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Posts tagged with Marketing

Stats and insight: The Indian Digital Landscape

Our new India Digital Market Landscape Report is the fourth in a series of trends briefings about the BRIC markets.

The report offers an overview for marketers and investors looking to India for new digital business opportunities and draws on interviews from those within the market, as well as a range of secondary sources.

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Death to content: long live the editor

If the saying goes that content is King, today’s warring agendas, varying competence and vulgar chaos would put Game of Thrones to shame.

In the effort to rule their industry, almost every player has ended up churning out the same old slurry by neglecting a key element of creating great stories.

It comes down to this: the world doesn’t need more content, it needs better editors.

A good editor establishes a fair, consistent point of view. They bring priorities, standards. They understand when to say no -- and why.

It’s a concept that (forgive me) Steve Jobs brought to Apple, and rings through its most heartfelt advertising.

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Five ingenious marketing rebrands that changed society

In 2007 researchers conducted an experiment where subjects sipped the same wine from two different bottles.

The only variable was the price tag, the wine’s market value. Not only did the subjects say they enjoyed the wine from the more expensive bottle, their neural activity showed heightened pleasure associated with better flavor and taste. 

As Rory Sutherland said: 

How do you get adults to enjoy wine? Why, it’s simple. Pour it from an expensive bottle.

This is essentially the power of brand. Perceived value can potentially affect experience more than the actual quality of the product.

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Madison Ave

Are consumers killing Madison Avenue?

Marketing, as we know it, is obsolete.

So say Simonson & Rosen in their recent book 'Absolute value'. Theirs is not a lone voice,  similar sentiments date from as early as 1999, in the Cluetrain Manifesto.

As it came in the peak of the dot-com bubble, though, that message was largely ignored.

Why do they say we’ve no use for marketing? It’s because of the rising power of the voice of the customer. With the growing availability of consumer opinions, the importance of brand messaging is diminishing.

Consequently, things are changing in the world of advertising. Slowly, but surely.

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Three ways to boost customer engagement by thinking like a game designer

Gamification is an effective way for marketers to create fun and engaging experiences for consumers.

While game design is certainly a highly technical skill, marketers do not need to be game designers to create customer-facing campaigns that are engaging and impactful.

Instead, by simply thinking like a game designer, marketers can implement strategies that create well-designed, game-like experiences that motivate consumer behavior.

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How to market your branded Facebook page

It’s getting tougher and tougher for brands to make an impact through organic means on Facebook.

In a recent tweak to the news feed algorithm, companies that run Facebook pages have seen a substantial drop-off in reach as Facebook prioritises content from users who your followers engage with the most.

That’s not to say that it’s now impossible to get your unpaid posts seen by your fans, it’s just that they’re more likely to only be seen by users who regularly engage with your page.

I discussed the pros and cons of this at greater length in the above linked article. Indeed the news feed change has scuppered many small publishers and businesses with little-to-no budget, but then again there’s an argument to say that if your content is engaging enough and tailored for your specific Facebook audience, then you shouldn’t see too much of a drop-off.

Everybody needs a little push now and then though. I run a Facebook page for my own music review website. I don’t make any profit from it, I just do it for the love of being mean about Skrillex. 

Previous to the algorithm change each of my posts would easily be seen by at least 100-150 users. In the last few months however this has dropped off substantially to around 20. The Facebook page was a great way to engage with readers as it provoked a lot of interesting and funny conversations. This isn’t the case anymore.

Whether you feel this is down to the quality of content, or whether you feel that Facebook has been unfair with this change or not, it’s difficult to argue with Facebook’s commitment to providing its users with a more personalised, tailored experience.

However, and this is a big however, Facebook has made it incredibly easy to market your branded page and its posts.

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Five ways to ensure your marketing strategy grows with your business

One of the most daunting tasks for any new business is developing a marketing analytics model that can scale and grow with the company.  

With a fast-growing startup, the value of every marketing decision, from website design to content creation to attending conferences, is critical. 

Individual startups will have differing needs dependant on various factors. However, we found that there were five key points that helped us to successfully grow our strategy with the business as we went from 10 people to more than 100.

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Three game mechanics you should borrow from Candy Crush

Game mechanics are the building blocks of a successful gamification strategy.

These elements make the experience engaging and fun for the consumer. Points, badges and leaderboards are the go-to mechanics marketers often use to make their programs more engaging, but the mechanics marketers can tap go beyond PBLs (as they’re called among game designers). 

Candy Crush, the social game that is more popular than every other game on Facebook, uses a long list of mechanics to create motivating and addictive experience for the user.

And there are a number of lessons marketers can learn from the torrid success of Candy Crush.

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We're hanging on Google+

How brands are using Google+ to offer unique experiences to consumers

With Google+ celebrating its third anniversary in June this year, I have noticed a surge in brands getting busy and shifting their marketing attention toward this network.

1.15bn users are only the beginning of many possibilities that Google+ has to offer, especially if Google is planning something big this year.

But have they tapped all the potential in waking up its sleeping community?  

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New Year marketing resolutions you shouldn't break in 2014

It’s February and already, according to a number of statistical sources, around a quarter of us have failed to uphold our New Year’s resolutions.

Interestingly, 39% of people in their twenties achieve their resolution each year compared to only 14% of people over 50. That’s interesting given the prevailing attitudes towards younger generations.

In the same vein, marketers are mapping out the conversations they want to have this year to stay ahead of the curve. Given the influx of ‘2014 Trends’ in January, I thought it would be a useful point to review the best and highlight a few that might follow New Year’s resolutions.

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What is scarcity marketing and should you use it?

As a relative newcomer to the digital marketing world, I've decided to write a series of 'beginner's guides' to uncover what is meant by certain terms, trends and technological advances in digital; being both a travel guide and a personal investigation.

Here I’ll be answering the following questions: What is scarcity? Why should you use it? Are there good and bad practices? In a tone of voice that has been described as both 'helpful' and 'not too rambling'.

Scarcity in marketing means to use the fear of shortage to sell more

It’s a fairly simple psychological premise. “We don’t have many Furbies left I’m afraid, you’ll have to buy it now if you don’t want to ruin your child’s Christmas” is the simplest and most extreme example.

However if we think of scarcity in terms of providing transparency about how much stock is left of a particular item, then it’s a very helpful, positive tool. 

Scarcity can also increase the perceived value of the item or service you’re providing. 

Your products can become that much more precious in the eyes of a customer. The fear that there is only a limited supply will make the customer purchase faster and possibly with less thought.

Which leads to the argument that scarcity can also be manipulative and in some circumstances, exploitative.

Before we get to the more frustrating end of scarcity, let’s take a look at some of the positive uses.

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Social media monetisation is a major concern among Asian marketers: new report

For the second year running, Econsultancy has published a freely available trends briefing about digital trends in South-East Asia, based on the Digital Cream Singapore event for senior client-side digital marketers held in November last year.

Digital Cream Singapore 2013 brought together more than 120 B2B and B2C in-house marketers from around the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) region and beyond to discuss best practice and common challenges in digital marketing, and learn from each other.

Delegates discussed a wide range of topics, ranging from managing and making sense of audience and customer data, increasing personalisation and loyalty, to using video marketing and cross-channel marketing.

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