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Posts tagged with Guardian

email open rate affected by temperature

50+ joyous digital stats from 2015's Festival of Marketing

I've been trawling through the Festival of Marketing presentations from 2015, to deliver you some statistical goodness.

OK, it's a bit of a potlatch, but a damn tasty one with something for everybody's palate.

Grab a spoon...

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Facebook to publishers: give us your content please

Facebook is the world's largest social network, but it's not just a social network.

If this wasn't already evident, it should be now that reports have surfaced indicating the tech giant is negotiating with prominent publishers to host their content within Facebook's walls so that users don't have to go to publishers' sites to consume it.

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shooting star

18 companies with brilliant digital strategies

It occurred to me that amongst the Econsultancy blog team we certainly have our favourite companies as far as digital ambition and execution are concerned.

So I'm simply going to round up some companies that have done good things on this front and see if our readers get annoyed by any omissions or, indeed, inclusions.

So, here are 18 digital trailblazers. A lot of them are involved solely in ecommerce but not all of them.

N.B. I've deliberately excluded agencies and what I think of as tech companies, though that distinction is a little difficult to make in some areas.

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Why internal links and hub pages are a major factor in SEO success

Here's an example which highlights the importance of internal linking and the creation of hub pages. 

To demonstrate this, I'll look at the Guardian and Mail Online's SEO and internal linking strategy, and the marked contrast between the two.

We're looking at publishers here, but the principles apply equally to any website. 

In the run up to the tournament, most major news sites created World Cup hub pages for the term, which is likely to be the most popular of 2014.

These hub pages gathered the World Cup content in one place, and should be the most useful for people searching on a generic term.

Ideally, publishers would want these pages to achieve a consistently high ranking over time for the term, allowing them to direct users to other areas of the site. 

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graph

10 online marketing statistics from this week

A real mix for you this week, from chocolate bathtubs to push notifications.

Which brands are making gains on social? Just how much reach do organic posts gain anyway? What will the size the wearables market be?

All that and more in this week's online marketing stats roundup. Read on!

Why not download our compendium of online marketing stats for more on the market?

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buzzfeed articles

Should the phrase 'native advertising' be retired?

Native advertising can cause a bit of a headache. The IAB is yet to offer a definition of the phrase, which is being used in a rather flexible manner by many ad networks.

The Guardian and BuzzFeed are two prominent examples of publishers that refer to 'sponsored' or 'promoted' content. This seems a lot less ambiguous and may clear up some of the confusion for those trying to make sense of the topic.

Whilst I think this type of advertising is here to stay (when done properly), I'm not sure that native advertising is the best term for it. In fact, I think it would benefit from being split into three terms that make greater sense of the issue.

Here's why...

For an overview of native advertising see the Econsultancy report, Native Advertising: What it means for brands and publishers.

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Native advertising: the Guardian Labs way

Guardian Labs began in early 2014 with its aim to work with clients to create sponsored content opportunities.

This is a trend in publishing with BuzzFeed and The Telegraph (and more besides) experimenting with in-house content creation tailored for brands.

The Guardian is seeking to rise above some of the disquiet around native advertising (is it a case of the emperor's new clothes?) by simply creating transparent sponsored content to a great standard.

Anna Watkins, who heads up Guardian Labs, was speaking at the IAB's Content Conference and this is what I took from her talk.

For a full intro to native advertising see the new Econsultancy report, Native Advertising: What it means for brands and publishers.

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the sun

How do five popular newspapers do mobile app subscriptions?

How do The Sun, The Times, The Guardian, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal manage subscriptions through their mobile news apps?

I've taken a tour through each, despite their slightly different paywall or subscription models. See which you think is finessed and which could do better.

For more information on publishing check out the publishing tag on the blog.

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BBC is the most shared UK news outlet on Twitter, Mail Online is fifth

The BBC and The Guardian are the most dominant UK news outlets in terms of the number of shares on Twitter, according to new data from PeerIndex.

UK Twitter users shared just over 4.2m articles from BBC News in January 2014, which apparently resulted in more than 100bn potential impressions of BBC content to Twitter users globally.

In comparison, content from The Guardian was shared 2.4m times via Twitter while The Telegraph came in third with 913,000 shares.

The research also shows the negative impact that paywalls have on social sharing, as The New York Times is the only paid-for online publications to make the top 10. For more on The NYT's business model, read our report on its recent native advertising trial.

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Is The Guardian having problems with its domain name migration?

The Guardian, seeking to appeal to a more international audience, recently changed its domain name from guardian.co.uk to theguardian.com

It seems that the newspaper's traffic has dipped as a result of the migration, with some tools showing a drop in key metrics which affect its rankings. 

We have first hand experience of this issue at Econsultancy, as we migrated our domain back in 2009, with a drop in referral traffic from Google being the consequence. 

So, has The Guardian handled this migration correctly, or is there more that Google should have done to help such a massive site with the change? 

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17 useful examples of EU Cookie Law compliance

The EU e-Privacy Directive was introduced last year as a way of forcing websites to be more open about the type of cookies they used to track visitors.

Initially there was quite a lot of apprehension as site owners were concerned that they’d be forced to add intrusive pop-ups and force visitors to opt-in before they could begin using the site.

Thankfully the Information Commissioners Office (ICIO) took a lenient approach to enforcement and allowed sites to use an ‘implied consent’ measure, which means that they can get away with simply making their cookie policy more prominent rather than explicitly asking for users to accept cookies.

Even brands that do explicitly inform users that the site uses cookies generally don’t give an option to opt-out, but instead direct people to change the settings in their browser.

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The content strategy behind The Guardian's NSA/Edward Snowden uberstory

The Guardian, traditionally seen as a 'UK news' organisation, has controlled the US news agenda over the last week with a story about an NSA leak.

This post looks at some of the Content Strategy decisions behind this success.

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