tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/big-data Latest Big data content from Econsultancy 2017-05-18T14:10:00+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69095 2017-05-18T14:10:00+01:00 2017-05-18T14:10:00+01:00 How Coca-Cola is using smartphone data to personalise in-store ads Nikki Gilliland <p>It’s not such a far-fetched notion. Recently, Coca-Cola started using Google technologies to target consumers in US grocery stores. So, how does it work exactly? Here’s a bit more on the story.</p> <h3>Ads in grocery aisles</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68051-six-case-studies-that-show-how-digital-out-of-home-advertising-is-changing/" target="_blank">Digital out-of-home advertising</a> typically uses contextual data to display relevant ads, e.g. a Coke billboard that changes depending on the weather. Digital signs (such as those at bus stops or in buildings) also use data in this way.</p> <p>The problem for brands like Coca-Cola, however, is the high cost of these ads, combined with a lack of any real <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67070-why-personalisation-is-the-key-to-gaining-customer-loyalty/" target="_blank">personalisation</a> or targeting to individual consumers. This is where Google-integrated ‘endcaps’ come in – a term used to describe advertisements at the front of grocery store aisles. (Endcaps are fairly common in the US, but less so in the UK.) </p> <p>These endcaps serve ads to passing consumers based on their smartphone data, using a combination of Google’s DoubleClick and location-based technologies.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6150/Endcaps.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="439"></p> <p>The data includes anything from your basic gender or age demographic to previous browsing history. So, an ad could change from Coke Zero to Glacéau Smartwater if it recognises a preference for healthier products, for instance.</p> <p>The aim is to connect and engage with consumers to drive sales of the brand in retail stores – however Coca-Cola has also suggested that it benefits other brands and products within the same category (in this case soft drinks). This sounds somewhat improbable, but moving on. </p> <h3>Creepy or enhanced customer experience?</h3> <p>The real question is: Will consumers will be happy to receive super targeted ads, or does this level of personalisation veer into creepy territory? This generally remains one of the biggest issues for marketers, with <a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/01/14/privacy-and-information-sharing/" target="_blank">research from Pew</a> suggesting that consumers do not want to trade privacy for personalisation. </p> <p>It found that people are particularly negative about targeted ads if they are unaware of what is happening or do not provide outright consent. However, the study also found that consumers are more willing to accept data tracking if ads are highly relevant or beneficial, e.g. offering discounts or coupons.</p> <p>Fortunately, Coca-Cola’s endcaps also involve communicating wirelessly with devices to send tailored offers or coupons, also meaning people do not have to log-in or stand still. This could be one benefit, but it is unlikely to satisfy all consumers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6151/Google_tech_Coca_Cola.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="544"></p> <h3>Will it catch on?</h3> <p>While this example from Coke appears to be a first, it’s clear that tracking physical consumers is becoming a pressing concern for the retail industry as a whole. </p> <p>Online retailers can easily hone strategies based on metrics like click-throughs and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">basket abandonment rates</a> – so it’s understandable that offline retailers want to build a similar picture of consumer behaviour. </p> <p>Interestingly, a report by <a href="https://dxc.turtl.co/story/55ee93d8bbfd077f2d4e22ee" target="_blank">CSC</a> recently suggested that as many as 30% of retailers are now using facial-recognition technology to track customers in-store. By comparing certain facial characteristics with browsing or buying behaviour, retailers are able to predict intent and deliver relevant ads. Unsurprisingly, CSC also reports that 33% of consumers think the technology is intrusive, while 56% do not even know what it is.</p> <p>Whether consumers are creeped out or keen for this kind of in-store tech – with Coca-Cola set to roll out endcaps to thousands of US stores – we could be seeing much more of it in future.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67705-what-s-now-next-for-digital-technology-in-retail-stores/">What's now &amp; next for digital technology in retail stores?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67418-what-is-location-based-advertising-why-is-it-the-next-big-thing/" target="_blank">What is location-based advertising &amp; why is it the next big thing?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67038-11-ways-to-track-online-to-offline-conversions-and-vice-versa/" target="_blank">11 ways to track online to offline conversions (and vice versa)</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69092 2017-05-18T11:10:20+01:00 2017-05-18T11:10:20+01:00 Skoda uses real-time traffic data as part of digital OOH campaign Nikki Gilliland <h3>Targeting travellers in the moment</h3> <p>Part of the brand’s ‘Driven by Something Different’ push, Skoda’s campaign involves digital billboards that highlight the natural beauty of four different locations in the UK, including Rye, Wales, the Lakes and Norfolk.</p> <p>The campaign is designed to encourage drivers to veer away from their day-to-day journeys and reconnect with things that are important in life – in this case nature. So, alongside stunning landscapes, each billboard displays how long it will take to drive from that exact spot to the location in the ad. It also uses Google’s API traffic statistics to update journey estimations in real-time.</p> <p>It’s certainly clever. But do passers-by really take notice of digital ads?</p> <p>According to <a href="http://kineticww.com/us/document/nielsen-2016-ooh-advertising-study/" target="_blank">Nielsen</a>, 91% of US residents who have travelled in a vehicle in the past month have noticed some form of out-of-home advertising. What’s more, 71% of people found these ads to be more noticeable than those seen online.</p> <p>The beauty of digital OOH advertising is that it is far less jarring than online, which automatically makes it more appealing to consumers. Instead of an online ad, which interrupts the user experience to deliver a marketing message, a digital billboard complements a real world experience – with passers-by viewing ads in a highly targeted and specific context. </p> <p>The result is a much more seamless experience, with a guaranteed high level of visibility.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/214814384" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>Providing more than just inspiration</h3> <p>Alongside its clever use of contextual data, another reason this campaign works is that it taps into the consumer’s real-time emotional needs and desires. While many automotive brands use travel-based imagery to engage consumers - as well as highlight a vehicle’s various features – this is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69053-how-maserati-uses-influencers-to-drive-its-instagram-strategy/" target="_blank">often on Instagram</a> or other online channels. </p> <p>Consequently, the separation between the consumer and the actual location feels huge – with the user response often being a passive sense of wanderlust. And naturally, brands hope that this feeling will be enough to prompt consumers to take action.</p> <p>However, Skoda’s campaign not only evokes this response but offers the solution.</p> <p>By delivering inspirational travel imagery to people in busy cities or on motorways, and then informing them exactly how long it would take to get from A to B, the campaign taps into and helps to solve a relatable frustration. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">In the ŠKODA Kodiaq, you'll enjoy the journey. Reconnect with the important people in your life along the way.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DrivenBySomethingDifferent?src=hash">#DrivenBySomethingDifferent</a> <a href="https://t.co/FAcrs2IH6k">pic.twitter.com/FAcrs2IH6k</a></p> — ŠKODA UK (@SKODAUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/SKODAUK/status/849169685656461313">April 4, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>A lifestyle-led campaign</h3> <p>For Skoda, the decision to launch a DOOH campaign aligns with a shift in its general marketing strategy. Instead of focusing on the functional or technical aspects of the car, it is now positioning itself in terms of the lifestyle of the consumer.</p> <p>As a seven-seater the Kodiaq SUV is a family car, which is reflected in the family-friendly locations of Rye and the Lake District. Similarly, by placing billboards in locations such as shopping centres Skoda is able to target a very specific demographic. </p> <p>Along with the theme of focusing on the things that matter most in life, it's a nicely executed campaign all-round.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6094/Skoda_shopping.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="377"></p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68051-six-case-studies-that-show-how-digital-out-of-home-advertising-is-changing/" target="_blank">Six case studies that show how digital out-of-home advertising is changing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68122-skoda-uses-data-to-power-tour-de-france-content-marketing/">Skoda uses data to power Tour de France content marketing</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69063 2017-05-05T13:07:06+01:00 2017-05-05T13:07:06+01:00 10 juicy digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Ecommerce decision-makers bank on new tech</h3> <p>A new study from Salmon suggests ecommerce decision-makers are increasingly investing in new technology like IoT and virtual reality.</p> <p>Research found that 61% are currently investing in IoT (Internet of Things) enablement, while 69% plan to invest in robots and 60% in machine learning within the next five years.</p> <p>What’s more, 74% of decision-makers plan to switch ecommerce platforms in the next 12 to 18 months, with 92% of organisations recognising the need to better analyse data to improve the customer experience. </p> <h3>82% of UK consumers are unaware of the filter bubble</h3> <p>Research from the7stars has found that most consumers are unaware that their online experience is limited by social media and search preference algorithms. In fact, 82% have never heard of the term ‘filter bubble’. The study also found that consumers want more serendipitous content online from brands, with many stating positive emotions when asked how relevant but unexpected ads make them feel.</p> <p>In contrast, when asked what they associate with expected advertising based on recent searches or expressed interests, the majority of consumers chose negative words such as ‘targeted’, ‘intrusive’ and ‘annoying’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5904/the7stars.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="463"></p> <h3>75% of consumers say Amazon would be their go-to physical store</h3> <p>According to new research from <a href="http://www.fujitsu.com/uk/solutions/industry/retail/forgotten-shop-floor/">Fujitsu</a>, four out of 10 consumers in the UK are disappointed by the state of in-store technology. 75% say they would choose Amazon or eBay over traditional names if these retailers had a physical presence on the high street. </p> <p>When it comes to the reasons for this disillusionment, 42% say it is because the technology is slow, while 37% say it is unreliable. Three quarters of consumers say they can access more information than retail employees as a result, with 73% saying they can get it quicker. This means that around 65% of employees are even using their own devices to try to bridge the gap.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5900/Fujitsu.jpg" alt="" width="464" height="336"></p> <h3>360-degree technology is fuelling investment in digital video </h3> <p>A new study by AOL suggests that new advances in technology are contributing to the rise of digital video. Research shows 55% of buyers and sellers in the UK believe immersive formats such as 360-video will provide one of the best revenue streams over the next 12 months. </p> <p>That being said, these formats are still in the early days of adoption. According to the study, 20% of consumers in the UK watch virtual reality video once a week or more, and 68% of Brits say they never watch VR at all.</p> <p>While immersive formats have yet to truly take off, live formats are becoming mainstream – 42% of consumers in the UK now watch live content once or more than once a week versus 55% globally. In truth even these numbers seem quite high.</p> <h3>Eight in 10 shoppers think music makes in-store shopping more enjoyable</h3> <p>A report by <a href="http://moodmedia.co.uk/shopping-with-emotion/">Mood Media</a> has highlighted the importance of improved customer experience in-store. In a survey of 2,000 consumers, 89% said they are likely to revisit a store if it has an enjoyable atmosphere. Eight in ten like background music while they shop in-store, with 75% saying waiting times are less dull if it is playing. </p> <p>When in a shop with enjoyable elements like music, visuals, or scent, the study also suggests that shoppers are more likely to stay longer, revisit, and recommend it to others – as well as choose the store over buying online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5901/Music.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="365"></p> <h3>Ad campaigns using audience IDs predicted to triple by 2020</h3> <p>Audience IDs – which are the online identity profiles used to recognise and match users across different devices and channels – will be used in 58% of total UK online ad spend by 2020.</p> <p>This comes from a new report by Yahoo and Enders Analysis, which also suggests that audience ID ad spend will triple to €7.9bn by 2020, compared with €2.7bn in 2016.</p> <p>Predictions also suggest that growth in the volume of ad spend which uses audience IDs will slow when GDPR comes into effect in 2018. However, it will continue to grow as the industry responds and adapts to the new regulatory requirements.</p> <h3>UK grocery sector grows 3.7%</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.kantarworldpanel.com/global/News/Britains-sweet-tooth-helps-grocery-sales-rise">latest figures</a> from Kantar Worldwide show that all 10 major UK retailers saw growth in the 12 weeks ending 23 April 2017, with the sector growing 3.7% as a whole. Britons spent an extra £1bn this year compared to last, with both Easter and inflation contributing to increased spend. A preference for premium confectionary lines was also a factor, with the average price paid for an Easter egg rising by 8.6% to £1.65.</p> <p>In terms of the big supermarkets, Sainsbury’s sales rose 1.7%, while Tesco's were up 1.9%. Meanwhile, Iceland, Aldi and Lidl saw greater success, with sales rising by 9.3%, 18.3% and 17.8% respectively.</p> <h3>Data privacy of retail apps is still a big concern for consumers </h3> <p>According to Apadmi’s latest <a href="https://www.apadmi.com/pdfs/retail-app-report-2017.pdf">retail report</a>, concerns over data privacy and security are still preventing consumers from downloading retail apps. </p> <p>In a survey of UK 2,000 shoppers, 74% said they were most concerned about the security of their information, while 34% said they don’t like the idea of retailers storing their information and not knowing what it would be used for. </p> <p>It’s not solely a generational worry, either. The report states that 36% of 45-54 year olds, 41% of 55-64 year olds and 44% of over 65s share the same concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5903/Apadmi.jpg" alt="" width="318" height="423"></p> <h3>89% of UK retailers have seen a drop in foot traffic over the last five years</h3> <p>Research by <a href="http://unbouncepages.com/retail-research-517/">LoopMe</a> suggests that the shift to online shopping has resulted in a loss of revenue for high street stores, with 93% of UK retailers agreeing this has been the case. </p> <p>In a survey of over 250 decision-makers within retail, 89% said they have seen a drop in foot traffic over the last five years, and 17% state they have lost between 31% and 50% of income from physical outlets.</p> <p>As a result, AI-powered campaigns could help to bring back footfall, with 74.5% of retailers suggesting the in-store experience is an ‘extremely important’ part of the purchase journey.</p> <h3>Young agency execs place less value on viewability metrics</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://www.turn.com/resources/2017-agency-report-split-opinions-could-impact-videos-evolution">Turn</a> has highlighted how agency executives under 30 are turning their back on current viewability standards, with only 28% viewing it as a key requirement in ad buying.</p> <p>Younger execs are also less likely to see fraud as a major concern, as only a quarter of survey respondents aged under 30 believe fraud-free guarantees will drive future video spend. Meanwhile, almost 40% of brands still consider online conversions and clickthroughs to be the chief measures of video success. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5902/Viewability.jpg" alt="" width="659" height="412"></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69047 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to wet your whistle, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even more.</p> <h3>Two thirds of UK consumers are worried about data privacy</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.gigya.com/blog/state-of-consumer-privacy-trust-2017-fear-hope/" target="_blank">Gigya</a>, 68% of UK consumers are concerned about how brands use their personal information, with two-thirds specifically questioning the data privacy of IoT devices like smartwatches and fitness trackers.</p> <p>The results of a poll of 4,000 consumers also found that the majority of people think privacy policies have become weaker rather than stronger – 18% predict it will worsen under Theresa May’s government.</p> <p>Apprehension over privacy was found to be higher in older generations, with 73% of people aged over 65 expressing concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5812/Gigya.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="409"></p> <h3>Nearly half of parents agree that personalised marketing is the future</h3> <p>A survey by Mumsnet has found that 46% of parents expect personalisation to become a big part of advertising in future.</p> <p>However, there is certainly some resistance, with 58% saying that their data is private and only 26% liking the idea of personalised ads.</p> <p>That does not mean that parents don’t see the value. 35% say they’d be open to seeing ads that apply to their lives, while 24% say that personalised ads would make them more likely to buy. The majority surveyed also said that they’d prefer to see tailored ads based on their previous search behaviour rather than online habits.</p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 13% YoY in March</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-april-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index show solid growth for UK online sales, driven by a rise in the average spend through mobile devices.</p> <p>Mobile retail was up 18% in March 2016, while overall online sales grew 13% year-on-year. More specifically, the home and garden sector saw a 10% YoY growth, while health and beauty sales increased by 15% YoY – most likely driven by Mother’s Day.</p> <h3>19% of professionals have landed a job through LinkedIn</h3> <p>This week, <a href="https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/24/the-power-of-linkedins-500-million-community" target="_blank">LinkedIn announced</a> that it has reached half a billion members worldwide, with 23m of these coming from the UK.</p> <p>As part of the announcement, it also revealed that London is the most connected city in the world, with professionals having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>It also stated that a casual conversation on LinkedIn has led to a new opportunity for 29% of professionals, while 19% have landed a job through using the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5815/LinkedIn.JPG" alt="" width="344" height="469"></p> <h3>UK adspend was 3.6% higher in Q4 2016</h3> <p>According to the Advertising Association/WARC Expenditure Report, adspend was <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">3.9% higher</a> in the fourth quarter of last year, with digital formats driving growth.</p> <p>Internet spending was up 15.3% during Q4 and 13.4% over the entire year. Meanwhile, mobile took a 37.5% share, hitting £3.9bn for the year and accounting for 99% of the new money spent on internet advertising. </p> <p>Lastly, forecasts for the next two years indicate continued growth, with 2.5% predicted in 2017 and 3.3% in 2018.</p> <h3>64% of marketers do not believe it is their job to analyse data</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.bluevenn.com/resources/ebooks/data-deadlock-report-1" target="_blank">BlueVenn</a> has found that nearly two-thirds of UK and US marketers believe it is their role to collect customer data, but not actually analyse it.</p> <p>However, it appears this is due to sheer volume rather than a lack of aptitude, as 93% of marketers say they are ‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ in their ability to analyse complex customer data.  </p> <p>The findings suggest a general discord amongst marketers, with 51% of UK and US marketers feeling that they spend too much time analysing data in their day-to-day work, with too little time left to spend on more creative aspects of the role.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers forget branded content</h3> <p>Upon discovering that eight in 10 consumers forget most of the information in branded content after only three days, while more than half are unable to recall a single detail, a <a href="https://prezi.com/view/RZXW2soO8IFMkzAFoNY7/" target="_blank">new report by Prezi</a> has highlighted the reasons why.</p> <p>Irrelevancy of ads is the biggest reason for a lack of recall, with 55% of consumers citing this reason. 37.7% said a lack of motivation to remember it, while 30% said there is simply too much content to retain.</p> <p>In contrast, content which 'tells the audience something new' was found to be the most memorable, helping 27% of respondents to remember a brand. This was closely followed by content which teaches, inspires, or entertains. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5813/Prezi_report.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="436"></p> <h3>Half of retailers unable to predict shopper traffic</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://d3fi73yr6l0nje.cloudfront.net/Lists/TRS-ResourceAssetsLib/EKN-TYCO_ebook_03-Excellence_Scorecard-20170427.pdf" target="_blank">Tryco</a> has found that retailers are failing to monitor store performance correctly, with 50% unable to predict shopper traffic. Consequently, it is becoming increasingly difficult for retailers to balance operational tasks and customer service. </p> <p>Other findings show 60% of retailers do not consistently manage inventory performance and turnover on a store-by-store basis</p> <p>Lastly, retailers spend 70% of their time on operational tasks as opposed to 30% on customer service, reducing the opportunity to build important relationships with consumers. </p> <h3>eBay sees spike in searches for home and garden sector</h3> <p>eBay has revealed that it saw big spikes in searches within the Home and Garden category around the May bank holidays last year, with online shoppers showing two distinct purchasing mindsets.</p> <p>On one hand, consumers appeared to be looking for quick-fix cosmetic items at the beginning of May, with sales of candles and plant pots leaping by 172% and 214% respectively.</p> <p>On the other, shoppers were planning bigger renovation and DIY projects at the end of the month. This was reflected by sales of saws and lawnmowers rising by more than 1,000%, and sales of sofas jumping by 194%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5816/ebay_search.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>46% of UK consumers open to relevant ads despite surge in ad blocking </h3> <p>Trinity McQueen has revealed that consumers will tolerate relevant online advertising, despite the popularity of ad-blocking.</p> <p>In a study of 1,000 UK adults, it found that 56% of consumers now use ad-blocking software on their laptops and PCs, yet 46% say they don’t mind online advertising as long as it’s relevant to them.</p> <p>The study also highlights the changing ways UK adults consume traditional and digital media. 29% of UK adults would be happy never to watch scheduled TV again, while one third say that scheduled TV does not fit in with their lifestyle.</p> <p>Finally, 41% of UK adults now subscribe to an on-demand service such as Netflix, Amazon Prime or Now TV.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69032 2017-04-26T11:09:00+01:00 2017-04-26T11:09:00+01:00 Lastminute.com partners with Spotify to target music-loving travellers Nikki Gilliland <p>The ‘Music Makes You Travel’ campaign is set to run from now until December – here’s a breakdown of what it involves.</p> <h4>Music linked to destinations</h4> <p><a href="http://www.lastminute.com/">Lastminute.com</a> has teamed up with Spotify to produce a series of interactive maps, playlists and podcasts – each one linked to 10 different destinations.</p> <p>The content can be found on a dedicated <a href="http://music.lastminute.com/?_ga=1.256337419.1462185020.1493024027" target="_blank">online hub</a>, with ads also running on both Lastminute.com’s main site and the Spotify platform. </p> <p>Each city is broken down by area, with playlists bringing to life the distinct sounds of each one. For instance, East London’s playlist includes songs by local artists like Dizzee Rascal and Katy B. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5667/Lastminute_maps.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="297"></p> <p>Meanwhile, the map highlights musical hotspots such as Rough Trade East – a popular record store in Shoreditch.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5666/Rough_Trade.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="567"></p> <p>Alongside this, the campaign will include a series of podcasts, with each one featuring an international artist giving insight into the music scene of their home city.</p> <h4>Driving online conversions</h4> <p>Not only does the campaign tap into the way that music transports us to another place, but it emphasises how music accompanies us wherever we go. From listening to music on the plane to discovering live music venues on holiday, we engage with music in key moments of the travel journey.</p> <p>Due to its highly emotive nature, Lastminute.com is hoping that music will prompt Spotify users – those who are typically young and of an adventurous mindset - to browse and ultimately convert online. </p> <h4>Bringing brand audiences together</h4> <p>So, what’s in it for Spotify? </p> <p>According to data, a large percentage of lastminute.com consumers are also Spotify users, meaning the collaboration appears to be a win-win for both brands. </p> <p>The partnership will also see <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68077-why-lastminute-com-is-taking-control-of-its-ad-inventory/" target="_blank">The Travel People</a> – Lastminute’s ad sales group – run campaigns for Spotify across its network. Meanwhile, the company will also delve into first- and third-party data to offer insight for advertisers based on listener’s music tastes.</p> <p>Playlists relating to travel are hugely popular on the platform. We’ve already seen other travel brands such as Lonely Planet using Spotify in this way, creating travel-themed playlists to take listeners on a musical journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5668/Lonely_Planet.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="668"></p> <p>With Spotify now reaching 50m paying users, it presents a massive opportunity for brands to reach a highly active audience.</p> <h4>Offering personalisation and discovery</h4> <p>The size and scope of Spotify’s audience is not the only draw for lastminute.com. The opportunity to serve <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67070-why-personalisation-is-the-key-to-gaining-customer-loyalty/" target="_blank">personalised</a> and interactive content to users is key, ramping up levels of brand engagement.</p> <p>Users can select what type of genres they are interested in to find related venues and events, with prompts to find out more on the destination’s main landing page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5665/Personalisation.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="616"></p> <p>Naturally, this also encourages activity of social, with the ability to embed and share playlists aligning with the campaign’s aim to reach a young and travel-hungry audience.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68626-three-reasons-to-appreciate-spotify-s-latest-data-driven-ad-campaign/" target="_blank">Three reasons to appreciate Spotify’s latest data-driven ad campaign</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/6180-five-tips-for-promoting-brands-on-spotify/" target="_blank">Five tips for promoting brands on Spotify</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68995 2017-04-24T10:00:00+01:00 2017-04-24T10:00:00+01:00 Big data: the golden prospect of machine learning on business analytics Rose Barnett <p>Although much is still written about the near-magical potential of data analytics for business, this fervour is now giving way to a more serious debate on where the real business value can actually be found. It’s clear that data prospectors are diverging into two camps: the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-not-yets'.</p> <p>A recent <a href="https://home.kpmg.com/lv/en/home/media/press-releases/2017/02/business-executives-lack-confidence-in-generating-trusted-insigh.html">KPMG survey</a> showed only 40% of executives have a high level of trust in the consumer insights from their analytics, and most said their C-suite didn’t fully support their current data analytics strategy. 58% of businesses told <a href="http://assets.teradata.com/resourceCenter/downloads/WhitePapers/EB9062_Final_Teradata_Insights_2015_web.pdf">Teradata the impact of big data analytics on revenues was “3% or smaller”</a>. The real bonanza appears confined to banking, supply chains, and technical performance optimisation – understandably some businesses feel left behind.</p> <p>Guidance on using data analytics is aimed at companies with a massive pre-existing data hoard who wish to extract value from it – the equivalents of the gold rush’s “49ers” who arrived in California early in 1849 to stake a claim on a good piece of prospecting land. Those struggling tend to be consumer-facing brands or marketers attempting to understand their customers’ behaviour by panning vigorously in a shallow stream of aggregated sales data.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5633/the_gold_rush.jpg" alt="" width="600"></p> <p>The first question these argonauts need to ask themselves is whether there’s really any difference between the ‘data analytics’ they are doing today and good old-fashioned business intelligence? The ubiquity of big data has led to a subtle shift in language use, whereby any information is now ‘data’ and analysis often simply means ‘looking’.</p> <p>Can human decision-makers find new actionable insights from just looking at data? Credible examples and detailed case studies are conspicuous by their absence, despite analytics vendors’ repeated promises of golden nuggets of actionable insight at the end of the analytics journey (it should be noted that merchants made far more money in the gold rush than miners – its first millionaire, Samuel Bannon, sold prospecting tools and supplies, and was also the first to publicise the gold strike by running up and down the streets of San Francisco yelling: ‘Gold! Gold in the American river!’). </p> <p>Attempting to squeeze insights out of small data has proven hazardous; to the extent it can lead one astray. Insight is defined as ‘the understanding of a specific <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causality">cause and effect</a> in a specific context.’</p> <p>Data cannot generate insight – insight is the conclusion people draw from evidence. Humans draw these conclusions, but in a deeply flawed way, simply because we’ve evolved to detect patterns everywhere.</p> <p>We see faces in house fronts, mythical beasts in constellations and apparitions on toast. We inevitably draw statistical inferences that are invalid and cannot pick-out the ‘random’ scatterplot from an identity parade of graphs by sight alone. People know that statistical correlation doesn’t imply causation, but they constantly behave as if it does. All these traits work against us when viewing data.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">One of these bathroom sinks loves its job <a href="https://t.co/TOGC77yzWY">pic.twitter.com/TOGC77yzWY</a></p> — Faces in Things (@FacesPics) <a href="https://twitter.com/FacesPics/status/854802045089587200">April 19, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>What about <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64743-predictive-analytics-machine-learning-and-the-future-of-personalization/">machine learning</a>, then? Can dumb machines, invulnerable to the cognitive biases that afflict humans, uncover causal relationships from data which our puny minds are too feeble to compute? Typically, as an industry, we’ve found the answer is yes, but while predictive models can reliably forecast and simulate events, their complexity prevents easy interpretation.</p> <p>For most business uses of prediction, this doesn’t matter. Typically, it’s been found that the forecast-and-simulate approach, particularly for marketing purposes, left unmet the fundamental need brands have to understand their customer and how to connect with them. In fact, there are platforms available in the market that apply machine learning to a particularly large pile of ‘pay dirt’ that any brand can access, but until recently had been considered impossible to mine.</p> <p>These platforms make use of the natural-language text churned out by millions of people across social media, blogs, and discussion forums and turn it into ‘datapoints’ which can be clustered, filtered, and modelled, just like quantitative data.</p> <p>This is a great leap forward in the big data era – the use of deep learning techniques such as neural nets to success transform ‘unstructured’ data (natural language, images, sound and video) into usable form. It’s now possible to harvest online conversations and model them using standard data science techniques, telling marketers exactly what position a brand occupies in consumers’ minds, what type of occasion and feelings they associate with a product, and giving a true understanding of how a target audience sees the brand. </p> <p>You can identify the distinct communities discussing a subject on social media, the drivers of their collective attention, and who influences the influencers. Finally, once the conversational data has been processed in this way, algorithms can be used to identify the online trends and triggers which track real-world events.</p> <p>These models are now used by marketers to uncover emerging consumer trends years before they show up in market research, test new product concepts, and determine the best copy for marketing materials.</p> <p>Most importantly, mining web data this way gives consumer brands the chance to reap the same rewards from advances in big data analytics as the banks and web companies, without sacrificing understanding on the altar of automation. For the data-starved marketer, it’s the mother lode.</p> <p><strong><em>For more on this topic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/measurement-and-analytics-report/"><em>Measurement and Analytics Report 2016</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-state-of-marketing-attribution/"><em>The State of Marketing Attribution</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/predictive-analytics-report/"><em>Predictive Analytics Report</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69028 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 10 tremendous digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>UK search data shows surge in ‘snap election’ queries</h3> <p>Following on from the announcement of the snap general election this week, Hitwise has analysed how the UK responded online.</p> <p>Data shows there was a 2,000% increase in searches for Theresa May on print media sites, while three out of five searches on Tuesday 18th were about the election news. Most searches were in the form of questions, with the nation generally appearing unsure about what a ‘snap election’ actually means.</p> <h3>One fifth of retailers are failing to offer preferred delivery options</h3> <p><a href="http://ampersandcommerce.com/insights/yougov-consumer-survey-delivery-2017/" target="_blank">Research from Ampersand</a> has found that many of the UK’s biggest retailers are failing to offer next day delivery, despite a YouGov survey showing that 58% of people favour this method over any other.</p> <p>In comparison to 2014, Ampersand found that most people still favour next day delivery over click and collect and same day delivery, with preference for this increasing 6% within three years. </p> <p>Meanwhile, preference for same day delivery has gone from 21% in 2014 down to 12% this year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5625/Ampersand.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="492"></p> <h3>UK add-to-basket rates on the up in Q4</h3> <p>Monetate's latest <a href="http://info.monetate.com/ecommerce_report_EQ4_2016.html" target="_blank">ecommerce report</a> has revealed that UK add-to-basket rates were 3.75% higher in Q4 2016 than a year previously. </p> <p>The report also shows that both global and UK conversion rates were lower this Q4 than in 2015. However, global and UK conversion rates saw its first increase since Q4 of 2015.</p> <p>Meanwhile, website visits via mobile continued to increase globally, with 44% of UK website visits coming from smartphones.</p> <h3>75% of UK consumers have not spoken to a chatbot</h3> <p>New research from <a href="https://insights.ubisend.com/2017-chatbot-report" target="_blank">Ubisend</a> has uncovered the brand characters people would most like to see turned into chatbots. Compare the Market’s Meerkats topped the poll, followed by the Andrex puppies and Nespresso’s George Clooney. </p> <p>Other research found that 75% of UK consumers have not yet spoken to a chatbot, however, 57% of consumers are aware of what a chatbot is. </p> <p>Lastly, 35% want to see more companies adopting chatbots to solve their queries, with 68% citing ‘reaching the desired outcome’ as the most important factor in their experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5628/chatbots.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="297"></p> <h3>Expedia outperforms other travel brands with 7% market share</h3> <p>Conductor has released its first ever <a href="https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;cad=rja&amp;uact=8&amp;ved=0ahUKEwis1ZyKnbXTAhXOaVAKHc0ZA4EQFggiMAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fww2.conductor.com%2Frs%2F149-ZMU-763%2Fimages%2FConductor-Organic-Online-Market-Share-Report-Holiday-2016.pdf&amp;usg=AFQjCNGO-bWF8Ak2EEpMJ7kZeecHFR3fjA" target="_blank">Organic Market Share</a> report, detailing the brands that excel at reaching consumers from organic search.</p> <p>In the travel category, Expedia was found to be the overall top performer, taking a 7% market share. Meanwhile, TripAdvisor dominates the ‘early stages’ of the consumer journey category with a 10% share. </p> <p>Data shows that airlines, car rental companies and hotel chains (including Hilton) have the potential to increase their visibility. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5627/Online_market_share.JPG" alt="" width="713" height="404"></p> <h3>Consumers prefer traditional advertising to digital</h3> <p>Research by Kantar Media has found that UK consumers feel significantly more positive about advertising on traditional platforms, such as TV and magazines, than they do about online formats.</p> <p>In a survey, 33% said they actively dislike seeing advertising on online video services and search engines, while 30% dislike being served ads in news and articles online. In contrast, only 13% and 14% of consumers dislike seeing ads in printed newspapers and printed magazines.</p> <p>With online ads predicted to account for more than half of all advertising spend in the next few years, this provides food for thought for brands.</p> <h3>Connected shopping driven by Generation Y </h3> <p>New research from Savvy suggests that the mass adoption of smartphones and social media has contributed to a fundamental change in the path to purchase.</p> <p>Data shows that Generation Y is driving changes in retail due to being constantly connected. 66% say they regularly use their smartphone to buy products and 49% regularly use their smartphones while in the supermarket. While this group represents around a third of shoppers at the moment, they are predicted to account for 47% by 2022.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5634/connected_shopper.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK marketers increase budgets in 2017</h3> <p>According to data from the Q1 2017 <a href="http://www.ipa.co.uk/page/ipa-bellwether-report#.WPnTjtLyuUk" target="_blank">IPA Bellwether Report</a>, marketing budgets increased in Q1 2017 with significant growth seen in internet and main media advertising categories.  </p> <p>The report suggests that the overall outlook for 2017/18 is positive, with 26.1% of companies suggesting growth in total budgets for the coming year. Meanwhile, ad spend is now predicted to grow 0.6%, replacing the previous forecast of -0.7%.</p> <h3>Only 55% of Brits associate Easter with religion</h3> <p>New <a href="https://yougov.co.uk/news/2017/04/13/only-55-brits-associate-jesus-christ-easter/" target="_blank">research from YouGov</a> has found that Brits are more likely to think of Easter in relation to chocolate eggs than religious connotations. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,670 UK adults, only 55% said they personally associate Jesus with Easter, while 67% said they associate it with a bank holiday. Chocolate eggs is clearly at the forefront of everyone’s minds, with 76% associating this with Easter above anything else.</p> <p>In a separate study, Captify analysed found that Cadbury products dominate searches for chocolate eggs, with Crème Egg accounting for 29% of searches and Mini Eggs accounting for 18%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5626/YouGov.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="752"></p> <h3>Luxury ad spend predicted to shift online </h3> <p>Zenith's <a href="https://www.zenithmedia.com/product/advertising-expenditure-forecasts" target="_blank">latest report</a> suggests that expenditure on luxury advertising is set to recover, with growth predicted to occur due to an increase in online spend. Zenith predicts a 3.9% rise in 2017 – a welcome figure following a 0.5% decline in 2016.</p> <p>It also predicts that the internet will become the main luxury advertising medium in 2018, despite print currently being the principal medium, accounting for 32.7% of ad spend in 2016 compared to 25.8% for internet advertising.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68977 2017-04-07T10:00:00+01:00 2017-04-07T10:00:00+01:00 10 notable digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Before we kick things off, remember that you can also download the <a style="font-weight: normal;" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more.</p> <h3>A third of B2B marketers are tracking sales from social</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://immediatefuture.co.uk/resource/b2b-report-what-has-social-media-ever-done-for-us/?utm_source=PR&amp;utm_medium=Msr&amp;utm_theme=&amp;utm_term=&amp;utm_campaign=B2B_Report17#sf_form_salesforce_w2l_lead_22" target="_blank">report by IF</a> has found that 33% of marketers are tracking sales through social media, with social platforms driving sales upwards of £50,000 per month. </p> <p>However, some B2B marketers are less adept at measuring social value, with 58% not rating their ability to measure social at all. More than one in 10 marketers also appear nonchalant about the benefits - 13% suggest that social media measurement is neither important or unimportant.  </p> <p>Senior marketers are much more optimistic, with 67% being confident that their ability to measure social will improve in the next two years, and 50% of them planning to increase resource and budget investment in the next 12 months.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5309/IF_report.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="480"></p> <h3>More marketing teams planning to restructure in 2017</h3> <p>An increasing number of marketing teams are restructuring to cope with technological challenges, according to new research by Technology for Marketing, the IDM and Pure360.</p> <p>In a survey, 33% of marketing teams said they expect to become more specialist in 2017, with just 3% becoming generalist in their expertise. However, just 12% of marketers said they exclusively ‘own’ the marketing technology they rely on, instead turning to partnerships with IT and external technology teams to get results. </p> <p>This highlights the need for restructuring, with marketing teams having to move away from all-purpose marketing managers towards specialist roles, agencies and freelancers.</p> <h3>UK consumers more trustworthy of familiar brands</h3> <p><a href="http://lp.outbrain.com/research-unconscious-content-bias-uk/?utm_source=press&amp;utm_campaign=research-content-bias&amp;utm_medium=pr" target="_blank">Outbrain suggests</a> that UK consumers place greater trust in familiar brands, with 77% of survey respondents citing them as a reliable source of information.</p> <p>In comparison, 67% say they trust content shared by their own friends on social media, while three in five people believe relevant content from even unfamiliar brands to be trustworthy.</p> <p>Research also shows that consumers place more trust in traditional publishers as opposed to social media or blogs, with two-thirds of respondents believing that content from the likes of The Guardian or The Sun is reliable.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5310/Outbrain.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="670"></p> <h3>Traffic to betting websites surge ahead of the Grand National</h3> <p>Hitwise has analysed the key data behind last years’ Grand National, looking at its demographic in comparison to other racing events.</p> <p>It found that betting websites saw a 35% increase in online traffic in the week of the race last year, with those searching for betting and racing sites most likely to be between the ages of 25 and 34.</p> <p>It also discovered that people who earn over £100,000 are 161% more likely to visit racing and betting sites in the week of Royal Ascot. Meanwhile, people aged 18-24 years old are most likely to visit Sky Bet over the week of Royal Ascot, whereas those aged 55 and over are more likely to choose At The Races.</p> <h3>37% of smartphone owners are using voice technology</h3> <p>According to a new report by <a href="http://www.mindshareworld.com/uk/about/speak-easy" target="_blank">Mindshare</a>, voice technology has the ability to drive a greater emotional connection with brands. </p> <p>A study carried out by Neuro Insight found that emotional activity was twice as high when consumers voiced a brand question rather than typing it out. People also find it much easier to use, as 50% less brain activity occurs when processing an answer delivered by voice.</p> <p>The technology is already becoming prevalent among smartphone users, with 37% using voice technology of some kind at least once a month and 18% using it at least weekly.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5312/SpeakEasy.JPG" alt="" width="599" height="357"></p> <p><em>Reasons for using voice technology</em></p> <h3>Aldi and Lidl are struggling to build shopper loyalty </h3> <p>An ICLP survey has revealed that Aldi and Lidl are struggling to build consumer loyalty despite an ever-growing market share. In a survey of over 1,000 people, 37% of Tesco shoppers and 34% of Sainsbury’s shoppers felt that their custom and loyalty was rewarded. In contrast, just 16% of people said the same for Lidl and just 9% for Aldi. </p> <p>Similarly, only one in four Brits believe that they get something back when they share their personal information with a supermarket. 52% of Sainsbury’s shoppers and 35% of Tesco shoppers said that they have benefited from sharing data, compared to 26% of Aldi shoppers, and 20% of Lidl shoppers.</p> <h3>UK retailers are failing to invest in AI and machine learning</h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.qubit.com/research/catalysts-of-change" target="_blank">Qubit report</a> on the future of retail tech suggests that the majority of brands are failing to invest in artificial intelligence, despite recognising its potential.</p> <p>While 82% believe that machine learning will have an impact on the retail sector, just 48% are currently using it in their business. As a result, 82% of companies are planning to invest less than £1m to introduce new tech, while 22% are planning to invest less than £50,000. </p> <p>Effective data collection appears to be hindering AI, with just a third of retailers having a strategy to collect and analyse data across all their channels. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5311/Qubit.JPG" alt="" width="588" height="618"></p> <h3>Digital performance of luxury brands is improving</h3> <p>Research by <a href="http://contactlab.com/en/more/reports/digital-competitive-map-march-2017/?step=step2" target="_blank">ContactLab</a> shows that there’s been a significant improvement in many luxury brand’s digital performance over the past year.</p> <p>The Digital Competitive Map found that Burberry still has the strongest digital presence of 32 international fashion and luxury brands, with Louis Vuitton and Gucci also remaining stable in comparison to the previous year.</p> <p>An overall 5% increase in the digital performance of 32 brands is said to be due to a focus on geographical localisation, a wider range of languages used on brand websites, and strong email campaigns. However, some are still lagging behind on social, with only half of the 32 brands using Instagram and only 10 having Snapchat accounts.</p> <h3>Consumer loyalty reduced by the threat of security breaches</h3> <p>A report by <a href="https://www.retail-week.com/analysis/retailers-face-losing-battle-in-fight-against-hackers/7019678.article" target="_blank">Retail Week and Cisco</a> has highlighted the impact of data breaches on both consumers and retailers.</p> <p>In a survey of 2,000 consumers, 72% said that they would be unlikely to do businesses with a company that has experienced a data breach. If their own personal data had been breached, nearly nine out of 10 respondents said they would reduce spend if the retailer did not take steps to quickly correct the problem.</p> <p>Lastly, only 9% of consumers would rule out taking legal action against a company if a data breach has occurred. However, 53% said they would definitely consider it and 38% would give it due consideration.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5308/Retail_Week.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="404"></p> <h3>US news consumption on the rise</h3> <p>Finally, a <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-report-q4-2016.html" target="_blank">study by Nielsen</a> has found a rise in news consumption in the US. Consumers spent 73.5bn minutes consuming news content in the average week last year – an annual increase of 18%.</p> <p>Insight suggests that the rise is due to an ‘unrelenting flood of stories’ resulting from events like the presidential election. To put this into context, the typical consumer dedicated 18.5 hours to this activity a week in 2016, compared to just over 16 hours in 2012 when the last presidential election was held.</p> <p>National cable television has been the main beneficiary of the rise, claiming 20 additional minutes of weekly attention in the first month of this year compared with the average from last year as a whole.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68938 2017-03-28T14:47:26+01:00 2017-03-28T14:47:26+01:00 How smartphone apps & personal data might reduce the cost of healthcare products Charles Wade <p>Sports brands, like <a href="http://www.nike.com/us/en_us/c/nike-plus/running-app-gps">Nike</a>, moved into the ‘wellness’ tech space early, as they quickly recognized the opportunity inherent within smartphones, utilising native functionality – such as GPS – to provide (often free) apps that offer users exercise regimes or maps to track their morning runs. </p> <p>Alongside goal-setting, fitness apps looked to enhance the experience by partnering with their home screen neighbors, such as Spotify, to combine their features, for example adding ‘Power Songs’ that play when performance dips. </p> <p>Only this month <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/12/adidas-new-open-digital-fitness-products/">adidas announced</a> that it plans to make its ‘Runtastic’ app an open platform, allowing third-parties to utilize its capabilities in their own apps to further personalize the user’s experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5083/adidas_runtastic.png" alt="" width="587" height="294"></p> <p>The reason for investing in technology is clear for the aforementioned sports apparel and footwear manufacturers – they hope to remain front of mind for their target market, namely ‘athleisure’ buyers, a segment <a href="http://digiday.com/uk/stretching-global-athleisure-boom-5-charts/">thought to be worth</a> $270bn globally last year. </p> <p>Not only is it a lucrative space, it is an increasingly competitive one where the ‘traditional’ players are under pressure from relative newcomers like Under Armour and lululemon, as well as Topshop (Ivy Park), H&amp;M, and American Eagle Outfitters, all of whom have developed ranges in an attempt to muscle in.</p> <p>At the same time the healthcare industry is spending heavily on apps as it looks to maximise the relationship that people have with their phone (<a href="https://insights.samsung.com/2016/02/24/do-patients-rely-on-mobile-healthcare-apps-more-than-their-doctors/">32% of US consumers</a> had at least one healthcare app on their phone in 2016). As an example: <a href="https://carezone.com/features">CareZone</a> acts as a journal, reminding you when to take medication; <a href="http://www.uptodate.com/home">UpToDate</a> helps students stay informed with medical developments; and the <a href="http://www.redcross.org/get-help/prepare-for-emergencies/mobile-apps">Red Cross</a> offers first aid advice.</p> <p>Incredibly, <a href="https://suite.face2gene.com/technology-facial-recognition-feature-detection-phenotype-analysis/">Face2Gene</a> allows the user to take a photo of their face (via their phone’s camera) and then uses an algorithm to scan it to identify any genetic syndromes.</p> <p>Aside from selling clothes or taking a fee for download or ‘Premium’ services, what <em>is</em> slightly unclear is what developers are doing with the most important aspect, namely the data that they collect. Looking further afield, Uber recently released ‘<a href="https://newsroom.uber.com/introducing-uber-movement/">Movements</a>’, a service which aggregates the information that the company has learnt about riders and their journeys, which it then offers to cities for better town planning. (Was that in the privacy settings?)</p> <p>It does not take a huge leap of the imagination to hypothesize that app developers might pass on the information that has been clocked up by users to insurers or pharmaceutical companies. If so, not only should consumers be alerted to this fact, but there might be an opportunity for them to demand more from this value exchange, above and beyond receiving information without having to wait at the Emergency Room.</p> <p>There are myriad apps that <a href="http://www.apppicker.com/applists/3414/the-best-health-insurance-apps-for-iphone">store insurance personal data</a>, and subsequently let users ‘compare the market’: why not take this a stage further? For example, a 40-year-old woman might share her Nike Run+ app data with her life insurance provider to show that she runs on average 25-miles a week, possibly along with her associated heart rate (and average time). This could be combined with the step counter on their iPhone, used to further detail the level of her fitness by assessing her mobility.</p> <p>Interestingly, <a href="https://www.healthiq.com/affinity/runspeed8minmile">Health IQ</a>, an insurer, has spent heavily recently on programmatic ads, stating: “Special rate life insurance for runners. Runners who can complete an 8-minute mile have a 35% lower risk of all-cause mortality and a 41% lower risk of death from heart disease.” </p> <p>Furthermore, <a href="http://www.runnersworld.com/general-interest/can-runners-save-on-life-insurance">in an article</a> from July 2016 (which also cites HealthIQ) Runner’s World explains how the US insurance provider <a href="http://www.johnhancock.com/">John Hancock</a> introduced a plan with discounts “of up to 15%” to those customers who meet exercise targets “measured by fitness trackers”. This is a good start for those people who workout.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5084/lifeinsurancead.jpg" alt="" width="578" height="368"></p> <p>Alongside the data above, could our runner submit her weekly online grocery order – that contains fruit and vegetables and low sugar items – evidence of a healthy diet that could also be used as a bargaining chip to reduce insurance costs. </p> <p>Again, John Hancock has implemented this, to a degree, through its ‘<a href="https://www.jhrewardslife.com/">Vitality Program</a>’, which rewards policy holders with points, redeemable at Whole Foods, Hyatt, and others if they can show a history of prudent eating. </p> <p>This is certainly commendable, but it does require the individual to have a relationship with that provider and the perks are only available at pre-determined vendors; those who remain fit and healthy might <em>possibly </em>prefer to use the information to reduce their premiums and buy whatever they like (such as new sneakers). </p> <p>Tech alone cannot determine the exact state of someone’s health. Indeed, people would need to continue to have medicals and routine check-ups to assess their overall state (until, that is, there’s an app for that too): however everyday activities should be seen as a tool for consumers to obtain services that are befitting of the condition they keep themselves in.</p> <p>This is timely for US consumers, given the long-term uncertainty around the <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/glossary/affordable-care-act/">Affordable Care Act</a> (recent climb-down notwithstanding). Millions of Americans pay significant sums for insurance coverage; above and beyond the impact on their health, the invaluable mine of data that apps contain should be used to positively influence their wallets too.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68851-six-ways-digital-is-changing-the-pharma-healthcare-industry/"><em>Six ways digital is changing the pharma &amp; healthcare industry</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68346-new-data-shows-why-digital-is-now-critical-to-pharma/"><em>New data shows why digital is now critical to pharma</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3173 2017-03-21T11:32:05+00:00 2017-03-21T11:32:05+00:00 Google Analytics Advanced - Optimising your Site <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently the tool hasn't been configured to tailor reports to make full use of its capabilities and drive business results.</p> <p>This practical small group workshop will help you get the most out of Google Analytics to improve your tracking, website and marketing campaign efficiency. Submit your own site during the workshop, and you'll have an opportunity to have it reviewed, with recommendations on "quick win" improvements for you to consider made by the expert trainer.</p>