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Posts tagged with Retail

Who is digital on London's Regent Street?

This morning I was on London’s Regent Street, so I thought I’d promenade up and down (from Oxford Circus, South to Piccadilly Circus) and check which of the mega brands here acknowledge their digital presence in window displays.

That's just the shop window, I didn't go into the store (incidently, West End stores have been slow to adopt in-store tech). In this instance I just wanted to see who pointed online from their front of store merchandising.

I was quite surprised. Some were good, and some were simple and clear. Others were token, and plenty didn’t mention online at all.  

mobile home cloggs

Cloggs responsive redesign: mega gallery

With 2013 the first year tablet shipments are expected to exceed that of PCs and also a year in which smartphone penetration reaches 64% in the US (Nielsen), responsive design is rightly this year’s hot topic.

Despite this, it seems a lot of big brands are playing catch up, with new research from Venda showing just one of the UK’s top 50 most visited retail sites (Curry’s) currently hosts a responsive website.

A quarter of websites analysed don’t have a mobile optimised site, and many retailers host their mobile site under a different URL structure to their existing website, which could be negatively impacting their SEO and affecting their efforts with analytics. 

As comScore estimates a third of all UK page views now come from smartphones and tablets, delivering a slick customer experience across all devices has become a massive competitive advantage for retailers.

To that end, I've been looking at the new responsive Cloggs website. 

customer expectations are rising

How can you go about meeting and managing your customers’ expectations?

It seems that everywhere I look this month I’m reminded of a major and growing trend that’s increasingly impacting the way that every business needs to think.

It’s this: customer expectations are rising faster than a bunch of helium balloons on a calm day. Especially when it comes to digital.

What does this mean and how can you go about meeting and managing your customers’ expectations?


10 Econsultancy posts from September to improve your knowledge (and three for fun)

I've started rounding up notable posts each month, with aim of ensuring our dear readers never miss a useful article, or a blog post that can make you feel a bit more of a jedi.

Here's the roundup from September, with 10 posts for you to bone up on SEO, analytics and the like, and three posts to sit back and enjoy with coffee.

You're welcome.


The ecommerce treasure hunt: how to breathe serendipity into your site

Conversion optimisation is great, but to some extent it works on the premise that customers know what they’re looking for. Ok, checkouts, calls to action, merchandising should always be finessed, but optimisation is a means of squeezing more from specific intent.

But what if moving the customer towards the magpie psyche is the future of selling online?

A new ecommerce model is emerging and it works on the premise that customers can be encouraged to ‘bag at will’. All retailers need to do is surface rarer, quality products that are socially proven and most importantly look great.

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Vera Wang to Tom Ford: how US luxury brands fare with email welcomes

There are many considerations when harvesting the email address of your customer. How much information do you ask for? How hard do you push the sign-up? What do you include in a welcome email?

For luxury brands, the purchase decision is surely all about education and information. Giving those moneyed customers knowledge of new lines and must-haves will keep them returning, in fear they're missing out.

Most luxury brands sell 'lifetime' pieces, and so to hook the customer ahead of your competitors, every word of your comms should entice and exude the charm of a private members club.

Here's how some of the most searched for US luxury brands do email welcomes.

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Coach: almost a first class website

Coach has an ultimately frustrating website.

Don’t get me wrong, the desktop site, designed this year, isn’t presenting too many barriers to customers. It also has some nice touches that should shine in a tweaked redesign. And it has some amazing product images (of amazing products).

But, at the moment, it’s a little buggy and has a homepage lacking in features above the fold.

With a little work, the desktop ecommerce site could make content and products easier to surface, and provide a much more immersive experience.

In this post, I’m looking at the US website. If you’re not in the US, you can hit ‘global sites’ in the footer and take a look at the American view.

For those outside of the US, Coach is big, with revenue of $3.23bn in 2009. It’s big enough that when I Google simply ‘coach’ (and bear in mind I’m in the UK), I get a Google company ‘card’ on the RHS of the SERPS (see below), which I can click to take me to results more relevant to the luxury leather goods store.

So, now that I’m in the store, what does it look like?

Lyle & Scott

Can you find a CEO on social media? Lyle & Scott hopes so

British fashion brand Lyle & Scott is looking for its next great leader, a new CEO.

To do this, shunning traditional recruitment methods, the company is using social media predominantly, linking to a microsite to attract the right person.

Will we start to see this kind of recruitment process more and more? Those at Lyle & Scott think that to find the right candidate, one has to mix things up a bit, and use a selective medium, symptomatic of the candidate one is looking for.

Let’s take a look…

Insight leads to lightbulb moments of clarity

Turbocharge your retail search strategy with customer data and insight

It continues to trouble me just how much dross there is floating about in the world of search marketing. Only the other day, I asked a prospect how their current agency had chosen the keywords that they were currently targeting.

Their response: "They asked us to supply a list of keywords we wanted to rank for and just went with those".

"Holy crap" I thought, "this still happens?"

There are plenty of good articles out there that talk about how to establish a keyword strategy so I’m not going to cover old ground in this article. Needless to say though, simply asking a client to supply a list of keywords, which are then ‘targeted’ without further analysis or discussion, is pretty scandalous in this day and age.

Unfortunately, this is just one example where agencies and consultants sell ‘search strategies’ that, in reality, are not strategies at all. 


Retailers must switch on to the discovery channel

It’s an empowering time for online retailers. Thanks to sites like Pinterest and Curisma, retailers know more about what their consumers are demanding than ever before. 

Two thousand years ago, Romans would make a shopping list by scratching the name of items they needed into a thin layer of wax on a wooden tablet.

Today, it’s a new generation of tablets that are playing an increasingly vital role in the retail journey, reviving a retail pattern that has long dominated the offline shopping experience: discovery shopping! 


The smartphone and the customer journey: a Google perspective

Google has a unique viewpoint from which to look at mobile’s part to play in the customer journey.

SERPs, AdWords, Google Maps, Google Chrome, Google accounts – all have a part to play. And perhaps soon Google Wallet and Google Glass.

I attended Latitude’s client summit last week and listened to Harry Davies, Lead Product Marketing Manager, Large Customer Marketing, at Google (helping customers get the most from search).

I’ve tried to sum up some of what Harry had to say, giving an overview of mobile’s involvement in retail in 2013.


How usable are the UK's top 10 mobile sites?

Stats from IMRG and Experian Hitwise released today show the ten most popular mobile retail sites in the UK. They are, as you may expect, almost the same as the top desktop sites, with the exception of Apple. 

So, since these retailers have the most popular sites, (and they must be aware of this from their own analytics) you would expect that they have optimised for mobile users. 

I've been taking a closer look at the sites..