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Posts tagged with First Party Data

brent spiner

What are first-, second- and third-party data?

I’m not trying to teach anyone how to suck eggs here. Perish the thought.

But let’s face it: some of you probably just smile and nod when somebody starts going on about the merits of ‘second-party data’. 

Sure, everyone knows what these terms mean in principle, but in this post I’m going to break down three key types of data – first-party, second-party and third-party – and explain what they all mean, where the different data sets come from and the pros and cons of each.


Three ways first-party data could help increase online advertiser value

First-party data could prove to be the future of online display advertising, according to our new report Digital Publishing: Increasing Advertiser Value Through Data and Identity.

Published in partnership with Signal, the report reveals the opportunities for publishers in the troubled digital advertising world.


Google Customer Match shows supremacy of first-party data

As rumored earlier this year, Google has announced Customer Match, a new ad targeting product that gives AdWords advertisers the ability to target their customers through Google Search, YouTube, and Gmail.


Resolving the customer identity challenge with first-party data

For years, third-party data has been the mainstay of digital marketing, but today's highest performing companies are increasingly looking internally, to their own first-party data.

It’s essentially a data-driven marketing revolution. Despite a predictable backlash to the overuse of terms like big data, it can’t be underestimated how firmly established the role of data already is in marketing and the benefits that can be derived.


Video short: Meet the Data (free report and webinar invite)

In this four minute video, we introduce our new research paper The Promise of First-Party Data, conducted in partnership with Signal. 


The most powerful data is the data you already own: new report

Marketers are under enormous pressure to turn data into customer knowledge, competitive advantage and ultimately profit.

Our brand new report The Promise of First-Party Data examines the opportunities in the proprietary data they already have (or should have).


Three’s a crowd: how first-party data builds customer relationships

Three’s a crowd, and I’m not referring to failed 80s sitcoms. I’m talking about customer relationships.

Yet according to a study by the UC Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, 85% of the top 1,000 websites have cookies set by a third party.

Propelled by widespread anonymity in the early days of the Internet, third-party cookies have undoubtedly become a staple for many marketers, tracking consumer behaviors across the web with the promise of uncovering invaluable insights.

Not only is this an invasion of consumer privacy (more on that later), but it also prevents businesses from truly knowing and understanding their customers.

First-party data, transparently collected via voluntary user registration, on-site activities and interactions, removes data brokers as middlemen, establishing direct brand and consumer connections and fostering 1:1 relationships.

Let’s take a look at three ways that third-party cookies are hurting your customer relationships, and how first-party data can be collected and used to improve audience understanding and user experiences.


Privacy and personalization: a marketer's Catch-22

Coined in Joseph Heller’s classic satirical novel of the same name, 'Catch-22' is a term that refers to a situation in which a person is trapped by completely contradictory goals or circumstances.

In Heller’s book, the only way for a pilot to escape his WWII flying mission is to request psychiatric evaluation due to mental instability, and be deemed insane.

However, awareness of his own insanity is considered proof of a rational mind, thus making it impossible to escape his mission, a total and complete Catch-22.

No doubt, many marketers are feeling stuck in this sort of paradoxical situation when it comes to the competing goals of consumer privacy and personalization.