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Posts tagged with Olympics

How Cadbury took Google+ by storm

Cadbury UK certainly made a splash when it showed up as one of the early adopters of Google Plus.

Despite its near immediate success on the platform (the brand gained 1.2m followers in a matter of months) many others have been slow to get on board with the not-so-new social network.

I wanted to share with you how Cadbury has used the platform to take its content marketing strategy to the next level.

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London 2012 digital legacy

London 2012 and the digital legacy

Now that the Paralympics has finished, let’s take a moment to reflect on the digital legacy left by London 2012, which has delivered the first truly digital Olympic and Paralympic experience.

The summer of sport saw ambitious projects from two of the main broadcasters, BBC and C4, and the rather more controversial, official London 2012 site.

And, for pretty much the first time, a range of mobile and tablet apps to support our desire to keep up to date on the move.

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Three parallels between Olympic athletes and brand management

No-one can fail to have been inspired by the 2012 Olympics we have just witnessed. Sports men and women competing at the top of their game to win the highest prize possible in sport.

They invest years preparing for the moment they go for gold. It is humbling and also motivating to witness that determination to be the best. 

While reflecting on the efforts of the Olympic athletes, I believe there are some parallels with brands. Here are three of them...

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Nike beats Adidas in social buzz during Olympics

Nike managed to outperform official Olympic sponsor Adidas on social media during the Games, generating more tweets and pulling in more new Facebook fans.

However Adidas had the last laugh, as it achieved a much bigger spike in traffic during the two weeks.

Non-sponsor Nike was particularly visible around London during the Olympics with a campaign that celebrated everyday athletes. It bought up hundreds of billboards around the city and on the tube featuring the hashtag ‘#findgreatness’.

Adidas, which spent tens of millions of pounds to be an official sponsor, ran a campaign featuring Team GB athletes and the hashtag ‘#takethestage’.

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NBC faces social media criticism for Olympics tape delay, but is it working?

If you're an avid user of popular social media sites, there's a decent chance you've been exposed to the significant criticism that's been leveled at NBC over its tape-delayed coverage of the Olympics.

While the media giant is live streaming events online, NBC's rationale for airing the biggest events on a broadcast tape delay is simple: it can earn far more advertising dollars by capturing prime time eyeballs. That's important given that NBC isn't guaranteed to make a profit from the Olympics given the costs associated with airing them.

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Why is the Olympic ticketing website so bad?

I read a great piece by Nick Donelly on the Usability Hell website, showing the sheer UX nightmare that is the London 2012 ticket website

I also heard on Five Live yesterday that, though more tickets are being released to fill in the empty spaces seen at venues, people can't just turn up on the day, they need to book online.

This means they have to face one of the worst ticketing websites ever...

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Are commercial aims behind Google's Olympic SERPS?

If you have searched for information around the Olympics online then it’s likely you will have come across Google’s new interface that contains a huge amount of information about the Games.

It is essentially a giant Olympics website containing thousands of pages that are integrated into the SERPs.

As highlighted by marketing consultant Dan Barker in his blog post, Google delivers so much information that it removes much of the reason for searchers to visit the official London 2012 site and broadcaster sites. 

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This week's top six infographics

Here's a round up of some of the best infographics we've seen this week.

We have infographics on social media at the Olympics, Apple's Q3 earnings, mobile content and the rise and fall of magazines.

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Olympic crackdown backfires as non-sponsors see traffic surge

The Olympics is only two days away now, and LOCOG has undertaken a well-publicised crackdown on non-sponsors’ attempts at guerrilla marketing.

However, new data from Experian shows that the overzealous approach to protecting the rights of official sponsors may have backfired.

As of last week, the Olympics was the third most visited sports category online behind football and cycling, while the average time spend on an Olympics website stands at six minutes 33 seconds.

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Facebook's portal problem

Apparently the next CEO of Yahoo will not be current Hulu CEO Jason Kilar. He reportedly isn't interested in the job, and one of the reasons may be that he has a new friend in Facebook.

According to the New York Post, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is considering Kilar for a senior role at the world's largest social network. His job: get Big Media to 'like' Facebook.

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Social Olympics: Nike versus Adidas

At the time of writing this article, there are just 40-something days left to go until the Olympics begins. And there’s been a lot of chatter  so far this year about how well Nike has capitalised on the ‘Summer of Sport’ theme.

So we thought we would take a closer look at how Nike (not a headline Olympic sponsor) has fared compared to headline Olympic sponsor Adidas in the social stakes on some comparable key terms.

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NBC to broadcast every event for 2012 London Olympics

London's 2012 Olympic Games are fast approaching, and NBC, which has television rights to the Olympics through 2020, is doing everything it can to recoup its substantial investment.

That's good news for viewers in the United States this year because NBC's strategy will make the 2012 Games coverage the most extensive yet.

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