tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/big-data Latest Big data content from Econsultancy 2017-03-28T14:47:26+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68938 2017-03-28T14:47:26+01:00 2017-03-28T14:47:26+01:00 How smartphone apps & personal data might reduce the cost of healthcare products Charles Wade <p>Sports brands, like <a href="http://www.nike.com/us/en_us/c/nike-plus/running-app-gps">Nike</a>, moved into the ‘wellness’ tech space early, as they quickly recognized the opportunity inherent within smartphones, utilising native functionality – such as GPS – to provide (often free) apps that offer users exercise regimes or maps to track their morning runs. </p> <p>Alongside goal-setting, fitness apps looked to enhance the experience by partnering with their home screen neighbors, such as Spotify, to combine their features, for example adding ‘Power Songs’ that play when performance dips. </p> <p>Only this month <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/12/adidas-new-open-digital-fitness-products/">adidas announced</a> that it plans to make its ‘Runtastic’ app an open platform, allowing third-parties to utilize its capabilities in their own apps to further personalize the user’s experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5083/adidas_runtastic.png" alt="" width="587" height="294"></p> <p>The reason for investing in technology is clear for the aforementioned sports apparel and footwear manufacturers – they hope to remain front of mind for their target market, namely ‘athleisure’ buyers, a segment <a href="http://digiday.com/uk/stretching-global-athleisure-boom-5-charts/">thought to be worth</a> $270bn globally last year. </p> <p>Not only is it a lucrative space, it is an increasingly competitive one where the ‘traditional’ players are under pressure from relative newcomers like Under Armour and lululemon, as well as Topshop (Ivy Park), H&amp;M, and American Eagle Outfitters, all of whom have developed ranges in an attempt to muscle in.</p> <p>At the same time the healthcare industry is spending heavily on apps as it looks to maximise the relationship that people have with their phone (<a href="https://insights.samsung.com/2016/02/24/do-patients-rely-on-mobile-healthcare-apps-more-than-their-doctors/">32% of US consumers</a> had at least one healthcare app on their phone in 2016). As an example: <a href="https://carezone.com/features">CareZone</a> acts as a journal, reminding you when to take medication; <a href="http://www.uptodate.com/home">UpToDate</a> helps students stay informed with medical developments; and the <a href="http://www.redcross.org/get-help/prepare-for-emergencies/mobile-apps">Red Cross</a> offers first aid advice.</p> <p>Incredibly, <a href="https://suite.face2gene.com/technology-facial-recognition-feature-detection-phenotype-analysis/">Face2Gene</a> allows the user to take a photo of their face (via their phone’s camera) and then uses an algorithm to scan it to identify any genetic syndromes.</p> <p>Aside from selling clothes or taking a fee for download or ‘Premium’ services, what <em>is</em> slightly unclear is what developers are doing with the most important aspect, namely the data that they collect. Looking further afield, Uber recently released ‘<a href="https://newsroom.uber.com/introducing-uber-movement/">Movements</a>’, a service which aggregates the information that the company has learnt about riders and their journeys, which it then offers to cities for better town planning. (Was that in the privacy settings?)</p> <p>It does not take a huge leap of the imagination to hypothesize that app developers might pass on the information that has been clocked up by users to insurers or pharmaceutical companies. If so, not only should consumers be alerted to this fact, but there might be an opportunity for them to demand more from this value exchange, above and beyond receiving information without having to wait at the Emergency Room.</p> <p>There are myriad apps that <a href="http://www.apppicker.com/applists/3414/the-best-health-insurance-apps-for-iphone">store insurance personal data</a>, and subsequently let users ‘compare the market’: why not take this a stage further? For example, a 40-year-old woman might share her Nike Run+ app data with her life insurance provider to show that she runs on average 25-miles a week, possibly along with her associated heart rate (and average time). This could be combined with the step counter on their iPhone, used to further detail the level of her fitness by assessing her mobility.</p> <p>Interestingly, <a href="https://www.healthiq.com/affinity/runspeed8minmile">Health IQ</a>, an insurer, has spent heavily recently on programmatic ads, stating: “Special rate life insurance for runners. Runners who can complete an 8-minute mile have a 35% lower risk of all-cause mortality and a 41% lower risk of death from heart disease.” </p> <p>Furthermore, <a href="http://www.runnersworld.com/general-interest/can-runners-save-on-life-insurance">in an article</a> from July 2016 (which also cites HealthIQ) Runner’s World explains how the US insurance provider <a href="http://www.johnhancock.com/">John Hancock</a> introduced a plan with discounts “of up to 15%” to those customers who meet exercise targets “measured by fitness trackers”. This is a good start for those people who workout.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5084/lifeinsurancead.jpg" alt="" width="578" height="368"></p> <p>Alongside the data above, could our runner submit her weekly online grocery order – that contains fruit and vegetables and low sugar items – evidence of a healthy diet that could also be used as a bargaining chip to reduce insurance costs. </p> <p>Again, John Hancock has implemented this, to a degree, through its ‘<a href="https://www.jhrewardslife.com/">Vitality Program</a>’, which rewards policy holders with points, redeemable at Whole Foods, Hyatt, and others if they can show a history of prudent eating. </p> <p>This is certainly commendable, but it does require the individual to have a relationship with that provider and the perks are only available at pre-determined vendors; those who remain fit and healthy might <em>possibly </em>prefer to use the information to reduce their premiums and buy whatever they like (such as new sneakers). </p> <p>Tech alone cannot determine the exact state of someone’s health. Indeed, people would need to continue to have medicals and routine check-ups to assess their overall state (until, that is, there’s an app for that too): however everyday activities should be seen as a tool for consumers to obtain services that are befitting of the condition they keep themselves in.</p> <p>This is timely for US consumers, given the long-term uncertainty around the <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/glossary/affordable-care-act/">Affordable Care Act</a> (recent climb-down notwithstanding). Millions of Americans pay significant sums for insurance coverage; above and beyond the impact on their health, the invaluable mine of data that apps contain should be used to positively influence their wallets too.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68851-six-ways-digital-is-changing-the-pharma-healthcare-industry/"><em>Six ways digital is changing the pharma &amp; healthcare industry</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68346-new-data-shows-why-digital-is-now-critical-to-pharma/"><em>New data shows why digital is now critical to pharma</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3173 2017-03-21T11:32:05+00:00 2017-03-21T11:32:05+00:00 Google Analytics Advanced - Optimising your Site <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently the tool hasn't been configured to tailor reports to make full use of its capabilities and drive business results.</p> <p>This practical small group workshop will help you get the most out of Google Analytics to improve your tracking, website and marketing campaign efficiency. Submit your own site during the workshop, and you'll have an opportunity to have it reviewed, with recommendations on "quick win" improvements for you to consider made by the expert trainer.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3172 2017-03-21T11:31:16+00:00 2017-03-21T11:31:16+00:00 Google Analytics Advanced - Optimising your Site <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently the tool hasn't been configured to tailor reports to make full use of its capabilities and drive business results.</p> <p>This practical small group workshop will help you get the most out of Google Analytics to improve your tracking, website and marketing campaign efficiency. Submit your own site during the workshop, and you'll have an opportunity to have it reviewed, with recommendations on "quick win" improvements for you to consider made by the expert trainer.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3171 2017-03-21T11:29:32+00:00 2017-03-21T11:29:32+00:00 Google Analytics <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently once the tool is in place there seems to be a "what next" moment.</p> <p>This practical, small group workshop will help you to get started with Google Analytics, offering you plenty of practical tips and shortcuts.</p> <p>You'll learn how to get useful information from the tool so you can begin optimising your site, online marketing and content.</p> <p>Your website will also be viewed by an industry expert, who will make recommendations as to the best starting points for your own analysis.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3170 2017-03-21T11:28:33+00:00 2017-03-21T11:28:33+00:00 Google Analytics <p>Research by Econsultancy has shown that over 70% of companies now use Google Analytics systems to report online performance. However, frequently once the tool is in place there seems to be a "what next" moment.</p> <p>This practical, small group workshop will help you to get started with Google Analytics, offering you plenty of practical tips and shortcuts.</p> <p>You'll learn how to get useful information from the tool so you can begin optimising your site, online marketing and content.</p> <p>Your website will also be viewed by an industry expert, who will make recommendations as to the best starting points for your own analysis.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68890 2017-03-15T01:00:00+00:00 2017-03-15T01:00:00+00:00 Two innovative ways brands will use web analytics in 2017 Jeff Rajeck <p>In the video below, Mr Clark lays out his vision for web analytics in 2017 and I've then provided a summary, examples, and additional commentary.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GlE_uBPa7io?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>So, according to Andy, in 2017 we will see brands:</p> <h4>1. Combine web analytics with marketing automation for a 360-view of the customer</h4> <p>In the past, customer views to websites were largely used for one thing in marketing – to create a personalised ad campaign through retargeting. That is, if someone visited a web page for 'red shoes', we made sure that those 'red shoes' followed them all around the internet.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4628/redshoes.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="354"></p> <p>Now, brands are using customer browsing behaviour as input data in order to change many things besides just an ad campaign. Through combining analytics data with marketing automation, marketers are able to use data from multiple sources to achieve multiple marketing objectives.</p> <p>For example, here a <a href="http://tealium.com/resources/webinars-and-videos/real-time-marketing-llbean/">marketing manager from LL Bean</a> describes how abandoned shopping cart data not only improves a retargeting display campaign, but can also improve email, paid search, and the user's future website browsing experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4631/llbean.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="338"></p> <p>Then through assembling all of the captured data points, companies can produce a 'Universal Visitor Profile' which will be the central repository and source of data about identifiable customers.</p> <p>This will allow brands, then, to treat each member of their audience pool uniquely. The excellent example provided by LL Bean is that having this profile allows the team to assemble an audience of people who have viewed an out-of-stock item and advertise it to them <em>when it becomes available</em>.</p> <p>In doing so, marketing has captured website behaviour, combined it with their stock system, and leveraged it to give customers information that they are looking for through an email or display ad. </p> <h4>2. Integrate web analytics with offline systems for new business insights</h4> <p>It's curious that while most companies will use website data to improve their web experience, it's rare to find one which uses it as an input for enhancing other, non-web related data.</p> <p>This could mean using page views, time on site, or even bounce rate to determine the level of consumer interest in a product or category.  Or, with the right data, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjoint_analysis_(marketing)">a conjoint analysis</a> of product features and benefits could be carried out through highlighting particular combinations on the website.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4632/conjoint.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="546"></p> <p>American airline US Airways (now American Airlines) had a <a href="http://tealium.com/resources/us-airways-tag-management/">particularly interesting external use case</a> for its website data. Besides providing air travel, US Airways also made significant revenue from its data monetization partner Adara Media.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4633/adara.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="383"></p> <p>But while US Airways had long ago integrated its offline booking system and loyalty programme database, the company website was changing so frequently that the web analytics data was often missing many key data points.</p> <p>Using a tag management solution, though, US Airways was able to greatly enhance the website data passed to Adara, and achieve an annualized ROI of over 400%.</p> <h4>So...</h4> <p>So whether it's through using web analytics to improve your marketing via enhanced automation or repurposing your web analytics to improve internal analysis, 2017 is going to see big changes in how brands use their website data, according to Tealium's Andy Clark.</p> <p>And while it will still be useful for more traditional reporting, the data marketers harvest from their websites can then be used to provide greater value both internally and to customers as well.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68848 2017-03-08T14:59:00+00:00 2017-03-08T14:59:00+00:00 AI is about to change the digital advertising landscape forever Dale Lovell <p><a href="http://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/robots-march-on-safe-jobs-of-middleclass-kxnljnsgg">The Sunday Times</a> has even gone as far as producing a list of the jobs most likely to become automatised in the coming years due to artificial intelligence. While some jobs are at a higher risk than others, it’s estimated that those in advertising have only a 3.8% chance of being replaced by a machine. </p> <p>In reality, AI will actively work with us, not against us, making our business processes more streamlined and efficient. Infosys, a global leader in technology services, <a href="https://www.infosys.com/newsroom/press-releases/Pages/leadership-workforce-implications-vital.aspx">published a report</a> that establishes a clear link between the revenue and implementation of AI technology in businesses. Although there have been cases of job loss due to automation, such as the recent <a href="http://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Layoffs-hit-GE-lab-in-Niskayuna-as-it-shifts-10897153.php">layoffs at General Electric</a>. </p> <p>But in spite of this, of the 1,600 senior decision makers that were surveyed by Infosys, 85% responded that they intend to train employees to use AI, and of those companies that are actually replacing jobs with the new technology, 80% stated that they were looking to retrain displaced workers. Over three quarters (76%) of respondents went on to say that AI will be a fundamental part of their organisations' success, and 64% believe their business’ future depends on the adoption and implementation of the technology. </p> <p>Within this report, earlier adopters of AI revealed that they’ve experienced faster growth in revenue over the past three years and attribute this to their use and implementation of artificial intelligence. In many cases it will enable marketers to perform and analyse at levels that are incomprehensible to the human mind.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4497/transformers.jpg" alt="" width="444" height="296"></p> <p>With this in mind, it’s more likely that AI will streamline our job roles than take them entirely, and ideally allow people to specialise in specific areas of work, rather than getting bogged down by day-to-day administration. Also, we can't dispute the fact that AI is already a part of everyday life – last Christmas saw Amazon Echo gain ground in the market and before long voice-activated technology will actually become the norm.</p> <p>In my opinion, it’s important that we look for the opportunities that AI presents us, rather than fearing the worst and foreseeing an unhappy dystopia where machines run the world. If we take a look back at the world of digital advertising we can see how greatly technology has progressed the industry. In the past, publishers and marketers simply made guesses as to how consumers behaved, then along came a technology that could target and deliver ads to certain individuals based on their online behaviour.</p> <p>Today, online advertising tends to focus on device type as well as website and social-demographic categories that often don’t quite line up with the viewer on the page. This type of approach has led to negative perceptions of digital advertising among consumers, and has, as a bi-product, led to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">the prevalence of ad blocking</a>. </p> <p>This is where AI can truly make a difference. For instance, IBM’s Watson can work on thousands of pages per second, analysing every piece of data relating to every ad generated. At AdYouLike, we know the full capabilities of this tool, as we’ve actually <a href="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/adyoulike-launches-worlds-first-semantic-targeting-ai-for-native-advertising-601107995.html">expanded into the AI space using Watson</a> to create better semantic targeting for native advertising. </p> <p>From what we’ve seen, its performance is truly impressive. It provides feedback upon this data, measuring the sentiment that’s expressed on the page and even going as far to gauge emotions such as happiness and anger. In addition to providing this granular level of detail, Watson is able to deliver in real time, meaning that campaigns can be adjusted immediately for maximum impact.  </p> <p>Although AI will be of benefit to the advertising industry as a whole, I believe <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63722-what-is-native-advertising-and-do-you-need-it/">native advertising</a> in particular will see the most to gain. As native ads rely heavily upon the context in which they’re served, AI technology enhances the level of targeting delivered, and ensures the ads are placed on the right pages where the right sentiment is expressed.</p> <p>Ultimately, through the use of AI in advertising, end users will be served which much more relevant ads, ones that won’t encourage them to block ads altogether and ones that they’ll actually want to interact and engage with. As this technology has already taken off, companies need to act now to make the most of it.</p> <p><em><strong>Further reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/marketing-in-the-age-of-artificial-intelligence/"><em>Marketing in the Age of Artificial Intelligence</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67745-15-examples-of-artificial-intelligence-in-marketing/"><em>15 examples of artificial intelligence in marketing</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68496-10-examples-of-ai-powered-marketing-software/"><em>10 examples of AI-powered marketing software</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68829 2017-02-23T11:10:00+00:00 2017-02-23T11:10:00+00:00 Benefit Cosmetics’ eyebrow loyalty app attracts 20,000 users Nikki Gilliland <p>The Wow Brows app is a booking system and loyalty app in one, and since it launched in November of last year, it’s attracted an impressive 20,000 users in the UK and Ireland.</p> <p>I’ve downloaded it to see what all the fuss is about. Here’s a rundown of its various features and what it aims to offer consumers. </p> <h3>Drives in-store beauty services</h3> <p>You’re probably aware of Benefit products, but you might not know that the brand also offers a wide range of beauty services in its various boutiques across the country. Undoubtedly, one of the biggest motivations behind the app is to increase awareness about these stores and to encourage bookings.</p> <p>The app works by allowing users to find and locate a nearby store, book an appointment, and collect rewards in the process.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4083/Benefit_2.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>It’s fairly simple to use, though it does require users to sign-up to the app even if they already have an online account with Benefit. </p> <p>Personally, I also find the tone of voice rather cringey. An app addressing me as ‘gorgeous’ would probably sound patronising at the best of times, let alone when it’s to inform me about a basic bit of information. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4081/Benefit_1.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>That aside, fans of Benefit are likely to be used to this sort of thing, so I suppose I can be forgiving.</p> <h3>Rewards loyal consumers</h3> <p>One thing I particularly like about the app is that it tells users from the start what kind of rewards to expect. And happily, you don’t have to wait until your 10th time to actually receive anything.</p> <p>You only have to book two appointments before you can claim your first reward, which is a free brow tint.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4083/Benefit_2.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Not only does this provide consumers with the incentive to actually use the app once they’ve downloaded it, but it offers a tangible reward for loyalty, in turn enhancing the consumer’s positive perceptions about the brand. </p> <p>The ability to gain extra rewards if you refer a friend is a bonus, too. </p> <h3>Offers real-time and functional elements</h3> <p>Another aspect that works well is its geo-locational technology and integrated map.</p> <p>All you have to do is allow the app to detect your location, and it will provide you with a list of nearby places that offer Benefit beauty in-store. You can also view opening hours, the different type of services on offer, as well as book your appointment there and then.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4084/Benefit_7.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>I think this type of mobile technology is likely to drive more booking conversions than an advert or promotion on social media. After all, the act of booking a beauty or hair appointment is often an afterthought or on the 'to-do' list. So the notion that you can simply use your smartphone to do so whenever you’re ready provides much more convenience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4085/Benefit_8.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Focus on simplicity</h3> <p>While a lot of brand beauty apps try to wear far too many hats, I particularly like how Wow Brow is quite narrow in terms of its focus. Its simplicity means that users are more likely to know what they’re getting when they download it – and use it again in future. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4086/Benefit_9.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Previous attempts from other brands, while good in theory, were probably overwhelming for consumers that are already happy shopping online or in-store. Debenhams Beauty Club, for instance, allowed consumers to collect loyalty points as well as actually buy products, read reviews and claim offers in-app. </p> <p>Similarly, while the likes of L’Oreal’s Make Up Genius capitalises on VR to wow users, Benefit is well-aware of its limitations.</p> <p>It’s not the fanciest mobile app ever, but it knows what it can offer consumers, and it does it pretty well.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67884-seven-ways-social-media-is-shaping-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">Seven ways social media is shaping the beauty industry</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68087-six-brilliant-blogs-from-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">Six brilliant blogs from the beauty industry</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68689-how-the-beauty-industry-is-embracing-the-internet-of-things/" target="_blank">How the beauty industry is embracing the Internet of Things</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68782 2017-02-10T11:36:23+00:00 2017-02-10T11:36:23+00:00 Three ways brands are using emotional analytics to connect with customers Tamara Littleton <p>But now it’s time for the next step.</p> <p>Emotional analytics allows brands to connect with people on a deeper, more personal, level. Unlike sentiment analytics, which simply allocates responses into broad positive, neutral or negative categories, emotional analytics tells brands what people are feeling and why. This, I think, makes all the difference.</p> <p>I might take to Twitter after a bad experience with customer service, and while the post could be defined as negative in a sentiment analysis report, how useful is that “negative” tag to the brand? My post will be lumped in with tons of other “negative” posts, depleted of all context which could make it actionable for the brand.</p> <p>Without deeper context, the brand can’t solve any problems. It can’t see that certain business practices make me frustrated, or that many other customers are experiencing a similar frustration for the same reason.</p> <p>Brands that don’t know why a customer feels the way they do can’t tailor their products and services to meet specific needs and wants.</p> <h3>How emotional analytics delivers results</h3> <p>By using emotional analytics, brands can see if there’s a disconnect between the emotions that we want the brand to create, and those that real customers are experiencing.</p> <p>A brand’s marketing team may want to promote the brand as inspirational and exciting, but how can it tell if it’s really delivering on this? Emotional analytics looks at how people are feeling, examines what topics they are having feelings about, and allows marketers the chance to change the narrative. </p> <h3>Three ways brands use emotional analytics</h3> <h4>1. Personalisation </h4> <p>As part of its 20th anniversary celebrations, <a title="campaignlive.co.uk" href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/easyjet-transformed-customer-data-emotional-anniversary-stories/1414488">EasyJet</a> used emotional analytics to discover what its customers felt about previous journeys they had taken.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3819/easyjet_20_years.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="450"></p> <p>It then used these insights to send customers personalised emails featuring their own history with the airline.</p> <p>These emails were opened 100% more than regular email campaigns, with the word “love” being the most common word used by recipients to describe how they felt about it.</p> <h4>2. Compliance</h4> <p>Bloomberg allows its clients to track the emotion in text and voice communications, helping them <a title="informationweek.com" href="http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/businesses-harness-emotional-analytics-for-gains/d/d-id/1324970">prevent market abuse</a> and remain compliant.</p> <p>Think of all the times that we don’t say what we mean. When we say we’re fine, when really were angry. By analysing our emotional responses, brands have a better chance of spotting any hidden meaning behind our messages.</p> <p>Businesses can apply this technology to their own internal communications and identify irregularities before they become problems.</p> <h4>3. Improved experience </h4> <p>We’re starting to see more <a title="insider-trends.com" href="http://www.insider-trends.com/is-emotion-tracking-the-next-big-retail-trend/">wearables</a> that track our emotional responses. For retailers, these offer a way to improve and tailor their in-store customer service – from sending assistance to frustrated shoppers to knowing which customers would be more open to special offers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3820/feel_wristband.png" alt="" width="700" height="349"></p> <p>When <a title="wgsn.com" href="https://www.wgsn.com/blogs/ebays-pop-up-tracks-shoppers-emotions/">eBay</a> launched its pop-up store in late 2016, it wanted to track how people felt when they shopped for Christmas gifts. The answer? Stressed. 88% saw their heart rate jump by 32% during their shopping experience.</p> <p>Ebay wanted to use this data to take the stress out of shopping, and use the emotional insights to show shoppers what products they had connected with. The ecommerce giant tracked this data using wearables and in-store experiences, but it could gather the same sort of data online using emotional analytics.</p> <h3>Emotional analytics: using humans to turn emotion into action</h3> <p>From managing a crisis to refining a customer’s retail experience - if you understand the emotion that your brand elicits from a customer, you can take positive action.</p> <p>Using human insight to get under the skin of the data means you can turn analytics into action, transforming your marketing, customer service and experience to resonate with customers. You can win not just their heads, but their hearts. </p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68776 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 10 astounding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>As always, the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> is ready and waiting if you’re in the mood for something a little extra.</p> <h3>34% of brands admit internal silos</h3> <p>New research from Oracle highlights how closer collaboration between sales and marketing teams is required to better target audiences and increase sales.</p> <p>However, despite also recognising the need, many organisations are failing to put it into practice. </p> <p>The Oracle survey found that 34% of brands admit their sales, marketing and customer service teams work completely independently of each other, leading to a lack of customer insight.</p> <p>In terms of the reasons why, 33% blame it on their current systems and technologies, while 30% say their corporate culture makes it tricky for sales and marketing teams to align priorities.</p> <h3>Millennials increasingly influencing tech-buying decisions</h3> <p>With millennials predicted to make up 50% of the US workforce by 2020, <a href="https://business.linkedin.com/marketing-solutions/blog/marketing-for-tech-companies/2017/millennials-and-gen-x-decision-makers-achieving-more--together">Linkedin has been exploring how younger generations</a> are influencing technology buying decisions in the workplace.</p> <p>In a survey of 5,470 global professionals, it found that 61% of younger millennials (age 19-25) contribute to their companies’ technology purchases, with one in three already being decision-makers. Older millennials (those aged 25-35) are said to have even more influence, with 68% contributing to decisions.</p> <p>Lastly, Generation X still holds the power, with 85% of employees aged 36-50 deciding technology purchases or managing the budget.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3667/Linkedin.JPG" alt="" width="428" height="519"></p> <h3>Searches for US visas surge following travel ban</h3> <p>Following Trump’s travel ban, Hitwise data has revealed that searches for American visas have since increased by 34%. More specifically, searches for “visa for USA from UK” and “US visa waiver” have been among the highest.</p> <p>This is similar to what happened after Brexit, when Hitwise witnessed a 300% increase in searches related to moving to the EU. </p> <p>Following the week’s news coverage, approximately one in every 10,000 searches over three days related to the “travel ban”, which is an increase of 2,045% since January 28.</p> <h3> </h3> <h3>One in 10 Gmail users say emails are miscategorised</h3> <p>Gmail’s automatic sorting feature is proving less than effective, with one in 10 users reporting incorrectly categorised messages.</p> <p>This is according to new research from Return Path, leading to warnings that marketers should be more vigilant about how and where their messages are being delivered.</p> <p>The study found that 45% of tabbed inbox users check the ‘Promotions’ tab - used to aggregate marketing promotions and other offers - at least once per day. As a result, if marketing email is delivered to another tab, it could be missed entirely.     </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3665/gmail.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK consumers spent the most via mobile last Christmas </h3> <p>According to Adobe’s latest Digital Index, UK shoppers spent more via mobile last Christmas than the US or any other European nation. </p> <p>Data shows that 60% of online visits to UK retailers over Christmas were made on mobile, and of every £10 spent online in the UK, £4.10 came from a mobile device. </p> <p>Insight suggests that this could be due to a rise in last-minute buying, with the amount spent on the last Monday before Christmas increasing by 50% in 2016.</p> <h3>Live chat leads to greater customer loyalty</h3> <p>A new <a href="https://skilled.co/resources/live-chat-best-customer-service-right-now/" target="_blank">infographic</a> by Skilled highlights how live chat on ecommerce sites can lead to increased levels of customer satisfaction and loyalty.</p> <p>Studies show that 63% of live chat users said they are more likely to return to the site as a result. Interestingly, Mexico is said to be the leader of live chat, with the highest customer satisfaction rate of 94.11%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3663/Skilled.JPG" alt="" width="674" height="342"></p> <h3>Nearly two in five shoppers have used their phone to pay in-store</h3> <p>MEF’s <a href="http://mobileecosystemforum.com/mobile-money-report/" target="_blank">Mobile Money Report</a> has revealed that mobile payments are on the rise, with nearly two in five shoppers using their smartphone to make a purchase in-store.</p> <p>From analysis of 6,000 consumers in nine countries, it also found that 78% of people have made a purchase using an app or mobile site.</p> <p>Mobile banking looks to be on a similar path, with 61% of respondents saying they now use their mobile phone to bank, and 44% using an app to check their balance.</p> <h3>Consumers see over half of brand content as ‘clutter’</h3> <p>The <a href="http://www.meaningful-brands.com/en" target="_blank">Meaningful Brands</a> report by Havas has revealed that over half of consumers view brand content as poor or irrelevant.</p> <p>In a study of 375,000 people across 33 countries, Havas found that while 84% of respondents expect brands to produce content of some kind, 60% of it fails to deliver any personal benefit.</p> <p>Consequently, we can see that the greater the impact on a person’s well-being, the more likely content is to be perceived as meaningful or effective.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3664/Havas.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="426"></p> <h3>80% of marketers describe data as ‘critical’ to success</h3> <p>A new GDMA survey has highlighted how customer data has become an indispensable asset, with 80% of global respondents citing it as critical to their marketing efforts.</p> <p>UK marketers are increasingly relying on data, coming top of all countries when asked about its importance.</p> <p>As a result, investment in data-driven marketing and advertising is still on the rise, with over half of global respondents saying they increased their spending in this area in 2016.</p>