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Posts tagged with Second Screen

brand table

10 revealing digital marketing stats we've seen this week

Lots of mobile ecommerce stats this week, with a smattering of brand storytelling and advertising.

There's an infographic thrown in too, looking at the mobile path to purchase. Enjoy!

For more digital marketing stats, download the Econsultancy Internet Statistics Compendium.

simpsons technical difficulties

Zeebox rebrands as Beamly, launches new second screen app: review

Zeebox launched two years ago as a fairly simple program guide with many second screen integrated features.

Ben Davis covered the app in his article Zeebox: insanely powerful advertising but will it catch on? At the time of writing in October 2013, it was found that 53% of adults interact with another form of media while watching television and of that number, 25% were chatting online about the shows they were watching.

With 6m downloads of the app, Zeebox were well on the way to capitalise on this second-screen trend.

As of this week, Zeebox has been rebranded as Beamly and a new app has been launched. The theory behind the rebrand is to expand upon the initial conceit of an app that added enjoyment to the programme you were watching at that particular moment, by expanding the experience throughout the day, away from the television. 

homer on a tv

My fundamental doubts about the second screen

Forgive the first person pronoun in the headline, but television is the most emotive of subjects.

Not for nothing does the Simpsons use the TV set as a cultural trope. Perhaps the emergence of broadband and the creative decline of the Simpsons is more than correlative?

Anyway, I don’t dispute the second screen phenomenon, not one bit. I use my phone whilst watching TV all the time.

What I am disputing, outside of a few important examples, is the extent of consumer demand for contextual second screen experiences. Within this disputation comes the assertion that a lot of second screen use is indeed not contextual (aside from social media use) and cannot therefore be ‘monetised’ as such.

Of course, fans of the second screen may point out that the reason second screen usage isn’t yet contextual is because second screen services and apps are nowhere near maturation yet. There may be improved uses and better content to come.

I’d argue that the same problems that beset social advertising (a place for branding but not sales) will ultimately beset the second screen, driven as it is by the demand for socialising whilst watching the box.

See if you agree with my devil’s advocate’s views.

1950 camera

The future of TV: five innovations to look out for

The box, the tube, the telly, the television. Are any of us sure the set is set to evolve?

The television is one of those unifying pleasures and most people are already happy with the experience of watching it.

Additionally, advertisers still think of television as the big hitting ad medium, rightly or wrongly. 

So, if it’s not broken, why fix it? Or is that the kind of reasoning that stymies innovation?

I think it’s fairly obvious that although we can choose to think of television as a constant, it has changed significantly since it went digital. FreeView in the UK, TiVo, Sky+, on-demand services like iPlayer and Netflix, Apple TV and Chromecast, the impact of Twitter and social TV, Roku, there have been many developments.

But what’s next? Here I’ve tried to sum up some of the innovations for advertisers and viewers I’ve seen in the last few months. See what you think..

H&M logo

H&M's big gamble with t-commerce at the Super Bowl

H&M is set to launch its entry into the nascent world of ‘television commerce’ during this Sunday’s Super Bowl.

The interactive, 30 second-long ad starring David Beckham will be screened during the second quarter of Super Bowl XLVIII and will allow viewers the chance to purchase the featured products via a Samsung Smart TV. It’s the first of its kind.

It’s an intriguing gambit and one that all marketers, advertisers and anyone with a keen interest in David Beckham running around in his underwear will be paying particular attention to.

If anything it’s certainly raising H&M’s profile ahead of the big game, where the biggest brands in the world fight for the attention of 108m viewers (2013 viewing figures) and can pay up to $4m for the privilege. In fact sneak previews of Super Bowl ads began to appear a couple weeks ago, such is the feverish building-up of anticipation.

H&M's experiment with t-commerce raises a few questions: Is H&M really the first to do this? What are the restrictions of t-commerce? Will t-commerce have a future?

Let's see if we can answer those questions here.

the matrix: what if i told you you can engage a tv audience

Twitter and TV: ignore the stats and focus on best practice

In this post, bear with me and you’ll get a couple of case studies and some best practice from brands using TV and promoted tweet tie-ups.

Before I give you the fun stuff, I want to say that best practice is all that matters. Ignore all the stats about engagement and sales uplift.

I don’t usually advocate ignoring stats, but as B2B marketing and service industries now pervade major cities of the developed world, we are awash with stats. And stats that claim to explain general concepts, such as generic increase in purchase intent after viewing a promoted tweet that references TV, are not helpful to you.

Yes, these stats succinctly explain the perceived benefits of advertising on Twitter, but like all data, it’s only that which directly pertains to your company that is of use.

There’s no point examining averaged trends when what you’re interested in is your business. Being blinded by amazing engagement stats will mean you don’t think properly about your campaigns. The last thing you want to do is drip out a poorly conceived set of promoted tweets and have faith they will deliver ROI.

The success of your marketing and advertising is dependent entirely upon detail; detail that’s way more granular than simply what channels you decide to advertise in.

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How can brands take greater advantage of second-screen usage?

A recent BBC World News survey of more than 3,600 digital device owners found that 43% of tablet users say they consume more TV than they did five years ago, with most respondents saying they use tablets alongside TV.

A recent Deloitte survey found that 24% are using a second screen while watching TV. This crossover with leisure time presents a unique opportunity to convert those in a ‘lean-back’ position. 

So how can marketers respond to this trend? 

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The coming age of Twittervision

For over 65 years, the $70bn TV industry has been traded on one currency...now all that is about to change.

Twitter's Vice President Joel Lunenfeld recently appeared on a Bloomberg TV segment to discuss the findings of a study linking tweets to live TV, and more importantly for his shareholders, to announce a new partnership and ranking method devised with Nielsen.

The two behemoths want to make watching TV with Twitter (see:second screen experience) 'even better for you, the TV fan,' according to Twitter's blog post on the announcement.

What does this coming new age of measurement mean for marketers and what can you do now to prepare? Read on to find out.


The smartphone and the customer journey: a Google perspective

Google has a unique viewpoint from which to look at mobile’s part to play in the customer journey.

SERPs, AdWords, Google Maps, Google Chrome, Google accounts – all have a part to play. And perhaps soon Google Wallet and Google Glass.

I attended Latitude’s client summit last week and listened to Harry Davies, Lead Product Marketing Manager, Large Customer Marketing, at Google (helping customers get the most from search).

I’ve tried to sum up some of what Harry had to say, giving an overview of mobile’s involvement in retail in 2013.


The potential of addressable TV advertising


Are your rivals going to let viewers respond immediately to TV ads on their iPads, while your ads just hope to be remembered?  

Second-screening, where consumers use mobile devices while watching TV, presents great opportunities for brands, retailers and financial services, and is on the increase.


Monetise this: the connected experience

Connected second screen experiences have enjoyed, or arguably suffered, a prolonged period of experimentation. No single slam dunk business model has disrupted the landscape, but there are several approaches that have succeeded in generating additional revenues and enhancing the 30-second TV spot. 

Since they are not ubiquitous, you may not be aware of these successes. Here I examine the barriers and opportunities for the connected experience in detail.

This blog elaborates on the latter, with some examples of great connected experiences that have been successfully monetised.


Second screen and why you should pay attention in 2013

Watching TV whilst browsing the internet has been around for as long as I have been using the internet.

It used to be because we needed something to do whilst waiting for slow dial-up connections to download content, but nowadays multi-tasking via a 'second screen' or 'dual screen' is part of our everyday routine.