tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/conversion-rate-optimization Latest Conversion Rate Optimization content from Econsultancy 2017-06-22T16:02:26+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69193 2017-06-22T16:02:26+01:00 2017-06-22T16:02:26+01:00 Using data to improve your mobile conversion: A simple but effective approach Steve Borges <p>In<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69160-mobile-conversion-rates-how-does-your-site-compare/"> a recent post</a> here, I described the Biglight Mobile Benchmark - a simple quadrant that allows any retailer to understand their own mobile conversion rate performance compared with the wider retail market. It has proven very useful as a visual and immediate way to answer two important questions: “How big is our mobile optimisation challenge?” and “How urgently do we need to start tackling it?”</p> <p>For many retailers it has also proven a useful way to secure the budget required to invest in their mobile optimisation programmes.</p> <p>In many ways, of course, that is the easy bit. Actually improving conversion rates on mobile can be much more challenging - and, for lots of ecommerce people I have spoken to, the next question is “Where do we start?”.</p> <p>That is where journey mapping and micro-conversion benchmarking are so important - they underpin a focused process that ensures that every penny invested in optimisation is spent where it is most likely to make a difference. What’s more, focusing on the ‘big bets’ enables rapid deployment, so the return on investment is realised quicker too.</p> <p>Here’s how it works - and we know it works, because this is a process we’ve been through with a number of clients this year.</p> <h3>Understand the journey</h3> <p>It is a statement of the obvious to say that it is hard to optimise the mobile experience for your customers if you don’t understand user needs and the user journey.</p> <p>As it happens, shopper behaviour on mobile is quite specific. Shoppers are pretty single minded about getting to the product quickly.</p> <p>Some of the insights from a recent, large-scale study we did at Biglight back that up:</p> <ul> <li>People choose the easiest route - to get to product quickly</li> <li>They bypass or ignore content they consider to be irrelevant</li> <li>Users invest considerable time filtering to refine their selections</li> <li>There is strong interest in interacting with the image gallery</li> <li>Product descriptions are ignored if they are overwhelming</li> <li>Once into the checkout, there is a genuine intent in completion.</li> </ul> <p>That combination of single mindedness and an obvious preference for native device functionality - mobile users want to pinch, swipe and so on - has implications for the way retailers should assess the mobile experience they are delivering.</p> <p>It’s actually quite a simple journey - a journey of two halves, each with its own thread of quite distinct characteristics. We refer to these are the ‘browse to basket’ and ‘basket conversion’ journeys.</p> <h3>Browse-to-basket journey</h3> <p>This part of the journey covers all browsing activity and has as its key success metric the proportion of users who enter the site that go on to view the basket page (with something in it), which we call the “browse-to-basket ratio”.</p> <p>We’ve found this is a reliable indicator of how well the site is performing in its core roles of helping users find products they are interested in, engaging them and motivating them towards purchase.</p> <p>It also represents the total available pool from which overall site conversions are derived. Clearly, if the browse-to-basket ratio is 3%, total site conversion will only ever be a proportion of this, never more.</p> <p>Finally, it’s reasonably simple to track on most websites, so it facilitates comparison from site to site. Right now, 'good' is a ratio of close to 10% and anything below 5% is a worry. But there are other important steps, or micro-conversions, along the way.</p> <p>In simple terms, the journey here is:</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6947/BTB_JOURNEY.png" alt="Browse to Basket Journey" width="964" height="146"></p> <p>The principal challenges in this part of the journey are to focus navigation, merchandising, content and search efforts on getting users to a product listings page (PLP) with a minimum of fuss then, once there, ensuring that filtering is simple, relevant and fast, so that users can progress to product details pages (PDPs).</p> <p>Once users get to the PDPs, they’ll spend time there. They’re keen to interact with images and reviews and will consume other relevant content if it’s brief and easy to engage with - in fact engagement with relevant content increases conversion and average order value (AOV).</p> <p>Overall, in the browse-to-basket journey there is a clear, direct correlation between time on site and micro-conversions. In other words, the challenge is to keep users engaged by getting them to product quickly and then making sure the product pages really deliver.</p> <h3>Basket conversion journey</h3> <p>In the second part of the journey, we’re interested in what proportion of the users who viewed a basket subsequently went on to complete a purchase, we call this the “basket conversion ratio”.</p> <p>Unlike the browse-to-basket journey, which is about engagement and motivation, the basket conversion journey is largely about retention or completion, so success is measured in terms of users who progress from step to step.</p> <p>We measure this part of the journey from the basket, rather than the start of the checkout process to allow us to make meaningful comparisons between sites with different checkout structures and those that provide different experiences for users that are logged-in. Broadly-speaking a typical journey has the following elements though:</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6946/BC_JOURNEY.png" alt="Basket Conversion Journey" width="972" height="145"></p> <p>Typically, there is an initial drop-off between the Basket and Welcome page, as those using the basket for other purposes (such as in preparation for store visit), or who have decided not to buy, leave the site. As you might expect, this can be significant, but it does vary considerably between retailers and does present opportunities for optimisation.</p> <p>Once users enter the checkout process proper though, there is evidence of genuine intent to complete it and extremely high micro-conversions of 95%+ between the individual steps in the journey are possible - provided the flow is intuitive and easy to use.</p> <p>In this part of the journey there is an inverse correlation between time and conversion - at the risk of stating the obvious, make it quick and easy, and you’ll convert more. Indeed, unsuccessful steps - where users do not convert - take up to twice as long as successful ones, which provides clear evidence of user struggle that can be addressed.</p> <p>Even so, high conversion rates are not always realised, as the benchmarking data I’ve included in the next section demonstrates - across the eight retailers included for illustration, the average basket conversion ratio is less than 40%, and individual rates range from 26% to 61%.</p> <p>It may be obvious, then, but retailers still have significant opportunities to improve their mobile checkout experiences.</p> <h3>Benchmarking mobile journey micro-conversions</h3> <p>Understanding how the journey works is one thing, but the crucial thing here is to see clearly how your own site is performing - to see where the micro-conversion issues are and identify the big optimisation opportunities.</p> <p>That’s where the more detailed picture behind the <a title="Biglight Mobile Benchmark" href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69160-mobile-conversion-rates-how-does-your-site-compare">Biglight Mobile Benchmark</a> comes in. As the table below demonstrates, the data enables comparison at pretty much every step of the journey - the overall browse to conversion journey expressed in terms of micro-conversions, or the proportion of users that move from one step to the next.</p> <p>Like any benchmark, it’s a really useful starting point - a way to zero in on where the problems and opportunities are. For instance, in the case of retailer 6 (below), a 10% browse-to-basket ratio is followed up by a disappointing 29% basket conversion ratio. No prizes for guessing where the priority optimisation jobs are…</p> <p>Retailer 5, meanwhile, has the opposite problem.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6909/Micro-conversion_benchmarks.png" alt="Micro-conversion benchmarks" width="800"></p> <h3>OK, but what next?</h3> <p>This kind of benchmarking may only be the start, but it is a positive one. It offers a really simple, useful answer to the “Where do we start?” question, and ensures that the ‘what next?’ - the optimisation programme - delivers results fast.</p> <p>It does that by ensuring the starting point is a clear focus on big opportunity areas, a focus that can be further honed through usability testing - centred on high priority steps in the journey - to ensure the <em>why</em> behind the data is understood and can be acted on.</p> <p>Crucially, that means that the final stage - A/B testing alternative approaches to each of the priority areas - is sure footed and confident, based on real insight, not guesswork. It also means that bigger, more extensive alternatives in each area (based on best-practice prototypes) can be tested with the confidence they will succeed.</p> <p>That in turn enables rapid deployment - through an experimentation roadmap that links parallel optimisation streams to specific, measureable goals, and moves each from preparation to results in weeks and months, rather than requiring long development cycles. In a market where mobile is taking over, that mix of certainty and pace could make the difference between success or failure.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69036 2017-04-27T10:52:19+01:00 2017-04-27T10:52:19+01:00 Six ways Aldo’s new mobile site streamlines the shopping experience Nikki Gilliland <p>Designed to make shopping more seamless across all channels, the mobile site in particular has got customer convenience in mind. Here are six features that deliver on the promise.</p> <h4>Prominent imagery and reviews</h4> <p>One major focus of Aldo’s redesign has been making it easier for mobile users to gain a more detailed view of the product – recognising that even in-store shoppers would like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/9366-ecommerce-consumer-reviews-why-you-need-them-and-how-to-use-them/" target="_blank">customer reviews and ratings</a>.</p> <p>Reviews are now a prominent feature on all product pages, including information about general sizing, calf size and width. It even allows customers to give feedback on where or how they have worn the item – e.g. ‘wear it for prom or party’ – to give reviews much more depth.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5715/Product_pages_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Alongside this, imagery is now at the forefront with photo galleries showcasing products from multiple angles. As well as giving a better view of the product, this also makes the mobile site look much more slick and polished.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5716/Product_pages.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>Social tie-ins </h4> <p>Today, <a href="http://www.fourthsource.com/social-media/social-media-shopping-next-step-retail-21641" target="_blank">more than half of consumers</a> who follow a brand on social media say they do so to research products and find inspiration. In line with this changing user behaviour, Aldo has introduced user-generated content into its mobile site, with an Instagram feed embedded directly into the homepage.</p> <p>Not only does this draw on the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68409-four-key-trends-within-the-world-of-influencer-marketing/" target="_blank">power of influencers</a>, but it also helps to drive additional purchases, with the ‘Shop the look’ feature including multiple products in one image.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5717/Shop_the_Look.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>In-store convenience</h4> <p>Recognising the fact that not everyone who browses online will want to checkout, the ‘Find a Store’ feature lets users locate the product to buy offline.</p> <p>Using geo-locational technology, it is super quick and easy to locate the store that’s nearest to you. With information on store opening times and an indication of how many items are in stock, it’s a highly effective way of driving offline conversions based on mobile interest. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5718/Find_a_store_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>True-Fit technology</h4> <p>In a bid to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68477-how-six-online-retailers-are-combatting-wrong-size-returns/" target="_blank">reduce returns</a>, Aldo is another retailer to integrate True Fit – technology that helps customers find the right size.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5719/TrueFit_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>By asking users the brand and size of a shoe that fits them particularly well, it is then able to tell them whether an item will be true to size, or whether to scale up or down.</p> <p>According to research, 60% of consumers say that they would be willing to provide information like this if it meant they'd be guaranteed the perfect fit first time. When it comes to shopping on mobile in comparison to in person, this reassurance can massively increase the likelihood of a transaction.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5720/True_Fit_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>Post-purchase tracking</h4> <p>Of course, the customer journey does not end after the point of purchase, which is nicely highlighted by Aldo’s easy tracking feature.</p> <p>Instead of hiding it within a help or customer service section, this is located towards the bottom of the landing page, with large font to catch the user’s attention.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5721/Easy_tracking.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>As well as being useful post-purchase, it is also likely to instil confidence in those in the early browsing stages, indicating that the brand is focused on delivering good customer service.</p> <h4>Simplified checkout  </h4> <p>Multiple forms or mandatory sign-ups are likely to increase <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">basket abandonment rates</a>, and when it comes to mobile, customers have even less time for complicated processes.</p> <p>Aldo’s redesign has simplified this experience, giving users the option for a guest checkout as well as condensing everything into a single page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5722/Checkout_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Upfront delivery information and returns policies are also helpful for providing reassurance throughout the process, driving customers towards that all-important final purchase.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68465-eight-features-to-appreciate-on-fat-face-s-new-ecommerce-site/">Eight features to appreciate on Fat Face’s new ecommerce site</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66644-how-debenhams-site-redesign-led-to-ecommerce-sales-growth/" target="_blank">How Debenhams' site redesign led to ecommerce sales growth</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69028 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 10 tremendous digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>UK search data shows surge in ‘snap election’ queries</h3> <p>Following on from the announcement of the snap general election this week, Hitwise has analysed how the UK responded online.</p> <p>Data shows there was a 2,000% increase in searches for Theresa May on print media sites, while three out of five searches on Tuesday 18th were about the election news. Most searches were in the form of questions, with the nation generally appearing unsure about what a ‘snap election’ actually means.</p> <h3>One fifth of retailers are failing to offer preferred delivery options</h3> <p><a href="http://ampersandcommerce.com/insights/yougov-consumer-survey-delivery-2017/" target="_blank">Research from Ampersand</a> has found that many of the UK’s biggest retailers are failing to offer next day delivery, despite a YouGov survey showing that 58% of people favour this method over any other.</p> <p>In comparison to 2014, Ampersand found that most people still favour next day delivery over click and collect and same day delivery, with preference for this increasing 6% within three years. </p> <p>Meanwhile, preference for same day delivery has gone from 21% in 2014 down to 12% this year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5625/Ampersand.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="492"></p> <h3>UK add-to-basket rates on the up in Q4</h3> <p>Monetate's latest <a href="http://info.monetate.com/ecommerce_report_EQ4_2016.html" target="_blank">ecommerce report</a> has revealed that UK add-to-basket rates were 3.75% higher in Q4 2016 than a year previously. </p> <p>The report also shows that both global and UK conversion rates were lower this Q4 than in 2015. However, global and UK conversion rates saw its first increase since Q4 of 2015.</p> <p>Meanwhile, website visits via mobile continued to increase globally, with 44% of UK website visits coming from smartphones.</p> <h3>75% of UK consumers have not spoken to a chatbot</h3> <p>New research from <a href="https://insights.ubisend.com/2017-chatbot-report" target="_blank">Ubisend</a> has uncovered the brand characters people would most like to see turned into chatbots. Compare the Market’s Meerkats topped the poll, followed by the Andrex puppies and Nespresso’s George Clooney. </p> <p>Other research found that 75% of UK consumers have not yet spoken to a chatbot, however, 57% of consumers are aware of what a chatbot is. </p> <p>Lastly, 35% want to see more companies adopting chatbots to solve their queries, with 68% citing ‘reaching the desired outcome’ as the most important factor in their experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5628/chatbots.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="297"></p> <h3>Expedia outperforms other travel brands with 7% market share</h3> <p>Conductor has released its first ever <a href="https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;cad=rja&amp;uact=8&amp;ved=0ahUKEwis1ZyKnbXTAhXOaVAKHc0ZA4EQFggiMAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fww2.conductor.com%2Frs%2F149-ZMU-763%2Fimages%2FConductor-Organic-Online-Market-Share-Report-Holiday-2016.pdf&amp;usg=AFQjCNGO-bWF8Ak2EEpMJ7kZeecHFR3fjA" target="_blank">Organic Market Share</a> report, detailing the brands that excel at reaching consumers from organic search.</p> <p>In the travel category, Expedia was found to be the overall top performer, taking a 7% market share. Meanwhile, TripAdvisor dominates the ‘early stages’ of the consumer journey category with a 10% share. </p> <p>Data shows that airlines, car rental companies and hotel chains (including Hilton) have the potential to increase their visibility. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5627/Online_market_share.JPG" alt="" width="713" height="404"></p> <h3>Consumers prefer traditional advertising to digital</h3> <p>Research by Kantar Media has found that UK consumers feel significantly more positive about advertising on traditional platforms, such as TV and magazines, than they do about online formats.</p> <p>In a survey, 33% said they actively dislike seeing advertising on online video services and search engines, while 30% dislike being served ads in news and articles online. In contrast, only 13% and 14% of consumers dislike seeing ads in printed newspapers and printed magazines.</p> <p>With online ads predicted to account for more than half of all advertising spend in the next few years, this provides food for thought for brands.</p> <h3>Connected shopping driven by Generation Y </h3> <p>New research from Savvy suggests that the mass adoption of smartphones and social media has contributed to a fundamental change in the path to purchase.</p> <p>Data shows that Generation Y is driving changes in retail due to being constantly connected. 66% say they regularly use their smartphone to buy products and 49% regularly use their smartphones while in the supermarket. While this group represents around a third of shoppers at the moment, they are predicted to account for 47% by 2022.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5634/connected_shopper.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK marketers increase budgets in 2017</h3> <p>According to data from the Q1 2017 <a href="http://www.ipa.co.uk/page/ipa-bellwether-report#.WPnTjtLyuUk" target="_blank">IPA Bellwether Report</a>, marketing budgets increased in Q1 2017 with significant growth seen in internet and main media advertising categories.  </p> <p>The report suggests that the overall outlook for 2017/18 is positive, with 26.1% of companies suggesting growth in total budgets for the coming year. Meanwhile, ad spend is now predicted to grow 0.6%, replacing the previous forecast of -0.7%.</p> <h3>Only 55% of Brits associate Easter with religion</h3> <p>New <a href="https://yougov.co.uk/news/2017/04/13/only-55-brits-associate-jesus-christ-easter/" target="_blank">research from YouGov</a> has found that Brits are more likely to think of Easter in relation to chocolate eggs than religious connotations. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,670 UK adults, only 55% said they personally associate Jesus with Easter, while 67% said they associate it with a bank holiday. Chocolate eggs is clearly at the forefront of everyone’s minds, with 76% associating this with Easter above anything else.</p> <p>In a separate study, Captify analysed found that Cadbury products dominate searches for chocolate eggs, with Crème Egg accounting for 29% of searches and Mini Eggs accounting for 18%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5626/YouGov.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="752"></p> <h3>Luxury ad spend predicted to shift online </h3> <p>Zenith's <a href="https://www.zenithmedia.com/product/advertising-expenditure-forecasts" target="_blank">latest report</a> suggests that expenditure on luxury advertising is set to recover, with growth predicted to occur due to an increase in online spend. Zenith predicts a 3.9% rise in 2017 – a welcome figure following a 0.5% decline in 2016.</p> <p>It also predicts that the internet will become the main luxury advertising medium in 2018, despite print currently being the principal medium, accounting for 32.7% of ad spend in 2016 compared to 25.8% for internet advertising.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68989 2017-04-18T13:00:00+01:00 2017-04-18T13:00:00+01:00 Three ways language can affect conversion rates on travel sites Nikki Gilliland <p>According to Unbounce, however, this can massively impact conversion rates. In a <a href="https://unbounce.com/conversion-rate-optimization/unbounce-conversion-benchmark-report/" target="_blank">recent report</a>, it suggests that if just 1% of a page’s copy subconsciously reminds visitors of feelings of anger or fear, it could lower conversion rates by up to 25%.</p> <p>With this in mind, here are just three ways travel brands can do the reverse, and use language to increase the chances of a booking.</p> <h4>Think positive</h4> <p>Unbounce’s study uses an 'emotion lexicon' to determine whether words associated with certain emotions affect overall conversion rates. </p> <p>It found that words associated with anger and fear tend to have a big impact, with these particular emotions putting off consumers from finalising a booking.</p> <p>So, what kind of words would a travel brand have to use to evoke anger? Surprisingly, it’s not the most obvious, and consumers might not even recognise that their response is negative. Words like ‘limited’ or ‘rail’ are said to subconsciously raise negative emotions in consumers, even when linked to unrelated experiences.</p> <p>The answer is simple - always use language that evokes positivity. It’s trickier than it sounds, of course, with most travel brands falling into the cliché trap.</p> <p>While its service speaks for itself (cue jeers), Southern Railways is a particularly bad example. Of course, it plays more of a functional role in the lives of consumers as opposed to the inspirational, yet its use of language does nothing to instil positivity in users.</p> <p>From ‘accessibility statement’ to ‘compensation’ – not to mention the glaring ‘major disruption’ – its homepage is littered with words that are both negative and corporate-sounding. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5404/Southern.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="705"></p> <p>In contrast, regional railway C2C puts a positive spin on local engineering works, using a friendly “we’re open” to reassure travellers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5405/C2C.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="579"></p> <h4>Keep it short</h4> <p>While it’s tempting to wax lyrical about destinations, travel brands tend to do best when landing pages are short and concise. </p> <p>Copy must always serve a purpose, and never be used to fill up space. Again, with travel typically being associated with inspiration and excitement, it’s easy to get caught up in superfluous language.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68505-a-closer-look-at-booking-com-s-customer-focused-strategy/">Booking.com</a> is a great example of copy that is both functional and inspirational. As well as pointing users towards various locations, it still manages to evoke the benefits of travel such as relaxation and beautiful scenery.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5424/Booking.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="599"></p> <p>Meanwhile, other brands like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68225-10-examples-of-great-airbnb-marketing-creative/" target="_blank">Airbnb</a> use visuals to tell a story, resulting in a minimal design and copy that is succinct and easy to digest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5403/Airbnb.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="722"></p> <h4>Evoke confidence</h4> <p>Lastly, Unbounce highlights how trust-inducing language can be an effective tool for travel brands, mainly stemming from consumer concerns over the legitimacy of low-price offers and deals.</p> <p>It found that dedicating at least 10% of copy to establishing trust could result in conversion rates that are up to 20% better.</p> <p>Words such as ‘share’, ‘friendly’ and ‘recommend’ are particularly good for building confidence, tapping into the notion of travelling as a social experience, and reassuring users that help and advice will be on hand every step of the way.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68201-how-hostelworld-uses-video-to-connect-with-target-audience-of-young-travellers/" target="_blank">HostelWorld</a> is a great example of this, using reassuring language to position itself as the perfect way to have an authentic travel experience. It recognises common consumer concerns, such as the safety of hostels and associated booking costs, and directly addresses them.</p> <p>The word ‘help’ and the phrase ‘helping you’ is consistently used to reassure and instil confidence. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5402/HostelWorld.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="626"></p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65007-how-the-travel-industry-uses-email-marketing/">How the travel industry uses email marketing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65347-10-essential-features-for-mobile-travel-sites/">10 essential features for mobile travel sites</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67766-10-examples-of-great-travel-marketing-campaigns/">10 examples of great travel marketing campaigns</a></em></li> </ul> <p><strong><em>For more on CRO, download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/conversion-rate-optimization-report/" target="_blank">Conversion Rate Optimization Report</a> here.</em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68910 2017-03-27T12:04:45+01:00 2017-03-27T12:04:45+01:00 Why so many website relaunches fail (but shouldn’t have) Paul Randall <p dir="ltr">But this is 2017. Surely, we have better tools than ever to unearth what it is customers want. We’ve never been better equipped to test web pages before they are rolled out. So why do brands continue to make a hash of launching a new site?</p> <p dir="ltr">One basic reason might be the temptation to go for a big bang launch, complete with PR fanfare. Great if it works. But what if conversion rates suddenly drop through the floor? </p> <p dir="ltr">You won’t have enough usable analytics data to identify where the problems are so you’ll either have to make changes and hope for the best, or quickly restore the old site. When you can make a series of controlled and tested incremental improvements, why take the risk of the big bang relaunch? That’s the riskiest thing you could do!</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s interesting to compare the approaches of Google+ and LinkedIn when they relaunched. LinkedIn seemed to do a great job of annoying the hell out of some of its most important users by plonking the new version on their desktops without much warning (I'm referring to LinkedIn's previous relaunch here, not the one currently underway).</p> <p dir="ltr">These people shared, very publicly, what they didn’t like about the new version. As the roll-out gradually reached other users there was an expectation that they wouldn’t like what they were about to see – even though for most of us it turned out to be okay.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5026/old_linkedin.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="622"></p> <p dir="ltr">Google+, on the other hand, went out of its way to keep users informed. Google ran the new and old versions side by side for several months and people could switch back and forth at will. By the time the new version was fully rolled out there had been changes based on the feedback and there was very little outcry.</p> <p dir="ltr">The BBC website is also one that seems to be in a constant state of development. It offers new options for keeping up with news, sports results etc., that you can try out, but always with the option of going back to what’s familiar. When new features are fully rolled out, users have been involved and everything is thoroughly tested.</p> <p dir="ltr">Surely this is a smarter way to approach website upgrades and relaunches. Compare this to CNN which, in a desire to ‘update and refresh’, launched a site that used more resources and made it harder for readers to find the news that interested them – users hated it. Or how about the legendary <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/6477-is-digg-digging-itself-into-a-hole-with-its-new-design">Digg.com relaunch that almost killed the business</a>.</p> <h3>Learn from your current site before relaunching</h3> <p dir="ltr">A classic mistake is to assume there’s nothing to learn from your existing site. Okay, it’s going to get binned. But you have thousands of customers using it every day providing data on what they want, how they want to do things and what they find difficult. You need to make use of that data.</p> <p dir="ltr">Yes, it does make sense to do usability studies even on a site you are replacing. That way you can focus on improving the parts people dislike, and keep hold of the things you know they like and use.</p> <p dir="ltr">And while you’re at it, talk to your customer service teams. They’ll have some excellent insights to offer on where people find the current website troublesome, as well at where there’s room for improvements to be made.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">What does your business need to achieve?</h3> <p dir="ltr">Every business has targets: the number of new customers, sales growth by product/service category, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-lifetime-value/">lifetime customer value</a>, cost of acquisition. How often do these business goals feed directly (and I mean <em>directly</em>) into your website redesign?</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s one thing to launch a new website because you need to increase sales by 20%. It’s quite another to identify exactly <em>how</em> the new site and the activities that feed traffic to it will achieve that goal. And it’s yet another thing to have the test data to show that the new site will deliver the conversions you need.</p> <p dir="ltr">Businesses rarely approach website relaunches with this degree of confidence. That’s because they don’t join up the dots between what the business needs to achieve and what the website is designed to deliver. And they rarely put those assumptions to the test before they launch. Result: disappointing return on the investment.</p> <p dir="ltr">With clear goals and certainty about the weak areas on your current site you can focus the development priorities more productively. Are your current below-target sales because people struggle to select the right products, or because too many shoppers abandon carts before completing a purchase? It certainly helps to know.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">What user experience do you want to create?</h3> <p dir="ltr">You’ve collected data and insights on current issues. You’ve blended these with the business goals you need to achieve. The next step is to define a user experience that will satisfy customers and deliver your goals.</p> <p dir="ltr">What, exactly, do people need to do on your site? How are you going to make this simple, enjoyable and rewarding?</p> <p dir="ltr">Draft a succinct and crystal clear statement for each key page across the website that defines the main objective(s) for your new, improved customer experience. Refer back to this constantly as you design and build the new solution to ensure you’re still focusing on your primary objectives.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">What does your brand stand for?</h3> <p dir="ltr">A website redesign is an excellent opportunity to revisit your fundamental brand values. What do you stand for? What is it that particularly appeals to your customers?</p> <p dir="ltr">What needs do you meet, what value do you create, and why do you do it better than your competition? What emotional drivers decide how visitors will act? Do they want to picture themselves as being more healthy, successful, in control, influential or contented? Or are they looking for something else?</p> <p dir="ltr">This analysis will guide colours, imagery, typography, content and vocabulary. Your insights will help you create more powerful CTAs and better performing landing pages.</p> <p dir="ltr">Here’s a great example of some content guidelines we recently came across from the team at uSwitch:</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4825/Screen_Shot_2017-03-17_at_15.32.32.png" alt="uSwitch tone chart" width="790" height="274"></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>uSwitch tone chart guide: <a href="https://ustyle.guide/language/tone.html">https://ustyle.guide/language/tone.html</a> </em></p> <h3 dir="ltr">Making it real</h3> <p dir="ltr">So now you’re clear about what your target audience think of your current website; you understand how the new site needs to perform, and how it needs to support visitors on their journey to becoming customers. What now?</p> <p dir="ltr">Wireframes let you test the structure and navigation against defined user journeys. How obvious will each step be? Are there too many steps? You can design the prompts and help users will need at each stage. You can make better informed decisions about content, headings and CTAs.</p> <p dir="ltr">Design visuals start to build a realistic picture of the look and feel of the new site that you can test against the business objectives and brand values.</p> <p dir="ltr">Everything you design can, and should, be tested before launch on a variety of devices. There are great tools out there for usability and A/B split testing that will take the risk out of your new web pages. </p> <h3 dir="ltr">The testing never stops</h3> <p dir="ltr">Launch isn’t the time to put your feet up. It’s a time to dive into the data and see whether all the hard work is paying off. It’s a time to be plotting tests and optimisation efforts to keep the metrics improving and to squeeze even more value out of your investment.</p> <p dir="ltr">The digital world moves quickly. Technologies emerge, and your customers will be trying to outdo your user experience. Plan how you are going to stay ahead in the long term.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68925 2017-03-22T11:19:22+00:00 2017-03-22T11:19:22+00:00 How ASOS targeted students via ‘Blank Canvas’ competition Nikki Gilliland <p>With help from marketing agency Seed, the ecommerce brand aimed to create an authentic and empowering campaign that would truly resonate and connect with this young audience. Here’s how it succeeded.</p> <h3>Understanding the student experience</h3> <p>ASOS says that its challenge was to become the number one destination for fashion-loving students. A rather broad aim, perhaps, but you get the idea. </p> <p>In order to do so, it first set out to better understand this target market and what it is they desire from an online brand. As well as determining specific characteristics of the consumer – someone who is likely to be fashion-forward, experimental, and highly targetable due to a high level of social media activity – it set out to identify key student trends.</p> <p>So, what do students want from university life today?</p> <p>ASOS suggests that the notion of ‘success’ is no longer as traditional as it once was – especially within university life. From starting a new business to becoming a social media influencer, the youth of today are far more set on creating their own version of success, as well as their own rules on how to achieve it.</p> <p>In turn, while fashion might have an impact on a student’s identify, it is clear that a curation of individuality and of one’s self is far more important than modern trends.  </p> <p>ASOS also emphasises the experience-seeking nature of today’s student audience – one that has grown up with the internet (and in fact has never been without it) - resulting in the expectation of a seamless consumer experience, whereby the real and digital worlds blur.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4945/ASOS_students.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="543"></p> <h3>An interactive campaign</h3> <p>Once the brand had determined the typical values and lifestyle of today’s student consumer, it aimed to craft a campaign that would ultimately align with and resonate with this audience.</p> <p>The ‘Blank Canvas’ competition – launched in time for the ‘back to uni’ period across multiple global markets – involved students creating their own version of a tote bag when they registered as a student on ASOS. </p> <p>There were a few ways to get involved, but it was all done via a simple app designed specifically for the campaign. Students could either create a bag from pre-designed emoji-style graphics, select from 10 designs by global professional artists, or upload a bespoke design that they had created themselves.</p> <p>Essentially, it meant that all students could have the opportunity to get involved, but it also gave the most creative the chance to truly stand out. The best design would win a prize – to be able to sell their creation on ASOS, as well as a bursary and dedicated mentor.  </p> <p>The winner would be decided by a voting system, with all voters receiving a 15% discount on the site to encourage participation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4944/ASOS_blank_canvas.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="361"></p> <h3>The results</h3> <p>With over 22,000 custom-bags designed and over 80,000 votes from territories like the US and the UK, the competition drew a huge amount of interest.</p> <p>In turn, ASOS saw great results on-site, with a 178% success rate for targeted sign-ups, and a high conversion from sign-ups to shoppers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4950/ASOS_stat.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="425"></p> <p>While the figures speak for themselves, the brand also measured success in terms of positive brand sentiment, citing excellent feedback from participants as well as the general overwhelming response of entries as proof. The competition element also meant that students essentially did the marketing on behalf of ASOS, using their own social presence to promote their entries and the campaign itself.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">last day to cast your votes for ASOS blank canvas! please click this link to vote for my bag design and share: <a href="https://t.co/Dt6Lun3uPK">https://t.co/Dt6Lun3uPK</a> xo <a href="https://t.co/O9I1u8kCmg">pic.twitter.com/O9I1u8kCmg</a></p> — Alison (@alison_geddes) <a href="https://twitter.com/alison_geddes/status/807582274996830208">December 10, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>Finally, the brand was able to take away a few key discoveries about the student consumer, using it to inform future campaigns and targeting. Firstly, that the age-old student stereotype is far from the reality of this super-ambitious demographic. </p> <p>Secondly, that by empowering a young audience – offering them a chance to fulfil their own potential as well as explore their individuality – a brand is able to generate great results. </p> <p><em><strong>More on ASOS:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67823-what-makes-asos-s-online-customer-experience-so-enjoyable/" target="_blank">What makes ASOS's online customer experience so enjoyable?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67950-eight-ecommerce-checkout-design-features-that-make-asos-great/" target="_blank">Eight ecommerce checkout design features that make ASOS great</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67870-why-asos-is-still-leading-the-online-retailing-pack/" target="_blank">Why ASOS is still leading the online retailing pack</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3152 2017-03-21T10:53:50+00:00 2017-03-21T10:53:50+00:00 Conversion Optimisation - How to Deliver Digital Growth <p>Have you turned the marketing dial to its limit with diminishing results? Are you working towards delivering the next big website redesign? Are you working on strategies to gain an advantage over your competition?</p> <p>This one day course shows you how to implement a robust conversion optimisation strategy and process which can deliver major uplifts in sales revenue and profitability, as well as changing the way you develop your brand, innovate your offering, and make website redesigns a thing of the past. The course will show you how to implement a data driven approach of onsite testing and optimisation as well as arming you with the strategic knowledge to accelerate growth for forward-thinking businesses.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3151 2017-03-21T10:52:55+00:00 2017-03-21T10:52:55+00:00 Conversion Optimisation - How to Deliver Digital Growth <p>Have you turned the marketing dial to its limit with diminishing results? Are you working towards delivering the next big website redesign? Are you working on strategies to gain an advantage over your competition?</p> <p>This one day course shows you how to implement a robust conversion optimisation strategy and process which can deliver major uplifts in sales revenue and profitability, as well as changing the way you develop your brand, innovate your offering, and make website redesigns a thing of the past. The course will show you how to implement a data driven approach of onsite testing and optimisation as well as arming you with the strategic knowledge to accelerate growth for forward-thinking businesses.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68898 2017-03-17T09:39:50+00:00 2017-03-17T09:39:50+00:00 Seven retailers that use live chat to improve customer service Nikki Gilliland <p>In fact, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63867-consumers-prefer-live-chat-for-customer-service-stats/" target="_blank">92% of customers feel satisfied</a> when they use a live chat feature compared to other modes of communication. And with <a href="https://www.forrester.com/report/Contact+Centers+Must+Go+Digital+Or+Die/-/E-RES122341" target="_blank">55% of US adults</a> also likely to abandon a site if they can’t find the answer to a question, live chat can be an effective key way of keeping customers happy and more likely to make a purchase.</p> <p>Offering immediacy, one-to-one interaction and potentially resulting in greater levels of customer satisfaction – here are a few examples of online retailers utilising the technology.</p> <h3>ModCloth</h3> <p>ModCloth is well-known for its tone of voice, however it’s just as friendly when it comes to customer care. With its live chat functionality, consumers can chat one-to-one with staff – or a Modcloth ‘advocate’, as they’re also known.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4693/Modcloth_live_chat.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="640"></p> <p>The fact that the service includes a photo and the first name of the person makes it much more personal – users really feel like they’re talking to a real life person rather than to a faceless brand. Similarly, this also serves to emphasise the brand’s customer-centric reputation. </p> <h3>Nikon</h3> <p>While fashion retailers might use live chat to drive the path to purchase, technology brands like Nikon use it to speed up the customer care process. After all, with <a href="https://blog.zopim.com/2014/11/13/infographic-theres-a-chat-for-that/" target="_blank">42% of people</a> saying that not having to wait on hold is one of the biggest benefits of using it, the immediacy of the service is key.</p> <p>For brands that have a commitment to customers when products go wrong, live chat can be utilised to troubleshoot common issues, also saving on the hassle of sending back products for repair.</p> <p>Nikon is a great example of this, offering help and advice on how to fix specific problems with its cameras.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4694/Nikon_live_chat_3.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="764"></p> <h3>Canyon Bikes</h3> <p>While many retailers might offer live chat, it’s often buried within a website’s help and support pages. In contrast, mountain bike retailer Canyon Bikes puts the service front and centre on its homepage.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4695/Canyon_Bikes.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="497"></p> <p>Not only does this instil an instant sense of trust – reassuring people that help and information is at hand throughout the path to purchase – but it also ensures that customers are less likely to abandon their journey due to difficulty in finding it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4696/Canyon_live_chat.JPG" alt="" width="672" height="578"></p> <h3>Warby Parker</h3> <p>Eyewear brand Warby Parker also puts live chat at the forefront of its customer service, promoting it alongside email and telephone help. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4697/Warby_Parker.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="607"></p> <p>However, with live chat resulting in <a href="http://www.maruedr.com/live-chat-tops-customer-service-league-table-thanks-to-high-satisfaction-and-low-customer-effort/">73% satisfaction levels</a> - the highest for any customer service channel - compared with 61% for email and 44% for phone, it’s likely to be the service that consumers are drawn to the most.</p> <p>This mainly looks to be due to its time-saving nature, providing instant results in comparison to calling up or writing out an email.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4698/Warby_Parker_live_chat.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="545"></p> <h3>Nordstrom</h3> <p>Nordstrom ensures that its online customer service covers all bases by separating its live chat service into categories such as 'designer specialist' and 'beauty stylist'.</p> <p>Even better, its live chat stays open 24-hours a day, seven days a week. Not only does this improve levels of customer satisfaction, but it also helps to prevent customers from being disappointed and potentially abandoning a purchase due to an unavailable service.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4701/Nordstrom_live_chat.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="523"></p> <h3>Toys R Us</h3> <p>While I am including Toys R Us on the list, this is not necessarily a good example of how to use live chat online. This is mainly because the service looks to be automated, sending consumers pre-programmed answers based on the query they select.</p> <p>So, even though the ‘Ask Emma’ service appears to be a real person, it’s actually not.</p> <p>This is a dangerous move, as instead of improving the customer experience, it could potentially harm it – leading users to feel frustrated and even duped if they realise <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68458-why-chatbots-are-an-important-opportunity-for-retailers/" target="_blank">‘Emma’ is a bot</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4699/Toys_R_Us_Emma.JPG" alt="" width="615" height="401"></p> <h3>Goldsmiths</h3> <p>Finally, Goldsmiths is a good example of a brand going one step further and making use of live chat with sound and video as opposed to just text.</p> <p>The jewellery retailer recently introduced this feature in order to mimic the personal service that it offers in its physical stores. With consumers potentially preferring an in-store experience – and therefore avoiding shopping on the website in the past – this is a great way to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68023-think-retail-how-brands-are-targeting-the-phygital-generation/" target="_blank">fuse the physical and digital</a> experience and encourage online purchases. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4700/Goldsmiths_live_chat.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="574"></p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68546-social-media-customer-service-six-important-talking-points/" target="_blank">Social media customer service: Six important talking points</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68893 2017-03-16T10:17:12+00:00 2017-03-16T10:17:12+00:00 Four digital priorities for retailers in 2017 Nikki Gilliland <p>Here are four key charts highlighting what’s high on the priority list for retailers in 2017.</p> <h3>Striving to become digital-first</h3> <p>While bricks-and-mortar operations drive traditional marketing activities for a lot of retailers, the quest to reach digital maturity is also growing in importance.</p> <p>The below chart shows that 48% of retailers say that digital ‘permeates most of their marketing activities’ – which is compared to 46% for non-retail respondents. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4660/Digital_in_marketing_activities.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="578"></p> <p>Meanwhile, 16% of retailers say that digital permeates all their marketing activities. Despite this figure still being fairly low – especially in comparison to other sectors such as media or gambling - it reflects a growing recognition that a strong digital element is needed to complement offline campaigns like TV ads and direct mail.</p> <h3>Targeting and personalisation remain top priorities</h3> <p>While other sectors are prioritising factors like social media engagement and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67985-what-is-the-future-of-content-marketing/" target="_blank">content marketing</a>, targeting and personalisation is now the top priority for retailers – with 33% citing it as one of their current three key areas of focus.</p> <p>Through personalisation, retailers are able to provide more of an authentic, relevant and memorable experience for consumers, in turn increasing the likelihood of repeat purchases and brand loyalty. </p> <p>As a result, we can see that budgets are expanding, with 57% of retailers now planning to further invest in personalisation during 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4662/Targeting_and_personalisation.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="593"></p> <h3>Understanding mobile users</h3> <p>With retail sales in the UK alone reaching £133bn in 2016, the impact of mobile is clear. </p> <p>For retailers, however, it’s becoming more about how mobile can be harnessed as part of an over-arching customer experience strategy – rather than a standalone area that competes for both attention and budget.</p> <p>The below chart demonstrates the importance of understanding the customer journey, more specifically in terms of how mobile users research and buy products on their smartphone. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4661/Mobile_users.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="550"></p> <p>75% of retailers now agree on the importance of taking all touchpoints into consideration when mapping the consumer journey, meaning both online and offline behaviour.</p> <h3>AR and VR breaking through</h3> <p>When it comes to how retailers plan to differentiate themselves in the face of competition, 34% cite making the experience as fun and valuable as possible - above and beyond other factors like customer service and the quality of products. </p> <p>With 28% of retailers also citing <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67713-augmented-reality-vs-virtual-reality-where-should-brands-focus/" target="_blank">VR and AR</a> as the most exciting prospect ahead of 2020, many are embracing technology as a way of achieving a fun and unique customer experience. Whether it’s a virtual dressing room or an <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68732-what-makes-a-good-chatbot-ux/" target="_blank">online chatbot</a>, technology is now being utilised to strengthen bonds with consumers. </p> <p>Finally, as technology trends are predicted to dominate the evolution of retail in the next five years, it remains to be seen how retailers will successfully integrate this alongside human-centred design.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4663/VR_AR_breaking_through.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="590"></p> <p><em><strong>For further insight, Econsultancy subscribers can download the </strong><strong>latest <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2017-digital-trends-in-retail/">Digital Trends in Retail Report</a>.</strong></em></p>