tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/ad-exchanges Latest Ad exchanges content from Econsultancy 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69413 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 10 fascinating digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Searches for iPads increase 1.2x YoY</h3> <p>First up, <a href="http://www.hitwise.com/blog/2017/08/hot-back-school-products-age-student/?lang=1&amp;bis_prd=1" target="_blank">Hitwise has revealed</a> what parents have been searching for as their kids head back to school. </p> <p>Parents of children aged 6-11 have been searching for iPads, with online searches for iPad increasing 1.2 times overall year on year. For kids aged 12-17, branded apparel has been in demand, with searches for Gucci belts, Net backpacks and Yeezys by Kanye West all being popular.</p> <p>Lastly, interest in fashion has been much lower for college-age youngsters, while searches for technology such as Nintendo Switch, Apple Watch and HBO Now have been high.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8867/Hitwise.JPG" alt="" width="702" height="380"></p> <h3>More than half of Brits use an ad blocker</h3> <p>In a survey of over 2,000 UK adults, Affilinet has found that more than half of all respondents use an ad blocker while browsing the internet.</p> <p>When it comes to the reasons why, 61.5% say it’s because they find online ads annoying, 41.5% say it’s because they find ads intrusive, while 33.1% say it’s because the ads they used to see were irrelevant.</p> <p>Men are also slightly more likely to use an ad blocker than women, with 48.7% of women stating that they never use them compared to 42.5% of men.</p> <h3>39% of teen YouTube users say it has too many ads </h3> <p>A survey by Forrester Research has found that four in 10 teen users aged 12-17 say there are <a href="https://www.emarketer.com/Article/YouTubes-Teen-Viewers-Complain-of-Too-Many-Ads/1016436" target="_blank">too many ads</a> on YouTube. </p> <p>This is despite the fact that YouTube is accessed by more US teens than any other social platform, with 77% using it on a daily basis compared to 55% who use Facebook.</p> <p>Just 11% of teens think that there are too many ads on Instagram and Snapchat, perhaps proving that native ads are less disruptive than pre or mid-roll ads.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8871/iStock-458931653.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="438"></p> <h3>Brits abandoning £3.4bn in online shopping baskets due to device switching</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="http://www.newsroom.barclays.com/r/3514/_10_5bn_more_in_five_years___that_s_what_uk_retailers" target="_blank">Barclays</a> has revealed that £3.4bn worth of goods are left in online shopping baskets in the UK each year. This is said to be due to device switching, with consumers browsing on their mobile phones before changing to laptops to make the purchase.</p> <p>The report suggests that basket abandonment is also due to a lack of discount incentives and the desire for a variety of delivery options. 38% of consumers say discount codes and 56% say free deliveries would incentivise them to buy.</p> <p>By making online shopping more convenient, Barclays says that retailers could generate £10.5bn more within just five years.</p> <h3>44% of consumers will make a holiday purchase via a voice controlled device</h3> <p>A report by <a href="https://www.walkersands.com/The-Future-of-Retail-2017-Holiday-Report">Walker Sands</a> has predicted that purchases by voice-controlled devices are set to rise this holiday season.</p> <p>Currently, 24% of frequent online shoppers say they ‘often’ or ‘always’ purchase through a voice-controlled device like Amazon Echo. However, 44% of total survey respondents also say that they are ‘somewhat’ or ‘very likely’ to make a product purchase through a voice-controlled device in the next year.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the report also highlights the demand for same-day delivery services, with 66% of frequent online shoppers saying they have used Amazon Prime in the past year, and 39% saying same-day delivery would make them shop online even more.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8868/Voice_controlled_shopping.JPG" alt="" width="666" height="274"></p> <h3>Popularity of mobile payments is rising</h3> <p>A new survey by <a href="https://www.aciworldwide.com/news-and-events/press-releases/2017/september/mobile-payments-rise-in-popularity-reaching-tipping-point-in-some-countries" target="_blank">ACI Worldwide</a> has found that European and American consumers are increasingly embracing mobile payments.</p> <p>While just 6% of US consumers regularly used their mobile devices to make payments in 2014, this has now tripled to 17%. Similarly, 25% of Spanish consumers now use mobile wallets, as do 24% of Italian and 23% of Swedish consumers. </p> <p>Consumer confidence in mobile wallet security is also on the rise, with 37% of UK respondents saying they trust their bank to protect their personal information when paying via their smartphone.</p> <h3>37% of internet users watch Netflix each month</h3> <p><a href="http://blog.globalwebindex.net/chart-of-the-day/netflix-vs-amazon-prime-video-a-global-view/" target="_blank">GlobalWebIndex</a> has been looking into the user-share of both Netflix and Amazon, following on from the latter extending its introductory Prime Video offer across all global markets.</p> <p>It has found that 20% of internet users now use Amazon Prime Video each month, whether on their own account or via someone else’s. However, 37% of people say the same about Netflix.</p> <p>In terms of marketshare, Netflix boasts impressive usage in both Mexico and Brazil, while Amazon Prime reigns supreme in India.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8869/Netflix_vs_Amazon_Prime.JPG" alt="" width="632" height="664"></p> <h3>More than 60% of digital publishers auto-play half of video ads</h3> <p>Despite auto-play ads often being viewed as intrusive or annoying by consumers, <a href="http://www.marketingdive.com/news/mediaradar-61-of-publishers-autoplay-at-least-half-of-video-ads/504417/" target="_blank">MediaRadar</a> has found that 31% of publishers auto-start 75% or more of their on-site video ads. Meanwhile, 60% of publishers auto-play at least half.</p> <p>Small, regional, and B2B publishers have the highest instances of auto-play video ads. Similarly, websites that rely on programmatic advertising are also more likely to employ this type of ad.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8870/MediaRadar.JPG" alt="" width="685" height="346"></p> <h3>Consumers annoyed by disruptive ads</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In other ad news, Inskin Media has been delving into the ad formats that users find the most annoying.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Unsurprisingly, 28% of respondents cited pop-up ads as the most irritating mobile format, closely followed by 26% saying the same for ads that sit in the middle of the screen. 18% said that they are vexed by ads that delay the page loading.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In contrast, ads that that move down the page alongside the content or sit at the top and bottom of the page were found to be much less annoying. In fact, the study also found that people are 134% more likely to remember ads that sit around content compared with the average mobile ad.</p> <h3>Brand activation revenues to reach $357bn this year</h3> <p>According to the <a href="http://www.ana.net/content/show/id/brand-activation-spend-2017" target="_blank">ANA</a> (Association of National Advertisers) and PQ Media, brand activation revenues will reach around $357bn in 2017.</p> <p>This is based on the fact that total marketing operator revenues from brand activation rose by 6.7% in 2016, with further growth now expected.</p> <p>Revenues in content marketing climbed 11.3% last year, while influencer marketing saw the second-highest growth rate, growing 8.7% to $49.1bn. Revenues from experiential marketing also jumped by 6.7% to $50.6bn.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69394 2017-09-01T12:18:43+01:00 2017-09-01T12:18:43+01:00 10 stupendous digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please enjoy.</p> <h3>McGregor generates the most social media engagements</h3> <p>He might have lost in the ring, but data from <a href="http://www.4cinsights.com/news/" target="_blank">4C Insights</a> has revealed that Conor McGregor was victorious in generating online media conversation.</p> <p>McGregor saw more than 3,294,078 Facebook and Twitter engagements on fight night, which includes tweets, retweets, replies and likes. In comparison, Mayweather generated 2,986,484 engagements, highlighting McGregor’s ability to generate mass hype and media discussion.</p> <p>The fight amassed 889,705 engagements on Facebook and Twitter in the week leading up to it, before a massive surge on the night itself saw engagements rise 605% to 6,280,562.</p> <h3>Small businesses falling behind on digital transformation</h3> <p><a href="https://www.g2crowd.com/blog/small-business/introducing-crowd-views-iii-small-business-technology/" target="_blank">G2 Crowd</a>’s third quarterly report has revealed that small business owners are failing to effectively market their businesses in a digital world. Research found that 24% of businesses are still largely investing in either newspaper ads and/or billboards, while only 19% of respondents are spending money on Google AdWords. </p> <p>That being said, the report suggests that technology is an area of focus for small businesses interested in scaling growth, with 47% planning to increase IT spending this year.</p> <h3>Number of hours spent checking email decreases 27%</h3> <p>According to Adobe’s third annual <a href="https://blogs.adobe.com/conversations/2017/08/consumers-are-still-email-obsessed-but-theyre-finding-more-balance.html" target="_blank">email survey</a>, people are checking their work and personal email less frequently than they were in 2016.</p> <p>The overall number of hours spent on email per day decreased 27% from last year. Specifically, there was a 28% decrease in consumers checking email messages from bed in the morning, with more than a quarter of consumers now waiting until they get to the office to check their inboxes. </p> <p>The report also suggests one in five consumers never check email outside of normal work hours, and nearly half don’t or rarely check while they’re on holiday. </p> <p>However, this is not the case for millennials. More than half of 18-24 year olds still check their email while in bed in the morning, and 43% of millennials aged 25-34 admit to doing the same.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8676/Adobe.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="311"></p> <h3>Google and Alexa make up 90% of voice commerce market share</h3> <p>The news that Amazon and Google are joining forces could mean big things for voice commerce, according to insight from Walker Sands.</p> <p>Currently, 24% of consumers own a voice controlled device, while 20% plan to purchase within the next year. Together Google and Alexa make up approximately 90% of the market share. </p> <h3>US social ads failing to drive conversions</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://civicscience.com/facebook-ads-affect-purchases-snapchat-twitter-instagram-combined/" target="_blank">CivicScience</a> has found that ads on social platforms like Facebook and Instagram are failing to convert users. </p> <p>In a survey of over 1,900 US consumers, just 1% of respondents aged 13 and older said they have previously made a purchase based on a Snapchat ad, and only 4% said they have bought anything after seeing an Instagram ad. Overall, 45% said that they have never purchased anything based on ads they saw from social media sites, and over a third said they don’t use social media.</p> <p>Facebook was found to be the most influential channel for purchasing behaviour, with 16% of consumers buying a product based on a Facebook ad.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8675/CivicScience.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="394"></p> <h3>Personalisation brings footwear brand 64% increase in ROI </h3> <p>Dune London has revealed that it’s seen a 64% increase in return on investment per customer after personalising its media to real people, in partnership with <a href="http://info.conversantmedia.eu/dune-london" target="_blank">Conversant</a>.</p> <p>Instead of targeting segments or cookies, Dune tailored messages to individual customer’s specific needs and interests. This involves showing complementary products post-purchase, and tailoring ads according to what kinds of products a customer tends to browse and buy the most.</p> <p>As well as a 64% increase in ROI per customer, personalisation also led to a 33% increase in messaged conversion rate.</p> <h3>Push notifications boost in-app spending by 16%</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/leanplums-analysis-reveals-push-notifications-increase-in-app-spend-16-and-drive-96x-more-users-to-buy-300510182.html?tc=eml_cleartime" target="_blank">Leanplum</a>, push notifications can lead to a significant increase in mobile conversions.</p> <p>The Insights to Mobile Revenue report states that push notifications can boost in-app spending by 16% – driving nearly 10 times more users to make a purchase compared to those who did not receive one.</p> <p>Research also found that promotional push notifications sent on a Saturday resulted in over twice as many purchases than notifications sent on Thursday. Meanwhile, push notifications sent during the late afternoon lead to 2.7 times more purchases than any other time of day.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8674/Leanplum.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="509"></p> <h3>One in nine marketers will spend more than £100,000 on influencers in the next year</h3> <p>New research from Takumi has revealed that one in nine marketers plan to spend in excess of £100,000 on influencer marketing in the next 12 months.</p> <p>39% of professionals say they will spend up to £10,000, while a further fifth predict their budget to fall somewhere between £10,000 and £100,000. In contrast, just 4% say they plan to forgo influencer campaigns entirely. </p> <p>This shows the extent to which influencer marketing has grown in popularity, with 26% of marketers now believing it is a more effective way to target consumers than traditional advertising. 43% agree that it is more effective, but only for millennial audiences.</p> <h3>‘In the moment’ searches are on the rise</h3> <p><a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/consumer-insights/consumer-immediate-need-mobile-experiences/?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=promo&amp;utm_team=twg-us&amp;utm_campaign=20170829-twg-micro-moments-email-B&amp;utm_content=cta&amp;mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWlROaE16STJaVE00TkdJdyIsInQiOiI3cVpldDV6cml6S1wvbHlhM0t1SjJzckdyUVZseGQ1NmtjeVwvUmtQXC9mYUVQTmExOEJOZFRNUWJmRkxVcUR0Z0JmcDZNaGMrbFVWNzlDQ2dxYjNia0hjc2FXeEZqd2IwUHFOdVo5N3p5Zk1QM0MxdjBXU1NxUktkNDZ1dVdQWlM0aSJ9" target="_blank">Google research</a> has found that consumers are more impatient than ever before, with increasing expectations for brands to immediately meet their needs. </p> <p>Searches related to ‘same-day shipping’ have grown more than 120% since 2015. Similarly, searches for ‘open now’ have tripled over the past two years, while searches for ‘store hours’ have dropped.</p> <p>Lastly, Google found that travel-related searches for ‘tonight’ and ‘today’ have grown more than 150% on mobile, reflecting consumer demand for spontaneous and in-the-moment bookings.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8673/Open_Now.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="454"></p> <h3>Consumers more likely to make frivolous purchases on touchscreens</h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969698917300024" target="_blank">new study</a> has revealed that consumers are more likely to make purchases when browsing on a touchscreen device, especially when it comes to things they don’t necessarily need.</p> <p>This is because touchscreens create more experiential thinking in users, while desktops evoke rational consideration. </p> <p>An experiment found that participants were more inclined to buy a restaurant gift card than a grocery gift card on a touchscreen, while desktop users favoured the opposite. In this sense, desktop elicits a similar response to shopping in-store, where a series of logical steps means we are less likely to be driven by emotions or impulse.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69276 2017-07-25T15:00:00+01:00 2017-07-25T15:00:00+01:00 Following YouTube's brand safety backlash, will ad relevance take center stage? Patricio Robles <p>But another crisis could be brewing for Google as advertisers wise up to the fact that their ads aren't always being displayed alongside relevant content. </p> <p>As detailed by AdAge's Jack Neff, one advertiser reviewed 1,000 YouTube videos its ads had been displayed with and came to the conclusion: "A lot of inventory was going to the wrong place."</p> <p>What does that mean in practice?</p> <p>Zefyr, a VideoID technology provider, performs audits for advertisers and Andrew Serby, the company's director of marketing, gave the example of alcohol marketers' ads "showing up in front of 'Minecraft' videos, Peppa Pig and all this problematic content where the only possible consumer is a kid."</p> <p>Serby further explained:</p> <blockquote> <p>We've looked at several campaigns where the target is a 25-year-old male or a 35-year-old woman, and no matter what, they're running against Peppa Pig videos, because the algorithm goes to where the eyeballs are, and younger people aren't skipping ads, and if there's a shared device and you're demo targeting, mom hands the kid an iPad and they see it.</p> </blockquote> <p>Oops. For all of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69115-what-marketers-need-to-know-about-google-attribution">Google's efforts to build tech that can track consumers across devices</a>, it's targeting capabilities are clearly falling short in this type of shared device scenario. </p> <p>John Snyder, CEO of Grapeshot, a "context marketing engine", suggests that this is because Google is ignoring the relevance problem. "They let these things happen because they're a media company, and they want to sell as many ads as possible. Basically, the tools are there. They're just not using them," he told AdAge.</p> <p>Grapeshot's tool, which is used by brands like Unilever, Johnson &amp; Johnson and Chase, as well as media agencies including Group M and Ogilvy, has access to Facebook inventory but not YouTube inventory.</p> <h3>So what can advertisers do?</h3> <p>They can gain access to theoretically more relevant inventory through the Google Preferred program, which "aggregates YouTube's top content...into easy-to-buy packages for brand advertisers." These packages offer access to 12 "lineups" that fit into categories like Beauty and Fashion and Entertainment and Pop Culture.</p> <p>But as AdAge's Neff notes, Google Preferred is already crowded and the costs of participation are hefty. </p> <p>"Preferred inventory is scarcer and pricier, subject either to category exclusives or more clutter from competitors, and leaves out lots of high-quality content," he explained, while also noting that Google Preferred, at one point, even included inventory from PewDiePie, the YouTube star whose offensive videos sparked the brand safety backlash.</p> <p>Ultimately, there are few easy answers. Nobody in the ecosystem is realistically going to pay human reviewers to sort through millions upon millions of videos, screening them for relevance. Brand safety is a big enough challenge.</p> <p>More likely, advertisers will have to come to grips with the fact that there will always be a conflict between reach and relevance, meaning being able to buy millions or billions of impressions in an automated or semi-automated fashion while ensuring relevance is little more than a pipe dream.</p> <p>Instead, advertisers will need to accept that greater relevance will come at a higher cost through programs like Google Preferred, as well as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68844-should-advertisers-be-more-picky-with-programmatic">private programmatic exchanges</a> (programmatic direct). </p> <p>They will also have to look at their investments in alternative ad formats, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69245-native-ads-gain-as-advertisers-seek-brand-safety-away-from-programmatic">such as native ads</a>, which not only promise greater levels of brand safety but could also be easier to control vis-à-vis relevance.</p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69208 2017-07-03T02:00:00+01:00 2017-07-03T02:00:00+01:00 Programmatic has become problematic: Here's what marketers can do about it Jeff Rajeck <p>Yet programmatic has remained a very popular ad-buying strategy. The market has been growing at an <a href="https://www.zenithmedia.com/%EF%BB%BF%EF%BB%BF%EF%BB%BFprogrammatic-ads-grow-31-2017-ahead-channels/">average rate of 71% per year</a> for the past five years and is projected to be a $64bn dollar industry in 2018.</p> <p>At a recent Econsultancy event in Singapore, Digital Outlook 2017 Part 2 hosted by NTUC, Hari Shankar, MD at Escelis (the performance marketing brand of Havas Group) told attendees about a few of the current issues programmatic is facing and what marketers can do about them.</p> <p>Two of these are summarised as follows.</p> <h3>The 'machine problem' </h3> <p>Hari started by introducing the programmatic landscape, which can seem overwhelming and confusing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7100/1a.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="500"></p> <p>But when programmatic is simplified down to how ads are served to web browsers, it is relatively straightforward. Publishers announce that they have an ad space to be filled and advertisers bid for the spot. The winning bid then serves the ad to the browser.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7101/2a.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="531"></p> <p>The 'machine problem' occurs due to how the bidding algorithms work. Instead of offering a free bidding market, programmatic buying auctions are held using a waterfall model. What this means is that while all advertisers can bid for the space, some bids take priority, even if they are not the highest bidder. </p> <p>In the case illustrated below, Partner #1 loses the bid because it is below the floor price set for the publisher, but Publisher #2, being above the floor price, wins the bid despite higher offers coming in from Partners #3 and #4.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7102/3a.png" alt="" width="321" height="371"></p> <p>Hari noted that this model creates an unfair advantage for large bidders, such as Google DoubleClick Bid Manager, as they are often at the top of the 'waterfall'. Publishers suffer too as they do not receive the highest bid for their ad space.</p> <p>Recently, however, a new technology called '<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68687-my-nightmare-trying-to-understand-header-bidding/">header bidding</a>' has emerged as a solution to the 'machine problem'. Instead of using the waterfall model, header bidding takes in bids from all ad partners at the same time and serves up the ad with the highest bid.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7103/4a.png" alt="" width="354" height="422"></p> <p>While some estimate that many large publishers, including MailOnline and CNN International, are implementing header bidding, not everyone is yet on board with the new technology.</p> <p>Regardless, marketers were advised to ensure that header bidding is on their programmatic roadmap and to lobby publishers to adopt the technology soon. Otherwise, brands will lose out on bids for quality ad space and will not be able to get their ads in front of the people they are targeting through their partner sites.</p> <h3>The 'people' problem</h3> <p>Another programmatic problem Hari brought up has more to do with people than algorithms.</p> <p>He noted that a lot of programmatic is still bought via agencies and trading desks which operate using an 'undisclosed' model. What this means is that many brands are buying ads programmatically through a third party which doesn't disclose the fees they are paying for their services.</p> <p>This might not be a problem if the fees were low enough to be negligible, but Hari drew attention to some recent data about the costs of programmatic ad buying.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7106/7.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="500"></p> <p>Using <a href="http://www.ana.net/getfile/25070">data from the Association of National Advertisers, et al</a>, Hari stated that for 3.9 billion display ads, the volume-weighted average cost was $3.30 per thousand impressions (CPM). <em>Disclosed</em> fees from agencies, however added on a further $1.49 per CPM, a 45% premium.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7104/5b.png" alt="" width="800" height="230"></p> <p>The researchers concede that many of these costs may be worthwhile as they encompass such services as sophisticated targeting and buying against KPIs, but Hari's point was that if disclosed fees saw a 45% premium then undisclosed fees are likely to be much higher.</p> <p>The 'people problem' then leads to brands cutting back on spending by buying low-quality ad inventory which then results in issues with viewability, click fraud, and the brand safety problems currently plaguing programmatic buying.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7105/6.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="500"></p> <h3>The solutions</h3> <p>Hari concluded by pointing out that if programmatic is going to succeed as a performance-based ad buying strategy, then brands need to take more control of the process.</p> <p>He makes three recommendations:</p> <h4>1) Set up a transparent model for programmatic buying</h4> <p>This could be one of three things: </p> <ul> <li>A fully-in house programmatic buying team, or</li> <li>Direct deals with DSP / RTB vendors, or</li> <li>Disclosed trading desk model with agency</li> </ul> <h4>2) Set up a strong tracking and optimization system</h4> <p>Hari advises that brands should use a single vendor for ad serving and web analytics and track display using multi-channel attribution. Additionally, marketers should integrate their customer data (CRM) with programmatic, ideally using a data management platform (DMP).</p> <h4>3) Test, learn, scale</h4> <p>Marketers should use tools like Optimize 360 for A/B testing and, using their transparent buying model, conduct more controlled buying such as programmatic direct, placement-led programmatic, and first-party tagged targeting. </p> <h3>A word of thanks</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank Hari Shankar, MD Asia Ecselis, Havas Media for his presentation as well as the delegates who took time out of their busy schedules to attend.</p> <p>We hope to see you all at future Singapore Econsultancy events!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7107/8.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="500"></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68844 2017-02-28T10:23:30+00:00 2017-02-28T10:23:30+00:00 Should advertisers be more picky with programmatic? Patricio Robles <p>For example, according to MasterCard CMO Raja Rajamannar, "we don't want to be anywhere and everywhere."</p> <p>He explained to AdWeek, "We stick to reputed sites. We don’t just go into programmatic and give a price point and buy everywhere. We have a whitelist so we said, ‘We want to [only] be on these sites,’ which really helps with mitigating if not eliminating ad fraud."</p> <p>As a result, Rajamannar says that ad fraud is a minor problem for the financial services giant.</p> <h3>The virtues of whitelists and blacklists</h3> <p>MasterCard's programmatic pickiness highlights the value of using whitelists and blacklists.</p> <p>While extensive use of these lists would appear to be at odds with the promise of programmatic – the ability to target audiences instead of properties – the reality is that it's increasingly difficult for advertisers to take a hands-off, anywhere and everywhere approach to ad buys.</p> <p>That kind of approach exposes advertisers to ad fraud, and leaves their ads vulnerable to placement on low-quality sites that have been created to exploit the complex digital advertising ecosystem.</p> <p>These low-quality sites include fake news operations, which have <a href="http://www.recode.net/2017/1/25/14375750/google-adsense-advertisers-publishers-fake-news">come under scrutiny</a> following claims that they may have impacted the results of the 2016 U.S. presidential election.</p> <p><em>The Times of London recently brought attention to brand safety in programmatic</em></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">The hazards of programmatic advertising... <a href="https://t.co/x9RXX8kLZv">pic.twitter.com/x9RXX8kLZv</a></p> — Emma Tucker (@emmatimes2) <a href="https://twitter.com/emmatimes2/status/829458659646251008">February 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Of course, putting whitelists and blacklists to use requires extra work on the part of advertisers, and isn't without its challenges. Advertisers using whitelists can find that their programmatic campaigns are less effective if the universe of properties they have whitelisted is too small, while those using blacklists can find that keeping up with bad actors is incredibly difficult.</p> <h3>Does the future belong to private exchanges?</h3> <p>Given the challenges, it shouldn't come as a surprise that private exchanges are on the rise.</p> <p><a href="http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/294004/agency-trading-desks-still-dominate-programmatic.html">According to</a> a recent survey conducted by the World Federation of Advertisers, more than two-thirds of respondents are investing more dollars into private exchanges.</p> <p>And soon, advertisers will have even more options for buying high-quality inventory in programmatic fashion as premium publishers, which <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68086-ads-on-premium-sites-drive-67-greater-brand-lift/">comScore says can deliver greater brand lift</a> than their non-premium counterparts, are <a href="https://adexchanger.com/publishers/digital-ad-ecosystem-messy-trustx-grabbing-broom/">banding together</a> to form programmatic cooperatives like TrustX.</p> <p>As the amount of inventory private exchanges and cooperatives like TrustX make available grows, it should become easier for advertisers to use programmatic to be anywhere and everywhere <em>worth</em> being without many of the headaches they currently face.</p> <p><em><strong>For Econsultancy subscribers:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/">The CMO's Guide to Programmatic</a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68742 2017-01-27T11:16:58+00:00 2017-01-27T11:16:58+00:00 Three common pitfalls in programmatic buying Lori Goldberg <p>Without an eye for the nuance, or a thorough understanding of a few key components of programmatic buying, advertisers run the risk of making pitfalls that create negative experiences while wasting ad dollars. </p> <p>Here's a summary of three common pitfalls.</p> <h3><strong>Not understanding the nuance behind the data</strong></h3> <p>One thing that is incumbent on media planners and buyers is to choose the right data for each campaign. We’ve all had moments where we realize we’re being served an ad for something that is completely irrelevant — in fact, just last week I was getting ads for puppy food, even though I don't own a dog. </p> <p>In order to avoid this kind of misstep, it’s critical to understand where data providers are sourcing their inventory. At the most basic level, advertisers need to know if their data provider is a reseller or if they are working with first-party proprietary data and if that data is verified. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3442/dog_food.jpg" alt="" width="724" height="483"></p> <p>While most data providers believe that their data set is superior, it’s important to dig deeper to consider the nuances of the data set. Knowing what kind of data will make a great source for their campaigns can help marketers have a more sophisticated view of how their data can impact campaign performance. </p> <p>For example, when working with registration data, having an understanding of the consumers’ motivations for being on that list can shed insights into whether or not that data set is the right set for the campaign.</p> <p>If the end user has particular motivation to answer questions inaccurately (e.g. data from a dating website), campaign impressions might not yield the targeted user experience advertisers were hoping for. </p> <p>Yet when we align data sources with the targets of the campaign, we can create powerful fuel for relevant ad experiences. For example, one of Silverlight Digital’s travel clients, a tourism department for a Caribbean island, has been able to source data from travel networks that partner with two of the most popular airlines that fly to the island.</p> <p>Understanding not only what kind of data, but also the end consumers’ motivation for being part of this data set, tells us that they are likely to shop with these airlines and are likely to want to travel. Ultimately this is the ideal experience for both the marketer (targeting accurate impressions) and the consumer (great user experience).</p> <h3><strong>Not understanding where consumers are in the buying cycle</strong></h3> <p>Another area where we see advertisers missing opportunities in programmatic is not properly understanding how frequently consumers need to be targeted within the context of the product.</p> <p>A great example of this is a recent trip I took to Santa Monica. At the time of this writing, only eight weeks have passed and now I’m being retargeted by hotels and travel deal sites that are offering packages on a return trip to Santa Monica. While I had a great time, I’m not likely to go back across the country eight weeks after I just visited.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3440/Santa_Monica.png" alt="" width="650" height="368"></p> <p>If these advertisers understood the buying cycles of their consumers, they might hold off and re-target again in 6-12 months when I’m more likely to be considering a new trip.</p> <p>Continuing with this example of my recent trip, I noticed one of the advertisers that was re-targeting me was the hotel that I stayed in during my trip, offering a discount if I “complete my purchase” and book with their hotel.</p> <p>If they were to cross-reference their data with recent customers, they would know that I’ve already stayed at the hotel and would be able to serve me an ad that feels more customized (i.e. come back to Santa Monica!). Advertisers should take the time to cross-reference their data so that they save ad dollars and don’t waste impressions. </p> <h3><strong>Not capping the frequency </strong></h3> <p>Understanding the optimum number of impressions can not only boost campaign performance, but also prevent waste. According <a href="http://digiday.com/agencies/ad-techs-frequency-cap-problem/">to DigiDay</a>, “bad frequency management is costing digital marketers billions of dollars a year.”</p> <p>Research published in DigiDay showed that "64% of impressions were out of frequency, and no advertiser had fewer than 60% of its impressions delivered beyond their cap." What this means is that marketers are annoying consumers, and wasting lots of ad dollars while doing it. </p> <p>Often caps are neglected and never tested because they’re not straightforward, but not knowing what optimal frequency cap to use can give poor results. Running A/B tests to understand ideal frequency isn’t necessarily easy, but it is an imperative part of the process. </p> <p>Properly evaluating data sources, tailoring the campaign to the product lifecycle, and targeting consumer buying behavior is the key to creating successful and powerful programmatic campaigns. </p> <p><em>For more on programmatic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/"><em>Programmatic Training Course</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/"><em>The CMO's Guide to Programmatic</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/"><em>A super accessible beginner’s guide to programmatic buying and RTB</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68665 2017-01-04T01:00:00+00:00 2017-01-04T01:00:00+00:00 Three keys to digital advertising success in 2017 Jeff Rajeck <p>Some the changes which have been covered extensively include: </p> <ul> <li> <strong>Platforms</strong> - some which have risen (hello Snapchat) and others, fallen (Meerkat, RIP).</li> <li> <strong>Header bidding</strong> - which has become a significant challenger to traditional ad exchanges.</li> <li> <strong>Advertising on messaging apps</strong> - which is tipped to bring big changes to the ad market.</li> </ul> <p> At Digital Cream Singapore, we spoke with dozens of client-side marketers about these changes and how they affect their agenda for the coming year. </p> <p>Surprisingly, though, <strong>most brand marketers were less concerned about the latest technology or platforms and </strong><strong>more worried about how they will use digital advertising to deliver value to the business. </strong></p> <p>To make that happen, participants on the day identified three things which they consider as priorities if they are to bring success in the coming year.</p> <h3>1) A single view of the customer</h3> <p>Attendees felt that most organisations have plenty of customer data. Nearly everyone has a CRM with customer attributes, most use web analytics to capture on-site user behaviour, and now a significant number have implemented a data management platform to understand what their customers do on other sites.</p> <p>The problem for marketers, though, is that customer data is spread across several systems. As a result, it is difficult to join up the data and obtain a single view of the customer which links their attributes, interests, and behaviour.</p> <p>Participants felt that fragmented customer data is particularly problematic for digital advertising. As digital ad platforms need data for segmenting, targeting, and positioning, marketers without a single view of the customer are not able to exploit opportunities and deliver the best value to the business.</p> <p><strong><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2647/3.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></strong></p> <p>One technology which helps marketers obtain a single customer view is a <strong>'customer data platform' (CDP)</strong>.</p> <p>A CDP is a system which:</p> <ul> <li>Combines data from multiple sources.</li> <li>Lets marketers build customer profiles.</li> <li>Delivers messaging across multiple platforms.</li> <li>Uses decision-making algorithms to optimize performance.</li> </ul> <p>While CDPs sound promising, they are relatively new and so marketers will need to conduct more research before they are widely-deployed.</p> <p>More information about CDPs is available <a href="http://customerexperiencematrix.blogspot.sg/2015/01/customer-data-platforms-revisited.htm">here</a> and a list of vendors is available via the <a href="http://www.cdpinstitute.org/">CDP Institute</a>.</p> <h3>2) A cross-market ad buying strategy</h3> <p>Another issue client-side marketers hope to solve in 2017 is how to buy ads programmatically across different markets.</p> <p><strong>The problem marketers face is that different countries usually have different ad platforms</strong>. Marketing managers struggle with becoming familiar with each of them in order to train the regional teams.</p> <p><strong>Some participants avoid this issue by relying solely on the 'ad duopoly', Google and Facebook</strong>, to cover multiple markets. Others, however, find this approach limiting and feel compelled to use additional programmatic platforms to reach more consumers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2648/5.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <p>Another issue raised was that <strong>Asia-Pacific does not have many third-party measurement services</strong> which help them avoid bot fraud, fraudulent inventory, and unviewable ads. This was particularly a problem for advertisers who operate in China.</p> <p>Delegates offered few ideas into what managers can do about this besides upgrading ad-buying technology and ensuring that regional marketers keep a closer eye on local ad networks.</p> <p>According to a 2016 <a href="https://www.exchangewire.com/bidswitch-report/">BidSwitch survey of buy-side technology firms in Asia-Pacific</a>, the problem isn't going away soon - and indeed may get worse. Nearly half (45%) of respondents indicated that <strong>there will be more programmatic technology companies in APAC over the next three years.</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2646/graph.png" alt="" width="800" height="517"></p> <h3>3) An attribution model</h3> <p>Finally, the most frequently-discussed item on the digital advertiser 'wish list' for 2017 was marketing attribution.</p> <p>Having an agreed method for attributing marketing success to different channels has eluded most marketing teams, participants noted. The issues they face include: </p> <ul> <li>Obtaining the view and click data from all of the channels.</li> <li>Calculating the value of each touchpoint.</li> <li>Using the model to dictate media spend.</li> <li>Understanding of the customer journey.</li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2649/4.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <p>One delegate said that<strong> their marketing team overcame some of these issues by implementing a 'fluid' attribution model</strong>. Their approach was to have all stakeholders meet regularly, review ad performance data and, based on hard data, adjust the attribution model appropriately.</p> <p>While not perfect,<strong> introducing flexibility into the model reduced the stakes for all parties as nothing was 'fixed in concrete'</strong>. This, in turn reduced the politics around adopting a model and led to quicker acceptance.</p> <p>Still, many attendees felt that they did not yet know enough to develop an attribution model and so 2017 was going to be another year of learning.</p> <h3>A word of thanks </h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank all of the marketers who participated on the day and the moderator for the Online Advertising table, <strong>Stephanie Myers, Senior Vice President of Digital Marketing at HSBC.</strong></p> <p>We hope to see you all at future Singapore Econsultancy events!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2650/end.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68637 2016-12-14T10:11:44+00:00 2016-12-14T10:11:44+00:00 The Guardian claims impressive results from new native ad platform Nikki Gilliland <p>On the back of this, the fact that the Guardian has launched a new platform for advertiser created content might not come as much of a surprise.</p> <p>But is it a welcome move? Here a bit more on the story.</p> <h3>What is ‘Hosted by the Guardian?’</h3> <p>‘Hosted by the Guardian’ is a new platform that has been specifically designed to host advertiser content on Guardian.com, mainly in the form of videos, articles and galleries.</p> <p>It has been described as a ‘premium environment’, drawing on traffic from the Guardian’s homepage where the content will first be promoted.</p> <p>So far, Renault is one of the biggest brands to test out the platform, running three videos to sell its new range of electric ‘ZOE’ vehicles.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2399/Renault_desktop.png" alt="" width="780" height="490"></p> <h3>A transparent approach</h3> <p>Native advertising continues to be a big challenge for both brands and publishers.</p> <p>On one hand, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67019-12-alarming-ad-blocking-stats-that-reveal-the-size-of-the-problem/" target="_blank">the rise of ad blocking</a> suggests that readers are fed up of intrusive ads, meaning that surely native ads - where the content mimics the editorial environment on which it is displayed – would be preferable.</p> <p>However, increasing confusion and frustration over poorly labelled sponsored content means that reader distrust is one of the biggest risks for publishers.</p> <p>The below chart from Contently’s <a href="https://contently.com/strategist/2016/12/08/native-advertising-study/" target="_blank">latest report</a> reflects confusion over the classification of ads, with the majority of readers unsure about what a native advert actually is.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2400/Contently_chart.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="412"></p> <p>Interestingly, the Guardian’s new platform aims to combat this issue, mainly by prominently labelling the various types of sponsored content it produces.</p> <p>The example from Renault is clearly labelled as ‘advertiser content’, meaning that is has been paid for and produced by the advertiser rather than the publisher. </p> <p>It also includes a link to a more in-depth disclaimer about what this means.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2404/Guardian_disclaimer.JPG" alt="" width="640" height="560"></p> <p>The videos distinctly feel like adverts, too.</p> <p>Showing a group of Central St Martins students taking part in a competition to design the 'car of the future' - the brand involvement is obvious.</p> <p>While there’s no real mention of the ‘ZOE’ cars, Renault has a heavy presence throughout, even down to praise from the judges about the company's innovative nature and its support of students.</p> <p>Despite this, the storytelling aspect means it is engaging to watch, with the genuine hard work and talent of the students shining through.</p> <h3>Will readers embrace it?</h3> <p>Results from Renault’s campaign indicate that the platform has so far proven successful.</p> <p>Apparently, Renault’s ‘Hosted by’ videos delivered a 60% view-through rate from over 25,000 unique visitors, with a further 4% clicking through to the brand website.</p> <p>What’s more, the overall campaign was said to double awareness of the Renault ZOE, with a third of those who recalled the campaign claiming that they would consider buying an electric car in the future.</p> <p>It’s surprising to hear such a positive result, however, this could be down to the platform being hosted on its own hub.</p> <p>It’s unclear whether or not the ad was labelled as ‘advertiser content’ on the homepage, as there is currently no sign of Renault’s campaign anywhere else on the site. But I’m assuming that this was the case, which means that readers would have known this before actively clicking through to watch it.</p> <p>Perhaps we can also put down this campaign's success to the fact that readers view both the Guardian and Renault as two trusted brands. </p> <p>Contently found that 41% of readers would feel increased trust towards a publisher if it featured a native ad from a most trusted brand.</p> <p>So, while there are obvious risks involved, native advertising does have the potential to increase positive sentiment for the publisher - as long as it is executed correctly.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2401/Impact_on_reputation.JPG" alt="" width="705" height="436"></p> <h3>In conclusion… </h3> <p>With native advertising remaining an important source of revenue for publishers, the Guardian's new platform is a sign that many are taking notice of the <a href="https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/native-advertising-guide-businesses" target="_blank">FTC's stricter regulations</a>.</p> <p>Of course, it helps that Renault's content is well produced, using the real-life context of a student competition to increase engagement.</p> <p>Likewise, with prominent labelling of 'advertiser content' as well as heavy use of the Renault logo, it's pretty unlikely that anyone would view it without knowing that it is an ad.</p> <p>Created with transparency in mind <em>and</em> the aim of providing value for readers, it is a decent example for others to follow.</p> <p><em><strong>Further reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67083-is-native-advertising-sustainable" target="_blank">Is native advertising sustainable?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67044-is-native-advertising-the-answer-to-ad-blocking/" target="_blank">Is native advertising the answer to ad blocking?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66281-five-changes-programmatic-native-advertising-will-bring/" target="_blank">Five changes programmatic native advertising will bring</a></em></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68578 2016-12-01T12:12:39+00:00 2016-12-01T12:12:39+00:00 The Weather Company on programmatic, ad fraud, and how extreme conditions affect business Olivia Solon <h4> <em>Econsultancy:</em> What proportion of The Weather Company’s ad sales are done programmatically?</h4> <p><em>Jeremy Hlavacek:</em><strong> </strong>There are two sales channels at The Weather Company. We have our direct sales organization and then I run the side of the business where we put our inventory up for sale through online platforms and exchanges.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1975/Jeremy_Hlavacek.png" alt="" width="246" height="194"></p> <p>It’s about half and half at the moment and the trend is towards more programmatic. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How do you make sure that your programmatic sales don’t cannibalize direct sales?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> We’ve spent a great deal of time looking at yield and pricing across the two channels. From our point of view it doesn’t matter if an advertiser wants to buy through a human being and a handshake or a technology platform as long as the inventory is priced appropriately.</p> <p>The second part is that both me and the gentleman who runs direct sales report to the Chief Revenue Officer, who can see the performance of both channels and make strategic decisions.</p> <p>He may want one client to buy through automated platforms and another to buy through direct sales channels, maybe because of the client relationship or the type of buy they want to execute, but both divisions are on equal footing. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Some media companies think of using programmatic for unsold inventory. What do you make of that?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> That’s an outdated way of looking at the business. At this point we see lots of premium advertisers who want to use automation technology to execute their buys.</p> <p>As long as the price works with the yield model we have no problem with that.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1976/weather_channel_map.png" alt="" width="800" height="413"></p> <p>We are finding that inventory can be worth even more when we sell it through automated platforms. When a buyer uses a DSP [demand side platform] they can get very precise with the impressions they want to buy so they get good return on investment. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> What data points can you use to target consumers more accurately?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> As a weather company we are unique in that we have many first-party data sets, primarily weather and location data.</p> <p>If a beverage advertiser wants to advertise they can use typical programmatic tools to identify the audience of, say, young men between 25 and 35 on the weekend when they are more likely to drink beer.</p> <p>We can then tell them when it is hot and sunny in New York City that’s a good time to run Budweiser ads for drinking a beer on the beach or whatever.</p> <p>Or if it’s cold and stormy in Chicago but it’s football season, it might be a good time to run a beer ad with a different message like “stay inside and watch the game with your friends and enjoy a Budweiser.” </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Earlier this year the east coast of the United States had to deal with Hurricane Matthew, how does such a major weather event affect your job?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> To really understand how publisher yield management works for digital properties a hurricane is a great unusual use case.</p> <p>In media traditionally lots of planning goes into forecasting inventory, understanding how many impressions you’ll have and selling those out in advance. That works well for our direct sales business.</p> <p>However, when a hurricane, snow storm, heatwave, tornado or other major weather event hits, it’s not unusual for us to see anywhere from a 200% to a 400% increase in traffic.</p> <p>It’s almost impossible to forecast that with enough precision to sell directly, so it’s really beneficial to have programmatic as we can immediately put that inventory up for sale in an exchange and monetize it. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> What is the biggest challenge facing the programmatic industry?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> One problem that has arisen in this space is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67659-three-things-that-show-the-scale-of-the-ad-fraud-challenge/">ad fraud</a>. Companies running the exchanges have perhaps been a little bit liberal in terms of who they let into that exchange.</p> <p>This means advertisers are spending good money on properties that are either very long tail, have non-human traffic or might not have highly viewable ads. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How does this affect your own business?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> The good news is that advertisers are getting a lot more serious about that issue to the benefit of companies like Weather, which can offer premium inventory at scale without any of the worries of fraud, viewability and non-human traffic.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1977/weather_channel_map_2.png" alt="" width="800" height="399"></p> <p>We can give advertisers what they want: efficiency through automation and targeting through data. We want people to buy real legitimate impressions.  </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How can the problem of ad fraud be solved?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> It’s gone on in media for a long time if we’re honest – from the early days of TV and print. That’s why third-party verification companies like Nielsen were invented, to track exactly what was served.</p> <p>This is just a case of the programmatic industry growing up and recognizing it needs to be held to the same standard as other media.</p> <p>When it was a new and disruptive emerging industry maybe it didn’t matter as much, but now $20bn+ is being spent in programmatic ad technology it’s not okay to say, “We’re going to let this slide.” The stakes are too high.  </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> What are some of the innovations in programmatic?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> It really grew out of web display inventory and the targeting technology has been pushed to the limit, but there is a huge opportunity in mobile.</p> <p>On the web side we have cookie targeting, but that doesn’t exist for mobile in-app inventory.</p> <p>We know there are huge audiences there, but advertisers haven’t figured out how to use data to target yet, so they are dumping most of their dollars into Facebook or Google.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How do you solve the mobile targeting problem?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> To me the key is data. Look at web. People used to buy impressions blindly and would use the site as a proxy.</p> <p>So to reach young men they would probably buy ESPN, but then you would also reach women who may not be in your target so would be wasting your dollars.</p> <p>Weather.com, the New York Times and other brands also have large audiences of young men. So we need to move away from contextual targeting where companies’ brands represent the audience towards truly defined audience targeting. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> What’s the future of programmatic?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> In 2017 we’re looking at ways to apply our data across all media. Display is great but social advertising, outdoor advertising and TV advertising are very powerful.</p> <p>There’s no reason why our data shouldn’t be effective across all channels, but it’s early days. The operational systems behind all these media channels are very different from what we do to put an ad on a website.</p> <p>That’s an area where the industry needs to get smarter. Once you master the ad serving technology, you can then think about targeting programmatically. </p> <p><em>For more information on this topic, check out these resources:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/"><em>A super accessible beginner’s guide to programmatic buying and RTB</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/"><em>The CMO's Guide to Programmatic</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/"><em>Programmatic Training Course</em></a></li> </ul> tag:www.econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68405 2016-11-15T13:56:48+00:00 2016-11-15T13:56:48+00:00 The programmatic hiring challenge: How to find and retain talent? Ben Davis <p>Here are some thoughts on the issue.</p> <h3>Writing new and tricky job descriptions</h3> <p>Whether a publisher developing their own sell-side team or an advertiser hiring a buying team skilled in targeting audiences, this stuff is (fairly) new.</p> <p>Many of these organisations are at a standing start and need to find employees that understand sophisticated platforms and their integration.</p> <p>Working with specialist recruiters may be vital in the first instance.</p> <h3>Finding people with soft skills and technical nous</h3> <p>For programmatic sales jobs, you ideally need a mix of two personalities.</p> <p>The most suitable candidates are media-sales people who are smart enough to understand programmatic disruption and are motivated by continually evolving technology.</p> <p>Likewise, when hiring more tech-minded people to work in operations, you should also look for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64780-have-changes-in-modern-marketing-led-to-a-soft-skills-revolution/">softer skills</a>, awareness of customer needs and of the bottom line.</p> <p>With programmatic advertising often challenging existing advertiser behaviours, new hires need to have this combination of soft skills and technical nous in order to educate customers.</p> <p>On the buy-side, too, whether agency or in-house, candidates must understand about getting the most bang for buck, but will also be tasked with defining and documenting best practice, collaborating with other teams and educating internally.</p> <p>What does this look like in the real world?</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Great communication:</strong> The ability to convey fairly abstract concepts and tell the story of programmatic both to stakeholders and the wider industry.</li> <li> <strong>Strategic thinking:</strong> Long term understanding of customer objectives within the programmatic world but also as a part of wider marketing and advertising.</li> <li> <strong>Media planning experience:</strong> Knowledge of ad formats, viewability, inventory, data management platforms etc.</li> <li> <strong>Measurement and optimisation experience:</strong> Tracking, troubleshooting and reporting.</li> </ul> <h3>Investing time and money in staff</h3> <p>Even when you find the right person for your team, the intricacies of different platforms means it takes time before they bed in.</p> <p>The danger for companies is that they get into a cycle of recruiting, training and then losing people from programmatic roles.</p> <p>Staff retention is important for any company trying to innovate with media. Recent emphasis on the role company culture plays in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">digital transformation</a> has meant many organisations have invested in this area.</p> <p>From the use of personal devices, to remote working, more money for training and office perks, as well as finding <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/effective-leadership-in-the-digital-age/">the right digital leaders</a> that can both inspire and listen to the workforce.</p> <p>Short-termism is the enemy here.</p> <h3>Doing a good PR job for programmatic</h3> <p>One of the problems remains an issue of PR.</p> <p>Media has no problem in attracting intelligent young people away from other industries or studies, but to what extent is programmatic advertising a draw?</p> <p>Agencies and the advertising industry as a whole perhaps need to paint a better picture of this new technology, one that hasn't yet fulfilled its potential but may shape the future of advertising and creative.</p> <p><em>For more information on this topic, see:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/"><em>A super accessible beginner’s guide to programmatic buying and RTB</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/"><em>The CMO's Guide to Programmatic</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/"><em>Programmatic Training Course</em></a></li> </ul>