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Posts tagged with Retail

big supermarket

Do big retailers need to create social value to succeed?

The high street debate is one that attracts much comment on the Econsultancy blog.

Feelings run high when it comes to ensuring the survival of stores in our towns. The situation has yet to crystallise, though it’s clear there are business models that aren’t best suited to bricks and mortar any more. 

Alongside the trend towards experiential retail (shops doing more than simply selling stuff that consumers can buy cheaper online), a trend towards creating social value in the community may be emerging. 

High street vacancy rates are steady in the UK at 14% in 2013 and independent stores such as cafes are on the increase. Part of the reason for this is social and local. 

Most of us still value our retail centres as places to take a ‘humanity bath’, meeting people outside of the office, the church/mosque/synagogue and your neighbourhood. 

But what else can big retailers do to engender a closer community? Does every store have to get involved? What about digital technology, can it play a part at a community level?

The RSA (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) has released a report detailing the business case for socially aware retail. The report includes the results of six months of research with three ASDA stores. 

Whilst most of the findings are relevant mainly for larger focal points, chiefly supermarkets, here’s what I gleaned...


A list of 10 retail mobile apps that customers love

I’ve been thinking a lot about mobile apps in retail recently. I’ve been thinking about which retailers need an app and whether in fact we’re seeing a bit of a backlash against the app, fuelled by mobile optimised and responsive websites.

Retail apps still have their place in a mobile optimised world, but they’re increasingly characterised as devices for customer retention. Loyalty programmes and coupons keep regular customers feeling loved.

Of course, there are still some successful shopping apps, too, often for retailers big or pervasive enough to demand smartphone real estate (supermarkets, Amazon and the like).

So, here you go, here are 10 apps that I think have made a difference for customers in retail.

Agree? Disagree? Tell me in the comments.

download all the retail apps meme

Mobile apps in retail: who needs them?

The lack of guidelines or general wisdom as to which retailers should actually have a mobile app and which shouldn’t can be confusing. 

In this post I’m going to start writing those guidelines myself, if you’ll stick with me.

There is definitely a burgeoning anti-app movement, fuelled in part by the move to adaptive or responsive websites. On top of this, the growth in app downloads is in sharp decline and we seem to be reaching market maturation for apps, in those countries that have highest smartphone adoption.

But what should retailers do? Should some still be entertaining the idea of a new app? There are certainly some great success stories out there. 

Some feel that the consumer has no interest in using many different retail apps, whereas others think the goal of consolidation is often unrealistic, with consumers happier using a range of options. 

Where should apps lie in a priority list of ecommerce to-dos? Which apps are succeeding and which aren’t? How do customer base, product range, internationalisation and other factors affect the decision whether to build an app? 

Well, these are the questions I’ve been attempting to answer. Read on to see what I dug up. If you make it to the end of my investigation, you’ll find my own criteria for apps in retail.


2014 will be all-access and all about satisfying consumer cravings

It was a great year for ecommerce and all signs point to an even bigger, even better year come January 1. What’s on the docket? Plenty.

Building on the success of the last 12 months, 2014 will likely signal a comprehensive integration of mobile with traditional brick-and-mortar along with a boom in gamification, personalization and more comprehensive and accessible methods to test and track.

It’s time to raise a glass to what’s going to be a game-changing year.


There are more than just four days of Christmas online

Over the last decade, the weekend between Black Friday and Cyber Monday has become known as the major sales high for retailers in the run-up to Christmas.  

But with the gifting season expected to exceed £10bn overall this year, retailers shouldn't put all their presents under the ‘Cyber Weekend’ tree this year. 

1 comment
Small Business Saturday Logo, 7th December 2013

Digitally showcasing your business on Small Business Saturday

The UK is celebrating its first Small Business Saturday on 7th December 2013, following in the footsteps of the United States who began the initiative in 2010, generating $5.5bn in its first year.  

Supported by the UK government, it is hoped that success will follow into the UK and generate support for the 4.9m SMEs currently located here.

As well as some well-meaning tips on digitally showcasing and preparing for the big day, the blog begins with some lovely stats that should hit home on how important it is to participate.

I mean, if the idea of competing with 4.7m business of the same size doesn’t daunt you, then perhaps you should participate for the fun part, or indeed to support other local businesses.

MyGoodness logo

Start Me Up! A profile of MyGoodness, 'buy to give' ecommerce

I recently wrote a round-up post on the fairly new phenomenon by 'buy to give' ecommerce sites. One of the featured sites was MyGoodness.com.

I've been talking to its founders to find out more about its founding ethos and the future of the platform.

Will buy-to-give become a larger part of charities' efforts and charitable 'donations', as the consumer urge continues unabated?

Internet tips for small businesses

17 steps small retailers can take to adapt to the internet

Let’s face it: the internet is never going away. However, for some small retailers, the disruption caused by the internet has been a painful experience.

It’s also undeniably a major contributing factor to the reduction in the number of retail outlets that are open and doing business.

So what can small retailers do? Starting with planning, I’ve outlined some steps you can take to use the internet and other digital technologies to their advantage (most of which comes straight from our How The Internet Can Save The High Street report and follow on from a speaking event I did with Royal Canin). 

This is a bit of a long post, so you may wish to bookmark it to return to later. Or take a nosey at our Fast Track Digital Marketing training to get a further deep-dive into what I describe.

Read below to find out how to start moving!

mobile ecommerce site usage infographic

10 interesting digital marketing statistics we've seen this week

This week's stats roundup is all about shopping, including conversion optimisation, mobile-friendly web design, showrooming and eBay.

There's also room for some beefy stats on Facebook and Twitter (after Twitter's IPO) and some interesting detail on web standards and ad complexity.

Feed your brain with this week's rare and juicy stats - watch that white shirt! And for more digital marketing stats, check out our Internet Statistics Compendium.

1 comment
warby parker

Buy to give: is philanthropy a natural fit for ecommerce?

The feeling of leading a charitable and sustainable life is one that most of us want. For those of us that don’t straight-out donate to charity, making the right choices is essentially the best way to give back.

Sort of like that decision not to go to McDonald’s but to use the local bakery instead or buying a pair of TOMS, for example, we feel as if we’ve given something back without making any effort. Guilt-free consumption, if you will.

If you’re not familiar with TOMS, it's the shoe and eyewear brand with the ‘One for One’ philosophy. For every product bought, TOMS will help a person in need.

Of course, this reads a little like cheating on the part of the customer that wants to feel like a saint whilst getting those in vogue boating shoes. Well, actually I don’t think it is.

I think ecommerce and philanthropy are a natural fit, allowing customers to give something back simply by making the right choices.

In this post, I’ll be listing eight buy-to-give ecommerce companies and explaining why I think this movement might fundamentally change company culture.


A look at Facebook Interests, and what this data can do for marketers

Facebook provides an unparalleled amount of real-time, accurate user data. With Facebook, marketers can be flies on the wall, quietly and unobtrusively gaining insight into their consumers by observing the details they share about their lives.

It is the world’s largest unfiltered focus group for brands to listen to, and it’s arguably the richest CRM database for marketers to take advantage of.

Consumers provide large amounts of data through their Facebook activities, enabling marketers to access far more information about who they are than a survey or poll might reveal. And, thanks to the high-frequency of consumer activity on Facebook, all of this wonderfully rich data is consistently kept up to date.

Best of all, the accessibility of consumer data on Facebook means that marketers can utilize it without interfering in their consumers’ lives.


Thanksgivukkah is coming! Are you ready?

Thanksgivukkah, if you live under a stone, is of course the beautiful coincidence that sees Hanukkah and Thanksgiving fall on the same day this year.

What better way to get some PR for your company and to grab some sales from some of the 6.5m American Jews and the many more that have an affinity with the religion?

I hope that isn’t too cynical, it’s not as if for a long time retailers haven’t greeted every season with glee.

And what’s more, publishers are no better. After all, maybe I'm writing this blog post to aim for a share in the ‘Thanksgivukkah’ search spoils.

For retailers though, there could be some tough decisions.