tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/data-analytics Latest Data & Analytics content from Econsultancy 2016-12-08T15:40:00+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4351 2016-12-08T15:40:00+00:00 2016-12-08T15:40:00+00:00 The New Marketing Reality <p>There can be no doubt that marketers are keen to embrace new platforms and technologies to help them drive growth. Sadly, it would appear that there is still a <strong>gap between those goals and the methods they have at their disposal to achieve them</strong>.</p> <p>The challenge is that while new technologies and the data that underpins them have the potential to create a truly omnichannel customer experience, marketers' methodologies are still forcing everything through the same <strong>outdated, siloed processes</strong>.</p> <p><strong>The traditional funnel no longer works.</strong> It assumes audiences are linear and predictable in their behaviour. At the same time, it doesn't take into account the fact that people will act the way they want to act, rather than sticking to a sequence designed by marketers.</p> <p>To help marketers break free from these processes that are stopping them from capitalising on the opportunities that more agile, disruptive companies are enjoying, this report identifies some <strong>key areas ripe for change</strong>.</p> <p><strong>The New Marketing Reality</strong> report, produced in association with <a title="IBM Watson Marketing" href="https://www.ibm.com/watson/marketing/">IBM Watson Marketing</a>, explores the challenges that marketers face in the three key battlefields of data, customer experience and business outcomes.</p> <p>Findings include:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Audience segmentation</strong> is the topmost priority, with 72% of executives stating that they are using their data to support this activity. It is viewed as a standard tactic by even the most laggard of companies. The next most popular data-related activity is <strong>customer journey mapping</strong>, with 67% practising it.</li> <li>The vast majority (80%) of those who rate their ability to understand the customer journey across channels and devices as 'advanced' or 'intermediate' find customer journey mapping or analysis 'highly valuable' and the remaining 20% claim it is 'quite valuable'.</li> <li>Most respondents are still <strong>finding it hard to move out of the channel-focused mindset</strong>, hampered by both technology and organisational structure.</li> <li>Considering that 83% of more advanced companies claim to practise customer journey mapping, we might expect less channel focus but 59% still have <strong>difficulty unifying their data sources</strong> and a further 61% are struggling with the <strong>complexity of their customer touchpoints</strong>.</li> <li>From a business buy-in and organisational perspective, there is still some work to do. The customer journey is still to see the sort of formalised approach that data strategies are only now beginning to enjoy.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Download a copy of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68612 2016-12-08T14:21:54+00:00 2016-12-08T14:21:54+00:00 How the Internet of Things will fundamentally change marketing Seán Donnelly <p>It’s always nice to receive comments and questions on posts as they provide great opportunities for us here at Econsultancy to challenge our own thinking. </p> <p>In this case, the subscriber asked about the implications of IoT for marketing and in particular digital marketing. These questions provide a nice opportunity to delve a bit more deeply into the topic that perhaps I didn’t do well enough in my first post.</p> <p>With that in mind, let’s start with marketing.</p> <h3>What are the links between IoT and marketing?</h3> <p>Perhaps this isn’t articulated clearly enough in my earlier post despite my intent. I would suggest that the link between IoT and marketing may depend upon how one views the role of marketing.</p> <ol> <li> Is marketing a tactical activity that focuses on the 4Ps of product, price, place and promotion?</li> <li> Or is it a broader strategic activity that positions marketing as the key function of a business?</li> </ol> <p>I would take the second view. If the goal of a business is to create and satisfy a customer, then marketing and product / service innovation are the key strategic activities that add to the bottom line.</p> <p>If we expand on that view even further, then it is up to marketers to understand the market. This means understanding consumer demand and continually observing the competitive landscape.</p> <p>Clearly this positions marketers as leaders and every other business function as a supporting activity.</p> <h3>Strategic marketing</h3> <h4>IoT and the competitive landscape</h4> <p>If we take this second view and then we need to be aware of what impact the Internet of Things might have on our competitive environment.</p> <p>In my earlier post I provided examples of how GE changed its business model from focusing on transactional relationships to designing systems to tap into closer client relationships, effectively making clients more reliant on GE and so making it difficult for those clients to change provider.</p> <p>And so I think marketers will need to consider what impact IoT may have in terms of the key competitive forces at play in their own industries. By competitive forces I am referring to bargaining power of suppliers and buyers and threats of new entrants and substitutes.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2255/Uber_homepage.png" alt="" width="800" height="419"></p> <p>I mentioned Uber which is effectively mobile software that connects passengers with drivers of vehicles for hire. Before the saturation of smartphone usage, Uber may not have succeeded. Here’s why.</p> <p>Buyers (of taxi services) had less bargaining power and for the taxi industry, the threat of new entrants was moderate.</p> <p>In countries with regulated taxi industries, drivers have to study and take tests to be awarded with a license to drive a public service vehicle. They may also have to spend a lot of money to purchase their taxi license and in some jurisdictions, a specific vehicle for taxiing; a black cab for example.</p> <p>Uber has bypassed much of this red tape although in fairness, regulatory bodies in many countries are scrambling to catch up due to concern about safety and protecting incumbent players. Since its launch in San Francisco in 2010 it has expanded into over 20 countries and significantly disrupted the taxi industry.</p> <p>In my first post I discussed attending Web Summit. Considering so many companies at Web Summit want to be the next Uber of [insert industry!], then marketers really do need to consider the impact that ubiquitous connectivity of devices with each other, the internet and the wider environment might have on their industry.</p> <p>They may consider this from a defensive point of view but equally, they may see it as an opportunity to innovate and find ways to create new and better customer experiences.</p> <h4>IoT disrupting industries</h4> <p>While taxi drivers couldn’t see Uber coming, car manufacturers can see self-driving coming. Beyond Uber, connected cars may be the most familiar example of IoT related technology.<br> </p> <p>Connected cars, autonomous driving systems, artificial intelligence and cloud computing are driving huge changes for car manufacturers. IoT has had a hand in all of these. </p> <p>IoT related technologies are going to redefine the automotive industry. Car manufacturers are now finding themselves operating in an environment where they need to keep an eye on the likes of non-traditional competitors like Tesla, Google and Apple. Two of these companies didn’t exist 20 years ago.</p> <p>IoT can enable new approaches to driving and potentially new business models:</p> <ul> <li>A landscape of connected cars could lead to a significant uptake in autonomous vehicles that can communicate with other vehicles, traffic management systems and sensors in the road to manage safety and optimise journey routes.</li> <li>IoT can and perhaps is turning car manufacturers into technology companies. Like mobile phones before cars, could cars, like mobile devices (think Nokia) become secondary to the software that is running them?</li> <li>Like the GE example I provided before, sensors in cars can create new services models, giving owners a better understanding of how their vehicles are running and predict potential breakdowns.</li> <li>Internet-enabled sensors in cars can also monitor driver behaviour and so also be used by insurance companies to charge more appropriate premiums.</li> <li>Car mobility data could be used by marketers to figure out ways to target drivers / passengers with personalised offers.</li> <li>For the likes of Google and Apple, companies which have entertainment platforms, they might also make money from selling in car services and entertainment. This makes sense if passengers aren’t actively involved in driving and so can spend time on other pursuits.</li> <li>If a connected car can recognise that something is wrong, it can diagnose the issue and optimise the driving experience to manage the issue. For example, it could turn off air conditioning to conserve energy. It could also communicate with other cars around it to identify that there is a potential issue and also find the closest service centre.</li> <li>In fact, a new connected landscape could lead to an end to car ownership altogether as more and more peer-to-peer services proliferate. In London at least, there are ZipCars in many neighbourhoods. </li> </ul> <p>As well as new opportunities, car manufacturers will also need to think about software security and the risk of being hacked.</p> <p>That changes the paradigm for tactical marketing in terms of producing communications not just about car performance and safety but also cyber security.</p> <h3>Tactical marketing</h3> <p>Let’s bring things back to a more tactical level and look at what IoT could mean for digital marketing in particular.</p> <p>I mentioned in the previous post that IoT could enable marketers to provide enhanced value and services. I also mentioned that IoT can provide real-time, contextualised data that can come from many touchpoints over a period of time.</p> <p>Let’s dig a bit deeper. The keywords here are touchpoints and data and could lead to functional changes in terms of how marketers do their jobs.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2016-digital-trends/">Econsultancy’s 2016 Digital Trends report</a> found that seven out of 10 respondents identified the mapping of the customer journey as a strategic priority for the next few years. This suggests getting an understanding of touchpoints along that journey, both online and offline.</p> <p>The beauty of IoT is that the deployment of internet-enabled sensors could provide marketers with real-time, contextualised data from online and offline touchpoints over a period of time. In this sense, IoT may provide marketers with the final piece of the jigsaw that’s been missing to provide a unified approach to marketing activities, online and offline.</p> <p>Consider that in Econsultancy’s 2016 Digital Trends report, personalisation and content optimisation topped the priority list for marketers this year.</p> <p>However only 20% of marketers have an actionable ‘single customer view’ that combines data sources about individuals (Source: <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-pursuit-of-data-driven-maturity/">Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Pursuit of Data-Driven Maturity</a>). Clearly there is a huge disconnect between the aspiration of truly personalised marketing communications and the reality.</p> <h3>Analytical marketing </h3> <p>As internet-enabled sensors such as beacons become more prevalent, the implications may be significant. I would suggest that the data from those sensors may be used to enable marketers to more accurately map offline touchpoints and develop a single customer view based on online and offline behaviour.</p> <p>This could lead to all sorts of functional changes to marketing activities:</p> <ul> <li>Real-time market research versus traditional market research methodologies.</li> <li>Access to a single customer view.</li> <li>Ability to deliver real-time, contextualised and personalised communications depending on where a customer is in their decision journey.</li> <li>Access to data that can be used not just for personalised marketing activities but also to inform product and strategic decision making. </li> </ul> <p>Consider that a million connected devices sending an update two times per second create the equivalent of 333 times the number of tweets per second that Twitter has to deal with.</p> <p>Then consider that Cisco forecasts 50bn such devices by 2020. That’s a lot of data to slice and dice. </p> <p>As organisations continue along their journey to digital maturity, marketers will be expected to deal in proven and impactful metrics. IoT may provide some of those metrics.</p> <h3>IoT and Customer Experience</h3> <p>A world of interconnectivity provides an opportunity to improve products and services in real time. </p><p>IoT could provide marketers with the information that they need to improve customer experiences and thereby effectively balance marketing activities between customer acquisition and customer retention.</p> <p>Clearly this has implications for the marketing function in terms of budgeting, operations, service design and approach to advertising. Interestingly, the concept of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67168-so-what-exactly-does-customer-experience-cx-mean/">Customer Experience (CX)</a> has been gaining traction in recent years as a key strategic priority for many organisations to create sustainable competitive advantage.</p> <h3>Conclusion </h3> <p>Ubiquitous availability of bandwidth, limitless computational capacity via cloud computing as well as near infinite amounts of storage means that we are increasingly going to see new and innovative use cases for IoT.</p> <p>In fact, I would suggest that the Internet of Things will bring things that we can’t even predict yet.</p> <p>With that in mind, I recall the words of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68374-10-quotes-from-unilever-cmo-keith-weed-at-the-festival-of-marketing-2016/">Keith Weed, CMO of Unilever when he spoke at our Festival of Marketing in October</a>. On the subject of learning, experimentation and success, he said “Pull the future forward and the outside in”.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2261/keith_weed.jpg" alt="" width="271" height="271"></p> <p>As we move towards an ‘Internet of Everything’ the only constant left on the table for marketers is that change is inevitable. The goal of this post and my original post is to encourage marketers to think about IoT beyond what it can do to support marketing campaigns today.</p> <p>With that in mind, as marketers I think we need to keep our eye on the horizon and consider what IoT means for us as professionals, for our business and for our industry.</p> <p>As always, comments, critique, questions and positive discussion are most welcome. It will be interesting to see how industries will continue to change as consumers acquire more internet-enabled devices and more of our everyday products are connected to the internet.</p><p>Econsultancy has published a <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/search/?q=internet%20of%20things&amp;only=BlogPost" target="_self">number of blogs about the Internet of Things</a> as well as these reports:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/a-marketer-s-guide-to-the-internet-of-things" target="_self">A Marketer’s Guide to the Internet of Things</a></li> <li> <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/a-marketer-s-guide-to-wearable-technology" target="_self">A Marketer’s Guide to Wearable Technology</a> </li> </ul> <p>Readers may also be interested in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/predictive-analytics-report/">Econsultancy’s Predictive Analytics Report</a>, published in association with RedEye.</p> <p>This report looks at adoption levels of predictive analytics and the types of strategies and tactics organisations are using.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3123 2016-12-05T08:14:53+00:00 2016-12-05T08:14:53+00:00 Masterclass in Lead Generation - Singapore <p>B2B (Business-to-business) brands are increasingly turning to digital marketing tactics to generate leads, build demand, grow opportunities, engage prospects, and retain customers. As B2B marketing is significantly different from B2C marketing, this workshop aims to specifically address the unique issues and challenges faced by B2B marketers on digital platforms and social media.</p> <p>This 2-day intensive workshop explores how digital marketing can help B2B companies to fill the sales funnel with qualified leads, engage prospects in the buying journey, nurture leads, integrate with sales efforts and measure results.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3120 2016-12-05T07:43:04+00:00 2016-12-05T07:43:04+00:00 Econsultancy's Certificate in Digital Marketing & Google AdWords Qualified Individual Certification **HRDF Claimable** - Malaysia <h3><strong>Course Details</strong></h3> <p>Econsultancy and ClickAcademy Asia are proud to launch the first world-class Certificate in Digital Marketing programme in Malaysia catering to senior managers and marketing professionals who want to understand digital marketing effectively in the shortest time possible. Participants who complete the programme requirement will be awarded the <strong>Econsultancy's Certificate in Digital Marketing</strong> and <strong>Google AdWords Qualified Individual</strong> <strong>Certificate</strong>.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">This is a part-time programme with 64 contact hours (total 8 days) spread over 8 weeks. Participants will only be certified after passing the Google AdWords exams and the digital marketing project, and complete at least 52 contact hours. </p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">The part-time programme covers topics ranging from the overview of digital marketing, customer acquisition channels to social media marketing.</p> <p>A special early bird rate of RM10,000/pax is applicable for participants who register one month before course date. (6% GST applicable)</p> <p>For more information and to register, please click <a href="http://www.clickacademyasia.com/classgroup/econsultancys-certificate-in-digital-marketing-google-adwords-certification-my/?id_class=868&amp;utm_source=econsultancy&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=doublecert-my-aug2016" target="_blank">here</a> <a href="http://www.clickacademyasia.com/training/digital-marketing/certificate-in-digital-marketing"><br></a></p> <h4>For any queries, please call +65 6653 1911 or email <strong><a href="mailto:apac@econsultancy.com" target="_self">apac@econsultancy.com</a></strong> </h4> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3113 2016-12-02T05:39:46+00:00 2016-12-02T05:39:46+00:00 Advanced Mastering Analytics – Singapore <p>A one-day workshop covering the principles of data analytics, focusing on digital marketing, and a practical approach to delivering meaningful data analytics to your organization.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68574 2016-11-30T01:00:00+00:00 2016-11-30T01:00:00+00:00 The five pillars of an online to offline tracking programme Jeff Rajeck <p>One thing which is still eluding brands, though, is how to continue tracking customers when they move from online to offline.  </p> <p>That is, <strong>marketers know their customers' online behaviours but when customers step foot in the store they lose track.</strong></p> <p>Some companies have come up with a number of solutions to this problem, as shown in a recent Econsultancy report, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/understanding-the-customer-journey">Understanding the Customer Journey</a>. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1872/graph.png" alt="" width="800" height="486"></p> <p>As none of the systems listed in the graph are being used by more than two in five marketers, however, it seems that <strong>many companies are still struggling with how to track customers from their various online platforms to offline locations.</strong></p> <p>To find out more about what successful companies are doing, we spoke to a number of marketers at our recent Digital Cream Singapore at a table sponsored by Universal Data Hub provider, <a href="http://tealium.com/">Tealium</a>.</p> <p>The result was five key requirements, or 'pillars', for an online to offline tracking programme.</p> <h3>1. The business case</h3> <p>According to one participant, tracking customers from online to offline is a long-term project and will require resources and buy-in from senior management.</p> <p>In order get buy-in, though, the project needs to be a priority to the business and so <strong>marketers need to draw up a business case.</strong></p> <p>It doesn't have to be extensive, but the business case should include resources required and let management know why tracking customers from online and offline is important to the business.</p> <p>Ideally, it will also include data which gives the business a reason to invest. One source of this data is the <a href="https://www.consumerbarometer.com/en/">Google Consumer Barometer</a> which offers data about how customer behaviour has changed in recent years.  </p> <p>This can form the basis for the argument that if the business doesn't cater to these new behaviours, customers will start doing business elsewhere.</p> <p>Additionally, one attendee noted, the business case should offer a 'clear vision' of why the department heads should support the project. Otherwise, an initiative of this size may never get off the ground.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1873/1.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>2. Responsibility</h3> <p>Once senior management is bought-in, <strong>marketers need ensure that the right departments are on-board.</strong>  </p> <p>Tracking customers between online and offline is not just a marketing project, said one participant. IT and sales, at the very least, should be involved from the start, as well.</p> <p>Responsibilities need to be assigned, too. Without defining roles, it is likely that the project managers will face resistance from departments which will, naturally, be protecting their domains.</p> <p>One participant noted that, at their firm, IT initially protested that adding tracking tags slowed down the website. Additionally, the CRM team was hesitant about sharing customer data with marketers.</p> <p>Getting support from the CTO and the CIO was the only way to overcome these objections.</p> <p>Through ensuring that these departments are on-board at a senior level, marketers will have the leverage they need to access the relevant data and push through the changes required to implement customer tracking.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1874/2.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>3. Goals</h3> <p>In addition to drafting a business case and assigning responsibilities, <strong>project leaders will also need to set goals for the initiative.</strong> That is, what exactly is the team trying to achieve?</p> <p>One suggestion was that the goal should be to 'stitch together online and offline data' to obtain 'a single view of the customer' throughout the organisation.</p> <p>To find out more about what this goal achieves for the project team, and indeed the business, watch this short video by the table subject matter expert, Andy Clark.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/193306758" width="480" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>4. Tactics</h3> <p>After plans are signed and goals are agreed upon, marketers need to get to work.  </p> <p>The consensus at the table was that<strong> the team should not try too many tactics at one time</strong>, but instead they should 'chip away at small blocks'.</p> <p>This could be as simple as implementing tracking codes on online coupons or collecting customer data at point-of-sale.</p> <p>Participants encouraged those just starting out to use free services at first and learn about how the technology works. After some time, they will likely need to upgrade to a more feature-rich solution but, having learned from their initial efforts, they will have data to support their requests for more budget and resources.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1875/3.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>5. Measuring success</h3> <p>The final pillar of tracking customers from online to offline is to agree from the outset about how the team should measure and report success.</p> <p>This should not be an afterthought, said one delegate, as project members will have so much data on their hands that it will be 'coming out of their ears'.  </p> <p><strong>Agreeing on metrics and key performance indicators (KPIs) beforehand will help the team avoid 'data overload'</strong> and assist them in producing reports which are meaningful to the team and to the business.</p> <p>One suggestion was that<strong> marketers should look at customer-based metrics as well as ones which are more business-oriented</strong>.  </p> <p>This is because tracking the customer between their device and an offline location may not immediately demonstrate financial ROI and so expectations need to be set accordingly.</p> <p>Marketers should, instead, look for uplifts in customer satisfaction, engagement, and loyalty and include these both as goals and as ongoing KPIs.</p> <p>Without agreeing on achievable success criteria, one attendee suggested, a programme which takes this much effort and resources will struggle to get the continuous support from management that it requires.</p> <h3>A word of thanks</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank all of the marketers who participated on the day, our table moderator, Econsultancy trainer Martin Ross, and our table sponsor for the day, Tealium.</p> <p>We hope to see you all at future Singapore Econsultancy events!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1877/4.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68565 2016-11-28T09:18:14+00:00 2016-11-28T09:18:14+00:00 Four top digital priorities for B2B marketers: Report Nikki Gilliland <p>Here are some key charts taken from our latest B2B Digital Trends report in association with Adobe, highlighting four areas of focus right now. </p> <h3>Playing catch up on content optimization </h3> <p>While the below chart shows content optimization to be the biggest digital priority for B2B organizations in 2016, it is interesting to note that this was top for B2C marketers two years ago.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1779/Top_priorities_in_2016.JPG" alt="" width="743" height="589"></p> <p>Today, while optimization still remains important for B2C, personalization and targeting have taken precedence.</p> <p>If this is anything to go by, it wouldn’t be a surprise to see B2B marketers citing the same in 12 to 24 months down the line. </p> <p>For now, catching up on optimization remains the most pressing matter, as does marketing automation, in part reflecting the continued importance of email campaigns.</p> <h3>Data-driven marketing will be key</h3> <p>Looking even further into the future, it appears that B2B marketers aren’t thinking too much in terms of technology innovation or major channel shifts. </p> <p>Rather, they foresee improvement within a current area of opportunity – data. </p> <p>More specifically, mastering the tools needed to analyse customer data correctly and optimize the customer experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1780/Five_years_time.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="578"></p> <p>While B2B marketers clearly understand the opportunity data presents, many companies report barriers due to lack of training, resources and involvement from management.</p> <h3>Implementing a strategy to underpin CX</h3> <p>With optimising customer experience cited as the most exciting opportunity now <em>and</em> in five years – what are the elements needed to achieve it?</p> <p>On a scale of one to five, 50% of marketers rank strategy as ‘most important to success’.  </p> <p>While the aforementioned element of data is crucial to developing compelling customer experiences, it is likely to be lost without an overarching strategy to guide decision-making.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1781/Strategy_for_CX.JPG" alt="" width="735" height="573"></p> <h3>Optimising across multiple touchpoints</h3> <p>Lastly, we can see that a big priority for B2B marketers is bringing together all of the above, combining them to create a seamless experience for customers across all channels.</p> <p>Despite <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68474-b2b-digital-marketing-trends-for-2017-finally-catching-up-with-b2c" target="_blank">a lack of focus on mobile</a>, delivering a consistent message across all customer touchpoints is still thought to be most important priority.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1782/mobile_optimization.JPG" alt="" width="740" height="575"></p> <p><strong>For lots more information, download the full <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-digital-trends-2016-2017/" target="_self">B2B Digital Trends report</a>.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/841 2016-11-17T05:22:20+00:00 2016-11-17T05:22:20+00:00 Digital Cream Singapore <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Exclusive to 80 senior client side marketers, <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Econsultancy's Digital Cream</strong> is one of the industry's landmark events for marketers to:</p> <ul style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">convene and network with like-minded peers from different industries</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">exchange experiences</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">compare benchmark efforts</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">explore the latest best practice</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">discuss strategies</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">learn from others who face the same challenges with suppliers, technologies and techniques. </li> </ul> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">In a personal and confidential setting (It's Chatham House Rules so what's said at Digital Cream, stays at Digital Cream), the roundtable format is a quick and sure-fire way to find out what's worked and what hasn't, an invaluable opportunity to take time out and come back to the office full of ideas.</p> <h3 style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004e70;">Roundtable Format</h3> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">There are 8 roundtable topics and each delegate chooses 3 table topics most relevant to you, each session lasting about an hour and fifteen minutes. Each roundtable is independently moderated and focuses on a particular topic discussing challenges or areas of interest nominated by the table's attendees in the time available. This level of input ensures you get the maximum from your day.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Digital Cream has been devised by the analysts and editors at Econsultancy in consultation with the most senior digital buyers in the world and runs in London, New York, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Singapore and Hong Kong.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Attendees pick three tables choices from the following full list of topics offered (extra topics will be removed at a later stage. If there is a topic you'd like to discuss which is not listed here, you can suggest it while registering):</strong> </p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">1. Agile Marketing - Develop a more responsive &amp; customer-centric approach</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">2. Content Marketing Strategy</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">3. Customer Experience Management</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">4. Data-Driven Marketing &amp; Marketing Attribution Management</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">5. Digital Transformation - People, Process &amp; Technology</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">6. Ecommerce</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">7. Email Marketing - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practices</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">8. Integrated Search (PPC/SEO) - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practices</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">9. Joining Up Online &amp; Offline Channels Data</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">10. Marketing Automation - Best Practices &amp; Implementation</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">11. Mobile Marketing</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">12. Online Advertising - Retargeting, Exchanges &amp; Social Advertising</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">13. Real-Time Brand Marketing - Using Data &amp; Technology To Drive Brand Impact</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">14. Social Media Measurement &amp; Optimisation</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">&gt;&gt;</strong> <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">View past Digital Cream event photos (source: facebook page)</strong><br></strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10153875617599327" target="_blank">Digital Cream Sydney 2016</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153214103704327.1073741876.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Digital Cream Singapore 2015</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153124439974327.1073741873.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Digital Cream Sydney 2015</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152276242849327.1073741856.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Digital Cream Melbourne 2014</a> and <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152209218799327.1073741854.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Digital Cream Hong Kong 2014</a></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/840 2016-11-17T05:07:45+00:00 2016-11-17T05:07:45+00:00 Digital Cream Sydney <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Exclusive to 80 senior client side marketers, <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Econsultancy's Digital Cream</strong> is one of the industry's landmark events for marketers to:</p> <ul style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">convene and network with like-minded peers from different industries</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">exchange experiences</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">compare benchmark efforts</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">explore the latest best practice</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">discuss strategies</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">learn from others who face the same challenges with suppliers, technologies and techniques. </li> </ul> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">In a personal and confidential setting (It's Chatham House Rules so what's said at Digital Cream, stays at Digital Cream), the roundtable format is a quick and sure-fire way to find out what's worked and what hasn't, an invaluable opportunity to take time out and come back to the office full of ideas.</p> <h3 style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004e70;">Roundtable Format</h3> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">There are 8 roundtable topics and each delegate chooses 3 table topics most relevant to you, each session lasting about an hour and fifteen minutes. Each roundtable is independently moderated and focuses on a particular topic discussing challenges or areas of interest nominated by the table's attendees in the time available. This level of input ensures you get the maximum from your day.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Digital Cream has been devised by the analysts and editors at Econsultancy in consultation with the most senior digital buyers in the world and runs in London, New York, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Singapore and Hong Kong.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Attendees pick three tables choices from the following full list of topics offered (extra topics will be removed at a later stage. If there is a topic you'd like to discuss which is not listed here, you can suggest it while registering):</strong> </p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">1. Agile Marketing - Develop a more responsive &amp; customer-centric approach</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">2. Content Marketing Strategy</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">3. Customer Experience Management</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">4. Data-Driven Marketing &amp; Marketing Attribution Management</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">5. Digital Transformation - People, Process &amp; Technology</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">6. Ecommerce</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">7. Email Marketing - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practices</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">8. Integrated Search (PPC/SEO) - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practices</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">9. Joining Up Online &amp; Offline Channels Data</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">10. Marketing Automation - Best Practices &amp; Implementation</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">11. Mobile Marketing</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">12. Online Advertising - Retargeting, Exchanges &amp; Social Advertising</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">13. Real-Time Brand Marketing - Using Data &amp; Technology To Drive Brand Impact</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">14. Social Media Measurement &amp; Optimisation</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">&gt;&gt;</strong> <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">View past Digital Cream event photos (source: facebook page)</strong><br></strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10153875617599327" target="_blank">Digital Cream Sydney 2016</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153214103704327.1073741876.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Digital Cream Singapore 2015</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153124439974327.1073741873.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Digital Cream Sydney 2015</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152276242849327.1073741856.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Digital Cream Melbourne 2014</a> and <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152209218799327.1073741854.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Digital Cream Hong Kong 2014</a></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68526 2016-11-16T14:22:07+00:00 2016-11-16T14:22:07+00:00 Why marketers need to pay attention to the Internet of Things Seán Donnelly <p>One of the bigger themes that popped up across each of these stages was Internet of Things (IoT). It’s something that we’ve <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67013-five-opportunities-for-marketers-using-the-internet-of-things/search/?only=BlogPost&amp;q=internet%20of%20things">written about at Econsultancy before</a> but what’s clear is that the Internet of Things is very much just getting started.</p> <p>Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/a-marketer-s-guide-to-the-internet-of-things/">Marketer’s Guide to the Internet of Things</a> defines IoT as “the connection of physical objects to the internet and thereby to each other and the environment. It promises the potential of a more frictionless world where many decisions and actions are automated to make our lives better and easier.</p> <p>"To enable this to happen, electronics and software are included in an object giving it an ability to network and communicate with other devices. This holds out the possibility of that object offering enhanced value and service.”</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/1461/internet_of_things-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="401" height="261"></p><p>While IoT may still seem like an ‘out there’ trend that takes up space in marketing and technology publications, the reality is that it will eventually transform entire industries as well as how we live our everyday lives.</p> <p>Consider that connected products can offer opportunities for greater reliability, higher utilisation and new functionality which cuts across traditional product or industry boundaries forcing companies to rethink nearly everything they do.</p> <p>On the Creatiff (design) stage Harry West, CEO of design and strategy firm Frog, discussed how General Electric has moved from a product business to a service business.</p> <p>Instead of building products for transactional client relationships, GE has moved to designing systems in a closely integrated way with clients.</p> <p>This means that GE doesn’t just make money from selling engines. It can also make money on services. In doing so, the company extends the relationship it has with clients which in turn raises the barriers to entry for competitors.</p> <p>This has been enabled by connected physical components with sensors that enable communication between the product and the product cloud.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/1462/arry_west_ceo_of_design_and_strategy_firm_frog-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="314"></p> <p>But the Internet of Things isn’t just something that huge corporations like GE need to think about or can utilise.</p> <p>According to Bracken Darrell, CEO of Swiss personal computer and tablet accessory firm Logitech, “sensors, storage and micro processing are almost free now.”</p> <p>He’s right. Breakthroughs in the cost of sensors, processing power via the cloud and availability of bandwidth are enabling ubiquitous connectivity.</p> <p>Connected or ‘smart’ products like the activity trackers, learning thermostats like Nest and Amazon’s artificial intelligence voice-controlled Echo speaker are gaining traction.</p> <h3>Internet of Things and marketing</h3> <p>While IoT is perhaps most associated with operational benefits such as improved logistics and maintenance witnessed at GE, there are numerous other applications for marketing.</p> <p>IoT provides real-time, contextualised data that can come from many touchpoints over a period of time. This provides a range of exciting marketing possibilities such as selling existing products and services more effectively, delivering truly personalised customer experiences and potentially creating new products and services.</p> <p>Due to the number of industries which will be affected by IoT, marketers need to be aware of how it may impact the structure of their own sector. </p> <p>Some commentators suggest that IoT is emerging as the third wave in the development and transformation of the internet.</p> <p>The first wave being in the 1990s when personal computers connected people to the internet and the second wave in the 21<sup>st</sup> century as mobile bypassed PCs and connected billions of people throughout the world to the internet. </p> <p>According to Gartner, there will be nearly 26bn things connected to the internet by 2020. Cisco says there will be 50bn. Intel predicts the number to be more like 200bn.</p> <p>These are mind-blowing estimates from companies developing and selling sensors and IoT related products and services. Whilst these numbers may be fuelling the media frenzy, they are still something for marketers to be aware of.</p> <p>Just this week, Samsung announced the $8bn acquisition of Harman International Industries to expand into high-end car audio and connected automobiles.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/1463/samsung_logo.svg-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="155"> </p> <p>In its press release, Samsung said: ”Harman perfectly complements Samsung in terms of technologies, products and solutions, and joining forces is a natural extension of the automotive strategy we have been pursuing for some time.”</p> <p>Vice-chairman Kwon Oh-hyun said in the statement: “Harman immediately establishes a strong foundation for Samsung to grow our automotive platform.”</p> <p>The connection of everyday objects (in this case automobiles) and appliances to the internet is increasingly becoming woven into the fabric of everyday life.</p> <p>It will be interesting to see how Samsung can extend its relationships with consumers beyond smartphones to more ubiquitous connectivity via televisions and automobiles.</p> <h3>Internet of Everything</h3> <p>Some commentators prefer to use the term ‘internet of everything’ rather than ‘internet of things’. This makes sense considering we are talking about everything.</p> <p>While we are still in the early days of IoT, that doesn’t mean that we can put this to the back of our minds.</p> <p>Consider car ride service Uber. This has something to do with IoT. Each driver and passenger carries a device with a GPS tracker which enables the entire Uber ecosystem. In the space of a few years this ecosystem has completely changed the 400-year-old traditional carriage and taxi system.</p> <p>With that in mind, what could IoT mean for you, your business and your industry?</p> <p>I attended 25 talks over seven stages at Web Summit. Internet of Things came up in came up in at least a third of these talks. Marketers take note.</p> <p><em>Econsultancy has published a <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/search/?q=internet%20of%20things&amp;only=BlogPost">number of blogs about the Internet of Things</a> as well as these reports:</em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/a-marketer-s-guide-to-the-internet-of-things">A Marketer’s Guide to the Internet of Things</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/a-marketer-s-guide-to-wearable-technology">A Marketer’s Guide to Wearable Technology</a> </em></li> </ul>