Posts in Content

Should fashion retailers adopt augmented reality?

Augmented reality is perhaps one of the coolest technologies to emerge in the past several years. It's not difficult to understand why -- just look at these cool augmented reality videos.

But can augmented reality really create business value for fashion retailers?

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Want quality content? Produce it in-house

For me, it simply comes down to the fact that agencies overcharge and under deliver. 

Maybe I’m too fussy, but I’ve proved from experience that having someone in-house producing editorial content produces better quality results.

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Thanks to simplicity, the New Yorker thrives on the iPad

As publishers and new media companies try to tap into the potential offered by the iPad, many have decided that offering richer, multimedia-laden experiences is the way to go.

Take Push Pop Press, for instance. Its vision for tablet publications: turn them into interactive applications. Its centerpiece, Al Gore's Our Choice interactive e-book, was heralded as "one of the most...impressive apps you've ever seen."

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Know your audience: lessons learnt from the newsjack

Content-driven everything is pretty much the marketing mantra. More than that, it's the rationale for anything we do online (depending on how we define content), and it's a pretty banal observation.

If something isn't content-driven, then what is it? Fluff-driven? Waste-of-time-driven? Tricky-dicky-driven? I'd go as far as to say 'content-driven online marketing' is some sort of mega-tautology.

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As social grows, community manager roles proliferate

Social media is all about people, and as social role's prominence as a business tool continues to grow, and according to software provider EPiServer, there will soon be substantial growth in the number of people -- 'community managers' -- who are hired to manage social media.

In a survey of 250 senior marketing executives in the UK, EPiServer found that nearly three-quarters of companies are involved with online communities or planned to be within the next 12 months.

As would be expected, much of the activity in this area is taking place on popular third party-owned sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

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NoSQL for the rest of us

NoSQL is fast becoming one of the trendiest tech buzzwords, and that means one thing: geek fights!

The relational database may not be dead, but there are legitimate debates about NoSQL alternatives to popular RDBMSes like MySQL, MS SQL Server and Oracle.

For most companies, however, such debates may seem too technical and abstract to be of any importance. But that doesn't mean that the NoSQL 'movement' should be ignored.

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Q&A: Tomas Bella of Piano Media on the paywall that's working

While many publishers in the West struggle to build profitable paywalls, I recently reported that a paywall in the East may provide a blueprint for success.

That paywall was erected in Slovakia by a company called Piano Media. It brought together nine of Slovakia's largest news publishers, and the early results are impressive given the size and characteristics of the Slovakian market.

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To prevent cord cutting, cable networks embrace the web

Are cable customers ditching their cords, or shaving them? While the debate over what cable customers are doing and planning to do with their cords continues, one thing is clear: cable players are concerned.

So in an effort to prevent cord cutting, they're increasing looking to find ways to embrace the channel cord cutting is blamed on the internet.

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Belgian newspapers: Google is boycotting us. Oh wait...

In 2006, a Belgian newspaper group, Copiepresse, sued Google. It claimed that the search engine was violating its copyrights in showing headlines and excerpts from its newspapers in Google News.

Google lost in court, but it may have won a small moral victory when it left those same newspapers crying 'Bloody Mary!' this week. The reason? They noticed that their websites were no longer appearing in Google search results.

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How to beat Panda: split into multiple sites?

Google's Panda update was designed to eliminate spam and content farm content, thus improving the quality of Google's index and SERPs.

Many sites caught in Panda's grip claim that they were unintended victims of the update, and have sought ways to recover.

Many have been unsuccessful in reestablishing themselves with Google, but according to the Wall Street Journal, one publisher may have found the secret to recovery.

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Did Netflix just make a huge multichannel mistake?

With a market cap of over $15bn and a share price of $290, Netflix is one of the internet's highest flying stars. But changes the company is making to its pricing could have it crashing back down to earth.

Yesterday, the company announced that it is offering two separate plans going forward: one for unlimited DVDs by mail, which costs $7.99/month, and one for streaming, which also costs $7.99/month. Currently, Netflix customers can receive both unlimited DVDs and streaming for only $9.99/month.

Not surprisingly, a 60% price increase has sparked an online fury, with angry Netflix customers threatening to drop their Netflix subscriptions.

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The move towards social 2.0: mirroring our offline and online social behaviour

The launch of Google+ has caused quite a stir in the ‘digital community’ with many viewing it as a potential game changer while others see only a desperate, and ultimately futile, attempt to try and combat the seemingly unstoppable Facebook juggernaut.

Whether Google+ succeeds or fails, only time will tell. But, for me, some of the subtler – and indeed less subtle – features in this new network points towards a change in our approach to social networking and online social behaviour in general.

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