p> <p>The timing for a golden era of location marketing couldn't come soon enough for retailers with physical locations. Thanks in large part to changing consumer behavior driven by the Amazonification of commerce, <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2017/03/22/retailers-closing-stores-sears-kmart-jcpenney-macys-mcsports-gandermountian/99492180/">a growing number of retailers</a> are downsizing and fighting for survival.</p> <p>While solutions like xAd Cost Per Visit and Foursquare Analytics alone won't save them, having better insights into consumer behavior, the ability to target consumers at the right place and time when they're on the go, and the option to pay for ads only when they drive visits to their stores could help give retailers that jump on the location marketing bandwagon quickly enough a fighting chance.</p> <p><em><strong>For more on this topic, read:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67418-what-is-location-based-advertising-why-is-it-the-next-big-thing/"><em>What is location-based advertising &amp; why is it the next big thing?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66171-six-useful-mobile-marketing-case-studies/"><em>Six useful mobile marketing case studies</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/863 2017-03-26T15:24:36+01:00 2017-03-26T15:24:36+01:00 Digital Outlook 2017 Part 2 - The Sequel <p>We hear you, and we understand that there are still many digital marketing topics that were not covered at <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154296603034327" target="_blank">Digital Outlook 2017</a>.</p> <p>We have selected the next six trending digital marketing topics to be presented at this event. Join us in this half day session to find out the trends and digital marketing best practices for the year.</p> <p>There will be 6 keynotes - all aiming to provide the audience with a outlook for the year.</p> <p>&gt;&gt;&gt; <strong>Overview of the 2017's trending digital marketing topics</strong></p> <p>&gt;&gt;&gt; <strong>Trends, best practices and c</strong><strong>ase studies</strong></p> <p>Hear from leading practitioners and network with industry players to learn what digital marketers should focus today to plan for tomorrow and succeed later.</p> <h4>Special Announcement</h4> <p>In partnership with NTUC, e2i and WSG, Econsultancy is carring out a research on <strong>digital marketing training and development needs in Singapore for 2017</strong>. Please help us improve our training courses by completing the short survey <a href="http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3421857/b9062f550750" target="_blank">here</a>. In return for your time, you can redeem a discount on Econsultancy training courses in Singapore. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68937 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 Stories from SXSW 2017: ad blocking, content distribution, and Joe Biden Nick Hammond <p>These looked at the areas of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">ad blocking</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">influencer marketing</a>, social video, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66752-10-steps-to-better-content-distribution/">content distribution</a>, and the thoughts of Joe Biden, former Vice-President of the USA.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP67501">Ending The Ad Blocking Wars</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included representatives from Brave Software, The New York Times, Digital Context Next and The Christian Science Monitor. They considered whether publishers can improve the ad experience to persuade readers to turn off blockers? Or will add blockers bring about the end of the free web?</p> <p>As you may imagine there was no simple solution to this conundrum. The two biggest players in the digital space (you know who they are) are not affected by ad blocking and therefore are not bothered by its effects. </p> <p>Although ad blocking is plateauing (<a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/uk-ad-blocking-levels-stabilise-22/1425085?bulletin=campaign_breakfast_briefing&amp;utm_medium=EMAIL&amp;utm_campaign=eNews%20Bulletin&amp;utm_source=20170223&amp;utm_content=www_campaignlive_co_uk_ar_6">at least in the UK</a>), the real squeeze is on smaller publishers, the little guys getting caught in the middle. These organisations are caught in an imperfect storm, made up of greater reliance on ad revenues and lacking the engineering investment levels and knowledge to respond to the threat.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/5034/adblock-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="163"></p> <p>As a result of this, there is a real possibility of local, smaller publishers, starting to disappear. This could create a regional ‘news desert’ as even more people seek their news from social media. Currently 44% of Americans use Facebook as a news source and the number is rising. </p> <p>There was also a discussion around different types of ad blockers. Much of the debate tends to be around the big players, such as AdBlock which has 200m downloads; but there are other providers with different business models. <a href="https://brave.com">Brave Software</a> (represented on the panel) doesn’t just remove ads – it replaces them with new ads and splits the revenue between publishers, users, network partners and the company itself.</p> <p>Brendan Eich from Brave suggested that this software is the first ‘post-bad’ ad blocking solution. Still early days for this, 'softer' ad blocking model and it will be interesting to see how it plays out.</p> <p>Predictably, content was identified as a way to get around this challenge. The NYT emphasized the importance of engaging content – ‘pull instead of push’ – and advised strongly against using technology to push advertising onto consumers.</p> <p>Sponsored ‘native’ content is not necessarily the panacea to solve this problem, as publishers often tag creative to acquire more data; these are then identified as ads and therefore blocked. </p> <p>Ad fraud was a serious related issue discussed, with an estimated 23% of global video traffic being served to robots. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65228">The Hundred Thousand Dollar Snap(chat)</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this one was ShopStyle and Neiman Marcus, who considered the opportunities and challenges arising from social commerce, as well as the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">growing importance of influencers</a>, particularly within retail.</p> <p>The background to this is the change in consumers’ consumption of media and the importance of the mobile channel. 30% of all time online is spent on social and 60% of that is on mobile.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5033/snapchat_logo.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="243"></p> <p>As is often not the case, influencer activity should be approached in the same manner as any other communications campaign. It is not safe to assume that a single endorsement – ‘one and done’ – will do the trick. An effective frequency of ‘seven’, was mentioned as appropriate to the fashion retail sector. As with other channels, planning should be considered over an extended activity period, not as a series of one-offs. </p> <p>In addition, activity should not undermine influencers connections with their followers, and these retail influencers can be initially incentivised through special deals to offer to their followers. </p> <p>An interesting analogy compared the purchasing process for expensive items, such as for a Chanel bag, to the dating process; where buyers return to the store to view and interact with the product over time. In instances like these, iterative influencer messages can be effective in moving an individual closer to purchase.</p> <p>Strategies need to be different across separate social channels. Facebook is all about advertising, whilst Instagram benefits from a more organic approach. Snapchat is the new kid on the block and the hardest to measure. </p> <p>Above all, brands need to work out when to act as themselves, or through influencers in the social space. What are the key KPIs, how to measure these and how to ensure valuable content lives effectively beyond social channels? </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP97038">Social Video and The Future of Consumption</a></strong></p> <p>Representatives from Vox Media, Vice Media and the New York Times joined this panel to discuss how social media is impacting video journalism. This session made very clear that Facebook is now the platform for video consumption. </p> <p>The NYT identified Facebook as ‘the stage’, and the essential channel for engagement and getting time with its audience. A major focus for NYT is around <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">Facebook Live</a>, which is being used to provide real-time coverage of news events. They are even looking at using this channel to create crowd-sourced investigations, a kind of mass citizen journalism.</p> <p>The upside of the live video phenomenon is that brands have an opportunity to powerfully engage with a massive audience, using current, exciting and rapidly changing content. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnytimes%2Fvideos%2F10151119750979999%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="476"></iframe></p> <p>The downside of live unedited content, is a concern around quality and the loss of editorial perspective. As a result, insightful user comments can be important to create context; but recognising this may not always be the case, Vice has indicated that all user comments are monitored in real-time.</p> <p>More controversially, the <a href="https://tytnetwork.com">The Young Turks</a> news channel is allowing users to pay to have their comments listed. Although the rise in importance of user comments can be seen as a democratic trend, allowing a financial bias on inputs would seem rather less altruistic. </p> <p>Another concern is that a publisher brand cannot easily prevent incorrect stories or unsuitable content being viewed. They can provide a retraction or an alternative perspective later on; but this may be seen by many fewer people. A good example of this would be the <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/10/technology/hillary-clinton-google-search-results/">SourceFed Hilary Clinton conspiracy theory</a>. </p> <p>For me, this progression towards an ‘always-on’ society is worryingly redolent of Dave Eggers' book, and now film, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCOXARv6J9k">The Circle.</a></p> <p>In any event, the benchmark for how quality video is defined is changing rapidly as we transition from a ‘TV-centric’ to ‘mobile video-centric’ world. In the digital space, where everyone with a phone is a director, quality is now less about production values and more about the story, speed and authenticity. </p> <p>Separate approaches to video content are needed across different channels. For example on Facebook a ‘raw’ approach is more appropriate and authentic. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy/">Episodic content</a> on Snapchat is popular, with bitesize ‘episodes’ being used to tell a story in a manner entirely fitting to the medium. </p> <p>With live video, there is also a greater ethical onus on brands to decide what they will show and what they will not. A good example of content that could be considered to be on this demarcation line is <a href="http://mashable.com/2016/10/21/snapchat-breaking-news/#i0SLEFuJPsql">Snapchat’s coverage of the conflict in Mosul</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65066">Content Distribution Platforms – Friends or Foes?</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included The Economist, Conde Nast International, The Young Turks and ABC News. They looked at how<em> </em>publishers are becoming more reliant than ever on content distribution platforms such as Facebook and Snapchat to reach new audiences. </p> <p>A good starting point for this session was mention of Emily Bell’s 2016 article <a href="http://www.cjr.org/analysis/facebook_and_media.php">Facebook Is Eating The World</a>.</p> <p>Facebook is the key platform under consideration here, as it increasingly becomes the place where online content is consumed. It’s importance and control over brand content has increased with the rise of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67544-facebook-to-open-up-instant-articles-what-publishers-need-to-know/">Instant Articles</a>, as opposed to publisher feeds, keeping traffic within the Facebook ecosystem. As an aside, Snapchat was seen to be on the rise but not currently a viable global option. </p> <p>With this is in mind, the panel considered that Facebook was both a friend and a foe. It was seen to be a friend in terms of providing a broad distribution platform and a foe with regards to its control over advertising revenues. </p> <p>According to Steve Oh of The Young Turks, the key to content success with Facebook is threefold:</p> <ul> <li>Creating regular, relevant content</li> <li>Swift use of new product features released</li> <li>Focus on building an audience </li> </ul> <p>The Economist’s approach is to focus on bite size content that lures customers towards subscription, with news topics including ‘on this day’ and ‘famous quotes’. A specific approach is with ‘Vimages’, using Facebook <a href="http://www.niemanlab.org/2016/09/with-vimages-the-economist-is-using-facebook-to-make-low-budget-video-versions-of-its-stories/">to re-package magazine stories into video form</a>.</p> <p>One of the questions in the session, was how to keep up with the rapid changes at Facebook and the best ways to share content. There was no clear answer, but suggestions included looking for Newsroom tips, and Google Alerts pertaining to Facebook algorithms. </p> <p><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP61899"><strong>Art + Science: Videos That Inform, Inspire &amp; Scale</strong></a></p> <p>Finally, PopSugar's David Grant discussed what brand marketers need to know about creating video that engages their target audience at scale while delivering on brand KPIs. The session sought to explain the success of PopSugar in targeting millennial women.</p> <p>The starting point for the brand's success is to understand, as does Snapchat, the increasing cultural relevance of the camera (<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html?_r=0">as identified in this NYT article</a>) and that humans naturally gravitate towards content that is made up of <a href="http://www.kvibe.com/2015/03/17/why-we-as-humans-gravitate-towards-video/">sight, sound and motion.</a></p> <p>PopSugar creates videos that inform, and are created from a combined perspective drawn from its brand, brand partners and their data. PopSugar has created its own tool, <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/how-popsugars-new-tool-will-help-you-stay-ahead-social-media-trends-174640/">Trend Rank</a>, to help it identify areas of content focus, supply ‘velocity data predicting’ and find trends ahead of time.</p> <p>Grant observed that, with video, companies typically have only one second to make an impact, so selected content has only that time to have an effect. </p> <p>Some examples of PopSugar's recent successful native content campaigns are: </p> <ul> <li>Doubletree by Hilton: ‘Find Your Happy’ campaign. Building on the fact that Hilton always leaves a cookie for its guests, PopSugar a campaign focusing on wider acts <a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Random-Acts-Kindness-You-Can-Do-Every-Day-40742607">of kindness and generosity</a>.</li> <li>Garner Shampoo: ‘Photo Ready Mums’. Based on the insight that mums often take pictures of the family, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzaKYqPYKyo">but regret that they are not in the pictures themselves;</a> this campaign shows how mums can be in the photos, and look great, with the help of Garner. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Joe Biden</strong></p> <p>And finally, some lessons from the keynote speech of SXSW 2017 (and a totally inspiring moment) from Joe Biden, former Vice-President of The United States. </p> <p>Perhaps more recently famous for his (unwitting) appearance in <a href="http://www.boredpanda.com/funny-barack-obama-joe-biden-tweets/">a sequence of memes with Barack Obama</a>, Joe Biden appeared on stage in Austin to raise awareness and seek support for his <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/09/biden-outlines-steps-to-pursue-post-obama-cancer-moonshot.html">cancer Moon-shot agenda</a>.</p> <p>He discussed the progress made during Obama's presidency by the call for innovative solutions to tackle the barriers that prevent faster gains in ending cancer; and described how he plans to remain in the fight. </p> <p>This talk has a wider relevance for business because, as Joe Biden put it, organisations involved in the cancer treatment process had become ‘siloed by design’ and their ability to face the growing threat of this disease was limited by this lack of co-operation.</p> <p>One of these silo-related issues was the low number of patients involved in clinical trials (only 4/100) as there was no system for companies to match the correct trial drugs to the correct patients and vice versa. In addition a database of patient learnings was not being effectively shared between hospitals.</p> <p>Biden’s efforts to break down the barriers in the cancer treatment process are a lesson to organisations who may have similar silo problems. </p> <p>Organisations in this process have started to collaborate and other bodies have become involved in the fight. NASA is adding information regarding the impact of radiation on astronauts, and Amazon has provided free cloud data storage for the project.  </p> <p>There is also focus on clear KPIs and where the biggest return on investment can be derived. As Biden said, of any process "where everything is treated as equally important, then nothing is considered important."</p> <p>The key to the project’s increasing success (apart from the obvious profile of the promoter) is the open sharing of information, offering clear encouragement and, of course, giving hope.</p> <p>Inspiring stuff and a lesson to all businesses interested in breaking down silos and identifying priorities.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3232 2017-03-23T09:15:34+00:00 2017-03-23T09:15:34+00:00 Advanced Mastering Analytics – Singapore <p>A one-day workshop covering the principles of data analytics, focusing on digital marketing, and a practical approach to delivering meaningful data analytics to your organization.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3224 2017-03-21T12:43:33+00:00 2017-03-21T12:43:33+00:00 Web Measurement and Analytics <p>If you are to get the best results from your website, leveraging digital insight is essential. This course focuses on using web analytics and other data sources to improve results from your website through analysis of site visitor characteristics and behaviour.</p> <p>You'll learn how to produce a plan to develop the most appropriate metrics, tools and digital marketing improvement process for your organisation.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3174 2017-03-21T11:33:08+00:00 2017-03-21T11:33:08+00:00 Intensive: Mastering Analytics <p>Develop your analytics strategy and gain practical skills in measurement, interpretation, optimisation and prediction.</p> <p>The volume of data, analytics tools and different sources relevant to digital is ever-increasing and getting value from that data requires a focused and structured approach.</p> <p>This three day course will arm you with the practical knowledge and skills you need to transform this wealth of data into increased performance and better strategic decisions. </p> <p>The Mastering Analytics Intensive covers the full analytics journey from planning measurement and data collection through to the practicalities of analysing, optimising and predicting behaviour.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Econsultancy’s intensives are three-day programmes offering you a deep dive into specific digital disciplines. The intensives offer the practical training without the need for long term commitment.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Intensives</strong>: </p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Are led by practitioner trainers</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Include access to resources to support the training</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Allow delegates to implement and evaluate what they’ve learnt through ‘homework’ and trainer feedback after training</p>