{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Product Pages

How Mango can improve its otherwise excellent ecommerce site

Mango is a Spanish fashion retailer founded on 1984 that now has more than 2,000 stores in 103 countries, 150 of which are in the UK.

Mango has also been operating its ecommerce site for around 15 years and it makes for an interesting study in highly innovative retail site design, but with areas that could definitely use an improvement.

Here we’ll take a look at what works on the site from a customer experience and usability point of view first, before highlighting where it could be more effective.


35 examples of ecommerce best practice from Hobbycraft

Hobbycraft is not a website we’ve covered on the blog before. It’s not the showiest website, it doesn’t feature the most technically dazzling array of tools and features, nor is it currently in the news for any particular reason.

So why cover it now? Because Hobbycraft gets the basics of ecommerce just right.

Out of all the sites I’ve researched so far, this one manages to include almost every ecommerce best practice feature that we’re constantly banging on about on the blog.


How Boots can improve its customer journey from search to checkout

In which we take a look at the experience of searching for a product, clicking-through to an ecommerce store and purchasing the item, all from a customer’s point of view.

Much like previous investigations on UK retailers John Lewis and Halfords this explores the customer journey in a nutshell, looking at visibility, relevancy, ease-of-use and speed of experience.

Here we'll be taking a look at Boots, and making suggestions on how it can improve the customer experience and perhaps increase conversion.

1 comment

Thorntons vs. Hotel Chocolat: user experience comparison

“Come with me, and you'll be, in a world of pure imagination...”

I have to stop there as I don’t want Paramount Pictures or the estate of Roald Dahl to sue us.

Instead I’ll pepper the content of this article with only the very subtlest of references to Willy Wonka and the Chocolate in the hope that nobody notices.


12 interactive examples of ecommerce product pages

Here at Econsultancy we’re all about encouraging the quickest, easiest journey from product page to checkout as possible. Not just from a conversion point of view but also from a customer experience one.

This is certainly true of customers who know exactly what they want and don’t have to do any research about the product itself. ”I want a Julio Iglesias Greatest Hits CD and I want it now damn it!”


How Western brands can break into China: the experts' view

China. We all know it's a huge market and that it will be part of our business efforts in the future.  

But at our recent Digital Outlook 2015 event I think even the most savvy were surprised at the scale of the Chinese market - and how different it is to the West.


How retailers handle site search for the most popular Christmas gifts

In which we take a selection of the most popular gifts this Christmas and see how some of the top UK retailers’ site search handles them.

When I begin typing ‘Frozen Snow Glow Elsa’ into Amazon’s search box, will the item immediately appear at the top of the predictive text suggestions? When I search for ‘Nerf’ at John Lewis will the first product listing be its most popular model ‘The Demolisher’. Will Toys R Us direct me to the correct ‘Transformers Grimlock’ toy?

1 comment

John Lewis: the customer journey from search to checkout

In which we take a look at the experience of using John Lewis from a customer point of view.

Meaning this won’t be a robust test of the ecommerce site’s search functionality, or the quality of its mega-navs, or the persuasiveness of its homepage. 

Instead this will involve searching for an item on Google, clicking on the most attractive result, testing the relevancy and helpfulness of its landing page and seeing how quick and easy it is to make a purchase. The customer journey in a nutshell. 

B&Q Homepage

What users think of B&Q's new responsive site

Last month, B&Q unveiled a new responsive website, as part of a £60m redesign of its website and backend systems. 

The new site was reviewed by David Moth earlier this month and to follow this up we decided to get some feedback by asking users to test the site, using whatusersdo.

A mix of desktop, mobile and tablet users were asked to perform two tasks on the site. The first was a targeted shop to find internal door handles and go through the purchase process up until payment.

As the new site prominently features sections titled ‘Inspiration’ and ‘Projects’, the second was to gather ideas for updating a room of their choice.  

So what did the users think of the site? 


Selfridges' new £40m site reviewed

Selfridges has just launched its new website, part of a £40m investment over the next five years. 

The retailer has experienced growing volumes of mobile traffic, more than 50% at the moment, and the site aims to cater for this with a 'touch-first' approach and a responsive website.

Here's an overview of the new site and some of the changes...


15 inspiring examples of ecommerce product pages

What makes a great ecommerce product page?

I'd say it's a blend of several factors, including usability, use of images, reviews and clear information for shoppers. 

Here I've rounded up some more excellent examples, with the intention of highlighting some examples from less mainstream sites. 


How far will customers go to qualify for free shipping?

We're well aware that free shipping can work well as a sales driver, but the extent to which shoppers will go to qualify is very interesting.

Stats from a UPS study show that 58% of customers have added extra items to their shopping basket in order to qualify for free delivery. 

So what does this mean for retailers, and how should they approach this issue?