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Posts tagged with Entrepreneurs

Is the acquihire really a smart strategy?

For many tech entrepreneurs, a startup leads to one of three destinations: acquisition, IPO, or failure. Historically, the risks have been big, but the rewards have been even bigger.

From Google to Facebook, few industries have created vast amounts of wealth faster than the internet, but for many entrepreneurs today, swinging for the fences isn't a must.

Increasingly, big companies (like Google) and high-flying upstarts (like Facebook) are targeting young startups for acquisition. Not for assets or IP, but for their people.


Startups: money can't buy love, or usage

With the hottest startups raising big money from investors, and founders and early employees of some of the most successful cashing out some of their equity to the tune of millions, it's no surprise that so many entrepreneurs and wannabe entrepreneurs are taking the plunge and starting companies that they hope could be the next big thing.

Building a successful company, of course, is tough, and the odds aren't favorable. Despite the hot market, a growing number of observers believe that we may be in the midst of a bubble which may not be as big as the first, but which could still create significant pain for entrepreneurs and the startup investment community.


Are the good times over (again) for startups?

In 2008, just as the global economy was collapsing, one of the most storied venture capital firms in Silicon Valley, Sequoia Capital, gave a presentation that encouraged entrepreneurs to raise as much money as they could, and hunker down for a nuclear winter.

Three years later, the startup economy is zooming along. Many young companies large and small have been raising money at significant (and arguably exorbitant) valuations. A new breed of angel investor -- the 'super angel' -- has emerged, buoying the market for startup capital. And thanks to secondary markets for private company stock, founders and early employees at some of the most successful companies have been able to obtain liquidity.

But are the good times coming to an end, again?


Ten signs we're in a tech bubble

Are we in a tech bubble?

There debate is only growing, and while it may not really matter to most of us, there are ten particularly worrying signs for those who have expoure to companies that are running on VC fuel and may need to go public in the near future.


Entrepreneurs: when should you stop pivoting?

For most entrepreneurs, the first time is usually not the charm. Nor are the second and third times. Instead, success is often reached after countless failures, rewarding only the most persistent and determined entrepreneurs.

So it's no surprise that a lot is made of 'pivoting' in the startup community. A 'pivot', as the name implies, occurs when a startup that isn't on the right path tries to move onto a different path.

When done successfully, a company on the brink of failure might find itself achieving great success.


Five things you can learn from TechCrunch's implosion

Bulding a successful company usually takes a lot of hard work, and a lot of time. But destroying a successful company can take be measured in hours and minutes. Case in point: TechCrunch.

Started by a single blogger, Michael Arrington, TechCrunch became one of the most prominent voices of Silicon Valley and the tech startup scene and was acquired a year ago by AOL for an eight-figure sum.

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Dispelling the TechCrunch myth

The debates over what constitutes journalism, and what the future of journalism will look like, rages on.

Last week, a firestorm erupted when TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington announced that he was launching a fund to invest in technology startups.

TechCrunch, of course, which is now owned by AOL, is a blog focused on technology startups, and while Arrington will apparently be off the editorial payroll, he'll still be able to contribute as an unpaid blogger.

Adding fuel to the firestorm: the fact that AOL itself is investing in Arrington's fund.


Six reasons you need a mentor

For many entrepreneurs, few things are more rewarding than building a board of high-profile advisors. The benefits are obvious: advisors can bring valuable knowledge and contacts to a company, and help the entrepreneur build his or her business.

But for entrepreneurs (and those looking to create a promising career path), it's worth remembering that finding a mentor can be just as important -- if not more important. Here are six reasons why.


Caveat emptor: SeedSummit's standardized seed financing terms

Times are good for internet entrepreneurs. VC money is flowing again, supporting a startup boom the likes of which hasn't been seen since the late 1990s.

Large companies aren't shy about acquiring technology and talent, and for the most promising companies, the public markets are once again open for business.

Although much of the startup investment activity and buzz is focused on startups in Silicon Valley and New York, Europe isn't without startup action of its own.


Investor: SEO is dead (to startups)

SEO may not be dead, but according to entrepreneur and angel investor Chris Dixon, it might as well be to startups.

According to Dixon, "SEO is no longer a viable marketing strategy for startups." Period. End of discussion.


Spending money on marketing: a waste of money for new businesses?

If you have a new business and plan to spend money on customer acquisition, are you making a huge mistake?

Venture capitalist Fred Wilson thinks you just might be. In a blog post that sparked an interesting discussion, and some heated debate, Wilson last week wrote that "I believe that marketing is what you do when your product or service sucks or when you make so much profit on every marginal customer that it would be crazy to not spend a bit of that profit acquiring more of them (coke, zynga, bud, viagra)."


When did complaining become innovation?

Building a new business is tough. And even though the internet has significantly reduced barriers and created incredible opportunities for entrepreneurs around the world, building a successful technology-based business is still challenging.

Unfortunately, the challenges sometimes lead companies that are labelled as 'innovators' to do something innovators usually don't: complain. The past week has given us two examples of this.

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