tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/behavioural-targeting Latest Behavioural targeting content from Econsultancy 2017-05-22T11:00:00+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69099 2017-05-22T11:00:00+01:00 2017-05-22T11:00:00+01:00 A day in the life of... Head of Product at a behavioural marketing company Ben Davis <h4> <em>Econsultancy:</em> Please describe your job: What do you do?</h4> <p><em>Michael Barber: </em>I’m Head of Product at SaleCycle. SaleCycle is a global leader in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66468-what-is-behavioural-marketing-and-why-do-you-need-it/">behavioural marketing</a>. We work with some of the world’s leading ecommerce brands; IKEA, Ralph Lauren, Virgin Atlantic, Panasonic, French Connection to name but a few.</p> <p>Basically I’m responsible for product management, portfolio management, commercial decisions, strategy and a whole other list of buzzwords. I’m responsible for the future direction of SaleCycle’s products and to do that I try and blend some operational management with longer term planning.</p> <p><strong><em>E:</em> Whereabouts do you sit within the organisation? Who do you report to?</strong></p> <p><em>MB</em>: I report directly to the CEO/Founder of SaleCycle. I meet with him and our CTO once a week as part of our technology and product management process. When we meet we look at a wide range of topics and subject matters from AI to wearable tech to complex data questions. It's a fairly broad process but we give a lot of focus to the research side of R&amp;D.</p> <p><strong><em>E:</em> What kind of skills do you need to be effective in your role?</strong></p> <p><em>MB</em>: My background is in strategic marketing, I’m a chartered marketer. Aside from that I’m a bit of a geek and have worked in digital marketing roles in technology companies for the last 12 years. So outside of the strategic experience in brand and proposition building and product management, my other set of skills are digital marketing; analytics, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census/">email marketing</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-search-marketing-ppc-best-practice-guide/">paid search</a>, ecommerce, social media and web development.</p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: Tell us about a typical working day…</strong></p> <p><em>MB:</em> No two days at SaleCycle are the same really, so nothing is really that typical. As a company, we have a blend of agency-style work and working on our software and technology, so I get the best of both worlds.</p> <p>On the agency side I work with a lot of our larger clients on projects and pitches/opportunities. On the technology side, I can be working with our engineers to solve complex problems or with the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68621-ux-in-2017-what-do-the-experts-predict/">UX</a> team working on our interface.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6206/Michael.Barber.jpg" alt="michael barber" width="615"></p> <p><em>Michael Barber, Salecycle</em></p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: What do you love about your job? What sucks?</strong></p> <p><em>MB</em>: Overall I love my job because I get to design the kind of products I would have bought in my previous jobs. Specifically I love the analytics side; we collect and store data for the brands I mentioned earlier.</p> <p>To help us build out features we work closely with clients to really understand what's happening on their website and take a real deep dive into the data. One retailer I worked with looked at all of the abandonment rates for their different products, we examined the ratio of sales per product, looked at the profiles of visitors who bought vs. those who abandoned. This analysis helped us develop new features where we target abandoning visitors differently by product category, price and name, real granular level <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68466-could-ai-kill-off-the-conversion-optimisation-consultant/">conversion optimisation</a>.</p> <p>I could write for hours about more of the stuff I love such as working on new features or products and analysing their performance or integrations with admired third parties such as Trustpilot or Google Tag Manager. But let's leave it as there's lots I love about my job.</p> <p>Not much really sucks. Sometimes when new features we're testing don't work quite as expected it can be a bit deflating but we are really agile as a business and 'everyday's a school day' so what we learn we apply next time and go again quickly.</p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: What kind of goals do you have? What are the most useful metrics and KPIs for measuring success?</strong></p> <p><em>MB:</em> My main goals are to develop the strategy for our product portfolio, the measurement is the growth of our business. We've won national and international awards for how successful our growth has been and I'm lucky to be part of a great team that all focuses on that.</p> <p>The growth piece is important because that's what lets us go and hire more great and talented people who can build products that deliver results for our clients. </p> <p>I also work closely with our head of client services. A few years ago I suggested we use Net Promoter (NPS) to measure clients' satisfaction. For my role it's a key metric, but again I'm lucky because our scores are always awesome so in the rare occasion there's feedback about how our products could be improved then I get to use the detail in that measurement to justify changes. </p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: What are your favourite tools to help you to get the job done?</strong></p> <p><em>MB</em>: My current favourite is not a tool I use so much, but our product design manager uses Adobe XD and that allows us to build working prototypes of our interface that we can show to our clients and garner their feedback. I used to use a similar product called Balsamiq that lets you easily wireframe websites and software interfaces but Adobe XD has taken it to a new level if, like our team, you have amazing design skills.</p> <p>For managing our projects and product feature requirements we use Trello and Jira. Both great tools. For team communication we use Slack.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6209/virgin_atlantic.jpg" alt="virgin atlantic email capture" width="615"></p> <p><em>Virgin Atlantic email capture</em></p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: How did you get started in the digital industry, and where might you go from here?</strong></p> <p><em>MB:</em> I started my marketing career in a FTSE 100 company. I had a background in IT and in about 2005 the team I worked in started its first ever PPC campaign. I was asked to write the ads content and work with our then media agency to start experimenting with less above-the-line media and start looking at this "Google' thing.</p> <p>After that I worked in a number of roles with different responsibilities such as the company's email marketing programs. I've worked on affiliate programs for the software industry and done quite a lot of consulting on CRM for some of the UK's largest brands. </p> <p>My current ambition is to grow SaleCycle to the same size of revenue and client base as some of the global providers in display advertising. After that I'd like to get into a new technology vertical, having previously worked in business software and now martech, something like healthcare tech seems appealing.</p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: Which brands do you think are doing behavioural marketing well?</strong> </p> <p><em>MB: </em>I'm pretty biased but brands that I work closely with like Tommy Hilfiger and Virgin Atlantic do a great job on the behavioural side.</p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: Do you have any advice for people who want to work in the digital industry?</strong></p> <p><em>MB:</em> Keep learning. I read a lot about the industry from great publications like Econsultancy (cheque is in the post, right?) But also a lot of books on business and creativity. I'm currently reading <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Hunting-Killer-Idea-Nick-McFarlane/dp/1908211342">Hunting the Killer Idea</a>, a book about how to breed creativity.</p> <p>The only other advice I would give would be to try your hand at as much as possible. I worked in search marketing and come back to it time and time again. In 2007 I was a social media ambassador for the large company I worked for and I still remember how to write social media guidelines, how to write an influencer strategy. I'm all for specialism but I feel I benefit from a really broad range of experiences.</p> <p>Also numerical skills and being good with data is important. A Gartner research director told me the biggest challenge facing CMO's from the Fortune 500 companies was finding professionals who could execute great digital marketing who had great data analytical skills. That's stuck with me which is why I always keep trying to improve mine.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69056 2017-05-04T14:11:38+01:00 2017-05-04T14:11:38+01:00 Bloomberg's Trigr will let advertisers deliver custom ads based on market conditions Patricio Robles <p>"Advertisers are clamoring to reach the right audience with the right content," Derek Gatts, Bloomberg Media's global technology and product head, told AdAge. "But there isn't a lot of conversation aligned with the 'when'."</p> <p>He further explained, "When markets are moving, our traffic booms. We saw that with the instability in Greece, Brexit, the US election – people come to Bloomberg when there is instability in the market because they want to know what the next steps are for their portfolio."</p> <p>Markets, of course, move up and down, and the direction they're moving can dramatically influence the moods of the people who are involved in them.</p> <p>As Bloomberg sees it, this creates an opportunity for advertisers to serve different messages that are appropriate in the context of what's happening in the markets. For example, Gatts says, "Luxury brands want to identify an audience that can spend $25,000 for a Rolex. What better time to advertise to an affluent audience than the moment they just made a ton of money?"</p> <p>With Trigr, advertisers can set triggers to deliver different creative based on granular market-based criteria, such as the performance of broad and category-specific indexes like the S&amp;P 500, various commodities, and stock exchanges in specific countries. Bloomberg will also give advertisers the ability to create triggers around a select number of specific companies.</p> <p>Trigr ads will be sold on a CPM basis and the Trigr technology is based on Bloomberg's own ad server, so Bloomberg can integrate it into any of its offerings that contain advertising, although it did hint that Trigr might be applied to ads "beyond Bloomberg's walls" as well.</p> <h3>The rise of emotional advertising?</h3> <p>Interestingly, Bloomberg's unveiling of Trigr comes at a time when Facebook has sparked interest in the idea of advertising to consumers based on their emotions.</p> <p>The world's largest social network is <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/01/facebook-advertising-data-insecure-teens">under fire</a> after a leaked internal document obtained by The Australian revealed that Facebook had told advertisers it can identify when young users feel "stressed," "defeated," "overwhelmed," "anxious," "stupid," "useless" and like a "failure." That knowledge of users' emotional states could in turn be used to target these users with advertisements.</p> <p>Facebook now claims that it doesn't allow advertisers to target users based on its analysis of their emotional states, but Antonio Garcia-Martinez, a former Facebook product manager, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/02/facebook-executive-advertising-data-comment">claims</a> the company <em>could</em> do this and questions why it would mention the capability in a presentation for advertisers if it had no intention of allowing those advertisers to use it. According to Garcia-Martinez, "The hard reality is that Facebook will never try to limit such use of their data unless the public uproar reaches such a crescendo as to be un-mutable."</p> <p>But while Facebook's capability might cast doubt on the concept of emotion-based advertising, Bloomberg's Trigr demonstrates that there are probably reasonable proxies for emotion that don't rely on mining user data and thus aren't so creepy for advertisers to use.</p> <p>The real question, of course, is just how powerful this will be in the real world. There's no doubt that a major market move might make some individuals happy for a day or two, but will it be enough to convince them to shell out $25,000 for Rolex watches and other luxury goods that they wouldn't have purchased otherwise, or would have purchased well in the future instead? Thanks to Trigr, advertisers will soon have the ability to find out.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69047 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to wet your whistle, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even more.</p> <h3>Two thirds of UK consumers are worried about data privacy</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.gigya.com/blog/state-of-consumer-privacy-trust-2017-fear-hope/" target="_blank">Gigya</a>, 68% of UK consumers are concerned about how brands use their personal information, with two-thirds specifically questioning the data privacy of IoT devices like smartwatches and fitness trackers.</p> <p>The results of a poll of 4,000 consumers also found that the majority of people think privacy policies have become weaker rather than stronger – 18% predict it will worsen under Theresa May’s government.</p> <p>Apprehension over privacy was found to be higher in older generations, with 73% of people aged over 65 expressing concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5812/Gigya.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="409"></p> <h3>Nearly half of parents agree that personalised marketing is the future</h3> <p>A survey by Mumsnet has found that 46% of parents expect personalisation to become a big part of advertising in future.</p> <p>However, there is certainly some resistance, with 58% saying that their data is private and only 26% liking the idea of personalised ads.</p> <p>That does not mean that parents don’t see the value. 35% say they’d be open to seeing ads that apply to their lives, while 24% say that personalised ads would make them more likely to buy. The majority surveyed also said that they’d prefer to see tailored ads based on their previous search behaviour rather than online habits.</p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 13% YoY in March</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-april-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index show solid growth for UK online sales, driven by a rise in the average spend through mobile devices.</p> <p>Mobile retail was up 18% in March 2016, while overall online sales grew 13% year-on-year. More specifically, the home and garden sector saw a 10% YoY growth, while health and beauty sales increased by 15% YoY – most likely driven by Mother’s Day.</p> <h3>19% of professionals have landed a job through LinkedIn</h3> <p>This week, <a href="https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/24/the-power-of-linkedins-500-million-community" target="_blank">LinkedIn announced</a> that it has reached half a billion members worldwide, with 23m of these coming from the UK.</p> <p>As part of the announcement, it also revealed that London is the most connected city in the world, with professionals having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>It also stated that a casual conversation on LinkedIn has led to a new opportunity for 29% of professionals, while 19% have landed a job through using the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5815/LinkedIn.JPG" alt="" width="344" height="469"></p> <h3>UK adspend was 3.6% higher in Q4 2016</h3> <p>According to the Advertising Association/WARC Expenditure Report, adspend was <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">3.9% higher</a> in the fourth quarter of last year, with digital formats driving growth.</p> <p>Internet spending was up 15.3% during Q4 and 13.4% over the entire year. Meanwhile, mobile took a 37.5% share, hitting £3.9bn for the year and accounting for 99% of the new money spent on internet advertising. </p> <p>Lastly, forecasts for the next two years indicate continued growth, with 2.5% predicted in 2017 and 3.3% in 2018.</p> <h3>64% of marketers do not believe it is their job to analyse data</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.bluevenn.com/resources/ebooks/data-deadlock-report-1" target="_blank">BlueVenn</a> has found that nearly two-thirds of UK and US marketers believe it is their role to collect customer data, but not actually analyse it.</p> <p>However, it appears this is due to sheer volume rather than a lack of aptitude, as 93% of marketers say they are ‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ in their ability to analyse complex customer data.  </p> <p>The findings suggest a general discord amongst marketers, with 51% of UK and US marketers feeling that they spend too much time analysing data in their day-to-day work, with too little time left to spend on more creative aspects of the role.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers forget branded content</h3> <p>Upon discovering that eight in 10 consumers forget most of the information in branded content after only three days, while more than half are unable to recall a single detail, a <a href="https://prezi.com/view/RZXW2soO8IFMkzAFoNY7/" target="_blank">new report by Prezi</a> has highlighted the reasons why.</p> <p>Irrelevancy of ads is the biggest reason for a lack of recall, with 55% of consumers citing this reason. 37.7% said a lack of motivation to remember it, while 30% said there is simply too much content to retain.</p> <p>In contrast, content which 'tells the audience something new' was found to be the most memorable, helping 27% of respondents to remember a brand. This was closely followed by content which teaches, inspires, or entertains. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5813/Prezi_report.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="436"></p> <h3>Half of retailers unable to predict shopper traffic</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://d3fi73yr6l0nje.cloudfront.net/Lists/TRS-ResourceAssetsLib/EKN-TYCO_ebook_03-Excellence_Scorecard-20170427.pdf" target="_blank">Tryco</a> has found that retailers are failing to monitor store performance correctly, with 50% unable to predict shopper traffic. Consequently, it is becoming increasingly difficult for retailers to balance operational tasks and customer service. </p> <p>Other findings show 60% of retailers do not consistently manage inventory performance and turnover on a store-by-store basis</p> <p>Lastly, retailers spend 70% of their time on operational tasks as opposed to 30% on customer service, reducing the opportunity to build important relationships with consumers. </p> <h3>eBay sees spike in searches for home and garden sector</h3> <p>eBay has revealed that it saw big spikes in searches within the Home and Garden category around the May bank holidays last year, with online shoppers showing two distinct purchasing mindsets.</p> <p>On one hand, consumers appeared to be looking for quick-fix cosmetic items at the beginning of May, with sales of candles and plant pots leaping by 172% and 214% respectively.</p> <p>On the other, shoppers were planning bigger renovation and DIY projects at the end of the month. This was reflected by sales of saws and lawnmowers rising by more than 1,000%, and sales of sofas jumping by 194%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5816/ebay_search.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>46% of UK consumers open to relevant ads despite surge in ad blocking </h3> <p>Trinity McQueen has revealed that consumers will tolerate relevant online advertising, despite the popularity of ad-blocking.</p> <p>In a study of 1,000 UK adults, it found that 56% of consumers now use ad-blocking software on their laptops and PCs, yet 46% say they don’t mind online advertising as long as it’s relevant to them.</p> <p>The study also highlights the changing ways UK adults consume traditional and digital media. 29% of UK adults would be happy never to watch scheduled TV again, while one third say that scheduled TV does not fit in with their lifestyle.</p> <p>Finally, 41% of UK adults now subscribe to an on-demand service such as Netflix, Amazon Prime or Now TV.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68911 2017-03-27T14:45:05+01:00 2017-03-27T14:45:05+01:00 Brand Commerce: Pushing the value of your brand through trial Michael Sandstrom <p>It allows your customers to ‘own’ your brand without initially paying for it, and because once they have a brand they value it more highly, they are more likely to continue using your product.</p> <p>Humans are creatures of habit and comfort, making it highly unlikely that we will give up on what we perceive to be a benefit to us once it has become an established part of our everyday lives. Just as the majority of us are unlikely to eschew the benefits of modern society for a hunter-gatherer lifestyle or even go back from smartphones to flip phones, some brands and their products have managed to make themselves indispensable in our lives. </p> <p>With the right product and the right kind of trial, barring a negative experience by your customers, the removal of your product from their life could end up feeling like an opportunity cost too high to risk. </p> <p>However, there are reasons for caution when considering running free trials. When executed badly, they can end up harming your brand. As reported by The Money Advice Service, four in ten Brits continue to pay for a subscription they’re not using, costing us <a href="https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/blog/don-t-forget-to-cancel-how-subscriptions-cost-brits-338m-a-month">collectively £338m a month</a>. </p> <p>While for the short term this ensures cashflow for these companies, it’s not helping them to build long-term brand loyalty and advocacy amongst their customers. Instead your brand might end up as a source of stress, affecting your brand affinity negatively. For this article, we will go through some of the brands that have not only made trials a key part of their marketing strategy, but have managed to firmly engrain themselves in our lives through it.</p> <h3>Instant gratification through extended trial</h3> <p>The healthy snack subscription service <a href="https://www.graze.com">Graze</a> has successfully used free trials to build its service and expand its offering into a ecommerce platform. Rather uniquely, they also seem to have managed to keep opportunists at bay, stopping customers from ordering one box and then swiftly cancelling the service. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5057/graze_brand_commerce.png" alt="" width="700" height="449"></p> <p>Graze has done this by offering both the first and fifth boxes of snacks for free. Looking at this from a consumer behaviour point of view, this is successful because of the perceived instant gratification from receiving both immediate and tangible future reward.</p> <p>This increases the likelihood of Graze's products becoming an established part of its customers' lives and a benefit they would rather not be without. </p> <h3>Showing your value through sudden deprivation</h3> <p>Swedish streaming company <a href="https://www.spotify.com">Spotify</a> has been instrumental in driving the music industry away from physical ownership into the instant access of music. With over 100m active users and now <a href="https://press.spotify.com/uk/about/">50m</a> of those choosing to pay for the privilege, Spotify’s strategy of providing a 30-day free trial of its Premium paid tier seems to be working.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5058/Spotify_screen.png" alt="" width="700" height="384"></p> <p>Those that choose to either not continue past the trial or outright cancel the service then revert back to only being able to access a limited freemium model. This tactic is especially effective since it effectively becomes a deprivation exercise. By removing a newly found benefit from your customers’ lives, you have a chance at making them understand what they miss the most.</p> <h3>Speak to your customers’ aversion to risk</h3> <p>Other brands such as a online mattress company <a href="https://www.evemattress.co.uk">Eve</a> and its multitude of competitors are using another type of tactic to incentivise trial and purchase. Eve is so sure of the quality of its mattresses that the company is willing to bet you won’t return the mattress after sleeping on it 100 times.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5059/eve_screenshot.png" alt="" width="700" height="366"></p> <p>While this might not be as successful for digital, immaterial goods, this is especially effective when pushing trial of physical products. Once accustomed to an everyday product such as a mattress, not many are willing to go through the hassle and risk of both returning and buying a new mattress.</p> <p>Pursuing a free trial as a sales tactic has great potential to both drive sales and build long-term brand affinity among your target customers. However, planning and implementation is important to make sure you stay away from opportunists only looking for a free deal. The best way of ensuring this and keeping your new customers past the end of your trial is by tapping into and using your customers' behaviours to your own benefit.</p> <p><em>To read more about <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68176-brand-commerce-a-new-planning-model-for-marketers">Brand Commerce</a> and how behavioural science can help drive sales and build brand affinity, see our previous articles on how to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68602-brand-commerce-navigating-through-online-customer-indecision">navigate through online indecision</a> and how to use your <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68357-brand-commerce-what-is-your-brand-s-key-feature">brand’s key feature</a> to stand apart from your competition.</em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68728 2017-01-24T10:09:00+00:00 2017-01-24T10:09:00+00:00 How fashion retailers can use search trend data to inform marketing & product strategy Nikki Gilliland <p>Search terms that combine both evergreen and seasonal keywords are the easiest to predict, with terms like ‘swimwear’ and ‘coats’ guaranteed to peak at a certain time each and every year. </p> <p>On the other hand, reactive trends - while harder to forecast – are also helpful.</p> <p>Using theory <a href="https://www.pi-datametrics.com/resources/market-performance-reports/search-trend-data/" target="_blank">from PI Datametrics</a>, here’s a look at how fashion brands can capitalise on both types of search data. (Note: this can be adapted to brands in any industry, but I'm using fashion as an example here.)</p> <h3>Long-term strategy from seasonal evergreen search trends</h3> <p>The below chart outlines search trend data for the term ‘swimwear’.</p> <p>Although it has high organic value all year-round, it also peaks at the same time every year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3256/PIPR.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="340"></p> <p>PI Datametrics suggest using the following strategy to capitalise on this.</p> <h4>Plan</h4> <p>The planning stage, which in this case would be January, involves getting ready for peak purchases, as well as ensuring all-year round interest will be met.</p> <p>During this time, it’s wise for retailers to stock up on swimwear to capitalise on off-season sales. Meanwhile, it’s also worthwhile conducting link-building activities and optimising a year-round landing page in preparation.</p> <h4>Influence</h4> <p>This stage involves taking advantage of consumer research during popular holiday periods like Christmas, when consumers are researching and planning their summer holiday. In turn, this data can also be used to build a cookie-pool, which can lead to effective re-targeting at a later date.</p> <h4>Peak </h4> <p>Drawing on the aforementioned Plan and Influence stages, retailers should also use the peak purchasing period around June and July to re-target lost customers, rather than build engagement.</p> <h4>Repeat</h4> <p>Finally, marketers should ensure that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65455-why-you-need-an-evergreen-content-strategy/">evergreen content</a> is optimised, and clear stock in time for next year’s seasonal cycle.</p> <h3>Reactive strategy for peak search trends </h3> <p>Google UK data shows that searches for the ‘off-shoulder look’ grew 261% between December 2015 and May 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3257/Reactive.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="537"></p> <p>In instances like this, it is useful to implement a reactive search strategy, as outlined below.</p> <h4>React</h4> <p>When it comes to new fashion trends, peaks in search can happen very quickly. As a result, success often comes from reacting at the right time.</p> <p>ASOS capitalised on 'off-the-shoulder' by creating and optimising a landing page for the trend term as quickly as possible. Similarly, it's helpful to utilise marketing channels other than organic search to capture interest. </p> <h4>Perform</h4> <p>Once it is clear that a keyword is growing in popularity, optimising content organically could prove to be more cost efficient and improve visibility. </p> <h4>Review</h4> <p>Once the peak has died down, retailers should reassess the value of continuing this campaign. Other tactics during this final stage include adjusting stock accordingly, or linking the landing page to a different or more popular trend.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>Whether it is based on evergreen, seasonal or one-off trends - search trend data can provide retailers with the ability to create a well-defined strategy.</p> <p>From replenishing stock levels to creating multi-channel content, if used and interpreted correctly, it can help fashion brands meet customer demand and increase sales.</p> <p><em>To learn more on this topic, download Econsultancy’s brand new <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/seo-best-practice-guide/">SEO Best Practice Guide</a> or check out our range of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/search-marketing/">Search Marketing training courses</a>.</em></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68609 2016-12-08T01:30:00+00:00 2016-12-08T01:30:00+00:00 Four things to consider before marketing on a new digital channel Jeff Rajeck <p>The same study also shows that <strong>these new consumer behaviours are good for brands which can keep up.</strong>  </p> <p>As the percentage of sales that a brand makes online increases, the more likely it is that a consumer will select the brand at some point in the purchase funnel. <strong><br></strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2149/Picture1.png" alt="" width="570" height="444"></p> <p>Because of this, marketers should always be on the lookout for new digital channels. With new ones appearing regularly, however, knowing which ones to use can be difficult. </p> <p>To find out how professional marketers decide whether to use a new digital channel, Econsultancy in association with <a href="https://www.ibm.com/watson/marketing/">IBM Cognitive Engagement: Watson Marketing</a> recently held roundtable discussions in Delhi.</p> <p>There, senior client-side marketers discussed how they launch on digital channels to improve customer engagement, acquisition, and loyalty.</p> <p>Below are four questions which attendees indicated that they ask when launching on a new digital channel.</p> <h3>1. What is the objective of using the new channel?</h3> <p>The first thing delegates consider when reviewing a new digital channel is their objective. That is, what are they trying to accomplish?</p> <p>To answer this, they look at what part of the buying cycle they are trying to influence and ask whether or not the channel is appropriate. For example: </p> <ul> <li> <strong>Awareness:</strong> Is this where people interested in our brand spend their time?</li> <li> <strong>Research: </strong>Do potential customers look for information here? If so, can we tell them what they want to know?</li> <li> <strong>Interest: </strong>Will we be able to draw them away from the platform to tell our brand story?</li> <li> <strong>Conversion:</strong> Will they be in the right mindset to buy when they are in this channel?</li> <li> <strong>Advocacy: </strong>Does the platform allow us to engage with customers one-on-one at scale? </li> </ul> <p>Different platforms will suit different purposes. Highly visual networks, such as Instagram and Snapchat, tend to perform better at the top of the funnel.  </p> <p>Special-topic sites such as a blog are more suitable for the middle and conversion. Messaging platforms are best for ongoing engagement.</p> <p>Marketers should, therefore, understand where a channel fits in the customer journey before committing resources and budget to develop their presence on it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2152/1.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>2. Is it possible to segment audiences on the channel?</h3> <p>In <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2016-digital-trends">Econsultancy's latest Digital Trends report</a>, 'targeting and personalization' was seen as one of the three top priorities for organisations in 2016.</p> <p>Marketers in Delhi agreed. Participants noted that whenever they look at new digital channels, <strong>they consider whether they are able to segment and target audiences on the platform.</strong></p> <p>The reason is that in order to increase engagement with the brand, content must be personalised to some extent. And to personalise, marketers need to be able to segment.</p> <p>Ideally, marketers would be able to segment using demographics, interests and behaviour, but at least one option must be available.</p> <p>While this is not a problem with established channels like Google and Facebook, many marketers have voiced frustrations with difficulty in doing so with Snapchat and Pinterest.</p> <p>Interestingly, both <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/new/%20http:/www.adweek.com/socialtimes/snap-audience-match-snapchat-lifestyle-categories-lookalikes/644849">Snapchat</a> and <a href="https://business.pinterest.com/en/blog/new-targeting-tools-make-pinterest-ads-even-more-effective">Pinterest</a> have recently announced that audience targeting will be available.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2153/2.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>3. Does the channel provide attribution data?</h3> <p>Another issue which marketers face when using new platforms is that they need to know whether it is effective in driving new business.  </p> <p>The way this is typically done is through a 'referrer source' tag which is picked up by web analytics platforms and recorded along with page views and conversions. </p> <p>While nearly all established digital channels provide this tag, many new platforms do not.  </p> <p>Out of eight messaging platforms commonly used in Asia-Pacific, <strong>only Facebook Messenger and Twitter DMs provide 'referrer source' and the rest are considered <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67529-the-rise-of-dark-social-everything-you-need-to-know/">'dark social'</a>.</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8441/dark_social_messaging_apps.png" alt="" width="607" height="471"></p> <p>The only alternative in these cases is for marketers to tag links they post on the platforms themselves. This is not easy to do and makes analytics even more difficult.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2154/3.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>4. Can we use marketing automation on the channel?</h3> <p>Attendees asserted that <strong>marketing automation reduces marketing costs and increases conversions.</strong> Because of this, marketers should consider to what extent new channels support automation initiatives.</p> <p>Again, this was not really an issue when using established search and social platforms as they offer APIs, ad bidding automation, and even automated customer service.</p> <p>Newer platforms, however, require that marketers post content manually making it even more difficult to send the right message to the right person at the right time. </p> <p>Participants agreed, though, that in order to reach their customers it was worth putting efforts into new channels such as chat platforms even without automation. Many felt that, in time, these platforms will support integration and allow marketers to use them more effectively.</p> <h3>A word of thanks</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank all of the marketers who participated on the day and our table leaders: </p> <ul> <li>Antonia Edmunds, Business Leader - IBM Watson Marketing.</li> <li>Gowri Arun, GBS Marketing Leader - IBM India/South Asia.</li> <li>Joseph Sundar, Business Development Executive, ISA/ASEAN - IBM Watson Marketing.</li> <li>Harsh Anand, CSP Leader - IBM Commerce.</li> </ul> <p>We hope to see you all at future Delhi Econsultancy events!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2155/4.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68534 2016-11-23T16:00:00+00:00 2016-11-23T16:00:00+00:00 What are dark Facebook posts? Nikki Gilliland <p>You might have heard of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67529-the-rise-of-dark-social-everything-you-need-to-know/" target="_blank">dark social</a> or dark web – but this is something different.</p> <p>Let’s shine a light on the subject.</p> <h3>Social posts for select eyes only</h3> <p>A dark post is anything a brand might post on Facebook – such as a link, video, photo or status – that will only be seen by a specific or target demographic. </p> <p>Unlike a regular published post, a dark post does not show up on a brand’s timeline or on its follower’s organic newsfeed. </p> <p>Instead, it appears as an advert for some, but remains hidden to everyone else.</p> <p>You might have heard dark posts also being referred to as ‘unpublished posts’ – they are the same thing, a promoted and targeted post that is not published on your brand page.</p> <p>A similar option is available on LinkedIn.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1527/Creating_dark_posts.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="739"></p> <h3>Why do brands use them?</h3> <p>There are many benefits to using dark posts.</p> <p>The biggest is that unlike organic or boosted posts, they enable brands to carry out <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67249-a-beginner-s-guide-to-a-b-testing/" target="_blank">A/B testing</a> without cluttering up their own pages and annoying users in the process. </p> <p>By tweaking headlines, call-to-actions and even the time of publication - brands can measure CTR’s and determine what kind of ads are the most effective and why.</p> <p>Further to this, it allows brands to ramp up <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67070-why-personalisation-is-the-key-to-gaining-customer-loyalty/" target="_blank">personalisation</a>.</p> <p>With the ability to post dozens of ads without the fear of backlash, posts can be targeted to a user’s location, interests or previous online behaviour.</p> <p>The idea is that the more targeted they are, the larger the likelihood of engagement. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1529/FB_flyer.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="602"></p> <h3>Are they better than boosted posts?</h3> <p>A <a href="http://trackmaven.com/thank-you-2017-facebook-advertising-index/" target="_blank">recent report from TrackMavens</a> found that businesses are spending on average nearly twice as much on dark posts as they are on boosted posts.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1531/Dark_post_average_spend.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="514"></p> <p>However, despite this increased spend resulting in greater reach and more page likes, boosted posts appear to garner more engagement overall.</p> <p>The average boosted post on Facebook receives 643 total interactions, while the average dark post on Facebook receives 559 total interactions.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1532/Dark_posts_interactions.JPG" alt="" width="718" height="411"></p> <p>With the latter having more longevity - staying active for around 42 days - it appears that dark posts are being used as more of a long-term strategy for larger brands.</p> <h3>Should you use dark posts with caution?</h3> <p>While dark posts mean improved targeting and testing, brands do need to be wary that they don’t enter into ‘creepy’ marketing territory.</p> <p>Instead of increasing engagement, using super-personal details like names has the potential to alienate users instead of attracting them.</p> <p>However, if used correctly, these types of posts can undoubtedly be a valuable tactic for brands online.</p> <p>The chance to carefully measure how an ad performs, as well as tailor it to a target demographic, could easily outweigh the high cost and potential pitfalls.</p> <p>With a recent survey finding that <a href="https://www.iabuk.net/about/press/archive/15-of-britons-online-are-blocking-ads" target="_blank">46% of users use ad blockers</a> due to annoyance over irrelevant ads - it's sometimes better to be left in the dark.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68494 2016-11-18T09:56:00+00:00 2016-11-18T09:56:00+00:00 How programmatic out-of-home can aid influencer marketing campaigns James Perrott <p>Everyone is looking for a method to create targeted content that audiences are searching for, through the right channels/publications which allow transparent measurement with positive ROI. Tough ask? </p> <p>One distribution option many brands probably haven't considered is influencer content delivered using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/">programmatic</a> out-of-home ads, which can be used to drive very specific actions among a target audience.</p> <p>Here's more on how it works...</p> <h3>Definitions</h3> <p>Definition of content marketing by the CMI:</p> <p>“Content marketing is about delivering the content your audience is seeking in all the places they are searching for it. It is the effective combination of created, curated and syndicated content.”</p> <p>Definition of influencer marketing by John Hall on Forbes.com:</p> <p>“Basically, influencer marketing is about providing product context and expertise through an inspirational person.” </p> <p>If we merge the two, we get somewhere close to Programmatic Influencer Content Marketing: “Programmatic influencer content marketing is about delivering the content your audience is seeking to a specific customer, in a specific context through an inspirational person.”</p> <p>Remember that, it’s what’s next – but it’s a mouthful...</p> <h3>Where is content moving towards?</h3> <p>Some enterprise-level businesses are now realigning their content efforts - more so internally - to focus on their current audiences. For example, Unilever <a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/unilever-plots-in-house-branded-content-division/1410371">recently announced</a> that it is creating a brand-led content studio internally. </p> <p>U-Studio has been established to create content sought out by consumers that meets an immediate need related to a brand or product. </p> <p>The interesting part that I took from this announcement is the types of content that U-Studio will be creating - commonly-used content marketing material:</p> <ul> <li>How-to videos.</li> <li>Infographics.</li> <li>Ratings and reviews.</li> <li>Editorial.</li> <li>Product information.</li> <li>User-generated content.</li> </ul> <h3>Why content marketing is becoming static and dangerously close to not evolving…</h3> <p>Through a generic content marketing approach, the content types mentioned (infographics, editorial, etc) would be created and then syndicated online. This is very one-dimensional. </p> <p>Unilever could make a large push after the creation of this unit to robustly develop its content efforts into a more integrated programmatic approach that will attract a much wider audience. This is where out-of-home ads could come into play.</p> <p>For example, one of Unilever’s brands, TRESemmé, has just launched a new product range – Beauty-Full Volume. </p> <p>Instead of working with a few bloggers or vloggers and have their reviews distributed to their audience and reviews syndicated online, a much wider approach could be taken which would significantly enhance the reach of this content and drive serious results. </p> <p>This wider approach incorporates programmatic practices, and most importantly digital out of home (DOOH). Below is an example of how you can forecast eyeball capture from advert screens to shop location:</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1555/map.png" alt="" width="944" height="508"></p> <h3>Why programmatic offers a new opportunity for influencer and content marketing</h3> <p>Working with bloggers and vloggers is hugely beneficial, more so with a wider distribution remit. TRESemmé will have its own personas for the typical customer/user and through using this information it could identify the right influencers. </p> <p>Below is the process that’s needed to run a successful, and targeted DOOH campaign:</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1557/list_of_six.jpg" alt="" width="911" height="563"></p> <p>For example, let's figuratively say that Jane Smith (random person) is an influencer for TRESemmé’s targeted audience. </p> <p>A new approach could be to work with Jane Smith on a wide content campaign for the launch of the new product. </p> <p>The types of content that could be created for this launch are exactly those that U-Studio is designed to create. The syndication of ambassador/influencer led content is heavily limited to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65560-what-s-the-difference-between-paid-owned-and-earned-media/">owned and earned channels</a>, but being smart through paid channels could unlock large potential. </p> <p>By locating where TRESemmé’s audience largely hangs out in London, you could then repurpose this content. </p> <p>Through digital billboards, the brand could run campaigns showing the influencer and new product with a '50 metres to your nearest Boots’ call-to-action, pushing the target audience to a store where they can buy this new product.</p> <p>Alternatively, you could also include a unique coupon code for stores on the advert that appears on billboards to have a much more accurate measurement of performance of campaigns. </p> <p>This part of programmatic is called digital out-of-home and is geared up to target a specific audience through traditional advertising techniques; digital billboards, rotating banners at train stations, etc.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1554/ecosystem.png" alt="" width="903" height="364"></p> <p>Furthermore, if you were to launch this campaign with a challenge or <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67547-10-excellent-examples-of-user-generated-content-in-marketing-campaigns/">user-generated content</a> element, such as showing before and after pictures of your hair with this product, you could push this through targeted billboards where you know the audience are located at times they will view this content - commuting, lunch hours, and so on. </p> <p>Through Bluetooth, we could even then begin to identify who went into the store from a nearby ad, not directly attributing it to that, but dig into data insight to see if there was an increase when adverts ran at times those personas were nearby. </p> <p>Testing the resonance that brand ambassadors have is always tricky, but if you have more than one, rotating these adverts could prove useful in knowing which has the most reach with your audience and drives sales.</p> <p>Similarly, using different competition ideas to decide which has the most potential for audience self-involvement, you would then be able to roll this out through owned channels such as social and by a blog.</p> <p>Alternatively, or as well as, we could also identify national papers, magazines or specific niche websites (fashion, sport, etc) where the audience spend their spare time through tools such as Global Web Index, Comscore, YouGov data and others. </p> <p>Using these publications, we can then begin to create campaign specific creative and push another portion of people through to the campaign content through these avenues. Due to the granular detail that can be used to target audiences through SSP and DSPs, these visits would be hugely valuable and most importantly, measurable. </p> <p>This more detailed targeting element of programmatic is becoming much more granular making it better for brands and advertisers. A recent example of this <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/gnm-press-office/2016/oct/04/guardian-programmatic-audiences-launches-with-eurostar-and-iprospect">is the partnership that The Guardian, Eurostar and iProspect have begun</a> in order to create an inventory that drills down to demographic, interest (luxury travel) and persona-based (business decision makers) targeting. </p> <p>This is a very specific audience that Eurostar can really tap into and drive much more relevant traffic.</p> <h3>Is this restricted to influencers?</h3> <p>Definitely not.</p> <p>Some of the best online campaigns are ones which involve real people in real situations. Using the before and after images in the TRESemmé example, a simple advert image could be created showcasing real examples on billboards with a similar call-to-action, which could have potentially greater impact. </p> <p>This programmatic approach with a designated hashtag could be part of a much wider campaign that has blogger challenges, infographics, how-to guides and editorial, all part of the more traditional content marketing approach. </p> <p>However, with this targeted approach in the out-of-home environment, a campaign will be able to reach a much larger number of eyeballs with real value associated to it through measurement of product performance.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68051-six-case-studies-that-show-how-digital-out-of-home-advertising-is-changing/"><em>Six case studies that show how digital out-of-home advertising is changing</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67414-is-this-the-next-step-in-programmatic-out-of-home/"><em>Is this the next step in programmatic out-of-home?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/"><em>The Rise of Influencers</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68505 2016-11-09T10:50:00+00:00 2016-11-09T10:50:00+00:00 A closer look at Booking.com's customer-focused strategy Nikki Gilliland <p>From multichannel ads to personalised apps – Booking.com is intent on keeping up with the evolving needs of its customers.</p> <p>Here's more on Gillian's talk, including other ways the company is delivering a winning experience all round.</p> <h3>Fostering diversity and innovation</h3> <p>When asked if Booking.com was a travel site or a tech company, Gillian didn’t miss a beat before answering with the latter. </p> <p>Because while travel might be its product, what many people fail to realise is that Booking.com is in fact the third largest ecommerce platform in the world. </p> <p>With a large team of web developers, and running more than 1,000 A/B tests at any one time, it also prides itself on innovating through continuous experimentation.</p> <p>Interestingly, while on this topic, Gillian emphasised how Booking.com also prides itself on diversity.</p> <p>Women make up 60% of the company's workforce, and with little to no background in technology herself, she explained why the company’s diversity is an important reflection of its global and wide-ranging demographic. </p> <h3>Concierge services to improve experiences</h3> <p>Booking.com fosters innovation through its constant measurement of data.</p> <p>In other words, it is continually looking at what customers want from the site as well as how they behave online.</p> <p>In turn, it is always introducing new technology and features to improve the online experience.  </p> <p>One example is a focus on delivering personalised messaging even long after the customer has booked their accommodation. </p> <p>Now, customers can interact with the site on their way to a hotel or apartment or even while out and about looking at tourist landmarks.</p> <p>Whether they want to order room service or make a restaurant reservation, concierge features like these help to create a more bespoke and personalised experience from start to finish. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">The only thing better than finding your perfect getaway home, is arriving there. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/bookingyeah?src=hash">#bookingyeah</a> <a href="https://t.co/hVuE7hxX6e">https://t.co/hVuE7hxX6e</a> <a href="https://t.co/dDCp8thAlg">pic.twitter.com/dDCp8thAlg</a></p> — Booking.com (@bookingcom) <a href="https://twitter.com/bookingcom/status/794113931149185024">November 3, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Targeting mobile travellers in the moment</h3> <p>So, what enables innovation like this to occur in the first place?</p> <p>Increased mobile usage, of course.</p> <p>Gillian spoke about how today’s consumers, and specifically millennial consumers, are using their mobiles in the moment – deliberately travelling without a plan and relying on smartphone technology to give them the service they need in real time.</p> <p>Naturally, when it comes to push notifications, there is a fine line between a mobile app being helpful and annoying. </p> <p>However, Gillian goes back to the notion of measuring and testing user response to determine when and how often interaction is required.</p> <p>Ultimately, it should never be about bombarding the customer with messaging, but engaging with them in the moments when they need it most. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1302/travel_app.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="521"></p> <h3>Staying relevant in a competitive space</h3> <p>With over 1m transactions every day, Booking.com’s customer base is huge.</p> <p>So, how does the company compete for the millennial audience against the likes of Airbnb.</p> <p>For Gillian, the answer is offering a non-traditional mix of multichannel marketing.</p> <p>While Airbnb and other more digital companies might resist offline entirely, Booking.com still dedicates a small yet focused portion of its budget to this. </p> <p>Why? Well, despite the ‘in-the-moment’ demand of mobile consumers, the company recognises the fact that a memorable offline ad is also what’s needed to stay in the mind of someone booking in six months' time. </p> <p>That being said, the company is still largely digital in its marketing presence - continually optimising for search to ensure relevancy and visibility online. </p> <p>Likewise, social media spaces like Facebook, where travel is an ever-present topic of conversation, offer great opportunities for targeted ads.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1LHTKVtiDnQ?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <p><em>(If you fancy a look at other travel marketing campaigns, you can find <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67766-10-examples-of-great-travel-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">10 great examples here</a>.)</em></p> <h3>The future of travel</h3> <p>While Booking.com is undeniably functional, its site has often been criticised for being incredibly unsexy in design.</p> <p>A little harsh, perhaps. But does this matter?</p> <p>For Gillian, the answer is decidedly no.</p> <p>What <em>is</em> important is that the company takes into consideration actual customer feedback rather than just assuming what it is they might want.</p> <p>Again, this goes back to user testing, with the developers making small and constant changes in order to gauge response.</p> <p>In future, more pressing matters include improving the Booking.com experience in any way possible.</p> <p>This looks set to include greater <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care/">chatbot</a> functionality, with booking assistants enabling an even faster and easier journey (both online and in literal terms) for customers than ever before.</p> <p>Finally, at the end of the talk, Gillian was asked a rather shoehorned-in question about Brexit. More specifically, its potential impact on the travel industry.</p> <p>For a global company like Booking.com, there doesn't appear to be any major issues on the horizon.</p> <p>Ultimately, it appears that people will always travel. The only thing that might change is where they travel to. </p> <p>But then again, with more leaving this decision up to the last minute, and even using sites like Booking.com to decide for them – nothing in this industry is quite so certain any more.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1301/London.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="483"></p> <p><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-trends-in-the-travel-and-hospitality-sector/"><em>Digital Trends in the Travel and Hospitality Sector Report</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67996-what-travel-tourism-marketers-can-learn-from-discover-la/"><em>What travel &amp; tourism marketers can learn from Discover LA</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66156-12-insanely-beautiful-travel-and-leisure-websites/"><em>12 insanely beautiful travel and leisure websites</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68446 2016-10-27T14:09:49+01:00 2016-10-27T14:09:49+01:00 Marketing is failing at its top priority: Three findings from new research Arliss Coates <h3><strong>Customer recognition is the end-all, but we’re far from the end</strong></h3> <p>When we look at marketers’ priorities in the chart below, we find a focus on personalizing messaging and the larger customer experience. But there is an alarmingly wide and consistent discrepancy; organizations simply don't have the skills and capabilities they need for growth.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0830/Screen_Shot_2016-10-27_at_11.40.40.png" alt="" width="754" height="436"></p> <p>Roughly 75% of executives surveyed agree that recognition - the ability of a company to identity individual customers across media and under different circumstances - and its attendant benefits are essential for growth.</p> <p>Yet in every category, only small minorities can boast a strong capability.</p> <p>A successful personalization strategy helps meet corporate goals and customer expectations, but before that can happen, data management vendors and marketers must absorb a few realities.</p> <h3><strong>We don’t know what we can’t define</strong></h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65425-what-is-the-single-customer-view-and-why-do-you-need-it/">Single customer view, or SCV</a>, is an advanced capability. It means tying together a set of data sources that truly offer a complete picture of a customer, past and present.</p> <p>That sets a high bar, and yet over 40% of respondents suggested that their organizations took advantage of an SCV. That figure is somewhat higher than observed in previous studies, but of greater concern is that when compared to what companies have actually achieved, there’s a huge disparity.</p> <p>Of the more than 220 companies in the study, only 12% have tied together the data sources required for a true SCV.</p> <p>Even for those advanced organizations, some activities are still obscured for technical or procedural reasons. For example, among those that have integrated offline data sources, only half can tie offline sales back to online marketing programs.</p> <p>With consistent recognition, brands can build upon profiles to refine and improve their understanding of the individual, but that’s a future state for the vast majority of marketers.  </p> <p>These distinctions aren’t just important in understanding the state of the industry as it works to implement single customer view. It also highlights how a lack of knowledge and agreement can confuse the marketer’s path to maturity.</p> <p>If organizations believe they have a single customer view, but have only part of the puzzle, it confounds their progress in information gathering, data strategy and customer experience.</p> <h3><strong>Unfulfilled promises</strong></h3> <p>Few spaces in digital marketing have evolved more dramatically or rapidly than data management, so perhaps it’s not surprising that marketers aren’t all happy with their data management platforms.</p> <p>Nearly 60% say that the reality of their technologies does not align to the promises they were sold. This is a notable figure, considering the scale and ubiquity of investment in the new technology stack.</p> <p>Part of the problem is in the difficulty vendors have with applying test-and-control measurements across devices, limiting brands' understanding of their mobile audiences.</p> <p>Similarly in personalization, a disappointing 13% of marketers reported high satisfaction with data management vendors’ ability to tailor messaging to particular channels.</p> <p>Returning to marketers' top priorities, customized messaging is a critical aspect of integrating customer experiences across devices and media.</p> <h3><strong>How to improve</strong></h3> <p>A compilation of failures makes for dismal reading, so the Customer Recognition Report includes a list of recommendations:</p> <ul> <li>Learn how to conduct a true capability audit and align the company behind measurement as a strategic resource.</li> <li>Discover the threat to evolving measurement practices, and the importance of reducing data-friction with customers, as well as the guidelines for getting you there.</li> <li>Get attuned to the increasing discrepancy between customer behavior and media allocation.</li> </ul> <p><em>Subscribers can click <a title="Customer Recognition" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-recognition-how-marketing-is-failing-at-its-top-priority">here</a> to access the Customer Recognition Report.</em></p>