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Posts tagged with Retail

mobile ecommerce site usage infographic

10 interesting digital marketing statistics we've seen this week

This week's stats roundup is all about shopping, including conversion optimisation, mobile-friendly web design, showrooming and eBay.

There's also room for some beefy stats on Facebook and Twitter (after Twitter's IPO) and some interesting detail on web standards and ad complexity.

Feed your brain with this week's rare and juicy stats - watch that white shirt! And for more digital marketing stats, check out our Internet Statistics Compendium.

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warby parker

Buy to give: is philanthropy a natural fit for ecommerce?

The feeling of leading a charitable and sustainable life is one that most of us want. For those of us that don’t straight-out donate to charity, making the right choices is essentially the best way to give back.

Sort of like that decision not to go to McDonald’s but to use the local bakery instead or buying a pair of TOMS, for example, we feel as if we’ve given something back without making any effort. Guilt-free consumption, if you will.

If you’re not familiar with TOMS, it's the shoe and eyewear brand with the ‘One for One’ philosophy. For every product bought, TOMS will help a person in need.

Of course, this reads a little like cheating on the part of the customer that wants to feel like a saint whilst getting those in vogue boating shoes. Well, actually I don’t think it is.

I think ecommerce and philanthropy are a natural fit, allowing customers to give something back simply by making the right choices.

In this post, I’ll be listing eight buy-to-give ecommerce companies and explaining why I think this movement might fundamentally change company culture.

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A look at Facebook Interests, and what this data can do for marketers

Facebook provides an unparalleled amount of real-time, accurate user data. With Facebook, marketers can be flies on the wall, quietly and unobtrusively gaining insight into their consumers by observing the details they share about their lives.

It is the world’s largest unfiltered focus group for brands to listen to, and it’s arguably the richest CRM database for marketers to take advantage of.

Consumers provide large amounts of data through their Facebook activities, enabling marketers to access far more information about who they are than a survey or poll might reveal. And, thanks to the high-frequency of consumer activity on Facebook, all of this wonderfully rich data is consistently kept up to date.

Best of all, the accessibility of consumer data on Facebook means that marketers can utilize it without interfering in their consumers’ lives.

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thanksgivukkah

Thanksgivukkah is coming! Are you ready?

Thanksgivukkah, if you live under a stone, is of course the beautiful coincidence that sees Hanukkah and Thanksgiving fall on the same day this year.

What better way to get some PR for your company and to grab some sales from some of the 6.5m American Jews and the many more that have an affinity with the religion?

I hope that isn’t too cynical, it’s not as if for a long time retailers haven’t greeted every season with glee.

And what’s more, publishers are no better. After all, maybe I'm writing this blog post to aim for a share in the ‘Thanksgivukkah’ search spoils.

For retailers though, there could be some tough decisions.

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Who is digital on London's Regent Street?

This morning I was on London’s Regent Street, so I thought I’d promenade up and down (from Oxford Circus, South to Piccadilly Circus) and check which of the mega brands here acknowledge their digital presence in window displays.

That's just the shop window, I didn't go into the store (incidently, West End stores have been slow to adopt in-store tech). In this instance I just wanted to see who pointed online from their front of store merchandising.

I was quite surprised. Some were good, and some were simple and clear. Others were token, and plenty didn’t mention online at all.  

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mobile home cloggs

Cloggs responsive redesign: mega gallery

With 2013 the first year tablet shipments are expected to exceed that of PCs and also a year in which smartphone penetration reaches 64% in the US (Nielsen), responsive design is rightly this year’s hot topic.

Despite this, it seems a lot of big brands are playing catch up, with new research from Venda showing just one of the UK’s top 50 most visited retail sites (Curry’s) currently hosts a responsive website.

A quarter of websites analysed don’t have a mobile optimised site, and many retailers host their mobile site under a different URL structure to their existing website, which could be negatively impacting their SEO and affecting their efforts with analytics. 

As comScore estimates a third of all UK page views now come from smartphones and tablets, delivering a slick customer experience across all devices has become a massive competitive advantage for retailers.

To that end, I've been looking at the new responsive Cloggs website. 

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customer expectations are rising

How can you go about meeting and managing your customers’ expectations?

It seems that everywhere I look this month I’m reminded of a major and growing trend that’s increasingly impacting the way that every business needs to think.

It’s this: customer expectations are rising faster than a bunch of helium balloons on a calm day. Especially when it comes to digital.

What does this mean and how can you go about meeting and managing your customers’ expectations?

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leaves

10 Econsultancy posts from September to improve your knowledge (and three for fun)

I've started rounding up notable posts each month, with aim of ensuring our dear readers never miss a useful article, or a blog post that can make you feel a bit more of a jedi.

Here's the roundup from September, with 10 posts for you to bone up on SEO, analytics and the like, and three posts to sit back and enjoy with coffee.

You're welcome.

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The ecommerce treasure hunt: how to breathe serendipity into your site

Conversion optimisation is great, but to some extent it works on the premise that customers know what they’re looking for. Ok, checkouts, calls to action, merchandising should always be finessed, but optimisation is a means of squeezing more from specific intent.

But what if moving the customer towards the magpie psyche is the future of selling online?

A new ecommerce model is emerging and it works on the premise that customers can be encouraged to ‘bag at will’. All retailers need to do is surface rarer, quality products that are socially proven and most importantly look great.

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Vera Wang to Tom Ford: how US luxury brands fare with email welcomes

There are many considerations when harvesting the email address of your customer. How much information do you ask for? How hard do you push the sign-up? What do you include in a welcome email?

For luxury brands, the purchase decision is surely all about education and information. Giving those moneyed customers knowledge of new lines and must-haves will keep them returning, in fear they're missing out.

Most luxury brands sell 'lifetime' pieces, and so to hook the customer ahead of your competitors, every word of your comms should entice and exude the charm of a private members club.

Here's how some of the most searched for US luxury brands do email welcomes.

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Coach: almost a first class website

Coach has an ultimately frustrating website.

Don’t get me wrong, the desktop site, designed this year, isn’t presenting too many barriers to customers. It also has some nice touches that should shine in a tweaked redesign. And it has some amazing product images (of amazing products).

But, at the moment, it’s a little buggy and has a homepage lacking in features above the fold.

With a little work, the desktop ecommerce site could make content and products easier to surface, and provide a much more immersive experience.

In this post, I’m looking at the US website. If you’re not in the US, you can hit ‘global sites’ in the footer and take a look at the American view.

For those outside of the US, Coach is big, with revenue of $3.23bn in 2009. It’s big enough that when I Google simply ‘coach’ (and bear in mind I’m in the UK), I get a Google company ‘card’ on the RHS of the SERPS (see below), which I can click to take me to results more relevant to the luxury leather goods store.

So, now that I’m in the store, what does it look like?

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Lyle & Scott

Can you find a CEO on social media? Lyle & Scott hopes so

British fashion brand Lyle & Scott is looking for its next great leader, a new CEO.

To do this, shunning traditional recruitment methods, the company is using social media predominantly, linking to a microsite to attract the right person.

Will we start to see this kind of recruitment process more and more? Those at Lyle & Scott think that to find the right candidate, one has to mix things up a bit, and use a selective medium, symptomatic of the candidate one is looking for.

Let’s take a look…

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