tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/commerce-2 Latest Commerce content from Econsultancy 2017-05-08T11:15:00+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69058 2017-05-08T11:15:00+01:00 2017-05-08T11:15:00+01:00 How millennial entrepreneurs are disrupting retail and ecommerce Nikki Gilliland <p>Surprisingly, one time the term wasn’t bandied about was during a talk solely featuring this all-important demographic.</p> <p>With insight from three entrepreneurs in the Forbes 30 Under 30 list, the discussion focused on how young people are effectively driving change in retail and ecommerce – as both consumers <em>and</em> entrepreneurs.</p> <p>So, how exactly are they changing the game? The panel included Tommy Williams, co-founder and CEO of All Shades Covered, Vivien Laszloffy, CEO of Áeron, and Freddy Macnamara, CEO of Cuvva. Here are a few key takeaways from the talk.</p> <h3>Innovation borne out of necessity</h3> <p>The panel began on the subject of motivation. When asked about the drive behind starting a new business, each speaker highlighted some form of frustration rather than any influence or inspiration from the existing market. And while the three companies are vastly different, this appeared to be a common theme.</p> <p>Cuvva is a pay-as-you-go insurance app aimed at infrequent drivers. Freddy, its CEO, explained how the company stemmed from the desire to drive his friend’s car – and the sheer annoyance at the lack of options out there for quick and easy cover.</p> <p>Similarly, All Shades Covered – co-founded by Tommy Williams – was borne out of the recognition that women of colour are incredibly underserved when it comes to hair and beauty products on the high street. Consequently, Tommy saw an opportunity to fill this gap, using ecommerce to fulfil the needs of consumers quickly and efficiently. </p> <p>As well as choosing to improve or bridge a gap on behalf of consumers, this drive perhaps also demonstrates their growing expectations, with a younger demographic demanding a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67322-not-offering-same-day-delivery-you-could-be-losing-customers/" target="_blank">superior customer experience</a> across the board.</p> <h3>It’s about more than influence</h3> <p>Alongside an avoidance of the term millennial, one thing that really stood out from the talk was a distinct lack of interest <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/measuring-roi-on-influencer-marketing/">in influencer marketing</a>. While it's not a strategy that's been sidelined completely, it appears to be less of a priority for the young entrepeneurs. Interestingly, during the session before, I’d heard Boohoo’s Chairman mention how it has been an integral part of the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69044-five-reasons-behind-boohoo-s-97-increase-in-profits/" target="_blank">brand’s recent success</a>.</p> <p>So, why are millennials choosing another route?</p> <p>Perhaps it's a case of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68716-four-common-mistakes-brands-make-with-influencer-marketing" target="_blank">influencer overload</a>, but from an entrepreneurial perspective, it appears to be a simple case of other strategies generating better results.</p> <p>Vivien, the CEO of Budapest-based fashion retailer Áeron, spoke about the importance of working with women within the creative industry – but not just the standard blogger or model. Instead, people who fundamentally understand and appreciate the heritage of the brand are far more desirable, outweighing an influencer who might have a massive audience or even a reputation in the fashion industry. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5883/aeron.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="528"></p> <p>Meanwhile, Tommy says that his brand has seen far more success with offline and community-based marketing. He explained how tools like online video do not typically resonate with his core consumer in the same way as speaking and communicating directly, in the places where they live and work. While this strategy might be costly and much more time-consuming, it has resulted in much higher conversion rates for the company.</p> <p>This demonstrates the importance of understanding how both the brand and consumer can align to build a longer-term relationship, rather than jumping on digital trends merely to attract the masses.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5884/Hair.JPG" alt="" width="621" height="714"></p> <h3>A point of difference</h3> <p>The final topic revolved around how new companies are able to compete with giants in the industry. Instead of striving to match them, however, the general consensus was that viewing big brands as competition can largely be a fruitless exercise.</p> <p>Instead, it was suggested that brands in their infancy should remember the importance of establishing a unique and valuable point of difference when it comes to the product itself. Freddy highlighted Cuvva’s recognition of the supply chain, i.e. the underwriters who offer the insurance cover to drivers. In contrast to larger comparison sites that tend to focus solely on raising awareness to general consumers - Cuvva is able to offer greater value all-round.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Big updates to <a href="https://twitter.com/cuvva">@cuvva</a> for sharing today:<br>✅ min age now 19 (17 for learners)<br>✅ business use included<br>✅ lower pricing<br>✅ insurance groups 1-50</p> — James Billingham (@billinghamj) <a href="https://twitter.com/billinghamj/status/825157088343121922">January 28, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>The biggest takeaway from listening to millennials talk? If you've got enough common sense, age doesn't come into it.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles: </strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67822-four-great-examples-of-marketing-to-millennials" target="_blank">Four great examples of marketing to millennials</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66805-millennials-and-mobile-what-marketers-need-to-know" target="_blank">Millennials and mobile: what marketers need to know</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68203-six-millennial-ux-lessons-from-insurance-brand-back-me-up" target="_blank">Six 'millennial UX' lessons from insurance brand Back Me Up</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69060 2017-05-08T10:00:00+01:00 2017-05-08T10:00:00+01:00 Why brands can’t resist partnering with Buzzfeed Tasty on Facebook Nikki Gilliland <p>So, why can’t users get enough of Buzzfeed’s take on food? More importantly, why are other brands (even in industries other than FMCG) falling over themselves to get involved?</p> <p>I recently heard Ashley McCollum, general manager at Buzzfeed Tasty, speak about this topic at Millennial 20/20. Here are a few key takeaways.</p> <h3>Adapting to the changing nature of food and social</h3> <p>When Buzzfeed Tasty first began, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67856-four-delicious-examples-of-food-drink-brands-on-instagram/" target="_blank">food content</a> on the internet was vastly different, being more about food porn and Pinterest-style imagery than everyday recipe videos. Since then, consumer interest has shifted towards fast and simple how-to's, prioritising the contrasting verticals of comfort and health.</p> <p>Content relating to these trends tend to be the most relatable and easy to replicate at home. In fact, according to Ashley, 50% of the audience has at some point made a Tasty recipe themselves. The most common type of comment is also a user tagging family or friends and saying ‘we should make this at the weekend’.</p> <p>This accessibility has undoubtedly been a huge factor in Buzzfeed’s success. And be it pizza cones or grow-your-own herbs – it is the publisher’s ability to tap into current trends and user interests that has helped audience figures to sky-rocket.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbuzzfeedpropertasty%2Fvideos%2F1852979081581430%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <h3>Accidentally global</h3> <p>The relatable nature of food also links back to why Tasty started, first being launched as an experiment to crack Facebook video.</p> <p>The fact that it has generated international interest is a happy accident. But that's the beauty of it, of course, with videos resonating regardless of language or location. The content disrupts the inaccessiblity of restaurants and high-end chefs, with videos that are short, relatable and easy-to-follow being watched in home kitchens around the world.</p> <p>So while they might have started out as part of an experiment, Buzzfeed’s spin-off channels have gone on contribute to the brand’s global audience growth. Proper Tasty might be a local channel, but content created for the platform has been replicated in other European markets. Meanwhile, Proper Tasty itself has also seen an increase in views for videos that celebrate global cuisine.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbuzzfeedpropertasty%2Fvideos%2F1889978077881530%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <h3>Loyalty in a crowded marketplace</h3> <p>More brands are now working on sponsored content with Buzzfeed on the basis of its growth – even choosing Tasty over other established industry publishers like the Food Network. Reach and scale is just one reason, of course. Engagement is perhaps the biggest driver. </p> <p>With content that's tailor-made for Facebook - where features like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67442-how-to-create-facebook-video-ads-that-cater-for-silent-autoplay/" target="_blank">auto-play and subtitles</a> enable users to watch directly from their feed – comments and views are typically high.</p> <p>Take the below video of a cheese fondue bowl, for example, which has had 12m views and over 43,000 shares since it was published.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbuzzfeedpropertasty%2Fvideos%2F1905931132952891%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <p>As Ashley pointed out, it is also Buzzfeed’s existing brand reputation that has generated such a large and loyal audience. Users can spot a Buzzfeed copycat a mile off, with similar formats coming across as unoriginal as a result. </p> <h3>Connection between food and lifestyle</h3> <p>While access to Tasty’s audience undoubtedly holds appeal, it's easy to assume that only FMCG brands would naturally align with the theme and style of its content. This is not the case. In fact, auto, finance and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67786-10-great-sports-digital-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">sports</a> are growing categories for Tasty and Proper Tasty, with brands across all industries showing interest in producing partnered content related to the core topic.</p> <p>Again, this boils down to the fact that food is an intrinsic part of all aspects of life, extending out of the kitchen and into other areas such as travel, home, and even fashion (demonstrated by the below image from ASOS).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5894/ASOS_burger.JPG" alt="" width="460" height="598"></p> <h3>Proof is in the pudding</h3> <p>So, what kind of success are brands seeing with Buzzfeed Tasty? Ashley highlighted the example of Oster Grill, whose minute-long video featuring a jalapeño and cheese-stuffed hamburger generated 20m views over the course of a single weekend.</p> <p>As a result of this, the brand requested that Buzzfeed pull the plug on its planned follow-up videos. The reason being that they had completely sold out of stock and were unable to meet customer demand.</p> <p>Success stories aside, it is also clear that Buzzfeed does not rest on its laurels. As a data-driven company it continuously uses data science to drive and inform decision-making. </p> <p>It recently partnered with Quaker Oats on a campaign that had already launched in the US. However, from looking at metrics from across the pond, it recognised that users were switching off during beauty shots – i.e. moments with zero context or information about how to actually make the oats.</p> <p>By making the video more utility-driven, the UK version ended up performing 20 times better than the US campaign, proving that even the biggest brands can benefit from a test and learn approach.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbuzzfeedpropertasty%2Fvideos%2F1823070134572325%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <p><em><strong>More on Buzzfeed:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67150-buzzfeed-the-art-and-science-of-social-video/" target="_blank">Buzzfeed: The art and science of social video</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68426-a-brand-that-loves-you-how-buzzfeed-uses-empathy-to-connect-with-its-audience/" target="_blank">A brand that loves you: How Buzzfeed uses empathy to connect with its audience</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69053 2017-05-04T11:30:00+01:00 2017-05-04T11:30:00+01:00 How Maserati uses influencers to drive its Instagram strategy Nikki Gilliland <p>So, why the rolling strategy? Here’s a bit more on the campaign and how it makes a refreshing change from the Instagram feeds of other automotive brands.</p> <h3>Bespoke and refreshed content</h3> <p>Disclaimer: I’m not the biggest car fan. One aspect that fails to interest me (especially when it comes to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67604-what-s-the-point-of-social-media-for-luxury-brands/" target="_blank">social media</a> activity of brands) is the repetitive nature of the content. </p> <p>How many different ways can you photograph a car? This is a deliberately shallow point of view, of course, but it perhaps demonstrates why Maserati has created a strategy that is based upon diversity and change.  </p> <p>Every month, the brand partners with an influencer from a different industry or profession. The list ranges from chef Francesco Mazzei to photographer Darryll Jones. The latest has been an ambassador for VisitScotland – landscape photographer Marc Pickering. It’s not just a case of the brand posting the occasional image either. The influencers are in total control of the Maserati account, with a new person taking over from the last at the start of each month. With a continual cycle of fresh content, the result is an incredibly varied and interesting feed.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5857/Maserati_2.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="506"></p> <h3>Socially inclusive campaign</h3> <p>While Instagram is known for being a channel based on exclusivity, with some brands even <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68119-how-everlane-is-using-an-exclusive-instagram-account-to-strengthen-customer-loyalty/" target="_blank">creating private accounts</a> to build on this notion – Maserati aims to be socially inclusive instead.</p> <p>Of course, Maserati is a luxury brand with a price point to reflect this. However, the strategy is designed to attract people with a wide range of interests. So, whether potential consumers are into fashion, travel or sports – the idea is that there is bound to be an influencer that they can identify with. </p> <p>Meanwhile, this also allows the brand to showcase a wide range of cars and how they can thrive in specific contexts. For instance, while an influencer like the Dapper Chapper uses the GranCabrio MC for a trip around Chelsea, photographer Joshua Cowan uses the far more robust Maserati Ghibli to tackle the bendy roads of the Lake District.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5855/Lake_District.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="547"></p> <h3>Reaches a wider audience</h3> <p>As well as creating bespoke content, the takeover campaign has also allowed Maserati to increase its reach, capitalising on the existing audiences of the influencers themselves.</p> <p>Tallia Storm, for instance, has over 209,000 followers on her own Instagram channel. By promoting the partnership across all her social media, she is likely to have attracted users who would otherwise be unaware or unlikely to engage with a car brand. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5856/Tallia_Storm.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="322"></p> <p>Granted, not everyone involved has over 200,000 followers, however by choosing personalities with a smaller yet highly active and engaged audience, Maserati hopes to tap into high levels of authenticity and consumer trust.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67877-how-automotive-brands-are-blurring-the-lines-between-digital-reality/" target="_blank">How automotive brands are blurring the lines between digital &amp; reality</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66853-what-can-brands-learn-from-automotive-website-trends/" target="_blank">What can brands learn from automotive website trends?</a></em></li> </ul> <p><strong><em>For more on influencer marketing, download Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers" target="_blank">Rise of Influencers</a> report.</em></strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69044 2017-04-28T10:00:00+01:00 2017-04-28T10:00:00+01:00 Five reasons behind Boohoo’s 97% increase in profits Nikki Gilliland <p>So, is Boohoo’s success merely a reflection of the dwindling fortunes of the British high street? Perhaps somewhat, but with other online retailers struggling to capture interest, there’s a reason why Boohoo is head and shoulders above the rest.</p> <p>Here’s what it’s been doing in order to drive online sales.</p> <h3>1. Influencer marketing</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/" target="_blank">According to research</a>, budgets for influencer marketing were predicted to increase by a whopping 59% last year.</p> <p>Boohoo has evidently ramped up activity in this area, with influencer marketing now a huge part of its strategy to target its core demographic of girls aged 16-24. </p> <p>The retailer has partnered with multiple influencers and bloggers to promote Boohoo across popular platforms like Instagram and Snapchat. One particularly successful example has been its collaboration with model Jordyn Woods on a new range of plus-size clothing. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5790/Jordyn_Woods.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="490"></p> <p>The reason it worked so well was not only due to Woods’ personal social media following, but also her connection to other high-profile media influencers like Kylie Jenner and Justine Skye – names that Boohoo’s Generation Z-consumers are likely to be aware of.</p> <p>More recently, Boohoo has also generated buzz from <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69011-jumping-on-the-bandwagon-how-brands-capitalised-on-coachella/" target="_blank">influencers attending Coachella</a> – a festival that typically fills social media news feeds during April.</p> <p>For more on influencers, download these Econsultancy reports:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">The Rise of Influencers</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer/">The Voice of the Influencer</a></li> </ul> <h3>2. Mobile mind-set</h3> <p>Google suggests that <a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/interactive-report/gen-z-a-look-inside-its-mobile-first-mindset/" target="_blank">68% of teenagers now shop via their smartphone</a>, while 63% of millennials are said to shop on their mobiles every single day.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, two-thirds of online visits to Boohoo come from mobile, with the retailer subsequently taking steps to ensure that the user experience is as slick and seamless as possible. </p> <p>Last year, it launched apps in international markets as well as a new and improved version for the UK.</p> <p>Personally, I’ve always been a big fan of Boohoo’s app. In fact it’s one of the only examples from a fashion retailer that I turn to over its mobile site. Features like the ‘wishlist’ – which allows you to save items to revisit later – are perfectly aligned with the mobile experience, meaning browsing on the app is even easier than online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5791/bohoo.PNG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>3. International expansion</h3> <p>As well as strong UK growth, Boohoo has also seen a rise in profits in international markets, with revenue rising 140% in the US and 40% in the rest of the world.</p> <p>What’s more, the brand looks set to increase expansion plans even further, acquiring Nasty Gal in February – a retailer with a large and existing customer base in the US. Combined with the fact that Boohoo also took over smaller rival, PrettyLittleThing, earlier this year, it looks set to capitalise on these takeovers with further international growth.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Fries before guys. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NastyGalsDoItBetter?src=hash">#NastyGalsDoItBetter</a> <a href="https://t.co/wYGU0PmtrR">pic.twitter.com/wYGU0PmtrR</a></p> — NASTY GAL (@NastyGal) <a href="https://twitter.com/NastyGal/status/856032866492334080">April 23, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>4. Fast and affordable fashion</h3> <p>Another draw for online consumers is undoubtedly Boohoo’s dedication to fast fashion – meaning the prices are low and the turnover is high. </p> <p>Unlike <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67870-why-asos-is-still-leading-the-online-retailing-pack/" target="_blank">ASOS</a>, which is well-known for carrying a broad and expansive range of designers at a higher price point, Boohoo focuses on stocking key seasonal trends at low prices. While 11% of ASOS products are in the £5 to £9.99 category, this rises to 23% for Boohoo. </p> <p>With consumer expectations rising, and millennial shoppers developing an ‘I want it now’ mindset, Boohoo's business model enables it to deliver a rapid and continuous cycle of affordable fashion trends.</p> <p>Its ‘test and repeat’ strategy allows it to quickly find out what items are selling online before ordering and stocking more.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">This <a href="https://twitter.com/boohoo">@boohoo</a> dress FINALLY came back in stock long enough for me to grab one...Happy Friday!!<a href="https://t.co/xKexqUAbkQ">https://t.co/xKexqUAbkQ</a> <a href="https://t.co/UapfEFbDHr">pic.twitter.com/UapfEFbDHr</a></p> — Halinalinalina (@viechoufleur) <a href="https://twitter.com/viechoufleur/status/850231762961571840">April 7, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>5. Harnessing social media and commerce</h3> <p>Its product offering is not the only reason Boohoo has such a large online customer-base. Its dedication to delivering high quality service – both pre- and post-purchase – has helped it to retain strong levels of customer loyalty.</p> <p>One way it does this is through social media, using platforms like Twitter and Facebook to communicate and resolve customer service issues. </p> <p>Of course, it also uses social to drive engagement, continually asking for feedback and opinions, as well as offering incentives such as promotions and competitions. </p> <p>Meanwhile, its also appears to be veering into the world of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69041-social-commerce-why-basic-bots-and-buy-buttons-are-not-enough/">social commerce</a>, notably including new shoppable elements in a number of recent Facebook posts. While other examples of social commerce have failed to live up to expectations, Boohoo’s ability to resonate and relate to a young and fashion-hungry demographic could mean that its one of the first to truly take off.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5792/facebook_boohoo.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="392"></p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68659-three-reasons-behind-the-white-company-s-boost-in-profits/">Three reasons behind The White Company’s boost in profits</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68472-three-reasons-behind-whsmith-s-boost-in-profits/">Three reasons behind WHSmith’s boost in profits</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69041 2017-04-27T15:16:00+01:00 2017-04-27T15:16:00+01:00 Social commerce: Why basic bots and buy buttons are not enough Nikki Gilliland <p>It seems that despite mobile commerce rising in popularity – and with one in four users trying to purchase a product on social last year – many brands have struggled to find the right balance between social media and ecommerce. </p> <p>In fact, a recent survey suggests that <a href="http://uk.businessinsider.com/buy-buttons-fail-to-show-return-on-investment-2016-12?r=US&amp;IR=T" target="_blank">45% of adults have no current interest</a> in clicking on a 'buy now' button, while a further quarter don’t even know the technology exists. Meanwhile, many brands are scaling back on chatbots after Facebook reported a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68868-facebook-scales-back-on-chatbots-what-does-it-mean-for-brands/" target="_blank">failure rate</a> of 70%.</p> <p>So, how can brands make social commerce appealing to users, as well as ensure the process is seamless across channels? </p> <p>This was a question asked at a recent event held by We Are Social, where a number of brands spoke about their previous experience and what they think will be the key to success. Here are a few takeaways.</p> <h3>Most buy buttons do not mirror the user mind-set</h3> <p>While it’s true that users are increasingly turning to social media for shopping inspiration, many brands are failing to realise how big the leap to buying on social actually is. Currently, the reality of social commerce is often very different to the user’s expectations. </p> <p>Caroline Lucas-Garner, strategy director at We Are Social, explained how most experiences involve clicking on a link in a social bio. This then means being taken from the cosy bubble of Instagram to an interim landing page, before finally onto the main ecommerce site itself.</p> <p>That’s a lot of disruption when you think about it, which could naturally lead to users abandoning the journey, or worse – being put off the brand as a result. </p> <p>Similarly, Caroline suggested that buy buttons on other platforms can be akin to a pushy sales assistant, which when you’re simply having a leisurely browse (or scroll), can feel frustratingly intrusive.</p> <h3>Brands in your Messenger inbox feel unnatural </h3> <p>Chatbots are of course another big part of social commerce – we’ve seen many examples of branded bots created for customer service or to drive conversions.</p> <p>But do users really feel that comfortable allowing them into this space? It's an odd notion to see a message from a brand alongside your nearest and dearest.</p> <p>Dominos is one brand that has tried to get around this by creating a character specifically to front its chatbot. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/" target="_blank">Dom the Pizza Bot</a> has his own unique set of characteristics, designed to urge people to speak to it like they would a friend. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5752/Dom_the_pizza_bot.JPG" alt="" width="658" height="309"></p> <p>Another way to make users feel more comfortable interacting with brands in this context is to establish boundaries early on – even making it clear that a bot has limitations. </p> <p>Sam Poullain, senior growth marketing manager at Skyscanner, explained how his team made the decision to include a ‘talk to a human’ option in its chatbot to point users towards an alternative or next step. This way, it was able to prevent people from abandoning their journey, giving users an option to talk to a real employee instead.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5753/Skyscanner.JPG" alt="" width="740" height="323"></p> <p>For more on this topic, read:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care/">What are chatbots and why should marketers care?</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68932-how-we-built-our-facebook-chatbot-what-does-it-do-and-what-s-the-point/">How we built our Facebook chatbot: What does it do, and what's the point?</a></li> </ul> <h3>Brand messaging <em>can</em> drive conversion</h3> <p>For ASOS, a brand that has seen growth of 84% on mobile orders year-on-year – social commerce feels like a natural evolution. It is clear that its target customer is highly engaged on social, with those aged 16-14 particularly overlooking search engines for discovery platforms like Instagram and Facebook.  </p> <p>Morgan Fitzsimons, ASOS’s acting head of content and broadcast, explained how the brand is now taking a three-tiered approach to targeting these kinds of customers – choosing to focus on the top of the funnel to ensure the bottom doesn’t have to work so hard. In other words, this means focusing on the brand messaging – not just the buy button.</p> <p>Its recent campaign for jeans is a prime example of this, using a combination of organic and paid promotion as well as dynamic product ads. An initial video tells the story of the brand but doesn’t include any further links. It instead introduces hints of the shopping experience in retargeted ads, before delivering blatant buying options in the final push. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fasos.us%2Fvideos%2F1540714015970588%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>Morgan also admitted that it’s taken a while for ASOS to get to this stage, with previous campaigns on Snapchat failing to follow up with those who first engaged.  </p> <p>Ultimately, she reiterated that success in social commerce lies in continually testing. Only then will brands understand how customers will best respond in this new and unique context. </p> <p><em><strong>Relating reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67778-made-com-on-the-value-of-social-commerce/" target="_blank">MADE.COM on the value of social commerce</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67306-is-pinterest-or-instagram-better-for-driving-ecommerce/" target="_blank">Is Pinterest or Instagram better for driving ecommerce?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69011 2017-04-19T15:00:00+01:00 2017-04-19T15:00:00+01:00 Jumping on the bandwagon: How brands capitalised on Coachella Nikki Gilliland <p>Last weekend, the Californian desert was home to music, merriment, and a whole heap of marketing - with brands taking the opportunity to capitalise on the ‘coolest’ event in the calendar.</p> <p>Here’s a few examples of how brands of all kinds capitalised on it.</p> <h3><strong>Pop-ups and parties </strong></h3> <p>This year, brand involvement began even before Coachella started, with ecommerce retailer Revolve taking advantage of inevitable excitement and pre-festival buzz.</p> <p>Revolve’s Social Club typically holds exclusive and members-only events, however, it launched a special pop-up shop – which was also open to the general public – a week before the festival started.</p> <p>Selling limited edition items inspired by the festival, its aim was to generate excitement for people going as well as those who might be missing out.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5525/Revolve_social.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="491"></p> <p>Pre-festival events like these are just the beginning of the story, of course, with most pop-ups and parties occurring during the festival weekend itself.</p> <p>While sponsorship is also commonplace at concerts and sporting events, festivals are the perfect environment to go one step further with an <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66908-10-inspiring-experiential-marketing-examples/" target="_blank">experiential marketing</a> approach. Heineken is one example of a brand that delivers an ‘experience’ for festival-goers, using its ‘Heineken House’ concept to entertain visitors and bring a sense of fun along with its brand message.</p> <p>This year, the pop-up included a sustainable dancefloor – powered by the movement of dancers during musical sets – and a free water initiative designed to encourage responsible drinking.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Our <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HeinekenHouse?src=hash">#HeinekenHouse</a> lineup is finally here, and it's looking like our most impressive line-up yet! You're not going to want to miss this. <a href="https://t.co/SvbMMmEPcI">pic.twitter.com/SvbMMmEPcI</a></p> — Heineken US (@Heineken_US) <a href="https://twitter.com/Heineken_US/status/851438114526695424">April 10, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3><strong>Freebies </strong></h3> <p>It’s ironic that the more famous people become, the more freebies they're able to get their hands on. Coachella is no exception, providing the perfect spotlight for brands for showcase their products, with the knowledge that the images will be circulated in the media and fashion magazines.</p> <p>Meanwhile, luxury brands are willing to give away products simply because the Coachella demographic is exactly the type of consumer they would normally target. For instance, tequila company Casa Dragones partnered with a startup helicopter service to offer consumers a journey like no other. (Yes, I did say 'startup helicopter service'. Moving swiftly on.)</p> <p>Offering free shots to all passengers, it ensured brand visibility at a time when consumers would be most receptive to it. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5526/Casa_Dragones.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="412"></p> <p>With transportation company Tesloop also reportedly offering free rides home from after-parties, it appears companies of all kinds are vying just for the opportunity to have a presence at the festival.</p> <h3><strong>Fashion inspiration</strong></h3> <p>While high-end fashion designers are typically seen at Coachella, high street brands still try to emulate the festival look with items inspired by the event itself – even if they aren’t directly affiliated with it.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66292-how-urban-outfitters-can-improve-in-joining-offline-with-online/" target="_blank">Urban Outfitters</a> landed in hot water last month over its recent Coachella-themed range, so much so that the festival filed a lawsuit against the retailer for exploiting the trademark without authorisation. Free People were also hit with the lawsuit, suggesting that the items falsely implied the brand was an official sponsor.</p> <p>Regardless of the outcome, this demonstrates just how synonymous Coachella has become with fashion, with brands using its name to drive sales as well as directly influence designs.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5527/Urban_Outfitters.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="528"></p> <h3><strong>Social media influencers </strong></h3> <p>These days, brands don’t only want to see their products promoted by celebrities, with some choosing to pay for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68409-four-key-trends-within-the-world-of-influencer-marketing/" target="_blank">social media influencers</a> to attend festivals like Coachella instead.</p> <p>This is because, instead of counting on third-party publications to cover the event, brands are able to rely on influencers dedicating posts or even entire blogs or vlogs to them. Keihl’s took several beauty influencers to Coachella this year, featuring them on its own social media channels as well as capitalising on their combined audiences.</p> <p>Fleur de Force, just one influencer involved, has over 1.4m subscribers on her second YouTube channel. By working with influencers like Fleur, whose dedicated audience is likely to trust her advocacy, the brand is able to ensure extra visibility and greater authenticity – as well as a strengthened relationship with the influencers themselves.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/os_DqBG6Xm4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><strong>To find out more about influencer marketing, check out Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/" target="_blank">Rise of Influencer</a> report.</strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68996 2017-04-13T15:22:31+01:00 2017-04-13T15:22:31+01:00 10 cracking digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>28% of marketers still feeling unprepared for the GDPR</h3> <p>With just over a year until the GDPR comes into force, a <a href="https://dma.org.uk/infographic/infographic-b2b-marketing-and-the-gdpr" target="_blank">new infographic</a> from the DMA shows that many marketers are failing to prepare.</p> <p>While general awareness of the GDPR is up, 28% of B2B marketers still feeling unprepared – down just 2% from previous figures. Only two-thirds of survey respondents said their business would be GDPR compliant in time for 2018.</p> <p>In terms of the causes of concern, 37% of marketers said profiling, while 50% said it was legacy data. The biggest was by far consent, with 70% agreeing that it would change under the GDPR.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5442/DMA_infographic.JPG" alt="" width="618" height="324"></p> <h3>Three fifths of marketing graduates have no knowledge of affiliate strategies</h3> <p>Affilinet has been researching how well marketing students are prepared for a career in the industry, with results showing that many are graduating with little or no knowledge of affiliate or performance-based marketing.</p> <p>In a survey, 41% of graduates said that they have studied modules related to affiliate marketing. Out of these, however, 67% stated that the information taught was ‘outdated and unhelpful’.</p> <p>52% admitted that they’d needed to teach themselves to progress in their career, with 22% learning through courses later on. The remaining 26% of marketing graduates said that they still had no knowledge of affiliate practices whatsoever.</p> <h3>Mobile drives digital ad spend past £10bn</h3> <p>According to a new report from <a href="https://iabuk.net/about/press/archive/mobile-drives-digital-ad-spend-past-10-billion-threshold" target="_blank">IAB and PwC,</a> digital advertising grew at its fastest rate for nine years in 2016, increasing 17.3% to £10.3bn.</p> <p>Mobile video is now the fastest-growing ad format, with spend on mobile video ads doubling to £693m. Consequently, it now accounts for 29% of the total growth in ad spend.</p> <p>Insight suggests that the rise reflects the increasing amount of users watching video clips on their smartphones, with two in five people reportedly saying they now watch mobile video more than they did a year ago.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5440/PwC_IAB.png" alt="" width="780" height="480"></p> <h3>Just 13% of employees able to name their company CMO</h3> <p>New research by eShare suggests that chief marketing officers are one of the least recognised board members, with just 13% of employees able to identify the CMO of their organisation.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 UK employees, just 8% were able to identify the chairperson and 14% were able to identify the chief information officer and chief financial officer. In contrast, 36% were able to name the CEO, making this the most visible board member to UK employees.</p> <h3>66% of beauty shoppers use Instagram for inspiration</h3> <p>Facebook and Instagram has revealed how beauty shoppers are increasingly turning to social media to help inform their purchases.</p> <p>The Mobile Makeover Report states that 66% of beauty shoppers look to social media for inspiration on how to achieve their perfect look, 70% for learning make-up techniques and 62% for advice on products. </p> <p>Tutorials are among the most popular types of video, with 74% of beauty viewers watching ‘how-to’ content. You can read more about how mobile is impacting the beauty industry <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68992-three-ways-mobile-is-impacting-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">in this article</a>. </p> <h3>41% of UK shoppers will spend more to make Easter special</h3> <p>Savvy has been exploring how consumers will spend their money over Easter, with 62% of UK shoppers planning to celebrate over the bank holiday weekend.</p> <p>In a survey, 41% of respondents said they don’t mind spending more in order to make their Easter celebrations special. That being said, shoppers will still be on the hunt for a discount, with 60% saying they already know where they’ll can find the best value Easter eggs.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, eggs will be the most popular item to buy, followed by chocolate in general, and the ingredients for a roast dinner. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5441/Savvy.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="452"></p> <h3>62% of ecommerce brands don’t personalise digital experiences</h3> <p>Episerver’s <a href="http://www.episerver.com/learn/resources/research--reports/seven-digital-commerce-trends-for-retail-2017/" target="_blank">State of Digital Commerce</a> report suggests that just 38% of ecommerce brands are incorporating personalisation into their current marketing strategies. Despite 70% of companies using email marketing, only 28% are using triggered emails to re-engage non-converting customers.</p> <p>What’s more, despite the abundance of data available, 46% of marketers admit they wouldn’t be able to create an omnichannel campaign due to a lack of insight into the customer journey.</p> <h3>Paddy Power generates the most social engagements during Grand National</h3> <p>4C has analysed the level of social engagement generated from TV ads during the Grand National. Results show that Paddy Paddy stole the show, with its two ads generating 59,527 engagements from public mentions, retweets, comments and likes on social channels – double the engagement of competitors.</p> <p>SkyBet saw 16,840 engagements and Coral saw 18,733. Meanwhile, despite its close association with horse racing, William Hill saw just 2,812 over the course of the event.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Looking for some guidance on how to pick the winner of the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GrandNational?src=hash">#GrandNational</a>? Watch this video to find out how the experts do it. <a href="https://t.co/27q9DPQJP0">pic.twitter.com/27q9DPQJP0</a></p> — Paddy Power (@paddypower) <a href="https://twitter.com/paddypower/status/850644686096281600">April 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Consumers see Snapchat as a passing trend for brand communication</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://uk.mailjet.com/blog/guide/email-innovations-research-report/" target="_blank">Mailjet</a> has revealed that consumers are displaying a lack of faith in new platforms like Pinterest and Snapchat and their role in brand communication.</p> <p>41% of consumers believe that email is the platform most people will be using in 10 years’ time, followed by 26% of consumers saying the same for Facebook and WhatsApp. In contrast, just 11% of people are certain that Pinterest and LinkedIn will be used in a decade and only 14% are confident that Snapchat will still exist. </p> <p>Despite many brands getting involved, major updates to platforms are also going unnoticed by consumers, with just 6% of people noting Instagram’s ‘buy button’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5443/Instagram_shop_now.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="452"></p> <h3>Supermarket promotions fall to lowest level in 11 years</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/uk/en/press-room/2017/supermarket-promotions-at-lowest-level-for-11-years.html" target="_blank">Nielsen</a>, supermarket promotions have fallen to their lowest level in 11 years in the UK, with just 26% of consumer spend going towards temporary discounts or multi-buy offers in the four weeks up until 25th March 2017.</p> <p>Nielsen suggests that this is due to supermarkets becoming increasingly price competitive, turning temporary price reductions into permanent cuts as a result.</p> <p>Year-on-year supermarket sales have also fallen, with the late Easter period said to have contributed to a 2.6% decrease in the four-week period to March 25th.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68785 2017-02-08T14:44:21+00:00 2017-02-08T14:44:21+00:00 How Adidas Originals uses social media to drive sales Nikki Gilliland <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">What a trend <a href="https://t.co/Vp78zN8nfL">pic.twitter.com/Vp78zN8nfL</a></p> — meredith faust (@mere_faust) <a href="https://twitter.com/mere_faust/status/822921744512065538">January 21, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>The brand has come a long way since the term ‘Adidad’ was coined. Maybe this was something that only occurred in my school, but it was used to denote somebody who typically wore unfashionable sportswear or offensively white trainers. Kids can be so cruel.</p> <p>But what’s made the brand cool again? </p> <p>Interestingly, Adidas Originals now has more followers on Twitter than the main Adidas account, cementing its position as a truly cult lifestyle brand. On the flip side, this also proves that it is definitely doing something right on social.</p> <p>Here are a few ways it has made its mark.</p> <h3>Creating hype</h3> <p>Social media is a natural extension of Adidas’s wider approach to marketing, especially when it comes to creating hype around its high-profile collaborations.</p> <p>Since the brand famously snatched Kanye West from Nike in 2014, it has carefully crafted a series of product launches, cleverly building on the rapper's wider (and fanatical) fan base.</p> <p>Tweeting and posting on Instagram in the run-up to shoe releases, the brand creates massive excitement and interest from followers.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">The V2’s Primeknit upper features SPLY-350 in mirrored text on both feet, engineered as part of the knit. Coming February 11th. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/YEEZYBOOST?src=hash">#YEEZYBOOST</a> <a href="https://t.co/Bb5H09LLwO">pic.twitter.com/Bb5H09LLwO</a></p> — adidas Originals (@adidasoriginals) <a href="https://twitter.com/adidasoriginals/status/828630759548317696">February 6, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Meanwhile, from Pharrell Williams to Stella McCartney, Adidas Originals is also shrewd in terms of how it collaborates with high profile personalities. Unlike other brands, who might merely use celebrities to front campaigns, Adidas put a huge focus on the personal and direct involvement of influencers in the actual designing process.</p> <p>In doing so, it ensures its collaborations feel entirely authentic rather than purely sales-driven.</p> <p>Again, this is reflected in how it posts on social, continuously reinforcing the core topic of originality and creative and artistic expression.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Strikingly similar. Completely unique. Nothing is original except your true self. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/SUPERSTAR?src=hash">#SUPERSTAR</a> <a href="https://t.co/5TyKfEbN4H">pic.twitter.com/5TyKfEbN4H</a></p> — adidas Originals (@adidasoriginals) <a href="https://twitter.com/adidasoriginals/status/827435119375941632">February 3, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Giving control to consumers</h3> <p>Adidas’s resurgence truly began with the relaunch of its iconic Stan Smith shoe. Not only did this draw on feelings of nostalgia, but by emphasising its heritage, it also helped to reinforce the brand’s influence on streetwear and subcultures such as Brit pop and hip-hop.</p> <p>The social media campaign surrounding its release cleverly made consumers feel part of the story.</p> <p>The ‘Stan Yourself’ initiative involved asking users to tweet a photo of themselves for the chance to win a personalised pair of shoes. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Stan yourself! Send us a selfie using <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/stansmith?src=hash">#stansmith</a> - the best will get their own personalised Stan Smith tongue logo! <a href="http://t.co/csFEvnVb6k">pic.twitter.com/csFEvnVb6k</a></p> — adidas UK (@adidasUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/adidasUK/status/422704045229219840">January 13, 2014</a> </blockquote> <p>This customer focus has been integral to the success of Adidas Originals in recent years, with the brand aiming to create conversation about youth and street culture rather than simply promoting its products.</p> <p>One example of this is the brand’s recent series of live events called TLKS. Featuring high profile influencers within fashion and music, each one was <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68075-who-will-win-the-live-streaming-battle-facebook-live-or-periscope/" target="_blank">streamed live on Facebook</a>, while giving fans a unique opportunity to relate to Adidas on an experiential level.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FadidasOriginalsUK%2Fvideos%2F1838108906404925%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Organic content</h3> <p>Lastly, we can see how social media is not simply a one-way marketing tool for Adidas Originals, but also a way for fans and consumers to show their appreciation. </p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67547-10-excellent-examples-of-user-generated-content-in-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">User-generated content</a> is particularly widespread on Instagram, with fans posting their love for the brand as well as excitement about product launches and exclusive events.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3713/Adidas_Insta.JPG" alt="" width="670" height="656"></p> <p>Likewise, the Adidas Originals Instagram feed (also with more followers than the main account) typically makes use of imagery from musicians, fashion designers and models to reinforce its tagline of ‘We Are Originals’ – including the consumer in the collective ‘we’.</p> <p>Using influence and artistic expression, Adidas Originals has managed to make its brand relevant again.</p> <p>By delivering its message on social media in a natural and authentic way, it has truly connected with a new and highly engaged young audience.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68568 2016-11-29T11:42:12+00:00 2016-11-29T11:42:12+00:00 Three reasons behind Dominos’ digital sales boost Nikki Gilliland <p>So, what’s behind the boost?</p> <p>Here’s a few reasons why Domino's is still taking a fairly hefty slice of the takeaway market, even in the face of competition with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68206-ubereats-vs-deliveroo-a-comparison-of-the-app-user-experience/" target="_blank">Deliveroo and UberEats</a>.</p> <h3>Embracing innovation</h3> <p>You might have seen Domino’s partaking in a number of unusual stunts this year. </p> <p>Despite occurring in other countries, many have resulted in UK media coverage due to their innovative and experimental use of new technology.</p> <p>The latest stunt involved a New Zealand couple getting their Domino’s pizza specially delivered by a drone - a result of the brand’s partnership with drone company, Flirtey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1812/Domino_s_Drone.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="471"></p> <p>Described by Domino's Group CEO and Managing Director, Don Meij, as a way to "avoid traffic congestion and safely reduce delivery time and distance" – it offered an exciting glimpse into the possibilities this type of tech could present in future. </p> <p>In a similar event in Australia, Domino’s trialled an autonomous robot designed to deliver pizzas at street-level without the need for human navigation. </p> <p>While it seemed even more gimmicky than the aforementioned drone example, it still demonstrated Domino’s intent to push the boundaries of fast-food delivery.</p> <h3>Utilising social</h3> <p>As well as large-scale technology, Domino’s has been ramping up efforts to make ordering as easy as possible through everyday social platforms.</p> <p>It created its very own <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/">social media chatbot, Dom the pizza bot</a>, allowing users to order via Facebook Messenger with a single word or emoji.</p> <p>This is not the only example of Domino’s capitalising on its large social following. </p> <p>It’s also been making use of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/" target="_blank">Facebook Live</a>, recently offering users the chance to win a year’s supply of pizza in a special art-themed online auction.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FDominosPizza%2Fposts%2F10157732659530453%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="646"></iframe></p> <p>Part of its campaign for the new Italiano range, it also allowed the brand to align online and offline marketing by transforming its stores into 'Pizz-Art Galleries'. </p> <p>Both of these examples show how Domino’s is keen to capture interest and excitement in the online spaces that its audience use the most.</p> <p>While it might not have generated many actual sales through Dom, the awareness it (or should I say he?) created was certainly valuable.</p> <h3>Improving mobile </h3> <p>Mobile is big business for the takeaway food market. <a href="https://www.comscore.com/Insights/Data-Mine/How-Food-Delivery-Services-Have-Kept-Customers-Reaching-For-The-Phone" target="_blank">Comscore reported</a> that 11m Brits visited one of the top three food delivery sites via a mobile device or PC during March of this year. </p> <p>What’s more, out of Domino’s 3m monthly users, around 70% are said to be mobile-only.</p> <p>Luckily for these customers, the brand made its website fully responsive in 2015 – a move that helped to <a href="http://internetretailing.net/2016/07/amazon-dash-dominos-pizza-online-changing-takeaway-food-delivery/" target="_blank">increase mobile conversions by an impressive 62%</a>. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1813/Dominos_mobile.JPG" alt="" width="200"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1814/Dominos_mobile_2.JPG" alt="" width="200"></p> <p>As well as this, it has introduced even more features to its popular mobile app, such as a one-touch ordering button for extra ease.</p> <p>Domino's also allows users to order via their Apple Watch or Amazon Echo device, taking an overarching ‘convenience-first’ approach rather than just a mobile one.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>Despite the popularity of Deliveroo and Just Eat, Domino’s Pizza has retained its appeal to fast-food lovers.</p> <p>Combining an increasingly innovative approach to delivery with a confident social media strategy it remains in a strong position, with the online sales to prove it.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68563 2016-11-25T14:29:12+00:00 2016-11-25T14:29:12+00:00 10 exciting digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Don’t forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for further insight. </p> <h3>82% of young people unable to distinguish between news and native ads</h3> <p>Stanford University has found that young people show a surprising inability to decipher the type of information they find online.</p> <p>In a study on the behaviour of ‘digital natives’, it discovered that most were able to identify banner ads, however, 82% were unable to see the difference between a news article and native advertising.</p> <p>In fact, a number had no idea what ‘sponsored content’ even meant, leading to the suggestion that media literacy should be taken more seriously in schools.  </p> <h3>Black Friday spend predicted to surpass £1.1bn</h3> <p>Analysis from Captify suggests that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68557-how-uk-retailers-are-promoting-black-friday-online/" target="_blank">Black Friday 2016</a> will surpass last year's record spend of £1.1bn.</p> <p>Based on the analysis of 15bn online searches, it found an 11% jump in people searching Black Friday during the month of October compared to the same time last year.</p> <p>Two key trends have also emerged. </p> <p>The first is retailers offering huge discounts across a greater number of days, and the second is consumers researching as early as August to ensure they get the best deal.</p> <p>Taking both into consideration, it has been predicted that this year’s spend will blow last year’s record out the water. Be sure to come back next week to find out...</p> <h3>15% of consumers paying over the odds due to direct debit</h3> <p>New research from Echo Managed Services has found that direct debit payments are leading to a loss of consumer trust, with many paying out more than necessary.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,000 UK consumers, 15% were found to be spending more than they should.</p> <p>So why is this occurring?</p> <p>Poor customer engagement looks to be a big issue, with one in five receiving a higher than expected bill without any warning.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1768/Direct_Debit.JPG" alt="" width="656" height="421"></p> <h3>Online Christmas shopping sales already up from 2015 </h3> <p>Hooklogic has revealed the first round of ecommerce data from the 2016 Christmas shopping season.</p> <p>The results show significant growth from last year, with the amount of shoppers growing 13.8% YoY and conversion volume rising 1.8%.</p> <p>While the US election delayed proceedings for a while, the rebound was rapid, with a growth of 36.5% in ecommerce shopping on the Friday after results day.</p> <p>Hooklogic also found that mobile is becoming the device of choice for consumers, with a slight decline in desktop conversions overall.</p> <h3>People who share content are nine times more likely to buy</h3> <p>A new report by RadiumOne has found that consumers who click and share content online are nine times more likely than non-sharers to go on to buy.</p> <p>According the research, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67529-the-rise-of-dark-social-everything-you-need-to-know/" target="_blank">dark social</a> is a huge purchase driver, with 77% of converted shares originating from dark social channels compared to just 12% from Facebook.</p> <p>This suggests that brands should pay more attention to analytics that track non-public sharing, as well as offer incentives to the most active sharers.</p> <h3>43% of Christmas shoppers turn to Amazon</h3> <p>New statistics from Astound Commerce show that 43% of shoppers will buy their gifts on Amazon this year, demonstrating the retailer’s long-standing popularity.</p> <p>Despite this, a survey found that shoppers could be tempted elsewhere, but only if retailers rise to the occasion on a number of factors.</p> <p>65% of respondents said that better prices would sway them away from Amazon, while 46% cited special offers and promotions.</p> <p>Interestingly, only 29% say that on par or faster delivery times would prompt a purchase elsewhere.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1771/Amazon.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="499"></p> <h3>Shoppers aware of 9.3 brands at the beginning of path to purchase</h3> <p>When it comes to the path to purchase, consumers enter the journey with a very limited shortlist of brands - this is according to new insight from Quantcast.</p> <p>Research has revealed that shoppers tend to be aware of nine to 10 brands during the initial stages, before narrowing it down to consider just two or three.</p> <p>Finally, they will seriously consider one or two before making the final decision.</p> <p>However, only four out of 10 consumers are said to go on to buy from one of their shortlisted brands, with price, value and promotions being the strongest influences in changing their minds.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1766/Shortlist.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="247"></p> <h3>Marketers choose to represent diversity over brand messages</h3> <p>In a survey of 500 marketers in the UK, Shutterstock has discovered that many prefer to choose images that represent diversity in Britain today - rather than those that align with the brand message alone. </p> <p>Representing ethnic minorities and diverse communities is becoming an important priority for marketers, with 49% having used images relating to this in the past 12 months.</p> <p>Likewise, non-traditional family images are also becoming more popular, with 66% choosing these types of images over traditional ones.</p> <h3>Online search reflects growing demand for Hatchimals </h3> <p>New data from Hitwise has revealed the products that UK consumers have been searching for in the run up to Black Friday.</p> <p>As we reported a couple of weeks ago, Hatchimals retains the title of the most-searched for item, followed by the ever-popular Fitbit.</p> <p>There has also been a spike in searches for the term ‘Hatchimal in stock’, demonstrating the high demand for the toy.</p> <p>With Argos and Tesco recently announcing the appearance of more stock in stores, Hitwise recommends consumers move fast if they want to get their hands on it.</p> <p>Lastly, it is interesting to note that the PS4 Pro is making waves, now up three places to become the fourth most-searched for product.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1767/Hitwise.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="476"></p> <h3>Generation Z shops in-store an average of seven times a month</h3> <p>A new report by Shoppercentric suggests that Generation Z, or consumers aged between 15 to 24, are becoming a bigger priority for retailers. </p> <p>Interesting stats from the report include:</p> <ul> <li>Generation Z shop in-store around seven or eight times a month.</li> <li>62% of Gen Z agree that online shopping is a great way to prevent boredom.</li> <li>70% say that they often browse online with no intention of buying.</li> </ul> <p>For more analysis on this, read our article on <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68554-how-retailers-are-targeting-generation-z/" target="_blank">how retailers are targeting Generation Z</a>.</p>