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Posts in Content

A journalist’s guide to SEO

Last week the BBC announced it was to start optimising its headlines in an attempt to gain greater visibility in the search engine results pages, so I thought I’d take a look at journalism and the web.


It's time to get rid of the word 'microblogging'

The word 'microblogging' has been popularized by services like Twitter. It's not too difficult to see where the word came from.

But when I read a post the other day on TechCrunch by Erick Schonfeld entitled "Blogging Vs. Microblogging: Twitter’s Global Growth Flattens, While WordPress’ Picks Up", the first question that popped into my mind: is 'microblogging' really blogging at all?


Say goodbye to Cyber Monday as shopping habits merge

Black Friday used to be a day of excessive shopping and deals for retailers taking advantage of consumers with Thanksgiving vacation time. But as the online and offline worlds merge, the distinction between Black Friday and Cyber Monday is quickly disappearing.

Retailers are stepping up their online offers for the weekend, but those who wait until Cyber Monday to lure customers are going to miss out on large returns.


Tynt tracks and links copy and pastes

Think you're tracking just about every possible user metric on your website? But what about, say, copy and pastes?

If you have an insatiable appetite for tracking everything, a nifty little product from a company called Tynt is probably going to excite you. It tracks how many times users copy and paste your content and increases the chances that those copy and pastes will turn into backlinks.


Google buys Teracent to improve display ads

Google's bread and butter is search advertising but it isn't neglecting display advertising. It made that clear when it purchased DoubleClick for $3.1bn in 2008.

And it continues to make bets in the display advertising space. Yesterday, Google announced that it was acquiring dynamic ad serving and optimization startup Teracent.

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Can Microsoft's money save the newspaper industry?

Maybe Rupert Murdoch isn't so crazy after all. Little more than two weeks after he essentially stated "Google? We don't need no stinkin' Google", reports have surfaced that Microsoft is talking with News Corp. and other newspaper publishers.

The proposition Microsoft is reportedly floating: "delist" from Google and give Bing exclusivity when it comes to indexing your content. In exchange, Microsoft would pay the publishers the cold hard cash they're so desperately seeking as print revenues continue their rapid erosion.


Lady Gaga cashes in on Spotify. Not

Swedish startup Spotify has taken Europe by storm. The ad-supported music streaming service, which also offers an ad-free and mobile-enabled paid offering, has more than 6m registered users across Europe, with more than 2.5m in the UK. Expansion into the US is planned for 2010.

Spotify's popularity has attracted investment from major record labels and recent reports suggest that Spotify may be Sweden's biggest contribution to the music business since Abba.


3am site goes from swearing off SEO to keyword stuffing in 3 months

The Daily Mirror's 3am.co.uk gossip site has gone from disavowing SEO and promising to concentrate on building a loyal audience - to stuffing its HTML titles with as many keywords as it can think of. And then adding some more. Before finally making sure Britney is in there.


Time tackles technology with Techland

It's a blogger's world and print publications just live in it. Thanks to the power of internet self-publishing, mini media empires have been built by small companies and passionate individuals working from their homes.  Increasingly, these online mini media empires have complicated the picture for print publications whose online presences have been forced to compete on less favorable terms for a more fragmented online audience.

In an effort to stay relevant, print publications are trying to sup up their internet efforts. The latest example of that: Time's new tech/geek blog, Techland.


Five reasons your content is damaging your brand

Although many businesses now recognise the importance of regularly updated content to their search engine optimisation (SEO) efforts, not enough of them understand the importance of quality content.

This is apparent from many of the badly-penned blogs, rubbishy ‘news’ stories and plagiarised or simply stolen articles that the web is gradually filling up with.
Many companies fill their sites with scraped posts, barely literate articles and keyword-stuffed nonsense in the hope of attracting Google’s attention, so I wanted to take a look at just what this sort of behaviour is doing to your brand; how it’s affecting the customer experience.


The market for paid news: does size really matter?

How much is the news worth? It's a question that's weighing on the minds of many news media execs these days as they grapple with the challenge of figuring out new business models.

Paid content looks to be a big part of those new business models, but there's one question that still dogs execs: just how big is the market for paid news?

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Why newspapers need brand managers

It's a subject that turns the stomachs of most journalists. After all in journalism, "marketing" and "branding" are dirty words. But given the media fall out as a backdrop for the global recession, it's time that newspapers, and the journalists who write for them, realise that the masthead of their paper is a brand.

Knowing what people think and feel when they see your newspaper's brand is more important than ever.