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Posts in Content

Seven ways to avoid marketing meltdown

meltdownWhatever the size of your business, there are several pitfalls we all face when putting together a marketing strategy and sticking to it.

These include daily tasks, too much research to do, the temptation to head to the pub. All of these things regularly pop up and threaten to knock us off course. Here's seven simple steps that will help keep your marketing on track...

4 comments

Yahoo's outsourcing: why the weak will get weaker

Yahoo's identity crisis is nothing new. And under the reign of the company's current CEO, Carol Bartz, Yahoo's identity crisis has arguably turned into an identity tragedy.

Nothing reflects that better than Yahoo's newfound 'product development' strategy: outsource everything to third parties, some of which were previously competitors. Recently, Yahoo outsourced Yahoo Personals to online personals competitor Match.com, and yesterday it was announced that Yahoo is outsourcing a good chunk of Yahoo Real Estate to real estate competitor Zillow.

5 comments

Should the AP pay Woot $17.50 for a quote?

The founder of Woot, Matt Rutledge, may be a wealthier man following Amazon.com's acquisition of his company, but that isn't stopping him from sending a clear message to the Associated Press: you owe me $17.50. Why does the AP owe Rutledge? According to Rutledge, AP violated his copyright when they included a quote from Rutledge's email to Woot employees in their story about the acquisition.

The quote: "For Woot, our vision remains the same: somehow earning a living on snarky commentary and junk."

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Back to the future: how email is helping build profitable internet startups

In the age of Facebook, Twitter and blogs, one might think that social media is a far more important to startup success than, say, email. But a new generation of startups, many of which are lean and achieve profitability early on, are proving that email can be a powerful contributor to success.

In a blog post entitled "Email Newsletters Are Still A Serious Business", startup entrepreneur Jason L. Baptiste details how email is an important ingredient for an impressive group of upstarts, including Groupon, the group buying site that investors have valued at more than $1bn, Help a Reporter Out (HARO), which was recently purchased for a rumored eight-figure sum and Thrillist, which is reportedly on pace to do more than $10m in revenue this year.

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6 questions to ask when choosing CMS for your e-commerce platform

A CMS is just about content so it doesn’t need much attention, right? Wrong. In an e-commerce environment CMS means so much more than being able to edit and publish content.

E-commerce pages have dynamic content served by code and this content can change depending on the visitor session; given such variation, how can you weave static content into dynamic pages without screwing the display?

As the sophistication of consumers and online technology has risen, so have the demands on e-commerce managers to understand which tools are the best-fit for the business. Having worked on many CMS implementations and seen the pitfalls, I thought I’d share some advice on what questions you need to be asking.

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Guardian to bloggers: please post our content on your blog

Content from major newspapers and news wires is often popular fodder for blogs large and small. Many, if not most, major news organizations have not, however, been enthused by the (fair) use of their content by bloggers.

But The Guardian has another message for bloggers: take our content and post it on your blog, please.

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Blockbuster on the verge of defeat in battle against Netflix, technology

Once-dominant video rental chain Blockbuster is trying its hardest to prove that it can compete in the 21st century. It is closing down stores, and has been bulking up its on-demand offering.

But it looks like it may be too little, too late. Last Thursday, the New York Stock Exchange announced that the company would be delisted from the exchange after the company failed to win shareholder approval for a measure that would boost the company's stock price above $1, the exchange's minimum. More often than not, a company's delisting is signal of impending demise.

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Great news: websites are completely free to run

A massive WTF moment interrupted my reading of The Observer's review of the paywall going up around the Times and Sunday Times.

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Tesco failing to deliver relevant emails

It has the most extensive loyalty scheme and probably the biggest database in the UK. The company is not short of cash either, as it accounts for something like one in every seven pounds spent in the UK.

So Tesco must have the clout to talk to their customers relevantly as individuals through email...surely?

33 comments

Is Flash a fit for mobiles? We'll soon find out

In April, Apple CEO Steve Jobs explained in detail why consumers aren't going to see Flash support on the iPhone and iPad. Long story short: Adobe Flash "is no longer necessary." Although Apple's lack of support for Flash is often cited as an iPhone/iPad drawback, Flash certainly isn't going to win a whole lot of popularity contests either. But the question remains: is there a place for Flash in the mobile market?

We may soon have an answer.

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BP's internet response: the good, the bad, the ugly

The Gulf of Mexico oil spill that has oil giant BP scrambling to save its brand -- and possibly its entire business -- has been juicy fodder for those involved in PR and marketing. Of particular interest: how the company is responding to the onslaught online.

From crisis communications experts to social media gurus, just about everyone has suggestions for BP. But what about BP's internet strategy overall? I decided it was worth a high-level look at the company's efforts to stem the tide of online criticism.

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Flickr partners with Getty Images for user-licensed photos

Snap the perfect photo that you're uploading to Flickr? Find the perfect photo on Flickr for an article you're writing? Thanks to an expanded relationship between Flickr and Getty Images, licensing that perfect Flickr photo is now a lot easier.

Based on the apparent success of the Flickr Collection on Getty Images, the companies have launched a new 'Request to License' program that could significantly expand the pool of Flickr photos that are available for licensing.

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