tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/big-data Latest Big data content from Econsultancy 2018-03-15T15:20:22+00:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4739 2018-03-15T15:20:22+00:00 2018-03-15T15:20:22+00:00 Second-Party Data <p>First-party data at scale sounds unattainable. But by creating second-party data pools, brands and publishers can vastly increase the applicability of their customer data. This report, created in partnership with <a href="https://www.salesforce.com/products/marketing-cloud/data-management/"><strong>Salesforce</strong></a>, addresses the fundamental questions about second-party data so it can move from abstract concept to specific strategy.</p> <p>The promise of customer data has tantalized brands for the better part of a decade. Their interest was focused on the maturation of the programmatic marketplace, where it became possible to easily buy audiences instead of space. The evolution of the ecosystem has been fueled by previously underutilized troves of customer and aggregate data.</p> <p>Today, it’s clear that huge stockpiles of data processed and sorted by third parties only hold the solutions to some of marketers’ needs. For data to be effective in digital media, it needs to balance quantity with quality and relevance. As the ad ecosystem evolves, marketers demand more certainty, accuracy and trust in the data that underlies their efforts.</p> <p>In recent years, the industry has begun exploring the value of second-party data—another brand’s first-party data acquired directly through partnership. The use of second-party data is no longer a nascent opportunity. We now can lay out guidelines for how to select partners whose data can enliven your campaigns, how to navigate walled-garden environments, and how to apply this data without risking your partners’ security or users’ privacy.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69805 2018-02-15T13:11:15+00:00 2018-02-15T13:11:15+00:00 45% of marketers cite content & experience management as top priority in 2018 Nikki Gilliland <p>So, what exactly are they doing, and what are the top digital priorities for the year ahead? Here's a few key findings and charts to consider.</p> <h3>45% cite content and experience management as their top priority</h3> <p>In terms of strategic priorities, 45% of companies cite content and experience management as their number one, demonstrating the importance of ensuring effective interactions with customers across multiple touchpoints.</p> <p>This also looks to be a key differentiator. Top-performing companies are 50% more likely than their peers to have well-designed user journeys that facilitate clear communication and a seamless transaction. (69% vs. 46%).</p> <p>With analytics and audience and data management coming next on the list of top priorities, the importance of a strong foundation in data and analytics is evident. Ultimately, content and data need to work in conjunction for effective digital experiences to occur.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/2288/Content_and_data.JPG" alt="" width="902" height="537"></p> <h3>Data-driven marketing increasingly seen as exciting opportunity</h3> <p>In 2018, optimising the customer experience once again came out on top as the <em>single most exciting opportunity</em> for organisations. While there has been a drop in the proportion of respondents citing this since 2017 – down from 22% to 19% - this doesn’t necessarily mean that CX has become less important. </p> <p>Companies appear to be more focused on specific opportunities which also feed into the overall customer experience. Data-driven marketing, for example, is up from 12% in 2017 to 16% of marketers in 2018 who see this as the most exciting opportunity for their organisation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/2286/CX.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="500"></p> <p>Interestingly, companies that display a cross-team approach to improving customer experience are nearly twice as likely as their peers to be exceeding their business goals (20% vs. 11%).</p> <h3>Top performing companies twice as likely to be using AI for marketing</h3> <p>Finally, with a constant stream of new innovations on the horizon, it can be difficult for marketers to know where to focus and invest. However, getting this right can be the key to success. </p> <p>When asked about the themes and technologies companies are most excited about in the next three years, the most popular choice was ‘delivering personalised experiences in real time’. 36% of company respondents and 40% of agency respondents chose this option.</p> <p>This means that, while big trends such as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67834-why-virtual-reality-is-the-ultimate-storytelling-tool-for-marketers/" target="_blank">virtual reality</a> are on many marketers’ radar (15%), the majority remain fixed on delivering against core objectives, namely on serving customers with relevant and personalised content and messaging at key moments and touchpoints.</p> <p>That’s not to say that some technologies aren’t emerging as differentiators. Artificial intelligence is one tool that is helping companies provide more compelling real-time experiences. In fact, top performing companies are more than twice as likely to be using AI for marketing (28% vs. 12%).</p> <p>There’s still resistance, however, with 41% of marketers citing a lack of knowledge, 38% citing resources, and 25% citing immaturity as barriers to integrating AI into their marketing mix. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/2289/AI_potential.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="506"></p> <p><em><strong>Don't forget, subscribers can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2018-digital-trends/" target="_blank">2018 Digital Trends</a> report in full now.</strong></em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69716 2018-01-11T09:22:00+00:00 2018-01-11T09:22:00+00:00 Why fashion and beauty brands are still betting on chatbots Nikki Gilliland <p>So, is this investment in bots paying off, and if so – how come? Here’s more on why chatbots are proving a popular tactic for fashion and beauty brands.</p> <p><em>(N.B. If you're interested in marketing applications of AI, <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/supercharged">Econsultancy's Supercharged conference</a> takes place in London on May 1, 2018 and is chocked full of case studies and advice on how to build out your data science capability. Speakers come from Ikea, Danske Bank, Just Eat, Age UK, RBS and more)</em></p> <h3>Try before you buy</h3> <p>We’ve seen many brands launch chatbots in the hope that social media users will naturally want to interact and engage with them in one of their most frequently-used channels – i.e. Facebook. However, it’s clear that occupying this space is simply not enough, as many bots have failed to offer users anything of real value, or a reason to come back after an initial conversation. </p> <p>Take the Whole Foods bot, for example, which replies to emojis with recipe ideas. It's a bit of fun initially, perhaps, but is it enough to overtake regular search for serious recipe-seekers? Probably not.</p> <p>For fashion and beauty brands, chatbots can solve a much more tangible problem, and something that has always been a barrier for ecommerce. That is the issue of not being able to try a product before ordering it online. This is especially pertinent in the beauty industry, where matching to skin-tone and colour also comes into play. </p> <p>It is through the integration of <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69388-ar-is-on-the-brink-of-a-breakout-thanks-to-new-platforms-from-google-apple" target="_blank">AR</a> into chatbots that beauty brands are able to solve this, with bots able to help users find the right shade of lipstick or foundation based on a photo.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/1590/estee_lauder_lip_artist_2.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="489"></p> <p>Estee Lauder’s lip artist chatbot is one decent example of this technology. By giving the option of a lip shade (and showing what it might look like in real life), the user is naturally prompted into making a purchase. This mirrors the in-store beauty experience, whereby trying out a product provides reassurance and instils desire.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/1585/estee_lauder_lip_artist.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="540"></p> <h3>An online stylist</h3> <p>For fashion brands, the ability to ‘try before you buy’ is limited, with AR and clothing proving a much trickier combination. However, one way fashion and ecommerce brands can tap into consumer need is by offering personal styling tips and advice. This also means that brands can combine general customer service with personalised recommendations, which again aims to replicate what an in-store employee might provide.</p> <p>There are limitations to this of course, with success largely depending on how advanced or slick the technology is. The best examples tend to be those which – instead of offering users a general selection of products based on broad categories – help consumers to narrow down to one specific item.</p> <p>One example of this is the Levi’s Virtual Stylist, which asks users questions about size, preference of fit etc. in order to suggest the right pair of jeans.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/1587/levis.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="537"></p> <p>Another benefit is that it uses True Fit technology, which is designed to increase the chances of retailers providing customers with the exact fit, which in turn helps to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68477-how-six-online-retailers-are-combatting-wrong-size-returns" target="_blank">reduce the likelihood of returns</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/1586/Levi_s_true_fit.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="482"></p> <p>As well as providing helpful advice, the chatbot also effectively saves the user time, taking away the need to browse on the website or look around in-store. </p> <p>Does it matter that the bot is clearly a bot – i.e. that it does not sound like a human? If it offers something of real value, which the Levi’s example does, I don’t think users will linger over this disappointment for very long. </p> <h3>Better integration</h3> <p>One of the biggest barriers to chatbot success has been the fact that many consumers do not know they exist. Many brands have <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68805-are-brands-failing-to-properly-promote-their-new-chatbots" target="_blank">failed to promote their bots</a>, instead relying on users to stumble across them on Facebook or seek them out themselves.</p> <p>Recently, however, Facebook has launched a new plug-in which could help to combat this issue. It allows businesses to integrate Messenger into their own websites, allowing users to interact with the chatbot on mobile, desktop, and tablet devices.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/1589/Bodeaz_bot.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="388"></p> <p>In some ways, this negates why Messenger chatbots exist in the first place (with the idea that users spend most of their time in this channel), however it certainly means that bots will become less of an isolated medium, and users will become more aware of the service as they naturally browse on brand websites.</p> <p>Plus, it also means that users will be able to visit Messenger at a later date to re-read or continue the conversation. With regular live chat on brand websites, users are typically required to start over again if they click away or end the conversation. </p> <p>Lastly, Facebook has also taken steps to help users discover chatbots in its own platform, with the launch of a new ‘Discover’ tab within Messenger. By suggesting recommended brand chatbots, Facebook is clearly placing a renewed focus on the medium, hoping that users begin to look to bots for problem-solving rather than fun and entertainment. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/1588/chatbot_discover.JPG" alt="" width="296" height="545"></p> <p>So, will other brands (other than fashion and beauty) start to invest as a result? Perhaps, but with aforementioned benefits of AR integration and personalisation – it’s clear why these industries in particular are still intent on reaching out to consumers in this way. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68732-what-makes-a-good-chatbot-ux/" target="_blank">What makes a good chatbot UX?</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69146-five-things-we-learned-from-launching-a-facebook-messenger-chatbot" target="_blank">Five things we learned from launching a Facebook Messenger chatbot</a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69714 2018-01-10T09:45:00+00:00 2018-01-10T09:45:00+00:00 The five Ps of AI strategy for marketers Mark Patron <p>(N.B. If you're interested in marketing applications of AI, <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/supercharged">Econsultancy's Supercharged conference</a> takes place in London on May 1, 2018 and is chocked full of case studies and advice on how to build out your data science capability. Speakers come from Ikea, Danske Bank, Just Eat, Age UK, RBS and more)</p> <h3>Purpose</h3> <p>AI for what? How can AI help your organisation? What business problem are you trying to solve?</p> <p>AI is good at targeting ads, product recommendations, deciding if someone is likely to repay a loan, face and voice recognition, even driving cars. AI is not good at more profound thinking such as creativity and innovation.</p> <p>The economics of your business can help guide you to areas where AI can add value. Customer acquisition, conversion and retention are good places to start. Consider the whole customer journey. </p> <p>Anything that you can automate is a good candidate for AI. Gartner forecasts that by 2020, customers will manage 85% of their relationship with the enterprise without interacting with a human. That will require a lot of automation. AI can help with the necessary personalisation of targeting, content and customer journey. Optimising those three things in real-time is better suited to AI than a human being.</p> <p>Benchmark your competitors and similar industries for potential AI applications. One of the reasons AI is not more developed is that many organisations are yet to work out what they can do with AI. With AI answers are easy, it’s the questions that tend to be more difficult.</p> <h3>Predictive data </h3> <p>The increasing power of computers and the greater availability of digital data have fuelled the growth of AI.</p> <p>First ask yourself if you can access the data you need to fulfil what you want to achieve with AI? Ideally you want a single customer view. Data silos can be a challenge. Data integration tools such as tag management and APIs are improving things but we still have a long way to go. Data is often the largest part of an AI project. Two thirds of the work in data mining projects is typically data preparation.</p> <p>As with all things IT – rubbish in, rubbish out. Data quality is important. Data needs to be predictive. If you have lots of data variables, by the time you add the last variable it is less likely to add much value to the overall AI solution. The answer may have already been found with the previous data. Data gives diminishing returns, especially if it is all saying the same thing. For example, customer databases in the financial services industry normally contain lots of wealth indicators. Ideally you want different types of predictive data. </p> <p>Sustainable competitive advantage and barriers to entry tend to be data rather than AI related. Data is easier to protect than AI. Data is less easy to copy than an AI algorithm. You do not need to own all the data, just enough to put competitors off from copying you.</p> <h3>People </h3> <p>AI needs people to make it work. Similar to how digital started, develop a centre of excellence. Centralise your AI task team. Then over time integrate AI resources into the business units.</p> <p>Recruiting and retaining AI people is hard. Good analysts are like gold-dust. You want people who are good with numbers and analysis, communicate well and understand your business. Not an easy combination to find.</p> <p>Do you use internal or external personnel? It’s often best to pilot AI externally and over time bring proven AI value in-house. External resources may be more flexible and knowledgeable about the many different AI possibilities. Internal resources will work out cheaper and may be better at optimising your AI solutions in the long run.</p> <h3>Process</h3> <p>Building an AI capability is not a short term project. It is a long term process. Changing your organisation’s culture to embrace and leverage AI takes time. </p> <p>Initially keep it simple. Walk before you run. Start with quick wins to build corporate confidence. Things change so AI algorithms need to be regularly updated. You need an optimisation process to continually improve them.</p> <p>ROI is obviously important. The incremental improvement AI brings has to outweigh the total costs of implementing AI. That is why testing is vital. AI is ideally suited to digital businesses that have developed an agile, data driven, test and learn culture.  </p> <h3>Platform</h3> <p>Last but not least, which AI platform? I say last because the choice of platform should only come after the four Ps above. Don’t rush into the mistake many marketers make of buying the latest technology and then wondering why it has not fixed the problem. </p> <p>There are many AI platforms available from cloud providers such as Amazon, Microsoft, Google and IBM to many new start-ups. Which of the numerous tools available is best for your organisation will become clear over time. And you do have time. AI is not built in a day. It’s much more important to grow a strong AI capability than finish a few quick and dirty AI projects.</p> <p>AI is poised to unlock incredible value for marketers. Define your goals, then test and optimise your AI processes. Develop talented people who can capitalise on AI. The next industrial revolution will come when enough smart people start asking the right questions about what AI can do.</p> <p><em><strong>More on AI strategy for marketers:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69151-a-day-in-the-life-of-senior-data-scientist-at-asos">A day in the life of... senior data scientist at ASOS</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.marketingweek.com/2017/11/28/ben-davis-ai-hype/">AI is much hyped but often misunderstood</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69187-channel-4-on-the-future-of-tv-personalisation-gdpr">Channel 4 on the future of TV, personalisation &amp; GDPR</a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3389 2017-12-20T12:22:22+00:00 2017-12-20T12:22:22+00:00 GDPR Essentials for Marketers - Online <p>This online course will help you learn everything you need to know about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) before it comes into force in May 2018, and crucially: what to do about it.</p> <h4>In association with:</h4> <p><img src="http://image.mail.centaurmedia.com/lib/fe9612747465007c7d/m/2/logo_RGB_web.png" alt="" width="250" height="150">       </p> <p> <img src="https://cdn.frontify.com/api/screen/thumbnail/EAzkFg3Qo4YvWC4ph_8yDMC_6Ml5rGzx333b8HZkq4KJx64s6xyk9RzcSAvrX2PW9ftJln_n7gjA8HJCDP8ZQg/800" alt="" width="300" height="100"> </p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3388 2017-12-20T12:14:54+00:00 2017-12-20T12:14:54+00:00 GDPR Essentials for Marketers - Online <p>This online course will help you learn everything you need to know about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) before it comes into force in May 2018, and crucially: what to do about it.</p> <h4>In association with</h4> <p><img src="https://cdn.frontify.com/api/screen/thumbnail/EAzkFg3Qo4YvWC4ph_8yDMC_6Ml5rGzx333b8HZkq4KJx64s6xyk9RzcSAvrX2PW9ftJln_n7gjA8HJCDP8ZQg/800" alt="" width="300" height="100"></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69629 2017-12-01T14:00:00+00:00 2017-12-01T14:00:00+00:00 The best digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Before we crack on, there’s just time to remind you to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a>. It’s got enough stats in it to last you till the new year. </p> <h3>Cyber Monday 2017 was the largest online sales day in US history</h3> <p>Adobe Insights has <a href="http://news.adobe.com/press-release/experience-cloud/adobe-data-shows-cyber-monday-largest-online-sales-day-history-659" target="_blank">revealed</a> the final sales tally for Cyber Monday came to a whopping $6.59bn, making it the largest online sales day in history in the US.</p> <p>Cyber Monday sales mark a 16.8% increase on last year, with overall web traffic to retail sites increasing by 11.9%. Black Friday also saw a rise in year-on-year sales, generating $5.03bn compared to $4.3bn in 2016.</p> <p>According to Hitwise, Amazon dominated the entire event, with data suggesting that out of the top 50 retailers in the US, it captured 54.9% of transactions (or 7.1m) on Black Friday alone.</p> <p>So what contributed to Amazon’s success? You can read <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69614-amazon-won-thanksgiving-and-black-friday-as-retail-strategy-varied" target="_blank">more analysis on that here</a>.</p> <h3>Retailers miss out on mobile opportunity this Black Friday</h3> <p>Despite big numbers overall, <a href="http://blog.qubit.com/black-friday-trading-recap-beyond-mobile-inflection-point" target="_blank">Qubit has suggested</a> that mobile was a major factor in low revenue-per-visitor numbers in the UK this year. </p> <p>On the Friday itself, 36.5% of all revenue was from mobile - down 1.7% on last year. The average order value also fell 16.39% to £102, with online UK shoppers spending an average of £20.12 less than they did in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0849/Qubit.JPG" alt="" width="660" height="205"></p> <p>So, while most shoppers typically used mobile to browse, the channel only accounted for a third of retailer revenue. This perhaps suggests that retailers are depending too much on desktop conversion and failing to do enough to convert customers on mobile. </p> <p>Meanwhile, with mobile-friendly experiences provided by social media channels like Instagram and Pinterest, only retailers who put customers first will be able to compete.</p> <p><strong>More on Black Friday 2017:</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69606-seven-email-strategies-used-by-10-retailers-on-black-friday" target="_blank">Seven email strategies used by 10 retailers on Black Friday</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69603-game-shows-risks-of-black-friday-downtime-despite-impressive-strategy" target="_blank">GAME shows risks of Black Friday downtime despite impressive strategy</a></li> </ul> <h3>UK lags behind US brands for customer experience</h3> <p>According to a new survey by KPMG Nunwood, the <a href="http://www.nunwood.com/excellence-centre/publications/uk-cee-analysis/2017-uk-cee-analysis/" target="_blank">UK is lagging behind</a> the US when it comes to delivering world-class customer experience. </p> <p>Ranking brands according to six metrics - personalisation, time and effort, resolution, integrity, expectations and empathy – the UK score fell from 7.33 to 7.08 this year. In contrast, the score for US brands rose from 7.42 to 7.75.</p> <p>The UK brand currently leading the way in customer experience is QVC, which scored 9% higher than the industry average for personalisation. It was also praised for its quick response on social media, and high level of customer empathy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0852/KPG.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="299"></p> <p><strong>More on customer experience:</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69576-river-island-s-head-of-customer-experience-on-the-brand-s-cx-strategy" target="_blank">River Island's head of customer experience on the brand's CX strategy</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69496-four-examples-of-automotive-brands-that-are-innovating-the-customer-experience" target="_blank">Four examples of automotive brands that are innovating the customer experience</a></li> </ul> <h3>63% of internet users stream music online</h3> <p>From a study of over 70,000 people in 40 countries, GlobalWebIndex has <a href="https://blog.globalwebindex.net/chart-of-the-day/1-in-4-spotify-users-pay-for-the-service/" target="_blank">found that 63%</a> of internet users now stream music online, with mobile being the most-preferred device for doing so. </p> <p>Perhaps unsurprisingly, it also revealed that Spotify is the most popular music streaming service (outside of China), with one in five internet users (or 22%) using it each month. </p> <p>Spotify’s global footprint is evident in its latest marketing campaign, where it makes use of rich user data to highlight perspectives on both music and cultural events. </p> <p>Drawing on streaming behaviour from its 60m paying subscribers – a milestone it reached in March of this year - it will run billboard ads in 18 markets featuring over 70 musical artists. Each one will depict ‘2018 goals’, such as ‘take a page from the 3,445 people who streamed ‘Boozy Brunch’ on a Wednesday.’</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0850/Spotify_campaign.JPG" alt="" width="570" height="376"></p> <h3>B2B marketers look to the IoT and AI to revolutionise the customer experience</h3> <p>For B2B marketers looking ahead, Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-digital-transformation/">B2B Digital Transformation report</a> has revealed that the Internet of Things and AI are thought to be the most exciting prospects for 2020.</p> <p>The findings back up other research that suggests <a href="https://www.demandbase.com/press-release/marketing-executives-predict-artificial-intelligence-will-revolutionize-marketing-2020/" target="_blank">80%</a> of marketers predict artificial intelligence will revolutionise marketing in the next few years. Over a quarter of respondents cited connected devices and AI (i.e. chatbots) as the most exciting opportunities to come.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0851/B2B_trends.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="441"></p> <p><strong>More on B2B marketing:</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69611-10-must-have-b2b-marketing-tools" target="_blank">10 must-have B2B marketing tools</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69512-b2b-digital-transformation-key-trends-recommendations" target="_blank">B2B digital transformation: Key trends &amp; recommendations</a></li> </ul> <h3>Marketers plan to increase video marketing in 2018 despite ongoing challenges</h3> <p>In a survey of 140 marketers from top US brands, Innovid <a href="http://www.innovid.com/press-releases/2017/11/27/innovid-releases-insights-from-survey-of-brand-marketers-on-video-marketing-strategies-and-expectations-for-2018" target="_blank">has found</a> that 79% plan to increase focus and overall spend on video marketing in 2018.</p> <p>Despite recognition that video is one of the most impactful and effective mediums, it appears many marketers are still facing several roadblocks to success. Innovid also found that just 6% would describe their organisations as innovative in video, with 45% of respondents saying they are uninformed about the costs associated with video ads. Meanwhile, 35% say they lack in-house video expertise, largely relying on agencies to create video assets instead.</p> <p>Interestingly, animation appears to be a rising trend in video marketing, as a number of brands look to the medium to create unique and emotive ads. Taco Bell is just one recent example, with its one minute and 40 second video so far generating over 1.1m YouTube views.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VhwqKUfRSio?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><strong>To learn more about this topic, check out Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/video-marketing-strategies" target="_blank">video marketing training</a>.</strong></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69548 2017-10-27T16:26:00+01:00 2017-10-27T16:26:00+01:00 10 of the best digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please enjoy.</p> <h3>UK marketers eager to capitalise on data pooling</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www2.criteo.com/vibrant-future" target="_blank">Criteo study</a> has revealed that most UK marketers think data pooling is a positive, with 76% of survey respondents agreeing that it offers a huge opportunity to improve the customer experience. </p> <p>Meanwhile, for UK marketers looking to boost multi-channel CX and sales, collaborative data pooling (i.e. the anonymous sharing of data sets) is also a growing priority. 83% of survey respondents think successful data aggregation can improve ease of purchase, while 75% believe it can lead to more relevant deals.</p> <p>UK marketers also appear much more eager to capitalise on pooled data, with 82% willing to contribute online search data to a pool compared to 71% of global respondents.</p> <h3>Ad fraud predicted to peak in Q4</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.whiteops.com/q4-ad-fraud-surge" target="_blank">White Ops</a>, half of all ad fraud in 2017 will take place as we head into the holiday season, leading to a potential $3.5bn in losses.</p> <p>Analysis of last year revealed that ad fraud spiked to 13.5% between October and January, which is more than double the previous quarter. It also found that fraud increased during key holiday periods, such as Black Friday and Cyber Monday.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0023/Ad_Fraud.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="379"></p> <h3>54% of travellers want better mobile tech on holiday</h3> <p>New research from <a href="https://www.apadmi.com/travel-report-2017/" target="_blank">Apadmi</a> has found that over half of travellers think the sector needs to offer customers more ways to utilise their mobile devices while on holiday.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,000 people who have taken a trip in the last 12 months, 50% said they want to see more mobile check-ins in airports, as well as the ability to check-in at hotels via mobile.</p> <p>37% of travellers also want a mobile digital hub containing all the travel information they need, e.g. for transport, accommodation and visitor attractions. Lastly, 38% would like better tools to help them with language translations, and a quarter would like to be able to use mobile payments more.</p> <h3>Seasonal product marketing generates 10% rise in email open rates</h3> <p>As Starbucks and other brands re-introduce Autumnal ranges, a Mailjet test found that email open rates rose 10% in instances where popular flavourings like pumpkin spice were mentioned. </p> <p>In the US, email subject lines mentioning pumpkin spice generated the highest open rate, with a 90% higher open rate than a regular email sent around the same time.</p> <p>Meanwhile, with Halloween on the horizon, Mailjet has found that marketers are successfully engaging consumers on the back on anticipation for the new Stranger Things series. Email open rates were 74% higher when the TV show was directly mentioned in the subject line.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Handcrafted. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MaplePecanLatte?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#MaplePecanLatte</a> <a href="https://t.co/89fURSIOvu">pic.twitter.com/89fURSIOvu</a></p> — Starbucks Coffee (@Starbucks) <a href="https://twitter.com/Starbucks/status/918181475723259905?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 11, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>UK ad viewability hits 18-month high</h3> <p>According to the latest benchmark report from <a href="https://www.meetrics.com/en/benchmark-reports/" target="_blank">Meetrics</a>, UK ad viewability has hit its highest level for 18 months. </p> <p>In the third quarter of 2017, the amount of banner ads served that met minimum viewability standards rose from 51% to 52% – the highest level since Q1 2016. This also follows a rise from 47% to 51% in the previous quarter.</p> <p>Despite this, Meetrics says that the UK still lags behind other European countries on ad viewability. Italy and Austria lead the way, with 68% and 67% viewability respectively, while Switzerland and Poland are the closest to UK levels with 55%. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0024/Country_comparison_chart.PNG" alt="" width="774" height="534"></p> <h3>34% of APAC consumers visit Amazon each month</h3> <p>Research by GlobalWebIndex has revealed that Amazon is now in the top three commerce platforms in the regions of Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and the Middle East. </p> <p>Its latest report states that 34% of internet users in Asia Pacific are visiting Amazon each month, closing in on rival Alibaba, which draws in 42%.</p> <p>Globally, 75% of digital consumers are now purchasing at least one product online every month. However, APAC is the top region for purchasing online, with 77% of internet spend coming from India, 79% from Indonesia, and 83% from both South Korea and China. </p> <h3>Only 8% of consumers pre-order new products</h3> <p>With pre-orders starting on Apple’s iPhone X, HotUKDeals has been investigating how consumers spend on newly-launched products.</p> <p>Interestingly, just 8% of British consumers say that they usually pre-order new products, while 53% that they prefer to wait to see if the price drops before purchasing. 11% usually purchase at the time of launch (when products are available) and 29% say that it differs depending on the product.</p> <p>Consumers who generally pre-order new products tend to be younger shoppers, with 14% of 16 to 24-year olds doing so. Meanwhile, 9% of the people who usually pre-order are men, compared to 6% of women.</p> <h3>Halloween generates 260% spike in online traffic</h3> <p>New research from BazaarVoice suggests that Halloween is now viewed as the start of the holiday shopping season, with the event generating 260% more online traffic than normal, and steady increases taking place in the lead-up to Christmas.</p> <p>People are said to start planning their costume about six weeks before Halloween, with increased page views for costumes starting around the third week of September.</p> <p>Black Friday and Cyber Monday see the next largest spikes after Halloween, before a peak in the week before Christmas generating 800% more traffic than normal.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0021/BazaarVoice.JPG" alt="" width="450" height="518"></p> <h3>Increase in US children using mobile technology</h3> <p>A report by <a href="https://www.commonsensemedia.org/research/the-common-sense-census-media-use-by-kids-age-zero-to-eight-2017" target="_blank">Common Sense</a> has revealed that American children aged eight and under are spending more time than ever using mobile technology. </p> <p>Kids reportedly spend 48 minutes a day on mobile devices – up from just five minutes in 2011 – with 42% also owning their own tablet device, compared to just 1% in 2011. </p> <p>The report also states that 49% of children aged eight or under typically watch TV or play video games in the hour before bedtime, and 10% of this group have a ‘smart’ toy that connects to the internet or a voice-activated virtual device.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0022/Mobile_Devices.JPG" alt="" width="540" height="472"></p> <h3>Mobile consumers more willing to engage during holiday season</h3> <p>Finally, a new study by <a href="https://liftoff.io/resources/" target="_blank">Liftoff</a> suggests that mobile marketers should capitalise on low acquisition costs and high rates of engagement in the period of October to January.</p> <p>Research found that last December, acquisition was at a low of $54.63 while engagement rates were at 6.81%. In contrast, engagement fell to 5.4% at the beginning of March, with the cost to acquire users going on make a purchase rising to $65.06.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3293 2017-10-26T13:17:27+01:00 2017-10-26T13:17:27+01:00 Google Analytics - Advanced <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently the tool hasn't been configured to tailor reports to make full use of its capabilities and drive business results.</p> <p>This practical small group workshop will help you get the most out of Google Analytics to improve your tracking, website and marketing campaign efficiency. Submit your own site during the workshop, and you'll have an opportunity to have it reviewed, with recommendations on "quick win" improvements for you to consider made by the expert trainer.</p> <p><a title="GDPR Add-on" href="mailto:training@econsultancy.com" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/1472/EC_06132_GDPR_bolt_on_graphics_1000X200_AW.jpg" alt="GDPR offer" width="1000" height="200"></a></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3291 2017-10-26T13:15:43+01:00 2017-10-26T13:15:43+01:00 Google Analytics <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently once the tool is in place there seems to be a "what next" moment.</p> <p>This practical, small group workshop will help you to get started with Google Analytics, offering you plenty of practical tips and shortcuts.</p> <p>You'll learn how to get useful information from the tool so you can begin optimising your site, online marketing and content.</p> <p>Your website will also be viewed by an industry expert, who will make recommendations as to the best starting points for your own analysis.</p> <p><a title="GDPR Add-on" href="mailto:training@econsultancy.com" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/1472/EC_06132_GDPR_bolt_on_graphics_1000X200_AW.jpg" alt="GDPR offer" width="1000" height="200"></a></p>