{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Twitter

Tweet. tweettweet. ReTweeting by the numbers

retweetSocial and viral media expert Dan Zarella has posted the results of a fascinating study: the numbers and semantics behind getting Twitter followers to ReTweet tweets, thereby amplifying and expanding upon messaging by using Twitter's built-in viral aspects.

Few marketers will be surprised by the fact that a simple call-to-action matters. A lot. Simply adding the phrase "please retweet" just plain works much of the time.

Zarella's semantic analysis of what gets ReTweeted reveals the following:

  • Timely content is often ReTweeted
  • Freebies are popular
  • Tweeting about Twitter is effective
  • So are lists
  • People like to ReTweet blog posts (he doesn't specify if this refers the original tweeter's own blog, but irregardless - Twitter users are also highly active in the blogosphere.)

Oh, and don't forget to mind your manners. Requesting a Retweent politely and remembering to say "please" ups the ReTweeting odds by nearly a 6X factor.

0 comments

Why should brands own their social media profiles?

Is this Captain BRAND, saviour of the universe? Via flickr by Gaetan LeeBrand managers are paid handsome salaries largely to optimise and protect their brands. This means raising the key brand metrics (reach, awareness, favourability, etc) and avoiding brand damage.

In today's multichannel environment I argue that brands need to be monitored, represented and protected online. I wrote an article last week that generated some interesting discussion around whether or not companies should be climbing onboard the Twitter train. Some argue that there's no point ('it isn't big enough' / 'how would you use it?') and others think that it is ripe for engagement. 

My own argument can be boiled down to this: even if you don't actively use these sites today, you might as well make sure that you're in a position to use them tomorrow.

This means owning the brand names...

8 comments

How Twitter can make money from commercial accounts

In recent posts, I've discussed Twitter and the ways companies are attempting to use it to drive business.

As much as I think Twitter is one of the more interesting social media platforms out there, I'm admittedly skeptical about its ability to charge fees, especially when it comes to commercial accounts.

3 comments

Why do top global brands like Coca Cola ignore Twitter for engagement?

Coke can, by poolie on FlickrRecently we’ve been looking more and more at the online performance of brands, which is increasingly key to success in a multichannel world.

Historically, many FMCG brands have not considered their products as being relevant for the internet, and certainly not in terms of e-commerce. It is understandable. Nobody really visits Google to find a place to buy a Coke. 

Nevertheless, the brand owners spend countless millions, and in some cases billions, on multichannel advertising campaigns. Partly because they have to, and partly because they can.

But here’s the truth of the matter: many ad campaigns aren’t delivering what they should be because budgets aren't being invested into digital channels to encourage (and capture) engagement.

All too often the internet (and mobile) is a last-minute thought, when it should be built into a campaign at the outset. More than that, it should now be hardwired into marketing strategies by default.

9 comments

How fast should you be blogging?

slow bloggingRecently, an underground rethinking of blogging practice began to hit the headlines; that of Slow Blogging. In a nutshell, this is where blog-posts are generated over a length of time with the aim to display a deep knowledge of the subject matter, rather than churning out quick content at a regular pace.

Displaying a thorough understanding of their services, products and industry can be highly beneficial to the promotional and marketing activities of many businesses, but at what speed should we really be blogging?

6 comments

Is Twitter going paid for commercial accounts?

We've been talking a lot about Twitter lately. Everybody has. The popular microblogging service continues to grow rapidly in popularity and seems to be making the transition from a first-adopter favorite to a bona fide mainstream property.

But as it does so, the one topic that can't be avoided: Twitter's lack of a business model. Despite the fact that it has raised a lot of money from venture capitalists, at some point the legions of loyal Twitter users will want to see their favorite service fly under its own power. That means that a scalable and sustainable business model must be developed.

6 comments

Innovation in search: how Twitter is changing the way people search and engage

Companies, organisations and social media aficionados alike are discovering that Twitter is a great way to reach wide audiences though a long term investment in short sharp communication.

9 comments

List of UK charities on Twitter

After publishing an interview with Dog's Trust about its use of Twitter for raising awareness and fundraising, I've had quite a few contacts from charities and representatives who also use Twitter.

Following the example of PRBlogger's very useful list of UK journalists on Twitter, I've compiled one for charity organisations and others who are using the service to promote some worthy causes.

There are more charities using Twitter than I first thought, but there are a few big names I haven't found Twitter accounts for, NSPCC, Childline, RSPCA are just three that spring to mind.

109 comments

'Listening' to Twitter is no longer merely optional

twitter searchSocial marketing, Web 2.0 - whatever you call it, proponents and gurus of the forms on online marketing that involve consumer-generated media and user participation constantly stress the conversational aspects of marketing in Web 2.0 channels. Some have gone so far as to dub this "conversational marketing."

All those drop-what-you're-doing news bulletins that begin, "The blogosphere is buzzing about..." are so 2005. The latest channel to attract attention is the first one that's literally a conversation: Twitter.

Slews of marketers are jumping into Twitter with both feet to participate: to show off domain knowledge, create promotions on-the-fly, to publicize upcoming events and sales - the possibilities are endless.

But what very few marketers, advertisers and brands are listening to Twitter - they're reiterating the same mistakes they made at the very beginning of Web 2.0.

0 comments

Should more charities be making use of Twitter?

Dog's TrustA Twitter account is free to set up, and keeping it updated doesn't need to take too much time and effort, so some charities are now making to use the site for fundraising and increasing awareness of their causes.

In the UK, I have found Twitter accounts for Oxfam, War Child, Greenpeace, though there may be others. One charity making excellent use of Twitter for promoting its cause is Dog's Trust.

I've been asking Alex Goldstein, the charity's social media and community editor, about Dog's Trust's use of Twitter and her tips for other charities....

7 comments

You have less than 200 minutes to become a Zappos.com Twitter VIP

Move over Dell. You're not the only company looking to turn social media into a medium for loyalty marketing.

If you wear shoes (who doesn't?) and want to be part of an exclusive club of VIP shoe buyers, you have less than 200 minutes to become a Zappos.com VIP. Zappos.com, of course, is the online shoe retailer whose CEO, Tony Hsieh, has made extensive use of social media, namely through Twitter, where he has over 50,000 followers.

3 comments

Is Twitter a viable loyalty marketing platform? Dell thinks it could be

Dell is one of the most prominent brands leveraging the popular microblogging service to interact with customers and potential customers and has a whole portfolio of Twitter accounts that are managed by real Dell employees who have names and personalities.

According to Dell, its use of Twitter has led to more than $1m in revenue. While that's a miniscule amount for a company that does billions in revenue every year, Dell has embraced social media like few other companies and deserves a lot of credit for making a real effort.

0 comments