{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Klout

Only 20% of Fortune 100 CMOs are active in social networks

As social leadership is an increased focus for global businesses, BusinessNext went in search of the top 25 CMOs in Fortune 100 Companies. In the end, they could only find 20 as only one in five CMOs on the Fortune 100 list are active in public social networks. I'd concur, though, that number is higher than previous years. 

Despite The CMO Survey's recent projection of an 150% increase in social spending in marketing budgets over the next five years, the majority of the senior staff holding the purse strings are yet to establish a social footprint of their own. Is this an indication that they don't understand the space, or is it that they put their efforts in promoting the brands they work for instead of the brand of "me"?


Six tools content marketers should be using daily

Journalists and news creators, who by nature are at the top of the social news cycle, as well as content creators for brands that offer value to their communities should be aware of these six great tools.

As part of my role here at Econsultancy as Content Marketing Executive, I was immediately immersed in product demos and in-person meetings for new products in the burgeoning social web discovery space.

Here are six immediate standouts from the pack that I feel other content marketers should be using and why.


Q&A: Mark Schaefer on creating web content that creates a reaction. Part one

Mark Schaefer
is the author of two best-selling books on social media and the opportunities and challenges present for brands and individuals online.

The Tao of Twitter was self-published in 2011 (Updated in 2012), and Return on Influence followed in March 2012, published by McGraw-Hill Professional.

We caught up with Mark while he was in the U.K. promoting Return on Influence and spoke about content marketing, influencer tracking tools and more in this two-part series.


Klout adds more useless signals to its algorithm

Klout-logoThanks to the rise of social media, there's a mad race to measure influence and help brands harness it to their advantage. That has created an ecosystem of companies vying to prove that they can most accurately identify the social media users with the most clout.

One of the most prominent players in the space, Klout, is also one of the most controversial.


Why people hate Klout, and how to fix it

Since inception, online influencer targeting has been a fraught activity.

In the early 2000s, brands had to fight the temptation to simply create their own fake influencers. Perfection of mommy blog targeting (one product for you and one to give away to your fans) was often achieved at the cost of polarizing their community over issues of authenticity. If individuals can’t trust their community leaders to not be unduly influenced by what are perceived as bribes, who can they trust?

Klout, which familiarized a mass of consumers with influence measurement, has regularly been the subject of withering criticism. “Kill me if I Klout,” wrote the gadget-catchall Gizmodo. “If I've ever interacted with Klout... punch me in the face,” said the net-comic XKCD.

Econsultancy's latest report, Influencer Channels: From Klout to Klouchebag, takes a look at these issues, asks why, and explores ways for marketers to effectively work around these antipathies.


To succeed, brands should focus on real clout, not Klout

Few social media companies are as controversial as Klout, which seeks to measure the influence individuals have within social networks.

For some, the company, which has raised tens of millions of dollars in funding, is the "standard for influence" it describes itself as. Others are more skeptical, questioning the ability of any company to truly measure who has influence in any meaningful way.


Klout vs Kred in the social influence game

We are in a time of convergence. Traditionally, influence was in the hands of the media. Now anyone with access to a cell phone can be engaged and influence a community. As our online identities now focus on our real name, personal brand isn't merely a celebrity worry anymore.
How this influence is measured is changing and Klout and Kred (amongst others) are all vying to be the barometer that we use to measure it. But which one is going to top the other or is there room for them all?


Klout moves into mobile with Blockboard acquisition

Social influence measurement company Klout is moving into the mobile space, acquiring Blockboard for an unknown sum.

Blockboard says that it "uses technology to connect neighbours and build stronger neighbourhoods". Its mobile app features a bulletin board that users can use to post messages for their local community to view and interact with.


Six social media recruiting mistakes to avoid

With more and more companies looking to use social media, it's no surprise that more and more of them are recruiting individuals for specialist social media job roles.

But how do you find the right person to mange your social media strategy and execute it on popular services like Facebook and Twitter?

That can be difficult, and unfortunately, many companies make big mistakes when recruiting for social media positions.

Here are six of the biggest mistakes you should seek to avoid...


Klout only matters if you say it does

Klout-logoEarly last year I wrote a post about online influence measurement service Klout, I ran a few simple tests and came to a conclusion: Klout doesn’t work.

Based on several recent articles supporting the service, I thought it was worth taking another look at Klout and restating a few points about the value of online influence and measurement.


The trouble with measuring influence via social media

Measuring influenceYesterday we wrote about a new app called The Social List, which has been launched by The Sunday Times and is boxing in a similar area as Klout and PeerIndex.

Here's how it is being positioned: "The Sunday Times Social List is set to become the definitive measure of the most influential people within the social space."

Tricky. The trouble with measuring 'influence' is that it is incredibly difficult to do so in an automated way. I think it's virtually impossible to make any real statements about who is and isn't influential without some form of human analysis. 

These tools are of course works in progress, and as they stand they are certainly indicators of something, but I'm not sure they're indicators of true influence.


The Sunday Times launches "The Social List"

sunday-times-rich-listWith services like Klout and PeerIndex continuing to attract investment and users, there’s some serious money and traffic to be had from social media measurement, which explains why a corporation like News International would be interested in acquiring a slice of the pie chart.

This week the NI-owned Sunday Times launched its own ‘Social list’, and based on initial use it could be set to attract a wider audience.