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Posts tagged with Web Design

12 mesmerising parallax scrolling templates for WordPress

If you think that awe-inspiring parallax scrolling websites are the sole preserve of the coding genius, think again.

Highly interactive and narratively driven web pages are a fantastic way to engage visitors on your website and hold their attention. The pages themselves are static and rely on the user to scroll with a mouse, finger swipe or an arrow key to generate movement, this achieves a unique storytelling experience.

For some inspiring examples, check out Chris Lake’s 14 scrolling websites that tell a story and parallax scrolling websites are also one of our crucial web design trends of 2015.

Creating this type of page has become a lot easier thanks to HTML5, CSS3 and JQuery, and there are loads of templates now available for your own WordPress site. 

The examples below are recommended based on the demo versions and the quality of the customer reviews. I haven’t installed or used them myself, I’m merely highlighting them as an example of what you can achieve with your own WordPress site.

5 comments
flat design vs realism

16 beautiful examples of flat design in ecommerce

Realism used to dominate digital design. Not any more. The world is flat.

At number one in Chris Lake’s 18 pivotal web design trends for 2014 is flat UI. For anyone new to the concept, here’s a brief introduction before we begin the cavalcade of smooth examples.

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mapmyrun home image

Strava VS MapMyRun: seven lessons in explainer homepage design

Strava and MapMyRun are both GPS-based web and mobile tracking services for runners and cyclists.

At a glance, they have similar homepages, designed to explain the concept and coax visitors to sign up. 

The respective pages are similarly sized, with large imagery, simple text, top and bottom menus and the aim of quickly informing the user of the service proposition.

And yet, Strava is more effective. How does it do it?

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15 delicious examples of card-based web design

The rise of the smartphone has ushered in a new way of thinking among web designers and developers, who need to create websites that work on smaller screens.

The constraints of smaller screens have actually helped the web to become that little bit more modular, with responsive design now one of the foremost web design trends: pages can be broken up into their constituent parts, and reordered on the fly, depending on browser or screen sizes. Content spread over three or four columns can be repositioned into just one. 

This has refocused attention on 'cards', as a design pattern for displaying information in bite-sized chunks. Cards are ideal for the TL;DR generation, perfect for mobile devices and responsive design, and I think we'll be seeing a lot more of them in the months and years ahead. The format may not be new, but it's on the rise.

What is a card, exactly? Well, they come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, but commonly cards will include information such as a title, a user name, a picture, and various icons. Sometimes there might be a brief amount of text, for example a product description. In a sense, they are miniature, condensed web pages.  

Cards were one of my 18 web design trends for 2014, and I wanted to highlight some beautiful examples of card-based user interfaces. Tuck in!

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tfl logo

Transport for London launches sumptuous new website

What’s that plinky plonky banjo sound? Yep it’s a new website explainer video!

TfL’s new website, which we looked at in beta back in July 2013, is now live and it’ll surely have been seen already by many of the London readers amongst you.

The TfL site has been used by two million visitors whilst in beta. That’s no mean achievement and indicative of just what a challenge the TFL website undergoes on a daily basis.

In April 2013, the TFL website had 20m visitors every month. That’s every Londoner visiting more than twice. 

The new site includes some really good features that vastly improve TfL’s ability to present information to the traveller. 

Let’s have a look at the new site.

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karlism

20 beautiful examples of web design from high fashion brands

The lovely header image I've used for this blog post is a 'Karlism'. I considered using a picture of Will Ferrell's Mugatu, but stopped short.

The world of high fashion is a strange one online. Some websites are beautiful but don't work well, some vice versa, and some hit both nails on the head.

Here, I've rounded up some little features, mostly about imagery and web design but also touching on UX. I've experimented a bit by showcasing them using Vine. Some of the imagery isn't captured particularly crisply, but you can click through from each heading, or from a static image if there is one, to explore the page in question.

I could have used screencasting to capture these elements, but Vine was quite a bit quicker and maybe it even makes me look agile?

See what you think. Visit the sites and check these things out for yourself and let me know what you think works and what doesn't.

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21 examples of user experience innovation in ecommerce

I’ve been keeping a close eye on innovation in the ecommerce sector for more than a decade now, and it seems to me that we're living in exciting times. We have hit some kind of purple patch. 

Why is this? Well, ecommerce has massively matured. It's big business. Digital teams are smarter, and more agile. Sexy new tech such as HTML5, CSS3 and jQuery allows for sublime user experiences. 

As such I wanted to raise a toast to innovation by highlighting a bunch of - hopefully inspiring - examples to you.

But first, a massive caveat: I would severely and mercilessly beat a few of these sites with a big best practice stick. There are product pages with missing information. There are search boxes with tiny fonts. There are usability issues galore.

Secondly, for ecommerce sites, it is all about the data. If you’re not constantly testing, measuring and refining, then you aren’t doing it right. What works for one brand might not work so well for another. 

All of that aside, the ecommerce teams that take chances and push the boundaries of are to be applauded. Guidelines are precisely that: guidelines. Rules are there to be broken. And innovation is always to be encouraged, even when it doesn’t work out.

So let's take a look at some ecommerce websites (and one mobile app) that are trying new things, and that are noteworthy for their approach to the user experience. Click on the screenshots to check them out for yourself, and do let me know what you think.

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UX Hazard

You know you’re working in UX when …

I’m sure you’ve heard the expression 'Never work with children or animals' right? Well, after you’ve read this lot, I reckon you’ll want to add participants, facilitators and even clients to this list. 

You see, since my last blog I’ve spent a few weeks “playing journalist” sourcing weird, wonderful and downright bizarre stories from the UX (User Experience) Community. 

The idea came to me while I was telling a friend how I had to sit throughout a whole study earlier this year in Norway, trying not to crack up every time a participant had to fill in his name on a form. Thing is, he was doing it with such a straight face that for a long time I thought it really was his name.  Which it obviously couldn’t have been. 

So it got me thinking that there must be other amusing or even downright weird experiences that my fellow UX practitioners might like to share with me... and share they did! OK, some took a little cajoling but I got there in the end. 

They’re all anonymous and I hope you at least find them interesting, even if they might not tickle you as much as they tickled me.

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20 stunning examples of minimal mobile UI design

Some of the best web and mobile app designs have a very limited colour range. Two or three colours can be more than enough, and I find that a restrained approach to colour works especially well on de-cluttered interfaces. 

The use of colour in design is a bit like great music, where balance, contrast, restraint and dissonance all come into play. I picked out monochrome and hypercolour as two of my 18 web design trends for 2014, but perhaps trichromatic design is where it's really at?  

For trichromatic design it is often the case that there is a 'main' colour, an 'active' colour, and a 'highlight' colour. A limited palette goes further when you reverse out the colours in certain areas (menus, or buttons, for example).

I wanted to highlight some examples of mobile interfaces that primarily focus on two or three colours, along with plenty of white (or otherwise neutral) space, and a lack of unnecessary clutter. In other words: minimal design. Less is more.

So let's take a look at a few examples. I don't claim to have used all of these apps and sites, and one or two are concepts, so the focus here is on the look and feel, rather than the user experience. Click on the images to see more in-depth or full size screenshots.

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the hobbit

14 blockbusting examples of movie website design

As the cinema experience continues to improve with technological advancements in Imax, 3D and fully immersive sound, so too does the aesthetic experience of the web with its glorious HTML5, parallax scrolling and super-slick CSS3 coding.

It's as if they're competing directly for our attention!

Thankfully the home experience will never match the cinema experience no matter how cutting edge your home cinema set-up may be. 

Just think of the sheer visceral horror of watching Sandra Bullock spinning out of control in the depths of space and how muted it will seem while watching it in bed on your tablet.

These films still need to be marketed through these less than cinematic desktops and portable devices in order to drag us out of our homes and into the theatres.

Luckily the fast pace of change in web design trends has meant that the large scale experience of cinema can be substituted online in brilliant alternative and innovative ways.

Here is a list of movie websites that either feature captivating visuals, grand technological achievements, innovative UX or highly interactive fun, whilst also perfectly capturing the essence of the movie online.

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burger menu from responsive website

10 responsive digital agency websites

Responsive design posts are always popular on the Econsultancy blog. That's because people enjoy looking at beautiful things.

We've previously rounded up some of the best sites of 2013. We've also looked at the ins and outs of RWD and at some examples of responsive email.

I thought I'd add to our roundups and look at a brief selection of agencies with responsive sites.

Do have a play around with them by resizing your browser or accessing on mobile. There's a few screenshots for each and you can click through from the desktop images.

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iWonder across devices

New BBC interactive guides: responsive, dynamic and accessible web design

iWonder is the evocative name for the BBC’s new interactive guides. The name conjures childlike enquiry (I wonder!), ‘90s crisps (Golden Wonder) and fits nicely with the Beeb’s and Apple’s use of the stunted ‘iProductname’ format.

The guides are the BBC’s new content format, described as 'sit forward', allowing the user to learn by doing.

They organise video and audio, infographics, text and activities into stories.

I’ve been having a play with the guides and given some brief thoughts below. Do go and check them out, they’re a powerful tool for schoolchildren or older autodidacts.

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