tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/commerce Latest Commerce content from Econsultancy 2017-02-07T10:28:08+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68767 2017-02-07T10:28:08+00:00 2017-02-07T10:28:08+00:00 How retailers are targeting mobile shoppers this Valentine’s Day Nikki Gilliland <p>With last-minute and on-the-move gift buying a real (if somewhat depressing) phenomenon, retailers need to ensure they are meeting the demand.</p> <p>With this in mind, here’s how retailers are targeting Valentine’s Day shoppers on mobile.</p> <h3>Debenhams</h3> <p>Debenhams is targeting consumers early this year, sending out a Valentine’s Day email before the end of January. With a growing number of people <a href="http://www.zdnet.com/article/consumers-prefer-marketing-offers-via-email-over-social-media-according-to-new-study/" target="_blank">using smartphones to check email</a>, this tactic is effective for prompting mobile shoppers.</p> <p>With a focus on gift guides, the creative is a fairly standard affair.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3584/Debenhams_subject_line.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3583/Debenhams_email.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Debenhams is already promoting Valentine’s Day quite heavily on its mobile site, too, using a prominent homepage banner.</p> <p>However, the banner sends users straight to the lingerie category rather a general category page. Which is an odd move, as it could be sending mobile shoppers towards items they might not be interested in, which is potentially very disruptive.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3586/Debenhams.JPG" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3587/Debenhams_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Luckily, it also promotes an ‘Editor’s Picks’ article from the Debenhams blog, which points consumers to the various other items on offer.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3588/Debenhams_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Firebox </h3> <p>Firebox is another adopter of Valentine’s Day-themed emails, using a humorous tone and personalisation elements to tempt consumers into clicking through to the mobile site.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3595/Firebox_email.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Unfortunately, the mobile experience is less than inspiring.</p> <p>All Valentine’s Day items are lumped into a single category (with no filters for him or her, etc.)</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3595/Firebox_email.JPG" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3598/Firebox_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>This means users are required to endlessly scroll through potential gift ideas, which could quickly lead to boredom and higher abandonment rates.</p> <p>It would make sense to incorporate some kind of sorting system, at the very least, to help channel mobile browsing.</p> <h3>H&amp;M</h3> <p>H&amp;M is not promoting February 14 too heavily on mobile, choosing instead to include subtle category banners towards the bottom of the homepage.</p> <p>The curated children’s category is an original approach, which nicely balances out its focus on stereotypical Valentine’s Day gifts elsewhere.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3600/H_M.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Again, lingerie seems to be a big theme, with an email that oddly relates ‘luxurious’ to skimpy underwear. </p> <p>With no indication of any other related categories, this could lead mobile users to assume it's the only option from H&amp;M.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3601/H_M_subject_line.JPG" alt="" width="300" height="61"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3602/H_M_email.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>Last year, sales of flowers increased by a whopping 220%, making it the biggest Valentine’s Day category of all.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, many retailers have cottoned on to this, with the likes of Tesco using the category to drive sales on mobile.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3603/Tesco_1.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3604/Tesco.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>While the homepage banner is restrained, Tesco is ramping up the incentives by offering free delivery and a free vase if you order online.</p> <p>I also noticed that Tesco is now prompting customers to sign up for alerts when new items come into or back into stock – a tactic which could help to turn mobile browsers into buyers at a later date.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3605/Tesco_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Thorntons</h3> <p>Despite a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68535-thorntons-fudges-site-relaunch-asks-customers-to-re-register/" target="_blank">relaunch marred by migration problems</a>, Thorntons is hoping to bounce back with an effective Valentine’s Day campaign.</p> <p>The creative is one of the most appealing I’ve seen, capitalising on pretty imagery and the sleek new design of its mobile site.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3606/Thorntons_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3607/Thorntons.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>The navigation is somewhat of a mixed bag, however.</p> <p>While there is the option to sort the Valentine's Day category by best sellers or price, there's no option to filter by type of gift, meaning users are left scrolling or searching elsewhere on-site.</p> <h3>House of Fraser</h3> <p>House of Fraser has nicely incorporated Valentine’s Day on its mobile site, making gifts front and centre on the homepage.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3608/House_of_Fraser.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3609/House_of_Fraser_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>It’s also one of the easiest mobile browsing experience I’ve come across, breaking down categories by gender and price. Likewise, it allows users to further filter by type of gift.</p> <p>Instead of bombarding users with a particular category (e.g. lingerie) or lumping all items together, it aids the mobile journey and nicely showcases relevant items.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3610/House_of_Fraser_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Lush</h3> <p>Lastly, Lush is a good example of how to use seasonal holidays to drive sales.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3611/Lush.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3614/Lush_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>By creating a specific range of products for Valentine’s Day and promoting it across all channels, it aims to capture consumer attention and increase spending (even though mobile users might not even be browsing for this reason).</p> <p>I particularly like how the creative does not mention 'gifts', meaning that consumers won’t be discouraged from buying regardless of relationship status.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3613/Lush_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68776 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 10 astounding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>As always, the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> is ready and waiting if you’re in the mood for something a little extra.</p> <h3>34% of brands admit internal silos</h3> <p>New research from Oracle highlights how closer collaboration between sales and marketing teams is required to better target audiences and increase sales.</p> <p>However, despite also recognising the need, many organisations are failing to put it into practice. </p> <p>The Oracle survey found that 34% of brands admit their sales, marketing and customer service teams work completely independently of each other, leading to a lack of customer insight.</p> <p>In terms of the reasons why, 33% blame it on their current systems and technologies, while 30% say their corporate culture makes it tricky for sales and marketing teams to align priorities.</p> <h3>Millennials increasingly influencing tech-buying decisions</h3> <p>With millennials predicted to make up 50% of the US workforce by 2020, Linkedin has been exploring how younger generations are influencing technology buying decisions in the workplace.</p> <p>In a survey of 5,470 global professionals, it found that 61% of younger millennials (age 19-25) contribute to their companies’ technology purchases, with one in three already being decision-makers. Older millennials (those aged 25-35) are said to have even more influence, with 68% contributing to decisions.</p> <p>Lastly, Generation X still holds the power, with 85% of employees aged 36-50 deciding technology purchases or managing the budget.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3667/Linkedin.JPG" alt="" width="428" height="519"></p> <h3>Searches for US visas surge following travel ban</h3> <p>Following Trump’s travel ban, Hitwise data has revealed that searches for American visas have since increased by 34%. More specifically, searches for “visa for USA from UK” and “US visa waiver” have been among the highest.</p> <p>This is similar to what happened after Brexit, when Hitwise witnessed a 300% increase in searches related to moving to the EU. </p> <p>Following the week’s news coverage, approximately one in every 10,000 searches over three days related to the “travel ban”, which is an increase of 2,045% since January 28.</p> <h3> </h3> <h3>One in 10 Gmail users say emails are miscategorised</h3> <p>Gmail’s automatic sorting feature is proving less than effective, with one in 10 users reporting incorrectly categorised messages.</p> <p>This is according to new research from Return Path, leading to warnings that marketers should be more vigilant about how and where their messages are being delivered.</p> <p>The study found that 45% of tabbed inbox users check the ‘Promotions’ tab - used to aggregate marketing promotions and other offers - at least once per day. As a result, if marketing email is delivered to another tab, it could be missed entirely.     </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3665/gmail.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK consumers spent the most via mobile last Christmas </h3> <p>According to Adobe’s latest Digital Index, UK shoppers spent more via mobile last Christmas than the US or any other European nation. </p> <p>Data shows that 60% of online visits to UK retailers over Christmas were made on mobile, and of every £10 spent online in the UK, £4.10 came from a mobile device. </p> <p>Insight suggests that this could be due to a rise in last-minute buying, with the amount spent on the last Monday before Christmas increasing by 50% in 2016.</p> <h3>Live chat leads to greater customer loyalty</h3> <p>A new <a href="https://skilled.co/resources/live-chat-best-customer-service-right-now/" target="_blank">infographic</a> by Skilled highlights how live chat on ecommerce sites can lead to increased levels of customer satisfaction and loyalty.</p> <p>Studies show that 63% of live chat users said they are more likely to return to the site as a result. Interestingly, Mexico is said to be the leader of live chat, with the highest customer satisfaction rate of 94.11%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3663/Skilled.JPG" alt="" width="674" height="342"></p> <h3>Nearly two in five shoppers have used their phone to pay in-store</h3> <p>MEF’s <a href="http://mobileecosystemforum.com/mobile-money-report/" target="_blank">Mobile Money Report</a> has revealed that mobile payments are on the rise, with nearly two in five shoppers using their smartphone to make a purchase in-store.</p> <p>From analysis of 6,000 consumers in nine countries, it also found that 78% of people have made a purchase using an app or mobile site.</p> <p>Mobile banking looks to be on a similar path, with 61% of respondents saying they now use their mobile phone to bank, and 44% using an app to check their balance.</p> <h3>Consumers see over half of brand content as ‘clutter’</h3> <p>The <a href="http://www.meaningful-brands.com/en" target="_blank">Meaningful Brands</a> report by Havas has revealed that over half of consumers view brand content as poor or irrelevant.</p> <p>In a study of 375,000 people across 33 countries, Havas found that while 84% of respondents expect brands to produce content of some kind, 60% of it fails to deliver any personal benefit.</p> <p>Consequently, we can see that the greater the impact on a person’s well-being, the more likely content is to be perceived as meaningful or effective.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3664/Havas.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="426"></p> <h3>80% of marketers describe data as ‘critical’ to success</h3> <p>A new GDMA survey has highlighted how customer data has become an indispensable asset, with 80% of global respondents citing it as critical to their marketing efforts.</p> <p>UK marketers are increasingly relying on data, coming top of all countries when asked about its importance.</p> <p>As a result, investment in data-driven marketing and advertising is still on the rise, with over half of global respondents saying they increased their spending in this area in 2016.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68761 2017-02-01T15:04:00+00:00 2017-02-01T15:04:00+00:00 Does ‘buy now, pay later’ reduce mobile basket abandonment? Nikki Gilliland <p>According to MEF’s new <a href="http://mobileecosystemforum.com/mobile-money-report/" target="_blank">Mobile Money Report</a>, 58% of people have started to pay for something via mobile, only to abandon it before the final checkout. </p> <p>With 31% saying this was because they were asked for too much sensitive information, and 21% saying the process was too long – it has been suggested that offering a ‘buy now, pay later’ option could help combat this. </p> <p>But would this option really prevent buyers from abandoning their baskets?</p> <p>Here’s a bit more info on the feature, as well as how online retailers are currently incorporating it. And to learn more about mobile UX, check out these Econsultancy resources:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/mobile-user-experience-mobile-marketing/">Mobile UX (User Experience) &amp; Marketing Training</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/user-experience-and-interaction-design-for-mobile-and-web">User Experience and Interaction Design for Mobile and Web</a></li> </ul> <h3>Paying at a later date</h3> <p>Some retailers have been offering the option to ‘pay later’ for a while, however this has commonly involved opening a credit account with potentially steep interest rates.</p> <p>Recently, a number of new third-party payment companies have popped up, aiming to offer more flexible and transparent services, and bridging the gap between consumers and retailers.</p> <p>Brands like FuturePay and Klarna essentially pay the retailer first, which means the consumer then owes them. These companies typically promote low or no interest as well as multiple payment options, providing the consumer with greater flexibility. </p> <p>Of course, there is still the suggestion that it is irresponsible to offer any type of credit, however companies like Klarna deliberately position themselves as an alternative to stereotypical credit companies.</p> <p>With a focus on the quick, easy and trustworthy nature of the service - it's all about making the mobile shopping experience as smooth as possible.</p> <h3>How do retailers promote pay later?</h3> <h4>AO</h4> <p>AO is known for its customer-centric approach, so it's unsurprising that it offers multiple payment options.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3534/AO_1.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="632"></p> <p>Partnering with credit company V12, it offers consumers the opportunity to 'pay on finance' - meaning they can pay nothing for six months or spread the cost (with interest). </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3532/AO_2.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="619"></p> <p>The service has been around for a while, meaning that the wording is rather out-dated and jargon-heavy. The focus on 'interest free credit' sounds rather serious as opposed to the general notion of paying at a later date, which could put potential customers off.</p> <h4>Currys</h4> <p>Curry's is another retailer that offers flexible credit, but it is poorly promoted on mobile.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3530/Currys_1.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="616"></p> <p>While it is highlighted on the product page, consumers are still required to fill out a lengthy checkout form before the option arises again.</p> <p>Similar to AO, the sheer amount of information offered here is also likely to confuse or put consumers off from using it to make the purchase.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3531/Curry_s_2.JPG" alt="" width="368" height="664"></p> <h4>GHD</h4> <p>GHD is just one of the retailers that has partnered with new third-party payment company, Klarna.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3535/GHD_1.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="632"></p> <p>There is immediately a much bigger focus on transparency and simplicity, with a lot of copy dedicated to explaining the concept.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3537/GHD_2.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="630"></p> <p>This extends to the checkout process, which includes the enticing 'shop now, pay later' option.</p> <p>By including it alongside the standard credit card or PayPal options, it's likely to catch the consumer's attention.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3538/GHD_3.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="608"></p> <h4>Clarks </h4> <p>Clarks Australia is another retailer that has partnered with a third-party payment provider.</p> <p>It is also one of the most heavily promoted examples, including links to AfterPay on its homepage and on each product page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3540/Clarks_1.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="624"></p> <p>This is undoubtedly the most effective approach.</p> <p>Not only does it let the user know early on, but it allows them to explore the concept instead of being confronted with it at the checkout.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3541/Clarks_2.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="620"></p> <h3>Will it reduce basket abandonment?</h3> <p>So, back to the real question at hand. Does the option to pay later really provide futher incentive to checkout on mobile?</p> <p>From the aforementioned examples, we are able to see that the way brands promote and present this information has an impact.</p> <p>The likes of AO and Currys - with their finance-heavy descriptions and dense explanations - might put consumers off, simply because this type of information is not convenient or engaging on mobile.</p> <p>However, with the subtler approach demonstrated by GHD and Clarks (plus the customer-centric nature of the third-party companies) - customers are more likely to show interest.</p> <p>Likewise, prominent promotion of 'shop now, pay later' on product pages and as early as possible during the checkout is key. For mobile shoppers making quick or spontaneous purchases - the concept sounds enticing.</p> <p>Despite recent criticism over '<a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-38378069" target="_blank">shock bills</a>' and spiralling debt, it is clear that flexible payment options can provide greater convenience.</p> <p>As long as the service is transparent and simple to understand, consumers might be willing to make it part of their mobile shopping experience.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">12 ways to reduce basket abandonment on your ecommerce site</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64167-basket-abandonment-emails-why-you-should-be-sending-them/" target="_blank">Basket abandonment emails: why you should be sending them</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64343-checkout-abandonment-mobile-ux-examples-to-help-boost-conversions/" target="_blank">Checkout abandonment: mobile UX examples to help boost conversions</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68647 2016-12-16T11:45:20+00:00 2016-12-16T11:45:20+00:00 10 smashing digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s roundup includes news about Instagram, online ads, IoT and much more. As always, be sure to check out the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for further insight.</p> <p>On we go...</p> <h3>Growing recognition of emerging technologies</h3> <p>New research from Adobe has delved into how brands are using emerging technologies such as AR, VR, and AI in their Christmas marketing.</p> <p>While it seems largely limited to big brands, emerging technologies are increasingly being used by marketers to help grab the attention of consumers. </p> <p>Consumers are now cottoning on to its potential, too, with 68% agreeing that it provides brands with a competitive edge. Likewise, 32% of consumers also agree that it helps to drive customer loyalty to a brand, and 55% believe that it is useful in attracting potential customers.</p> <p>Finally, one fifth of marketers also believe VR will be the biggest trend of Christmas campaigns next year.</p> <h3>Instagram reaches 600m monthly users</h3> <p>Instagram has announced that it now has over 600m monthly active users, with 100m having joined in the past six months.</p> <p>This also means that the platform has doubled in size in just two years, increasing from 300m in 2014.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Today we’re proud to announce a community of more than 600 million. From all of us at Instagram, thank you. <a href="https://t.co/DqHwU0y2Lv">https://t.co/DqHwU0y2Lv</a> <a href="https://t.co/OUNyb08tNu">pic.twitter.com/OUNyb08tNu</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/809398925417443328">December 15, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Pre-Christmas discounts reach a new record</h3> <p>UK consumers are witnessing record discounts in the run-up to Christmas, according to analysis from Deloitte.</p> <p>Discounts are currently averaging 43.3%, a figure that’s 1.5% deeper than last year, and discounts are also set to rise to 54% by Christmas Eve.</p> <p>The high level of discounting is said to be due to a number of factors, including a successful Black Friday period, unseasonably warm weather and favourable economic conditions for consumers. </p> <p>However, insight suggests that it is also an indication of nervousness from retailers, particularly in how increasing inflation will affect consumer confidence and spending. </p> <h3>Nearly half of online ads miss target audience</h3> <p>Online advertising is missing the mark, according to new research from Nielsen.</p> <p>In a study of more than 44,000 campaigns across 17 countries, only 53% of ad impressions served in the UK were viewed by people of the intended age and gender.</p> <p>The accuracy of ads also varies between sectors, with travel marketers being the most likely to reach their desired audience, closely followed by entertainment.</p> <p>Demographics also appear to be a tricky factor, with campaigns focusing on those aged 25-44 reaching the audience just 38% of the time. </p> <p>Older consumers are said to be a little easier to reach, with success 44% of the time in campaigns targeting 18-34 year olds and 58% for 35-64 year olds.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2486/Nielsen.png" alt="" width="400" height="395"></p> <h3>23% of consumers have bought a fake product online</h3> <p>New research by MarkMonitor has revealed that nearly a quarter of all online consumers have been duped by counterfeiting, with 23% unwillingly ordering a fake item.</p> <p>Surveying the percentage of people that were duped, MarkMonitor found that 71% said the experience had a negative impact on their perception of the genuine brand, with 59% being extra cautious when interacting with the company in future.</p> <p>Likewise, 12% said they wouldn’t buy from that brand again, and 29% complained to the company that owned the brand. </p> <p>Lastly, a very polite 32% took no action upon discovering they were duped.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2489/Counterfeit.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="447"></p> <h3>Eurovision is TV’s most-tweeted about event in 2016</h3> <p>Kantar Media has revealed what got us talking on social media in 2016, with data on the most-tweeted about television shows in 2016.</p> <p>The most-tweets in a minute occurred when Adele won a Brit award in February, generating 16,832 tweets in 60 seconds.</p> <p>In terms of the top broadcasts, everyone went gaga for Eurovision, with the program resulting in 1.6m tweets and 246,000 unique authors overall.</p> <p>Entertainment has been the most-tweeted about genre, accounting for almost half of tweets sent. However, current affairs saw a significant increase, accounting for almost a quarter of TV related tweets. </p> <h3>Abandonment rates drop during Black Friday sales</h3> <p>Data from SaleCycle has shown that abandonment rates dropped on Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year, with shoppers keen to follow through with their bargain hunting.</p> <p>While abandonment rates for the rest of the year averaged out at 75%, they dropped to 67% on Black Friday and 70% on Cyber Monday. </p> <p>However, there was also a 312% increase in abandonment emails sent, due to the greater volume of traffic on retailer websites.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2487/Black_Friday_stats.JPG" alt="" width="440" height="315"></p> <h3>‘Fitness buffs’ 25% more likely to buy on mobile</h3> <p>Hitwise, a division of Connexity, has examined the shopping behaviour of consumers who typically purchase or visit websites for athletic apparel, fitness trackers or workout equipment.</p> <p>It has found that this demographic is strongly dependent on mobile, with 25% of fitness buffs more likely to purchase a product advertised on their mobile.</p> <p>Likewise, this group places a deep trust in social media reviews, being 95% more likely to pay attention to the opinions of other consumers and 94% more likely to follow their favourite brands or companies on social platforms.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2493/fitness_buffs.jpg" alt="" width="459" height="348"></p> <h3>34% of consumers say extended delivery dates would prompt purchase</h3> <p>With Christmas nearing ever closer, Astound Commerce’s latest report revealed how logistics factors will play a role in purchase decisions during the holidays.</p> <p>According to survey results, 35% of consumers say extended shipping dates would cause them to make a purchase from a particular retailer this Christmas. </p> <p>The option for in-store pick-up is also a big draw, with 34% also citing this factor.</p> <p>Lastly, the study also found that technology is of growing importance for consumers, with 81% saying that technology to help locate products in-store would be desirable.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2490/Delivery.JPG" alt="" width="578" height="268"></p> <h3>A fifth of businesses to embrace the Internet of Things</h3> <p>Big data and the Internet of Things (IoT) are expected to add <a href="http://www.sas.com/en_gb/news/press-releases/2016/february/bi-data-internet-of-things-economy.html" target="_blank">£322bn to the UK economy</a> from 2015 to 2020.</p> <p>Now, research from SAS has predicted that a fifth of businesses are planning to adopt IoT to address customer demand and drive overall engagement.</p> <p>In a study of 75 large European organisations, 36% of respondents said that IoT will have a positive impact on end-user experiences if fully embraced.</p> <p>What’s more, 29% believe it would drive them to produce higher quality hardware and services, and one in 10 cited concerns about losing market share as the biggest risk of not embracing IoT.</p> <p>Despite concerns over the time required for IoT implementation, 37% of organisations are said to be responding to these challenges - and to the persistent skills shortage - by collaborating with external technology vendors.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68636 2016-12-14T14:02:00+00:00 2016-12-14T14:02:00+00:00 Pizza Express, Channel 4 and TFL: Three examples of brand chatbots Nikki Gilliland <p>For now, let’s take a look at some of the latest examples to pop up, from three very different UK brands.</p> <h3>Pizza Express</h3> <p>Following on from <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/" target="_blank">Domino's</a> and Pizza Hut, Pizza Express is the latest pizza chain to join the chatbot brigade.</p> <p>It has recently launched a bot as part of its Christmas marketing campaign, allowing restaurant diners to play the 'Dough Baubles' game via Messenger.</p> <p>By asking the bot to #shakethetree, customers will receive a personalised video along with the chance to win free pizzas as well as the restaurant’s famous dough balls. </p> <p>The game has already proved to be popular, with 75,000 people reportedly using it in first two weeks.</p> <p>Despite the bot mainly being promoted to diners in restaurants by a special code to scan on phones, I was also able to get involved simply by messaging Pizza Express on Facebook.</p> <p>There's not much to say about it other than that it's a fun bit of marketing - customers are likely to enjoy the light-hearted tone (and chance of a free meal).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2390/Pizza_Express_chat_bot.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="561"></p> <p>For Pizza Express, it is a great way to interact with consumers on social media as well as gain more in-depth data. Apparently, this bot only marks the start of the restaurant using the technology, with the brand also keen to adopt payment via Messenger in future.</p> <p>Of course, it is one thing to play a game via a chatbot, but will customers be as keen to use it to pay for food? A big stumbling block might be the public's willingness to put their trust in Facebook as a payment service. </p> <p>So far, it is unclear how many users have passed on card details via the platform, but with recent <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68332-should-marketers-be-more-concerned-about-facebook-s-video-metrics-faux-pas/" target="_blank">controversy over inflated metrics</a>, fake news, as well as a history of privacy issues, it might not be as many as brands might hope. </p> <p>However, regardless of whether the social commerce aspect takes off, Pizza Express’s success with #ShakeTheTree still shows that users are keen to use chatbots in different ways – <em>and</em> in different environments.</p> <p>What’s more, it is also hoping that the technology will help enhance its reputation for customer service, allowing the chain to easily respond to enquiries about opening hours and bookings. </p> <h3>Channel 4</h3> <p>A few months ago, Channel 4 created a Messenger chatbot to promote the second series of its acclaimed drama <em>Humans</em>.</p> <p>If you didn’t see the first series, the broadcaster also created an advert suggesting that robotic humans called ‘Synths’ were actually arriving in shops. This time around, its campaign is based around the notion that the Synths are malfunctioning. </p> <p>As well as an interview between the real editor-in-chief of the New Scientist and a fictional spokesperson from Persona Synthetics, other activity included placing trucks in cities across the country in pretence of being the “synthetic human collection service” for malfunctioning Synths.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9TrkZln4eyY?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <p>All of this marketing pointed people towards the <a href="http://www.personasynthetics.com/productrecall/" target="_blank">Persona Synthetics website</a>, where they can chat with Synths over Facebook Messenger.  </p> <p>Despite the fact that I’ve never even seen <em>Humans</em> before, I decided to check it out, resulting in a rather interesting conversation with ‘Walter’, my chosen Synth. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2420/Walter_3.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="526"></p> <p>And yes, things got weird, with Walter quickly playing up to his creepy robot persona.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2421/Walter_2.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="539"></p> <p>Some have suggested that Channel 4’s bot is a little self-indulgent, questioning whether or not the premise will be too confusing to viewers who haven’t seen the show - or a case of overkill for existing fans.</p> <p>However, I think it’s incredibly well done, and regardless of my awareness of the TV program it's definitely one of the best bots I’ve experienced.</p> <p>Most chatbots tend to have a limited amount of responses or say fairly basic things, but Walter definitely impressed with his creativity (and ability to tell a joke). That said, the conversation did seem to continue on the designated theme regardless of my responses.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2422/Walter_4.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="552"></p> <p>A great example of a chatbot being used for advertising purposes – it shows that the technology doesn’t have to be used purely for customer service.</p> <h3>TFL</h3> <p>Speaking of customer service, Twitter has recently announced the introduction of new chatbot features into its direct messaging service, designed to lure more brands into using it for this purpose.</p> <p>The features allows brands to set up automatic welcome messages whenever a user starts a conversation, as well as use quick replies to prompt the best ways to reply to a DM.</p> <p>One company to already get on board is Transport for London.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2388/TFL_bot.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>Now, travellers can instantly check the status of a tube line by clicking ‘check status now’ within a direct message. Even better, travellers can also subscribe to receive alerts, meaning that they’ll automatically be alerted whenever there is problem on the line.</p> <p>It’s a slick tool, and certainly makes sense for people who already use their phone (and Twitter) to check travel information on a daily basis. It also nicely prompts customers - when you search for a specific tube line, the 'provides support' description indicates the new feature is there.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2386/TFL_bot_4.png" alt="" width="350" height="622"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2387/TFL_bot_5.png" alt="" width="350" height="622"></p> <p>Another positive is that, even if you're talking to a specific line such as the Jubilee, you can also check the status of other lines in the same conversation.</p> <p>This will certainly be a time-saver for anyone who uses multiple tube lines within a single journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2389/TFL_bot_3.png" alt="" width="400" height="711"></p> <p>As well as creating a seamless customer experience, Twitter’s new bot feature is also an attempt to move conversations away from the public sphere into a private context, allowing for a greater exchange of information between brands and users.</p> <p>Likewise, with many brands now using Messenger for customer service, it is a strategic attempt from Twitter to catch up with Facebook's progress on bots.</p> <p>With many more predicted to launch in 2017, it'll certainly be interesting to see where chatbots reign supreme in 2017.</p> <p><em><strong>More chat about bots:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care" target="_blank">What are chatbots and why should marketers care?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68046-five-pioneering-examples-of-how-brands-are-using-chatbots/" target="_blank">Five pioneering examples of how brands are using chatbots</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68458-why-chatbots-are-an-important-opportunity-for-retailers" target="_blank">Why chatbots are an important opportunity for retailers</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68532-the-case-for-chatbots-being-the-new-apps-notes-from-websummit2016/" target="_blank">The case for chatbots being the new apps</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68613 2016-12-09T11:41:06+00:00 2016-12-09T11:41:06+00:00 Argos's 'Christmas Wishlist’ app: Clever Christmas marketing for kids Nikki Gilliland <p>Argos’s ‘My Christmas Wishlist’ has been around for the past couple of years, but having been recently been updated to include more gift ideas, I thought I’d give it a whirl.</p> <p>Here are my thoughts.</p> <h3>Traditional turns digital</h3> <p>It’s a bit sad to think that children don’t write Christmas lists anymore, however, that’s the basis of the Argos wishlist app.</p> <p>Designed for kids between the ages of three to seven, it allows them to pick the items they’d like from Santa whilst having fun with technology.</p> <p>Featuring the animated characters of Mo, Squidge, Gil, Fly, and Stik to help - it’s colourfully designed to engage little ones.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2185/Argos_App.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <h3>Setting it up</h3> <p>When you open the app, you are met with a fun synopsis of its various features, such as adding stickers and taking selfies.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2186/Argos_2.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2187/Argos_3.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>Having been designed for kids, it’s obviously quite easy to use, however it’s nice to have this guide to get you started.</p> <p>From here, you’re immediately prompted to edit the settings – the most important element for adults.</p> <p>This allows you to limit the amount of products kids can select, set a maximum price, as well as enter in your email address to receive the final wishlist or send it to family and friends.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2188/Argos_Settings.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2189/Argos_music_setting.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>The ability to stop kids from wanting <em>everything</em> they see is one feature that the old fashioned Argos catalogue does not have.  </p> <p>Another cool feature is the ‘grown-up calculator’, which prevents kids from tampering with the settings by asking a tricky maths question.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2190/calculator.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>Lastly, there’s the option to turn off music and sound effects, which is the biggest blessing of all.</p> <p>If you don’t, look forward to the pleasure of listening to the same neverending tune.</p> <h3>Creating the wish list</h3> <p>As I continued exploring the app, I was met with some nice touches of personalisation, such as the option to enter a name and choose an animated 'helper'.</p> <p>And now the adults have done their bit, it can be handed over to kids worry-free.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2193/Argos_5.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2195/Argos_7.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>With thousands of toys to choose from, everything is separated into brand categories such as ‘Barbie’ or ‘Lego’.</p> <p>Children can then browse the various items and add them to their wishlist.</p> <p>One thing that struck me was that there’s no real information about the toys themselves, other than a few images to swipe through.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2196/Argos_Barbie.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2197/Argos_Barbie_Pics.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>But then again, this is more of a negative for adult users, and certainly isn't something children are going to worry about.</p> <h3>Creative elements</h3> <p>Once the kids have selected the items they want from Santa, they can then choose to decorate the final wishlist.</p> <p>This is the most interactive part of the app and a feature that elevates it from a standard gift guide or brochure.</p> <p>Including stickers and a doodle function, kids can make it as personal (and messy) as they like.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2198/Argos_12.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>This feature also distracts from the ‘I want it now’ element and encourages children to get creative.</p> <p>Despite being digital, it also means the app is at least a little reminiscent of the traditional experience of writing to Santa.</p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>In terms of actual design or UX, the Argos wishlist isn't overly innovative. There are tonnes of apps out there that are far more slick.</p> <p>However, the difference is that there's normally a distinction between kids apps (for games or learning) and retail apps (for grown-ups).</p> <p>It's quite unusual to see a combination of the two.</p> <p>While the premise is quite basic, it is very easy to use, with plenty of fun and enjoyable interactive elements.</p> <p>Even the most simple features - such as the fart noise you hear while pressing the ‘back’ button - is likely to make kids want to use it.</p> <p>Sadly for parents, this might even continue once the gift selection part is over with.</p> <p><strong><em>Related artices:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62865-six-ingredients-of-a-great-mobile-app/" target="_blank">Six ingredients of a great mobile app</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67237-eight-examples-of-best-practice-on-argos-product-pages/" target="_blank">18 excellent features of Argos’s mobile app</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67237-eight-examples-of-best-practice-on-argos-product-pages/" target="_blank">Eight examples of best practice on Argos product pages</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68587 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 Black Friday & Cyber Monday 2016 ecommerce stats bonanza Nikki Gilliland <h3>Black Friday 2016 breaks US online sales records</h3> <p>Adobe has revealed that this year’s Black Friday shopping frenzy broke online sales records in the US, with $3.34bn being spent online and a 17.7% increase on sales last year.</p> <p>It also found that retailers who invested in mobile, email and social saw 30% more sales on average than those concentrating on just one or two channels.</p> <h3>Black Friday traffic up 220% on a normal day</h3> <p>Confirming the success of this year’s event is Qubit, which has analysed more than 50m visits from 120 UK and US retailers to discover how consumers reacted.</p> <p>The results show a huge increase in both traffic and revenue.</p> <p>When comparing Black Friday to a normal Friday, it found traffic was up 220%. Similarly, traffic increased 155% on Cyber Monday when compared to a normal sales day.</p> <p>The same goes for revenue, which was up 240% and 380% on the Friday and Monday respectively.</p> <h3>Lego is the top-selling toy</h3> <p>Adobe’s results from Black Friday show that Lego is still a hot favourite this festive season, with Lego Creator Sets coming out as the top-selling toy.</p> <p>This was closely followed by Razor electric scooters, Nerf guns, DJI Phantom Drones and Barbie Dreamhouse. </p> <p>With items under $300 being 20% more likely to sell out, this gives us a good indication of the toys parents need to snap up if they still want to get them in time for Christmas.</p> <p>The five bestselling electronics from Black Friday were Apple iPads, Samsung 4k TV’s, Apple’s MacBook Air, LG Televisions and Microsoft Xbox.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1970/Lego.JPG" alt="" width="536" height="345"></p> <h3>Travel companies see greater interest than in 2015</h3> <p>Data from Sojern shows that consumers spent more on travel this year than last, specifically taking advantage of Cyber Monday.</p> <p>On the Monday, there were 32% more searches for flights from the US compared to the week before. </p> <p>Similarly, while 2015 saw an increase in bookings of 9%, this Cyber Monday resulted in a jump of 21%.</p> <p>Out of the most searched for destinations, Italy, Japan and Colombia were in the top 10, while Canada, Haiti and US Virgin Islands were among the most-booked.</p> <h3>Consumers embrace mobile shopping</h3> <p>According to PayPal, Black Friday demonstrated the enormous growth of mobile shopping and its popularity with consumers.</p> <p>On Black Friday, one third of all PayPal payments were made on mobile devices, as PayPal handled $15,507 in payments per second.</p> <p>Cyber Monday resulted in similar activity, with PayPal seeing over 50% year-on-year growth in global mobile payments.</p> <p>Based on the data, it is also expecting more than 40% year-on-year growth in total payments.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1972/mobile_shopping.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="370"></p> <h3>Brits more confident in shopping on mobile</h3> <p>While results show that mobile overtook desktop as the most preferred shopping channel overall, data from ChannelAdvisor suggests that Brits are more at ease than US shoppers when it comes to following through on mobile purchases.</p> <p>Throughout the five-day sales period, 75% of shopping searches in the US took place on mobile devices, however, mobile accounted for less than one in two purchases.</p> <p>Meanwhile, despite the percentage of UK shopping searches on mobile platforms being slightly lower, more than three in five sales conversions took place on mobile.</p> <h3>1.2m app installs on Black Friday</h3> <p>Continuing the mobile trend, it seems there was a significant increase in retailers targeting consumers via mobile apps this year.</p> <p>According to Urban Airship, retailers sent 56% more holiday notifications in 2016 than in 2015.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1966/App_notifications.png" alt="" width="624" height="469"></p> <p>The big difference this year was retailers embracing targeting, with 88% of notifications being highly targeted to shopper’s locations, preferences and behaviours. Only 12% of messages were broadcast to everyone.</p> <p>The data also shows daily app installs averaged more than 696,000 per day in November, up 24% from the average daily rate in October. </p> <p>On Black Friday itself, there was a peak of more than 1.2m app installs.</p> <h3>Gilmore Girls generates more excitement than Black Friday on social</h3> <p>The latest data from Spredfast shows that there was a huge increase in noise around Black Friday this year, with the event racking up 2.4m mentions on social media - over 1m more than in 2015.</p> <p>However, insight suggests this could be due to more interactions on social overall, rather than direct interest in the shopping event.</p> <p>Despite Black Friday trending in many of these countries last year, the hotly anticipated return of Gilmore Girls, and the hashtag #GilmoreGirlsRevival, came out on top in France, Italy, New Zealand, Ireland and Germany.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">When everyone is hyped for black friday but you've been waiting 9 yrs for this day and it's because the <a href="https://twitter.com/GilmoreGirls">@GilmoreGirls</a> revival is today!!</p> — frayadawe (@frayadawe44) <a href="https://twitter.com/frayadawe44/status/802047855955505152">November 25, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Rise in footfall to UK high streets</h3> <p>Springboard has analysed where UK consumers did their shopping on Black Friday, measuring both online sales and footfall in high streets and retail parks.</p> <p>It found that, while online transactions rose on Saturday by 1.9%, they had dipped by 5.5% on Sunday compared to last year. Footfall also dipped by 0.6%.</p> <p>In terms of the entire weekend, online transactions rose by just 2.3%. </p> <p>Footfall declined by 0.5%, however the 1.4% uplift in footfall to high streets apparently demonstrates the increasing importance of leisure-based trips to retail destinations.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1967/Footfall.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="176"></p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68432-black-friday-2016-how-are-uk-retailers-optimising-search-landing-pages/"><em>Black Friday 2016: How are UK retailers optimising search landing pages?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68573-seven-examples-of-black-friday-email-marketing-from-retailers/"><em>Seven examples of Black Friday email marketing from retailers</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68577-the-whisky-exchange-increased-prices-on-black-friday-did-it-work/"><em>The Whisky Exchange increased prices on Black Friday: Did it work?</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68568 2016-11-29T11:42:12+00:00 2016-11-29T11:42:12+00:00 Three reasons behind Dominos’ digital sales boost Nikki Gilliland <p>So, what’s behind the boost?</p> <p>Here’s a few reasons why Domino's is still taking a fairly hefty slice of the takeaway market, even in the face of competition with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68206-ubereats-vs-deliveroo-a-comparison-of-the-app-user-experience/" target="_blank">Deliveroo and UberEats</a>.</p> <h3>Embracing innovation</h3> <p>You might have seen Domino’s partaking in a number of unusual stunts this year. </p> <p>Despite occurring in other countries, many have resulted in UK media coverage due to their innovative and experimental use of new technology.</p> <p>The latest stunt involved a New Zealand couple getting their Domino’s pizza specially delivered by a drone - a result of the brand’s partnership with drone company, Flirtey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1812/Domino_s_Drone.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="471"></p> <p>Described by Domino's Group CEO and Managing Director, Don Meij, as a way to "avoid traffic congestion and safely reduce delivery time and distance" – it offered an exciting glimpse into the possibilities this type of tech could present in future. </p> <p>In a similar event in Australia, Domino’s trialled an autonomous robot designed to deliver pizzas at street-level without the need for human navigation. </p> <p>While it seemed even more gimmicky than the aforementioned drone example, it still demonstrated Domino’s intent to push the boundaries of fast-food delivery.</p> <h3>Utilising social</h3> <p>As well as large-scale technology, Domino’s has been ramping up efforts to make ordering as easy as possible through everyday social platforms.</p> <p>It created its very own <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/">social media chatbot, Dom the pizza bot</a>, allowing users to order via Facebook Messenger with a single word or emoji.</p> <p>This is not the only example of Domino’s capitalising on its large social following. </p> <p>It’s also been making use of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/" target="_blank">Facebook Live</a>, recently offering users the chance to win a year’s supply of pizza in a special art-themed online auction.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FDominosPizza%2Fposts%2F10157732659530453%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="646"></iframe></p> <p>Part of its campaign for the new Italiano range, it also allowed the brand to align online and offline marketing by transforming its stores into 'Pizz-Art Galleries'. </p> <p>Both of these examples show how Domino’s is keen to capture interest and excitement in the online spaces that its audience use the most.</p> <p>While it might not have generated many actual sales through Dom, the awareness it (or should I say he?) created was certainly valuable.</p> <h3>Improving mobile </h3> <p>Mobile is big business for the takeaway food market. <a href="https://www.comscore.com/Insights/Data-Mine/How-Food-Delivery-Services-Have-Kept-Customers-Reaching-For-The-Phone" target="_blank">Comscore reported</a> that 11m Brits visited one of the top three food delivery sites via a mobile device or PC during March of this year. </p> <p>What’s more, out of Domino’s 3m monthly users, around 70% are said to be mobile-only.</p> <p>Luckily for these customers, the brand made its website fully responsive in 2015 – a move that helped to <a href="http://internetretailing.net/2016/07/amazon-dash-dominos-pizza-online-changing-takeaway-food-delivery/" target="_blank">increase mobile conversions by an impressive 62%</a>. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1813/Dominos_mobile.JPG" alt="" width="200"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1814/Dominos_mobile_2.JPG" alt="" width="200"></p> <p>As well as this, it has introduced even more features to its popular mobile app, such as a one-touch ordering button for extra ease.</p> <p>Domino's also allows users to order via their Apple Watch or Amazon Echo device, taking an overarching ‘convenience-first’ approach rather than just a mobile one.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>Despite the popularity of Deliveroo and Just Eat, Domino’s Pizza has retained its appeal to fast-food lovers.</p> <p>Combining an increasingly innovative approach to delivery with a confident social media strategy it remains in a strong position, with the online sales to prove it.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68560 2016-11-28T11:31:38+00:00 2016-11-28T11:31:38+00:00 Five compelling reasons to offer free Wi-Fi in-store Nikki Gilliland <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1743/WIFI.png" alt="" width="300" height="517"></p> <p>What can I say? I’m a consumer cliché - and a great example of why retailers should be offering Wi-Fi in-store.</p> <p>Despite many retailers introducing it quite a few years ago, a suprising number of others have failed to do so.</p> <p>Here are five reasons to explain further.</p> <h3>Immediate affinity with a brand</h3> <p>According to research, more than <a href="http://www.retailtouchpoints.com/topics/mobile/more-than-90-of-consumers-use-smartphones-while-shopping-in-stores" target="_blank">90% of consumers now use their smartphone</a> while shopping in-store.</p> <p>So, first and foremost, that is a huge percentage of people walking through the door that a retailer could potentially target. </p> <p>If a store does not have Wi-Fi, I doubt it would impact the customer’s perception too negatively. </p> <p>But on the flip side, customers are much more likely to have a positive response towards those that do.</p> <p>Regardless of what I used it for, I certainly appreciated Anthropologie allowing me to log-in whilst perusing their irresistible over-priced candles.</p> <h3>Aids the path to purchase</h3> <p>So why would a person use Wi-Fi in-store, other than to check their WhatsApp messages? </p> <p>SessionM's 2015 study found that approximately 54% of consumers use their smartphones to compare prices, while 48% and 42% use it to search for product information and read reviews respectively. </p> <p>You’ve probably heard of '<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62447-13-ways-for-retailers-to-deal-with-the-threat-of-showrooming/" target="_blank">showrooming</a>' – a phrase that refers to when a customer browses in-store before buying online. However, ‘web-rooming’ is apparently becoming even more popular, meaning to browse online before buying in-store. </p> <p>Rather cringe-worthy terms, I know. </p> <p>But the point is that Wi-Fi enables both. Even a combination of the two.</p> <p>John Lewis is one retailer that introduced Wi-Fi into stores a few years ago, with the aim of facilitating this new type of consumer behaviour.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1739/John_Lewis_Wifi.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="487"></p> <p>By making it easier to shop in-store, and ensuring transparency, the retailer is able to deliver on its famous promise of being ‘never knowingly undersold’.</p> <h3>Encourages more time in-store</h3> <p>Unsurprisingly, Wi-Fi means that customers are more likely to linger in a store for longer.</p> <p>More importantly, around 50% are likely to spend more as a result.</p> <p>With many people using Google Maps and various apps to find where they can access Wi-Fi, it also has the potential to increase foot traffic, acting as a great incentive to enter a store.</p> <p>While this has been standard practice for coffee shops and cafés for a while, only the biggest department stores and flagship shops tend to have it as standard.</p> <h3>Marketing opportunity</h3> <p>Many Wi-Fi solutions allow brands to create custom-made landing pages before a user even signs in. This is a great promotional opportunity.</p> <p>Whether it’s a current deal or or simply a nice bit of copy saying 'welcome' – it allows the retailer to engage with the customer at this first point of contact.</p> <p>Retailers can also use it to promote special or unique services that are exclusive to in-store shoppers only.</p> <p>The Foyles branch on Charing Cross Road is a great example of this. </p> <p>On opening the WiFi, users are met with a map of the store that allows them to find specific books as well as search the store to check if an item is in stock.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1740/Foyles_map.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="552"></p> <p>While my colleague Ben found both <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65096-can-bookshops-like-foyles-benefit-from-digital-in-store/" target="_blank">positives and negatives to the in-store digital experience</a> when it first launched, it is still a great example of how to increase value for consumers.</p> <h3>Captures customer data</h3> <p>Lastly, one of the most obvious reasons a retailer should offer Wi-Fi – the opportunity to retarget customers once they have left the store.</p> <p>With many people more than willing to enter an email address in exchange for the service, retailers can easily follow up with related offers or promotions depending on what a customer did or didn’t purchase.  </p> <p>Likewise, valuable customer data such as demographic information and dwell time can help retailers gain a much better understanding of exactly who is walking through the door.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68554 2016-11-23T11:00:00+00:00 2016-11-23T11:00:00+00:00 How retailers are targeting Generation Z Nikki Gilliland <p>A <a href="http://www.shoppercentric.co.uk/trends" target="_blank">new report by Shoppercentric</a> suggests that Generation Z – those between the ages of 15 to 24 – are set to shape the future of retail. </p> <p>So, move aside millennials, here’s a closer look at how this ‘communicative, confident and complex’ consumer shops - as well as a few ways retailers are targeting them.  </p> <h3>Social media scanning</h3> <p>Unlike older generations who have gradually incorporated social media into their lives, Generation Z has grown up digitally-savvy.</p> <p>The prevalance of smartphones means that social is intrinsic to the way this age group shops.</p> <p>According to the Shoppercentric's research, 50% of Generation Z use Instagram, compared with 17% of older shoppers. 41% of these Generation Z Instagrammers also regularly use the network to contact retailers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1693/Digital_DNA.JPG" alt="" width="294" height="544"></p> <p>Instead of viewing social media solely as a way to keep in touch with friends and family, many young people don’t think twice about engaging with a brand online.</p> <p>A retailer like ASOS is incredibly clever in how it capitalises on this.</p> <p>With a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62038-how-asos-uses-facebook-twitter-pinterest-and-google/" target="_blank">heavy presence on all social channels</a> – and specifically those with a teenage user-base like YouTube and Tumblr – it is highly visible to the eyes of young users.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1684/ASOS_tumblr.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="526"></p> <p>Alongside their 'always on' nature, this also taps into the way Gen Z views shopping as a fun activity as opposed to a necessity.</p> <p>With 62% of young people agreeing that online shopping is a great way to prevent boredom – ASOS knows that if they're 'always on', they're always open to buying.</p> <h3>Inspirational browsing</h3> <p>Today, one in two young consumers (53%) agree that smartphones enable them to get better information to help them buy in-store.</p> <p>While spontaneous buying is also prevalent, this type of considered and thoughtful shopping is becoming all the more common, with younger shoppers typically searching online to gain inspiration.</p> <p>Likewise, having been around to witness the 2008 recession, Gen Z are also unafraid to shop around for the best price as well as the best quality product.</p> <p>Essentially, they are said to be much more open and inquisitive – responding to retailers that are able to validate their choices and instil confidence.</p> <p>Missguided is one brand that appears to do this well.</p> <p>Again, it <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67600-missguided-launches-tinder-inspired-app-experience-review/" target="_blank">uses mobile</a> and social media to ensure it is present in the spaces that young shoppers spend their spare time, but more specifically, Missguided encourages user generated content to inspire purchases.</p> <p>Its blog regularly features other bloggers and social influencers, promoting how they shop and style Missguided.</p> <p>Combining <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65722-18-highly-effective-examples-of-social-proof-in-ecommerce/" target="_blank">social proof</a> with editorial inspiration - the brand is a great example of how to use online content to engage a target market.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1686/Missguided.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="764"></p> <h3>Shopping with a social conscience </h3> <p>One of the most striking statistics from Shoppercentric’s report is that fewer than one in five of Generation Z feel that retailers <em>don’t</em> think they are important – compared to one in three of the general population.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1694/Gen_Z.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="363"></p> <p>This shows that younger generations recognise their own value, and in turn, have higher expectations when it comes to how they are treated by brands.</p> <p>Alongside this confidence, Generation Z is increasingly empowered when it comes to social matters.</p> <p>23% strongly agree that “we can make a difference to our future” – and this is reflected in how many companies are beginning to focus on social good.</p> <p>Lush is one retailer that is typically loved by a younger generation, having <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67953-how-lush-cosmetics-uses-word-of-mouth-marketing/" target="_blank">built upon its cult status</a> in YouTube haul videos and blogger reviews.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/n3dcxsTY9eU?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>It also happens to be one of the most ethically-aware brands out there, only using fair-trade ingredients and setting up a number of charitable initiatives. </p> <p>Nicely combining this with a decent <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68308-four-things-to-appreciate-about-lush-s-new-app/" target="_blank">digital presence on mobile</a>, Snapchat and Twitter - Lush ensures its young audience is well aware of its stance on important issues.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Pod goals Margaux and Liz from <a href="https://twitter.com/MC_org">@MC_org</a> have made ending the captivity of dolphins and whales their lives' work: <a href="https://t.co/eMSAuPcfu0">https://t.co/eMSAuPcfu0</a></p> — LUSH Cosmetics UK (@LushLtd) <a href="https://twitter.com/LushLtd/status/781448723989692416">September 29, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Looking for brand-led experiences</h3> <p>Generation Z are said to shop in-store an average of seven or eight times a month.</p> <p>In contrast to older generations, shopping is also seen as more of a social activity than anything else. </p> <p>Consequently, retailers are beginning to focus on the in-store experience in order to meet this demand for fun and immersive shopping.</p> <p>MAC make-up is one example of a brand to do this, designing stores that are specifically tailored to younger consumers.</p> <p>Instead of focusing on sales or transactional elements, MAC’s youth-targeted stores are designed to be spaces that teens want to hang out in.</p> <p>With dedicated hubs for make-up testing, taking selfies and generally spending time in-store – it encourages shoppers to linger and become immersed in the MAC world.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1691/MAC.JPG" alt="" width="591" height="393"></p> <p>Lastly, this also falls in line with the trend for younger shoppers displaying intense loyalty towards the brands they love. </p> <p>Whether it’s MAC make-up, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68536-how-glossier-has-used-instagram-to-create-a-cult-following/" target="_blank">Glossier</a> or Converse, brands typically loved by Generation Z - and that deliver on the aforementioned factors - tend to reach ‘cult’ status.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1692/Starbucks_Converse.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="472"></p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>While Generation Z is by no means the only demographic targeted by the likes of Missguided and MAC - it is clear that they are becoming more of a priority for retailers.</p> <p>With an open-mind and a digital-first mindset, it is up to brands to deliver the kind of experiences they expect.</p>