{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Journalism

25 things journalists can do to future-proof their careers

I know a number of journalists who are growing increasingly concerned about the sustainability of their careers. Those working for offline publications tend to worry more than most, and with good reason, given the tide of bad news in this space.

25 things journalists can do to future-proof their careers

But despite the problems with business models, there will always be a need for journalists. It isn’t game over for journalism, not by a stretch, it's just that the game is changing. Old media journalists will need to learn some new skills and adapt mindsets to accommodate changes in their industry. 

45 comments

Bloomberg's Federal Reserve lawsuit highlights the importance of news organizations

In the debate over the future of journalism, there are some who argue that stodgy old news organizations aren't necessary. Leaner and meaner ventures can take on the same burdens. Citizen journalists and bloggers are capable journalists.

But a victory for Bloomberg LP in a lawsuit against the United States Federal Reserve highlights the importance of having large news organizations.

0 comments

Q&A: AnnArbor.com blogs leader Ed Vielmetti

In March it was announced that The Ann Arbor News, located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, would be closing. The paper had been publishing since 1835. Sad as it was, it wasn't an unusual considering the state of newspapers nationwide. What made it unique was what happened next.

The newspaper was closing, but in its place, AnnArbor.com would launch as a mostly online-only, hyperlocal news portal. As the industry remains in flux and more news executives are turning to the web, AnnArbor.com is being seen as a case study in online local news. Ed Vielmetti is AnnArbor.com's blogging leader

3 comments

Journalism's challenge: pageview economics

This weekend, the Washington Post's Ian Shapira detailed in a piece entitled "The Death of Journalism (Gawker Edition)" how the triumph he felt when Gawker blogged about a story he wrote turned into anger after his boss asked him why he wasn't angry that his story had been stolen.

After reviewing Gawker's eight-paragraph post, Shapira came to the same conclusion as his boss: he'd been ripped off.

4 comments

Tomorrow's news companies: small, lean and venture capitalist

Future news organisations, the ones that make it out of the recession, will look much different than pre-recession times. They'll be smaller and leaner. But if they're smart, they'll also have a big role in VC for companies developing products that could help them gain a competitive advantage.

2 comments

Five reasons why consumers will reject news paywalls

Much has been said about newspapers looking more fondly at the possibility adding a paywall to their precious content so 'bloggers stop stealing it' and Google 'stops being a vampire'.

Almost all of the arguments centre around what the business side of this decision is. While that is important, the reaction of the public matters much more.

2 comments

Q&A: Spot.Us founder David Cohn on crowdfunded journalism

In the search for ways to fund journalism, some organisations have flirted with the possibility of crowdfunding some stories. While there have been a few minor successes (such as the non-profit hyperlocal project MinnPost), David Cohn's Spot.Us has garnered the most attention. 

0 comments

How newspapers lost the breaking news game to a Twittering 19-year-old kid

Across much of the western world, news organisations are in a fight for their life. Between Google 'stealing' their news and bloggers 'stealing their readers', things are not well in the land of news. The next challenge to news's authority is a 19-year-old kid from the Netherlands.

8 comments

How fast is the blogosphere?

How fast are bloggers? According to researchers at Cornell University, it typically took bloggers two and a half hours during the 2008 US presidential campaign to pick up on stories that were broken by the mainstream media.

That conclusion was reached by using computers to analyze 1.6m websites between August and October 2008. All told, these websites published around 90m blog posts and articles.

1 comment

Q&A: Broadersheet.com CEO Peter Clark

Earlier today I wrote about whether a news aggregator could be a success in the UK. Prospects are not good, and even Briton Nick Denton, founder of Gawker.com, says he wouldn't dare do it.

However, despite the pessimism, there exists an interest in giving it a try. The first major entrant into the UK news aggregation scene looks to be Cambridge-based Broadersheet.com.

0 comments

Aggregation in the UK: Can it work?

Americans and the British are quite similar, but also quite different. Jokes that make Americans laugh may not make a British person laugh; food that a Brit might love could repulse an American; and so on. It seems the way the two nations consume news online is different, too.

0 comments

The Economist launches a massive ad campaign - but is that a good thing?

The Economist launches massive ad campaignToday it was announced that the London-based current affairs/economics magazine The Economist is launching a far-reaching ad campaign aimed at broadening its readership. It's a unique title in a unique position with an equally unique readership. But an ad campaign could spoil that...

3 comments