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Posts tagged with Images

kpp homepage

10 successful homepages that show the trend for video backgrounds

GIF and video backgrounds are spreading. 

Focus on enjoyable customer experiences has led many to create focused, unfussy websites that provide clear messages and unforgettable images.

Open source platforms and social media have played a large part in perpetuating this trend. The rise of the smartphone means we're more comfortable with scrolling experiences, so content can be dispersed down the page.

3 comments
toolkit

The SME content creation toolkit for images, video and text

I've kept this list simple and it's a fairly accurate idea of what I use day-to-day.

I didn't use any of these tools when I started working on the Econsultancy blog. I'm still not an advanced content creator but I do have some small tricks up my sleeve.

Take a look at this list of tools to aid you in your image, video and text travails.

Enjoy!

1 comment
100 things in London

lastminute.com hits the content sweet spot

What is travel?

Airbnb is certainly trying to define it, with the message that inclusion and community make for memorable experiences. We shouldn't stand for standard, the homogeneity of a hotel chain.

The internet in general is encouraging a fightback again corporate globalisation (though perhaps these are simply our death throes?), with everything from homespun craft available through Etsy and crowdsourced cycle routes on Strava.

I watched John Kearns perform recently (a storytelling comic that won the Edinburgh Comedy Award) and he had one line designed to show how much he wanted to return to a more personal world.

He spoke about seeing tourists in the more garish areas of London promoted by guidebooks, such as Picadilly Circus, and how he wanted to talk to each of them and tell them about the really niche and beautiful parts of London, often tucked in neighbourhoods that tourists never make it to.

I'm getting to the point here. lastminute.com has produced a lovely piece of content designed to show parts of London that only the discerning have discovered*. It's called 100 Things in London and it's a nice bit of content marketing.

Let's take a look and I'll attempt to point out why it should go well.

3 comments
le coq tennis

Six of the best image-led ecommerce sites

Not everybody loves a hero image or a carousel. But imagery is a continuing trend in ecommerce.

Whilst brands don't want to compromise load times, the increasing uptake of tablets and their use for shopping means that images can help a site stand out.

A browsing experience is a lot more fun, and arguably realistic, with some big imagery thrown in.

Here are six websites that hit those retina-popping notes of colour on their homepages and beyond.

3 comments
gmail grid view

Gmail grid view: six implications for email marketers

I’ve only recently been thinking about Gmail and its trial of grid view, though the trial has been happening since the end of March 2014.

The announcement had passed me by until I chatted to someone from an email build company that specialises in creative use of imagery. See this post on agile creative in email.

If you’re not familiar with Gmail’s grid view, it’s the ‘Pinterest-isation’ of the promotions tab in Gmail’s tabbed inbox, currently only for addresses that end in gmail.com.

There’s an example of such a ‘Pinterested’ inbox further down this post.

The tabbed inbox itself is a bit of a mixed blessing for marketers. On the one hand, it encourages intent on the part of the consumer. She only engages with promotions when she feels inclined to do so, and your message is less likely to have disappeared into the morass of personal or social email in other tabs.

On the other hand, she, the user, may never click on that promotions tab. The implications of such tendencies, I’ll go into further down this post.

But what are the implications of Gmail’s grid view? Here are some ideas…

7 comments
Eric Abensur, CEO of Venda

How brands can use social images to sell online

When it comes to shopping, consumers have always preferred a more tactile and visual experience. 

The growth of ecommerce and social networks like Pinterest means that brands are increasingly allowing, even encouraging, consumers to share images of products online. 

Here, I'll look at how the mobile revolution and the prospect of wearable technologies like Google Glass are set to change how retailers  can use images to drive both brand awareness and, ultimately, sales.  

3 comments

How to optimise your images for SEO

Images are increasingly important to the customer experience and search yet many sites are not optimised to take advantage.

In the early days of the web images were typically small and of low quality. We all remember the little animated men at work icons that littered the web in its infancy.

However, as users have moved from dial-up to broadband connections, the number, size and quality of images on the web has increased significantly. 

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Do Twitter images really increase engagement?

With more than 9,000 messages being sent every second, Twitter can be a noisy place, so it's always important to distinguish yourself from the crowd.

Luckily, Twitter has a few features that can help, including Twitter Cards, promoted tweets and images. 

Over on Facebook, posts that include optimised images receive around 120% more engagement. Research suggests that the same is true on Twitter, so I decided to test this out.

5 comments

Five key themes for fashion ecommerce success

So here’s the bad news. It’s no longer enough for your site to be ‘usable’ and ‘intuitive’. Today’s best in breed online retailers mastered the usability thing a while back and have long moved on.

To survive in a competitive market your site must also draw customers in, provide ideas, inspiration and help all without being overly attentive and obtrusive. 

Whether your site is selling high fashion or stationery, we can all learn something from the most successful online retailers. We used whatusersdo.com to find out what was working best on two big fashion retail sites: ASOS and H&M.

Here are the five key themes both have hit upon to help them to their success.  

4 comments

Is Google+ going to feature Facebook style promoted posts?

https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0003/3800/gplus_screen_ft-blog-thumb.pngIf you’re a regular user of Google+ (and if you aren’t, here’s some good reasons you should be), then you may have seen a few unusual posts popping up on your feed today.

This will lead to speculation that despite its previous ‘No ads’ stance, Google may be willing to include a few Facebook style promoted posts to add spice to the G+ mix...

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How new Google Plus features can help you create great content. Part one: image editing

Google Plus has announced a host of new image editing features, which integrate the brilliant Snapseed application into the social network.

There's also an 'awesome' twist with the addition of animated gifs for sequence photos. A collection of useful tools for anyone who wants to use original imagery in their content. 

On Wednesday Google+ announced a host of improvements. For me, involved in the content side of things, I was particularly interested in the new image features, particularly after hearing that they'd integrated the excellent Snapseed app

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Pinterest opens to everybody: what it means for brands

According to Experian, Pinterest is the third most popular social network in the United States. So it's no surprise that brands have flocked to set up shop, particularly given that Pinterest may be a far more profitable platform for brands than social networking stalwarts like Facebook and Twitter.

What's remarkable about Pinterest's rise is that up until yesterday, the social network was still technically in an invite-only beta. One of the reasons cited for this was the company's desire to maintain cachet and a feeling of exclusivity. Others suggested that the startup was trying to mitigate scaling risks, which can easily put a dent in a promising startup's plans.

2 comments