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Blog

Web 2.0 startups in the UK – questions to consider

There’s a pretty great post on Particletree  about the kind of questions VCs ask when you’re doing a startup, so I thought I’d highlight them here as there seems to be a profound lack of 'noisy' UK-based Web 2.0 startups, and maybe finding finance is one barrier for entrepreneurs?

Where are all the UK web startups? Maybe everybody is just being very quiet (to fail in complete obscurity), or perhaps things are as dead as they seem to be (more than likely). The UK seems almost entirely barren compared with what's happening in the US.

It’s probably worth noting that local VCs seem to be a little behind their US conterparts (two local startups that I can think of off the top of my head have been approached by US investors – names of the innocent withheld). This too could be part of the problem.

2 comments

You know when you've been viralled

Ben Metcalfe reports British TV channels are now showing a Welsh spoof of the increasingly-infamous Sony Bravia commercial.

For the sunny slopes of San Francisco and an avalanche of bouncing balls, swap with the hills of Swansea and a cascading torrent of fruit, complete with that beautifully sleep-inducing Jose Gonzalez backing track.

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Web 2.0 and customer relationships

Web 2.0 isn’t all about rounded corners and social software – there are real benefits to leveraging the Web 2.0 philosophy and technologies in business, but the key is selecting the right entry points to start conversations with your customers, and then to grow from there, using the community you’ve developed as your sounding board.

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Bill Gates to quit full-time Microsoft role in 2008

Bill Gates is stepping down from his full-time role as Microsoft’s Chief Software Architect in July 2008, when he will hand over the baton to right-hand man and current CTO Ray Ozzie. Gates will thereafter concentrate on his eponymous charitable foundation. Woah…

Gates said he believes “the road for Microsoft is as bright as ever” and emailed staff to thank them for their efforts, making reference to the fact that they have helped create the success and wealth that has ultimately funded the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which will allow him to pursue a new philanthropic role. The foundation has built up a war chest of around $29bn.

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Netscape is reborn, now resembles Digg

Netscape is back, only this time it looks a lot like Digg.com, the social news aggregator that allows readers to submit and vote on news stories. The more votes, the more likely a story appears at the top of the list.

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Are all AJAX homepages doomed?

Dozens of personalised homepages (aka "AJAX homepages") have emerged over the past 18 months as developers started to programme lovely drag and drop interfaces, allowing users to customise the layout of their personal homepage. Cool technology, great use of AJAX, but is there trouble ahead?

12 comments

PR bloggers stand up and be counted

My eyebrow raised this week when I read PR Week editor Danny Rogers' assertion in MediaGuardian: "There's a real lack of good PR blogs in the UK at the moment."

"Shurely shome mishtake," I thought, as the UK has a growing crop of decent online journals dedicated to analysing the increasing impact of new communications methods on corporate communications, marketing and media.

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RSS strategy - full-text vs partial-text, round 2

In an article about RSS earlier this week I explained that there is no single rule of thumb when it comes to your RSS strategy.

A number of experts have suggested that the only sensible way to embrace RSS as an organisation is to launch full-text feeds, allowing RSS subscribers to read the whole story (or other message) within their RSS feed reader.

Yes, full-text is the first rule of RSS. But rules are there to be broken. Full-text simply doesn’t work for everybody, for a number of reasons.

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Getting creative with SEO tactics

Increasingly it is common knowledge on how to do best practice search engine optimisation. That doesn't make it easy, but it does mean you'll need to start thinking more creatively to keep a competitive edge.

So outside your standard SEO best practice, what more creative tactics might you use?

4 comments

Online PR - Capitalisation Is Fine, But CAPS LOCK ISN’T

Online PR is something all companies should be doing, but too many PR professionals aren’t bothering to use the web in the right way. The rules have changed, people. And they’ve changed for some very good reasons…

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Guardian to publish news to web before the printed version

According to an article in today's MediaGuardian by Kim Fletcher, as of tomorrow (Tue 12 June), the Guardian will publish stories first to the web, "ending the primacy of the printed newspaper".  

 The newspaper industry seems to be agonising over such decisions and this is no doubt a 'ground-breaking' innovation for them. But isn't this as obvious as was the need for a format of newspaper you could actually read on the train (Berliner format blah blah)...?

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Google's Smart Pricing - how's it working for you?

In the past people have commented that their ROI from clicks from Google's Adsense content network didn't match performance from Google search-referred clicks.

Smart Pricing, a click-discounting system for AdSense, was meant to help address this - so how's it working out?

1 comment