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Posts tagged with Matt Cutts

Google 'takes action' against major guest blog network

Earlier this year, Matt Cutts announced the 'death' of guest blogging for SEO, declaring it finished as a link building tactic. 

Now, following a tweet by Cutts announcing that action has been taken on a 'large guest blog network', it seems that, though Google hasn't confirmed it, MyBlogGuest is the 'victim'. 

It no longer ranks for its own brand name, a classic sign of a Google penalty, while I can't see it anywhere for terms like 'guest blogging'. 

Seemingly Google wants to send another message about guest blogging, so what does this mean? 

Reducing value of links

We’ll stop building links when they stop adding value

We’ll stop building links when they stop adding value”. This seems to be the motto around at the moment and it’s probably due to the high value that gaining links still offers to sites.

Within the industry we are always striving to keep one step ahead of the curve, to ensure that our client’s rankings continue to progress whilst keeping ourselves afloat within the search engine results pages (SERP’s), and link building is still a very powerful tool. 

I believe that this is changing and that Google will devalue the power of links over the next few years, defending against the manipulative optimisation trends and habitual forms of online marketing taking place.  

Bearing this in mind, I believe that now is the best time to start adapting your search engine optimisation (SEO) for this change if not already.


Matt Cutts declares the death of guest blogging for SEO

Matt Cutts made his strongest statement yet on guest blogging, declaring it dead as a linkbuilding tactic.

This does seem to be a broad statement and, as Editor of a blog which accepts (and values) guest posts, Google's policing of the internet can be irritating. 

Still, there's no doubt that guest blogging has been hammered as a link building tactic, to the extent that we've become tired of guest blogging approaches. 

So how will this affect sites looking to accept guest posts?


Five website pre-launch tips

Launching a new website is a big event for most companies, and while most of the effort is typically focused on building a great website that delivers compelling content and a superb user experience, what you do before you launch can impact your post-launch success.

Here are five ways you can promote a successful launch before you introduce the world to a new website.


SEOs beware: Google preps over-optimisation penalty

Can you ever have too much of a good thing? According to Google, the answer is 'yes' when it comes to SEO.

In the past couple of years, the search giant has made a concerted effort to improve the quality of its index.

The measures taken are wide-ranging, from updates targeting content farms to the more recently announced penalty for pages with too many ads.

Now Google is apparently set to take its efforts one step further by targeting pages and sites it deems have been over-optimised.


Google issues a penalty to itself

Google doesn't like paid links, sponsored posts and low-quality content. 

So it was quite surprising, and embarrassing, to learn this week that Google was associated with all three in an apparent effort to promote its web browser, Chrome.

That left Google with little ability but to respond and explain itself. And yesterday it did just that.


Google continues to fight scrapers, turns to public for help

If you're a publisher, one of the most frustrating experiences is to discover that your content is being scraped by a third party that does not have permission to use your content.

Even more frustrating: when that scraper's website is able to outrank yours for searches related to your own content.

For obvious reasons then, Google has engaged in a considerable effort to thwart scrapers. And now it's turning to the public for additional assistance.


How to beat Panda: split into multiple sites?

Google's Panda update was designed to eliminate spam and content farm content, thus improving the quality of Google's index and SERPs.

Many sites caught in Panda's grip claim that they were unintended victims of the update, and have sought ways to recover.

Many have been unsuccessful in reestablishing themselves with Google, but according to the Wall Street Journal, one publisher may have found the secret to recovery.


Could email reputation become a Google ranking factor?

In the battle to maintain the quality of its SERPs, Google is increasingly tweaking its algorithm. Since there are only so many on-page ranking factors for Google to consider, it's logical to expect that off-page ranking factors will only become more numerous and important over time.

At least one website operator believes these off-page factors may now include email reputation. Jake Ludington, who runs JakeLudington.com, noticed a drop in his traffic in April, and after looking at his website, came to the conclusion that his email newsletter must have caused the drop.


Google reconsiders keyword domains

2011 has been a busy year for Google. Faced with increasing criticism about the quality of its search results and the tactics publishers use in attempts to influence them, the world's most prominent and widely-used search engine has taken aggressive steps to crack down on paid links and content farms.

But Google's tweaks may go well beyond moves to reign in black and gray hat SEO tactics. In fact, it may be looking at core components of its algorithm altogether.


Google: our search results sucked in 2000

Have you started questioning the quality of Google's search results? You've probably noticed that a lot of people have been lately.

Before you start asking too many questions, however, Google's Matt Cutts wants you to take into consideration a fact you may not know: Google really wasn't all that good in 2000.


Load time: coming soon as a Google ranking factor?

Google's algorithm looks at a significant number of ranking factors when it decides where a site should be in the SERPs. These ranking factors, and the weight they're each given, change over time.

Last week at PubCon, Google's Matt Cutts revealed a new ranking factor that may debut in 2010: page load time.